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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 9, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and sian lloyd. more 13,000 mobile phones and 200 kilograms of drugs have been seized from prisons across england and wales in the last year. ministers say the situation is "unacceptable" — and they're recruiting more officers to crack down on illegal activity in jails. good morning, it's sunday the ninth ofjuly. also ahead: the parents of baby charlie gard will help deliver a petition to great 0rmond street later, calling on doctors to let him travel to america for treatment. iraqi government forces say they're "within hours" of declaring victory over islamic state militants in mosul. it's famous for its meres and mountains — but could the lake district become britain's first national park to achieve world heritage status?
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former champions roger federer and novak djokovic find form at wimbledon as they book their places in the last 16. and helen has the weather. good morning. it looks like another mostly fine and warm day for england and wales but for scotland and northern ireland there are changes from the weather yesterday. details inis from the weather yesterday. details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. 13,000 mobile phones and more than 200 kilograms of drugs were found in prisons in england and wales last year. the government has described the situation as "unacceptable" but says measures are being put in place to disrupt illegal activity in jails. james waterhouse reports: being smuggled into jails, through whatever means possible, it only highlights the scale of the
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challenge facing prison officers who have had to deal with staff cuts and growing violence over recent years. in april, a european watchdog warned that incident in ukjails in april, a european watchdog warned that incident in uk jails were spiralling out of control, making them unsafe for prisoners and staff. the latest ministry ofjustice figures say there are 86,000 inmates in england and wales. 7000 singh cards were found along with 13,000 mobile phones. they are a valuable resource behind bars, sometimes rented out frock to £1000. along with the seizure of 200 kilograms of illegal drugs, it is the scale of the problems that forces the government to act once more. this £2 million investment brought into every prison can detect phones. dogs have also been trained to find drugs. ministers acknowledge they could not stop there, however. the government has recently had a recruitment drive, saying it is on
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track to bring in two and a half thousand more officers by 2018. in just over half an hour, we'll be speaking to the prison reform trust about what needs to be done to stop contraband being smuggled into jails. the parents of charlie gard are expected to help deliver a petition to great 0rmond street hospital later — calling on doctors to allow their terminally ill baby to travel abroad for experimental treatment. a new hearing about the case is due in the high court tomorrow. john mcmanus is outside great 0rmond street hospital for us this morning. is this petition likely to make any difference? the parents of 11 —month—old charlie gard would hope for. they will be here at around two o'clock this afternoon at great 0rmond street with their supporters to hand in this petition which has been signed by over 350,000 people. calling on the doctors behind me to allow 11
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—month—old charlie to travel with his parents for experimental treatment to try and tackle the genetic condition which is affecting him. it has left him unable to breathe without the help of a respirator and unable to move. in april the high court said that the doctors here are great 0rmond street could turn off his life support system. that decision has been fought by his parents from the court, so far unsuccessfully, but 110w court, so far unsuccessfully, but now the hospital itself has secured a new hearing at the high court. they say it is because they have been presented by new evidence about a possible experimental treatment for charlie. the hospital says they are not convinced that will make his life any better but they say the decision is now in the hands of the judges at the high court tomorrow. his parents will be pinning their hopes on what happens tomorrow and they hope that today's petition will help to influence events. they say the fight goes on. iraqi state television is reporting that government forces are on the verge of retaking the city of mosul. it was seized by so—called islamic state more than
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three years ago. but after nine months of intense fighting, iraqi soldiers have been celebrating on the streets — despite no official word of a victory. 0ur defence correspondent, jonathan beale, has more. it has been the fight of their lives. their battle to retake mosul from the group calling itself islamic state started in october last year. they have lost many, runs along the way. but today the iraqi security forces were firing their weapons in celebration, claiming victory over there enemy. translation: this joy has been achieved the sacrifices our martyrs and the blood of our wounded heroes. god willing, may happiness prevail in iraq. after nearly nine months of brutal street to street fighting the security forces now believe they have defeated is in a city that was
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once their stronghold. but there are still pockets of resistance and the occasional sound of gunfire. but a look, everyone around you and you will see that pretty much every building has been damaged or destroyed. if this is victory, it has come at a cost. no—one yet knows how me civilians have lost their lives in the city. it is still a fight for survival. translation: hunger, first, fear and aerial bombardment. we lived in the sale. look at this. our house was destroyed above us. the extremist's reign of terror may be coming to an end. but they are by no means finished in iraq. anti—capitalist protesters clashed with german police for a third night in hamburg, following the end of the g20 summit hosted in the city. police used water cannons and tear gas to push them back after some set fire to vehicles. during the summit, world leaders declared the paris climate agreement "irreversible", despite president trump pulling the us out. while theresa may left the meetings confident
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about post—brexit trade deals. a wealthy businessman has submitted alternative plans for a third runway at heathrow, which he says would save more than £5 billion. the hotel tycoon, surinder arora, suggests changing the design of terminal buildings and reducing the amount of land built on. a spokesperson for the airport said they would "welcome views" on the plans during a public consultation later this year. tens of thousands of people are expected to attend a rally in the turkish city of istanbul to protest against the government of president erdogan. the event is being held to mark the end of a 280—mile march from ankara. it was organised by the opposition to highlight the mass arrests and sackings since last year's failed coup. a state of emergency has been declared in the canadian province of british columbia, where the authorities are trying to battle more than 180 wildfires.
