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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 10, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. a crucial day for the parents of charlie gard as they return to court in the hope he'll be allowed to travel to the usa for treatment. judges will assess claims of new evidence which suggests the 11—month—old's quality of life could be improved. this morning we'll talk to charlie's mum connie yates. good morning, it's monday the 10th ofjuly. also this morning: theresa may faces up to her disappointing general election result with a call to rival parties to work with her on issues like brexit and social care. 75 firefighters have spent the early hours of the morning tackling a fire at london's popular camden lock
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market. good morning. the english wine industry has grown by nearly 20% in the last year so i'm at this vineyard in kent looking at what's been behind that sparkling performance. millions of us already know how beautiful the lake district is, now the rest of the world does too. we are live there this morning as the united nations gives it world heritage data is. i'm at wimbledon where a place in the quarter—finals is on offer for britain's best. andy murray and johanna konta are both in action today and both looking to get into the last eight here at the all england club. weather—wise, we're looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers, a 30% chance of showers through the afternoon. for the uk as a whole, sunshine and showers but some of the showers will be heavy and thundery in east anglia and the south—east. more later in the programme. good morning. first, our main story. the case of the terminally ill 11—month—old boy, charlie gard, returns
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to the high court today, as judges consider new evidence relating to potential treatment for his condition. an earlier ruling supported the view of his doctors that nothing can be done to improve his quality of life and they should be allowed to switch off his life support systems. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. "he's still fighting, so we're still fighting." a phrase that charlie gard's parents have used many times as they battle to keep their son alive. this could happen to anyone. we are just two ordinary people. we're not strong people. we just have love