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thousands of homes have been evacuated and some destroyed. most of the blazes started after lightning strikes in dry electrical storms. the church of england will vote today on whether to allow special services for transgender people after their transition. at an annual meeting in york, prominent figures will address calls for the church to update its attitudes towards sexuality. the lake district will find out today whether it will be given unesco world heritage status. if successful, it would become the uk's 31st such site, as caroline rigby reports. from the great barrier reef to the taj mahal and the grand canyon, they are some of the most recognisable sights in the world. soon the lancs district could be a member of the club. later today but will delegates from unesco will announce whether
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they deemed the region inspiring enough and irreplaceable enough to be protected under world heritage status. it would be lovely if it did. it would be very nice. it is one of the top places. i have been coming here for over 40 years. it has changed a lot. it is popular but there are so many beautiful things here that need to be recognised and protected. with its towering peaks and glistening waters the national park currently attracts around 80 million tourists a year. they contribute over £1 billion to the local economy falls retix worried that attaining world heritage status could see even more visitors descend on the region, putting extra pressure on the landscape. 0thers argue it would mean greaterfunding and investment. a world heritage site, it would demonstrate the changing landscape because it is not natural. that is shaped by people with their farming practices, natural. that is shaped by people with theirfarming practices, they have spoken about this landscape and people come to see it. it will draw new customers and new visitors
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who've never heard of this area full of it is a tick of the box to visit a world heritage site. william wordsworth once described as the loveliest spot. but will unesco agree? if successful, it will be the 3ist agree? if successful, it will be the 31st world heritage site in the uk joining places like the houses of parliament, hadrian ‘s wall and stonehenge. that is one of my favourite places. a day of gay pride celebrations in london ended with the houses of parliament lit up in the colours of the rainbow flag. it's the first time the symbol has been projected on the building. earlier, an estimated one million people watched the annual pride parade in the capital. ten minutes past six. let's have a look at the paper this morning. 0n the front page of the sunday times we have a photograph of the british
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lions. and the trade deal which donald trump said would happen quickly post brexit. that is their main story. the sunday telegraph... a picture on the front. we're both in this photo, it says, and you are in the tummy. that is prince william speaking to prince harry. it is for a documentary that will be shown later. they are studying a photograph of prince as diana holding prince william while pregnant with harry at the main story there, again, brexit mei playing the trump card, seizing the optimism of donald trump over brexit. seeing as they have got exactly the same headline, a quick mention in the sunday express. however, a slightly different take on the brexit the jewish however, a slightly different take on the brexit thejewish and on the
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front page of the observer. here german industry and stark warning to uk over brexit. priority to protect the single market and it is hard to avoid hurting british business. the mail on sunday has a headline, the pressure on theresa may to quit as prime minister is growing after it says the former tory cabinet minister said she lost all authority and should go. it is 12 minutes past six and andrew will be with his later in the programme to review papers. it was one of the worst naval tragedies of the first world war. and today, a ceremony will be held to remember the 843 men who lost their lives when hms vanguard sank off 0rkney injuly 1917. to mark the centenary of the disaster, a team of divers has been given special permission to document the wreck. 0ur scotland correspondent, lorna gordon has more. in the cold northern waters, the
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final resting place of hms vanguard, a dreadnought battleship from world war i. the bow and stern almost entirely intact after 100 years underwater. this the group of civilian divers to be given permission to document the wreck since it was designated a war grave. i think the loss of life was never far away from my mind. that said, we had a job to do and an obligation to do thatjob to the best of our ability. so you got on with the work but, yes, part of the wreck are quite emotional indeed. ships steaming into the war base... along with many other ships, vanguard could be anchored in the seas off 0rkney. she had seen action at the battle of jutland but 0rkney. she had seen action at the battle ofjutland but on a southern evening injuly 1917, battle ofjutland but on a southern evening in july 1917, the battle ofjutland but on a southern evening injuly1917, the entire ship was destroyed after a magazine
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exploded. she sank almost instantly with the loss of almost all her crew. 843 men died, only two of those on board at the time survived. the team of volunteer divers spend hours surveying the wreck and piecing together its story. it lies at the death of 100 feet and among the a rtefa cts at the death of 100 feet and among the artefacts discovered, cutlery, an anchorand the artefacts discovered, cutlery, an anchor and the telegraph. as part of the commemorations, their sign was recently replaced by divers. 0ne century on, honouring the lives lost in what was a catastrophic accident. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: hundreds of kilograms of drugs and 13,000 mobile phones were smuggled into prisons in england and wales
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last year, according to the ministry ofjustice. the parents of baby charlie gard will help deliver a petition to great 0rmond street, calling on doctors to let him travel abroad for treatment. and coming up on the programme: they are some of the most recognisable sites in the world, but could the lake district soon be part of their club? we will find out why unesco is considering granting it world heritage status. here is helen with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, helen. what a lovely day to be out and about, as well, in the lake district today. this is not too far away across the pennines, in north yorkshire. a beautiful sunrise this morning, and it should for most of england and wales be another warm and fine day. however, we do have
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some low cloud around at the moment across the coastline, actually, of cumbria, parts of the irish sea and the east, but this is where we have the east, but this is where we have the rain, bringing a different day for scotland and northern ireland in particular. to the north of that weather front we will see the sunshine returned, and it won't be heavy rain, it certainly won't be a wash out, but for much of scotland and northern ireland a lot more cloud than yesterday, and therefore it will be quite damp. morning mist lifting and some warm sunshine coming through. it will feel warmer across the north of scotland compared with yesterday, where we have the cloud and very strong winds but for aberdeenshire across the dumfries and galloway, we have outbreaks of rain. further south towards antrum, as well, it will be cloudy. for much of northern england until late in the day that weather front meanders its way south. fine and dry with the odd drizzly shower in the west, possibly in the east are heavy, thundery shower, but few and far between this afternoon, and
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it should be another full day ‘s play, i am it should be another full day ‘s play, iam hopeful, as it should be another full day ‘s play, i am hopeful, as the test match continues and we have the anniversary games as well. it will be hotter than yesterday. we have the humidity, having returned overnight, hence the misty this this morning. it will be quite an oppressive night in southern and eastern areas, but it starts to freshen up behind that weather front across scotland than in the northern ireland by the end of the morning. as that rain and weather front staggers in the western parts of england and wales it becomes much more showery tomorrow. tomorrow looks like a date change from this muddy, oppressive air across england and wales. brighter and drive for scotla nd and wales. brighter and drive for scotland and northern ireland compared with today, and for scotland, on school holidays, that will be good news. the outlook for the week ahead is a more unsettled picture. so enjoy the sunshine, but it will not be as nice a day across parts of scotland and northern ireland. thank you very much. we will be back with the headlines at 6:30am.
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now it is time for film review, with jane hill and mark kermode. welcome to the film review on bbc news. taking us through the week was maximo releases is mark kermode. this week we have it comes at night, which is a very creepy thriller. the midwife with catherine deneuve and catherine frot. and spider—man: homecoming. it comes at night. i have read enough to know that this is your kind of film, and so not mine. you have two minutes to persuade me. it is not a jump—scare horror like the trailers make it look like. if you expect that you will be disappointed. it is a creepy thriller. it is set after the outbreak of one unspecified plague—like incident, which has pretty much
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done for civilisation. there was a family, mother, father, son living in a remote woodland. the windows are boarded up, there is a corridor with a red door which is the elite access to the outside world. they have to make a decision about whether or not to accept another family into their home. they would bring friendship and food supplies, but also bring suspicion and paranoia and desire, and mysterious sleepwalking. here is a clip. angela is in grandpa's room. she was having nightmares so i woke up. i was in the back wall, i saw the door open, i heard something. andrew was there? yes. you tell mummy what you remember.
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does he sleepwalk? no, it doesn't make any sense. it is all that claustrophobic, is it? you get the sense of people starting to distrust each other and be suspicious of each other. if you think of a film like the witch that has deep themes, they are creepy but not full of jump scares. they make you feel very worried and uncomfortable. the sound effects and score work in favour of this film. it was terrific. it occupies a realm between being awake and being asleep. it contracts during certain sequences. maybe we are, maybe
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we are not awake or asleep. it is what happens when you lose track of objective reality and you just start to trust your fears. it is like that classic horror movie with a cold hand on the back of the neck. it is not the film the trailers make it look like. they make it look like it is a slam—bang horror. if you want something that is going to cause you to lose sleep, you should see it. i think you would not enjoy it but admire it. it is all to do with what is implied rather than what is actually shown. which is the sort of film that is the most frightening. i hearyou, in terms of the skill that went into it. the midwife is about a friendship between the two main characters. catherine deneuve is beatrice, her father's lover has had a medical diagnosis, suddenly she reappears. what do you want?
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it turns out maybe she wants friendship, closure, maybe this financial, who knows? these two characters start, one of these characters drinks and gambles. the key distinction between them is that one of them has been involved in bringing children into the world. what i like about this was it has well—observed characters. it has people in professions that you actually believe in. i can understand all of those things that happen and i can think that they really have these stories.
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has a rather over—emphatic and tingling score. it tells you things are moving when you did not need to be taught. it was played with some very fine performances. it is understated. for the most part, it allows you to observe the characters. most important to believe in them. and that is important, to have characters that you can absolutely believe in. and that, oddly enough brings us to spider—man: homecoming. we spoke before uploading. i said that this was a low—key character study posing as a superhero movie, but this is like ferris bueller‘s day off with added wedding. he also happens to have the superpowers, and he wants to become an avenger.
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what he is desperately trying to do is to punch above his weight, whilst also keeping his identity absolutely secret. here is a clip. what are you doing in my room? come through. are you an avenger? can you keep a secret? this is the craziest thing that has ever happened to me. we are both chuckling. this is tom holland, who won the bafta award, a rising star. it is doing something different with the character. since i have been working as a critic this is the third or fourth spider—man film — how many times are you going
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to reboot this? they are playing to the adolescent story, the school boy story, the high school story, so there is all the action stuff, web spinning and dealing with criminals, but really what makes it work is the high school stuff, the stuff about wanting to fit in and being awkward, wanting to grow up but not actually growing up yet, and what he has actually got to do is hang out in the canteen. i liked it very much. i went in thinking, do we really need to go here, all over again? but this does do something different. he's very good. he's very charming in a very kind of oddball way. only one false step in the film, there's a lovely sequence which is a direct reference to ferris bueller‘s day off, and they make direct reference to it. it sounds good. it sounds different. you have been loving this, this week, as anyone who has been following you on twitter, baby driver.
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it is a car chase movie which is actually a musical. everything in it is cut to a fantastic selection of pop tunes. the joy of it, for me, is this. it is really brilliant cinema, c on a big screen with a good sound system, it is witty, clever, poignant and nostalgic and it is made by somebody who was going to direct another movie and then walked away because it wasn't a film he wanted it to be. now he has made exactly the movie he wanted and it is a pleasure to see a director like edgar wright saying, this is the film i want to make. i have seen it three times. it is like an american in paris meets the french connection. i hear you, see it on the big screen. that said, a quick thought
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for anyone not wanting to see on the big screen, what is out on dvd? i mentioned it early on, logan. it is a film about ageing, about regret, about losing the powers that you once had. it is really well directed. you can do something really interesting with the superhero theme, and as long as we get movies like that and spider—man, there will always be new light, people say, haven't we had enough of this? but as long as people keep reinventing it, it will not die out. that is a good week. yes, but you must go and see it comes at night. get under your skin and you will appreciate it. you are laughing! that said, still lovely to see you, as ever. mark kermode, thank you. a reminder that you can find all the film news and reviews online at the usual address. and you can find all of our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. that is it this week. enjoy your cinema going.
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those that you are brave enough to go and see! goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and sian lloyd. coming up before seven, helen will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. 13,000 mobile phones and more than 200 kilograms of drugs were found in prisons in england and wales last year. the haul comes after a £2 million investment in technology to aid detection, as well as 300 specialist sniffer dogs. the government has described the situation as "unacceptable" but says the figures highlight the determination of prison staff to disrupt such behaviour. the parents of charlie gard are expected to help deliver a petition to great 0rmond street hospital, calling on doctors to allow the terminally ill baby to travel for experimental treatment. the petition has been signed by more than 350,000 people. charlie gard's case is due to return to the high court tomorrow, after the hospital said it had seen
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claims of new evidence relating to a potential therapy. anti—capitalist protesters clashed with german police for a third night in hamburg, following the end of the g20 summit hosted in the city. police used water cannons and tear gas to push them back after some set fire to vehicles. during the summit, world leaders declared the paris climate agreement "irreversible", despite president trump pulling the us out. while theresa may left the meetings confident about post—brexit trade deals. a wealthy businessman has submitted alternative plans for a third runway at heathrow, which he says would save more than five—billion pounds. the hotel tycoon, surinder arora, suggests changing the design of terminal buildings and reducing the amount of land built on. a spokesperson for the airport said they would "welcome views" on the plans during a public consultation later this year. tens of thousands of people
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are expected to attend a rally in the turkish city of istanbul to protest against the government of president erdogan. the event is being held to mark the end of a 280 mile march from ankara. it was organised by the opposition to highlight the mass arrests and sackings since last year's failed coup. a state of emergency has been declared in the canadian province of british columbia, where the authorities are trying to battle more than 180 wildfires. thousands of homes have been evacuated — and some destroyed. most of the blazes started after lightning strikes in dry electrical storms. the church of england will vote today on whether to allow special services for transgender people following their transition. at the synod's annual meeting in york, prominent figures will address calls for the church to update its attitudes towards sexuality. the lake district will find out today whether it will be granted
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world heritage status by unesco. if successful, it'lljoin the likes of the taj mahal, great barrier reef and grand canyon. it would also become the uk's 31st — and largest — world heritage site. a day of pride celebrations in london ended with the houses of parliament lit up in the colours of the rainbow flag. it's the first time the symbol has been projected on the building. earlier, an estimated one million people watched the annual pride parade in the capital. sixty years since it took its first spin, more than a thousand fiat 500 enthusiasts have driven across europe to attend a rally in italy. the event saw hundreds of the original models parade through the town of garlenda where the ownership club has its headquarters. more than six million of the italian classics have been built. they are quite popular.
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they are quite popularlj they are quite popular. i had a fiat once, it was quite rusty because i did not look after it. i had one as well. it was my first car. but will now be sport. jeff is with us. good morning. wimbledon and... roger federer, he is evergreen. keeps on going. wimbledon fans have loved seeing him on court for many years and at 35 years old it really seems as if he is rolling back the years. his elegant backhand, i am so envious. he is like a ballerina on court. light on his feet and he floats around. you would not have thought that a few months ago that he was injured and making people wonder if he would ever return. he has played well. seven—time wimbledon champion roger federer has booked his place in the fourth round. he comfortably beat the 27th seed mischa zverev in straight sets on centre court.
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federer will play bulgaria's grigor dimitrov next. i think it is important to get through the first week of with a good feeling. i think i got that. the first one, the walkover, that did not give me much information but it saved my energy. 0bviously, did not give me much information but it saved my energy. obviously, we go one round at a time and, i must say, my first goal was to get to the second week and i did that today. i am happy now to sit back, relax and come back strongly on monday. three time champion novak djokovic is also safely through to the second week of wimbledon — he hasn't even dropped a set! he beat ernest gulbiss yesterday with ease. he was a break down in the first set and argued with the umpire early on but it seemed to focus him, he went through in straight sets. it was a little more precarious in the women's draw, top seed angelique kerber onlyjust scraped through against shelby rogers of the usa.
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kerber reached the final last year, but fell to a set and a break down, before eventually coming through to set up what will be one of the match—ups of the next round — she'll play 2016 french open champion garbine muguruza. now, do you remember marcus willis? he won over the wimbledon crowd last year. the briton didn't qualify for the singles this time around but he is impressing in the men's doubles. along with fellow brit jay clarke, they produced the shock of the day knocking out defending champions french pair pierre—hugues herbert and nicolas mahut in a five set thriller. andy murray plays tomorrow — brotherjamie has teamed up with five—time grand slam champion martina hingis in the mixed doubles this year and it looks like a great pairing. their first match together secured them a place in the third round when they beat britain's neal skupski and anna smith in less than an hour. the british and irish lions head
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coach warren gatland says people will look back on the new zealand tour as a success. the lions drew the final test match 15 points all, meaning the series against the world champions was shared. it was a thrilling finish to the game in auckland — 0wen farrell's late penalty kick drew the lions level in the game. a disputed offside decision denied the all blacks a further penalty so the series ended 1—all. and gatland says he hasn't ruled out taking charge of the lions for a third time. my my focus now is back on wales and looking forward to 2019. i definitely finish there, unless they get rid of me before then. and then i don't know. maybe i come back home or maybe something else. i might just go to the beach and put my feet up just go to the beach and put my feet upfora just go to the beach and put my feet up for a while, i don't know. but,
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um, you never say never. england's cricketers are in control of the first test against south africa — they go into day four with a lead of 216 runs at lord's. they bowled the visitors out for 361 yesterday before finishing on 119 for one with former captain alastair cook making a half century. i think the morning session is key. if you get off to a good start and get a decent partnership going then that sets us up for the rest of the day and hopefully whether it is an hour before or after tea, we have a chance to make a decision then. lewis hamilton will have his work cut out if he's to finish on the podium at today's austrian grand prix. he was third in qualifying, but a penalty means he'll start back in eighth on the grid. his team—mate valtteri bottas will be on pole, with world championship leader sebastian vettel second. striker romelu lukaku has been ordered to appear in court in los angeles in october after police were called to reports of excessive noise at a house in beverley hills.
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lukaku, who's been on holiday in the us, was arrested last sunday after being given verbal warnings by officers. it comes as the everton player is on the verge of a £75 million move to manchester united, he's set to have a medical with united. lukaku's former club chelsea had matched the fee wanted for the striker. the deal is believed to include another £15 million in add—ons. meanwhile it's looking increasingly likely that wayne rooney will be leaving old trafford and heading back to everton. he was seen yesterday at their training ground. manchester united and england's record goalscorer signed from everton thirteen years ago. britain's chris froome will start a mountainous stage nine of the tour de france with a 12—second lead, ahead of team—mate geraint thomas. the race has reached thejura mountains near the swiss border. froome had a minor scare yesterday when he and thomas briefly went off the road, but were quickly
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back in the action. stage eight was won by the 24—year—old french rider lilian calmejane who's riding his first tour. wigan warriors have moved up to seventh place in super league after a 32—10 win at catalan dragons. the scores were level on the hour mark, but wigan dominated the final 20 minutes. joe burgess scored a hat trick of tries in the game to secure the win. wigan are now four points clear of warrington in ninth spot with two games to go before the super 8s. interestingly, when you spoke their you were talking about the unbelievable amounts of that soccer player. we spotted this earlier, that messi has netted a deal worth £1 million a week. annual ranges of
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£50.8 million and a four—year contract. it will make him a millionaire. but, you earn1 million euros, what do you do with it? how do you spend it? i would certainly try. thank you very much indeed, jess. mobile phone detectors, sniffer dogs and drug testing — just some of the ways the government is trying to combat criminal activity behind bars. it says that the seizure of over 200 kilograms of drugs and 13,000 phones from prisons in england and wales point to better detection rates, but acknowledges more still needs to be done to tackle the problem. peter dawson is the director of the charity, the prison reform trust and joins us now. good morning to you. the government says that this is unacceptable. why is so much contraband getting into
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prisons? they are i watering figures and the government is right to say it is unacceptable but it is good news is that that trade is being heard. it causes bullying and violence inside prison and extortion of families outside prison. the trade built on a very, very strong market and although this is good news and it is good that these measures are being taken, the next step for the government is to ask itself why there is such a high demand for drugs and phones in prisons. in your view, why is that? i think there are two things that contribute towards it. life imprisonment for many people is simply too idle. enforced idleness, they are bored and have no hope. some people enter with a drug problem and some people begin to use drugs in prisonjust to cope. that is the first thing. the second thing is the first thing. the second thing is in relation to phones, using one
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legitimately is quite difficult. for two reasons, the cost is high. a ten minute call home could cost one quarter of your week ‘s wages. the second thing is that you are simply not out of your cell enough to speak to yourfamily. not out of your cell enough to speak to your family. you are not out of your cell at all in the evening when your cell at all in the evening when yourfamily may your cell at all in the evening when your family may be available to speak. some people may find it difficult to understand because prison is a punishment. if you are suggesting that, perhaps, prisoners should have more access to phones, perhaps they should be something they are deprived of because it is a punishment and a deterrent. both the law and government policy are clear about whether prison is a punishment. the punishment is the deprivation of liberty. countless government ministers for many years have said that. it is a very clear statement of the law and policy. the point about phones in prison is that they help people not only to cope
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with the experienced and also to prepare for release after they finish their sentence. it is in all our own interests that people retain family ties and the phone is an obvious way of doing that. it should go much further. we all use computers all the time in our life outside prison. doing all sorts of practical things. you need it for finding employment a place to live. most prisoners are denied that for most of the time and it hurts us for if that is true.. most of the time and it hurts us for if that is true. . there is most of the time and it hurts us for if that is true.. there is some concern, however, that phones can be used for criminal act to be inside prison. that is absolutely true. prisoners are targeted by organised crime occurs there is a huge amount of money to be made from this. that is absolutely right. but part of the a nswer is absolutely right. but part of the answer is to give prisoners at legitimate access so that the people who get mobiles in a rally the people who want to use them for nefarious purposes, the people who wa nt to nefarious purposes, the people who want to use them for crime. a huge
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number of prisoners will use their mobiles to call them on and it is pointless to spend so much money tracking them down instead of concentrating on the people who are making a profit from this business. thank you very much forjoining us this morning. it isjust approaching quarter to seven. let's have a look at the weather forecast. i wanted to bring the changes to show you it is not all plain sailing. this is the picture in cornwall. more moisture and humidity through the night has brought some fog to some of the coast and the south—west and in fact across the south—west and in fact across the south coast as well it is foggy in kent. we do have some sunshine. the northern wales it will be a warmer day than yesterday with some good spells of sunshine but for scotland and northern ireland it has changed through the night. this is a weather front, the rain trundling its way slowly southwards and almost grinding toa
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slowly southwards and almost grinding to a halt across southern and central scotland in the north of northern ireland. that means behind it will be a brighter day for the north of scotland, where we had the cloud, the wind in the rain yesterday afternoon. a very different feeling day for northern scotla nd different feeling day for northern scotland while for england and wales we have the morning fog which will clear away, and the only fly in the oink is if you don't like the heat we could have a few isolated showers. the odd isolated shower for aultbea in the far north—west of scotland, the rain tapping up a bit and it is cool. just 14 or 15 degrees. not like a summer day at all across scotland and northern ireland. down across wales and the south—west, that mist and low cloud lifting. temperatures 27, a couple of degrees up yesterday, so as high as 28 or 29 for the south—east of england. if you are heading off to the anniversary games it is strong sunshine and quite humid air. it will be a warm evening and warm well into the night. there isjust the
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possibility into the evening and overnight that these thunderstorms across france will creep into the south—east of england, and we may have our own home—grown thunderstorms which will rumble away, and weather fronts thunderstorms which will rumble away, and weatherfronts pushing southwards into northern england and wales. that means a chilly night into the north of scotland but a warm night elsewhere and really quite oppressive into the south—east. especially with that threat of thunderstorms around tomorrow morning. tomorrow is a day of change. it is that transition from the heat to the humidity to a much more showery picture when we finally get rid of that humid air and we allow the atlantic weather fronts to come in from tuesday on. it is all change but another nice day for many, but not all today. noticing there that london is markedly hotter at times than other parts. is this my a—level geography letting me down? is that in the urban heat island ? letting me down? is that in the urban heat island? absolutely, london at self will be a couple of
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degrees perhaps on reading, further west, but quite a big conurbation as well. we have to remember the highest temperatures normally do not get into more than the mid—teens at this time of year and five degrees of latitude across the british isles as well. we are more likely to be having the influence of the continental air at this time of the year a cross continental air at this time of the year across the southern half of the uk. the atlantic influences never too far away from the north of scotland. it doesn't help when you have a weather fronts at across us. with the sunshine in the central lowlands, temperatures into the high teens and low 20s. it does even itself out a little bit more if we get the worn out pushing northwards. i asked you a question that you were not expecting, and we get so much detail. that is why you are top of your game, helen. thank you very much indeed. we will be back with the headlines at 7:00am. now on breakfast, it is time for click. on july 12th, the internet,
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as we know it, will change. go to amazon, twitter, reddit or many other sites and you could be asked to wait on a slower connection, or pay extra, or you may be blocked altogether. thankfully, these warnings aren't real. they're part of an internet—wide protest, with the aim of protecting net neutrality. net neutrality is the basic principle that protects our freedom of speech on the internet. it's the guiding rules that have made the internet into what it is today, and it prevents our internet service providers — so the cable companies like comcast, horizon and at&t — from controlling what we can see and do when we go online. under the net neutrality principle, all data should be treated
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equally by isps. that means they can't slow down companies who refuse to pay to have their data prioritised, and they can't charge customers for fast access to certain data. but the us federal communications commission, the fcc, voted recently to overturn rules from 2015 which enshrined these neutrality principles, and which meant telecoms firms could be fined for noncompliance. and that, says the organiser of the july 12th protest, will play right into the big cable companies' hands. if we lose net neutrality, you're going to start to see the internet look more like cable tv. you can imagine trying to go to a social media site and getting a notification from your internet service provider saying — oh, sorry, if you want to access this site, you need to upgrade
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to our social media package. you need to upgrade to our streaming video package. you need to pay us more, in order to access the same sites that you've been using day after day for years. they can also go to those sites and charge them extra fees in order to deliver their content to users. and, of course, those fees get passed on to all of us. so it's really an issue that affects every single person that uses the internet, regardless of your political views. it's gonna hit us in the pocketbook. and this won'tjust affect us internet users. if you use an american web service — which, let's face it, is most of us — it may affect the service that they provide to us. the fcc says that the 2015 rules are unnecessary and may have stifled investment in next—generation networks. and free—market think tanks agree. well, this fight could have been resolved ten years ago if it were really just about net neutrality. this has really primarily been a fight about the fcc‘s power
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to regulate the internet. we had ourfirst major update to our communications law 20 years ago, and that law made it unclear exactly how the fcc was going to regulate the internet, and that ambiguity has left the agency to wrestle with this issue for a decade. and in a nutshell, there were simpler, better ways of dealing with this issue. there were other agencies that could have addressed net neutrality concerns when they arose, starting back in 2008. and congress has three times tried to legislate, and both republicans and democrats, i think, share the blame for missing the opportunity to craft a solution that would resolve this issue. and that, unfortunately, has led us to where we are today, which is a thorough rule—making at the fcc to deal with this issue of legal authority,
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when the rules themselves — the core of net neutrality — have really never been controversial. well, i wonder what the original inventor of the concept of net neutrality would make of these changes. you know, it's...very disappointing, let's put it that way. so, you know, the 0bama administration had finally put net neutrality into law, done a good job with it, everyone was happy, but out of nowhere, the trump administration... and it's not been any public movement against net neutrality, it's really the cable and phone companies wanna make more money, let's put it that way. and they have somehow, kind of under the cover of trump's madness, managed to start the process on net neutrality. the thing is making the government realise that there are severe electoral consequences for messing with net neutrality. it has to be understood as the third rail, that you mess with this and you're going to get people very angry and descending on constituents. well, whatever happens next week, i have a feeling it won't be the last word we hear
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on net neutrality. just a hunch. welcome to this week's tech news. volvo announced they'll only make electric and hybrid cars from 2019. formula one racing team williams unveiled a carbon—fibre baby carrier that can transport critically ill newborn infants by ambulance or helicopter. the ba bypod protects against vibrations and can be kept at a constant temperature. dubai police are to introduce a robot cop and autonomous patrol ca rs. the vehicles will use 360—degree surveillance technology to identify suspicious objects, launch a mini drone, and they claim, even give chase to suspects. google is in the doghouse again — this time, for a deal with a uk hospital that didn't respect the privacy of patients. the uk's information commissioner
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ruled that 1.6 million patient details were provided to google's deepmind illegally, to help develop an app to diagnose kidney failure. and could tickets be replaced by inaudible sounds? well, it seems maybe. ticketmaster has teamed up with listener, a company that uses ultrasonic sound technology to transmit information between devices. checking into a venue with an app would give off the sound, and organisers could log who was in and where they are — unless your phone dies, of course. whether you love or loathe a trip to the shops, retail is changing. but there's more to it than people just shopping online instead. can i just see what colours there are downloaded? here's an idea that takes shopping online a step further.
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o ne com pa ny‘s software allows you to go a shop's website and, from there, you can connect to a shop assistant in store, who will be wearing a pair of smart glasses. yeah, what do we have there on the right? there are some bags. can you please take the cream bag off the shelf, and can you open it and show me the compartments? the shop has actually found that the same experience being streamed through a mobile has actually proved more popular than the smart glasses. and although i found the experience pretty good, it does of course have some limitations. 0h, isee. i wasn't expecting that, i thought it was going round your waist. i'm glad i asked you. if, when shopping online, you're worried about getting your size right, then these smart leggings could help. they aim to be able to measure you and tell you the exact right size ofjeans that you should be buying. hmm!
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likeaglove hopes to measure women for the right size and style of jeans for their body shape. the stretchy measuring leggings connect via bluetooth to a smartphone app, where your stats will be stored, so you can keep track of your body shape. oh, my waist measurement here seems to be about five inches larger than i thought it was, and a fair bit bigger than the jeans size i normally wear. when i clicked through to the suggestions, my size was as expected. the company say these measurements represent where the jeans would sit, rather than actual measurements you would expect. might upset a few people along the way, though! but another trend emerging is that we head back to the high street, but shop assistants as we know them don't. wheelies unmanned stores are open 24 hours a day, with only a series of cameras and microphones keeping an eye on you. you gain access through your smartphone, use it to scan your
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purchases and pay, then head off. their first branch opened in sweden last year, followed by another in shanghai recently. the launch of amazon go's first store in seattle appears to have been delayed, but aims to replace queues and checkouts by using computer vision, deep learning, and data from sensors. it will see what you've picked up in store and, in turn, charge your amazon account. but one us company has another idea about self—service. well, on first view, this does just look like an ordinary vending machine, that happens to have a tv screen on it. but a machine like this could soon be selling alcohol, cannabis, and even guns. let me explain more. the device uses biometric sensors to identify users by the veins in theirfingers, meaning you can turn a standard machine into an apparently secure one, only dispensing goods to the person with the right to collect them. and yes, in the us, that
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item could be a gun. the company claims the machinery uses the same level of security employed by us military and large corporations to access facilities, but they do add... everything is hackable. if it's connected to the internet, they say ‘where there's water, there's sharks‘. where there's internet connectivity, somebody can make their way in there, perhaps. we've jumped through every possible hoop we can do, to make sure that only the person standing in front of it is able to get the product that they want, it's that sort of regulated product. right, and there are guns and alcohol available too. so some fellas are going out hunting and they leave late from work, and they rush out there to catch up with their friends. usually, you're far outside the city limits, you've made a whole plan, you've made your trip, you get out and you say, "oh, i forget my ammo".
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in this situation, a secure machine would allow you to pick up some ammo, or even a replacement gun, if you're in the system. maybe get their whiskey off the one side, get their ammo off the other, and head on into the camp and have a fine week of hunting. ok, maybe this isn't solving a problem that many people have. and suddenly, the idea of shops without assistants doesn't seem so surprising. and that's it for the short version of click from the royal society's summer science exhibition. more from us in the full—length version, which is on iplayer, and you can find us on twitter as well. thanks for watching and see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and sian lloyd.
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more than 13,000 mobile phones and 200 kilograms of drugs were seized in prisons in england and wales last year. ministers say the situation is "unacceptable" — and they're recruiting more officers to crack down on illegal activity in jails. good morning, it's sunday the ninth ofjuly. also ahead: the parents of baby charlie gard will help deliver a petition to great 0rmond street later, calling on doctors to let him travel
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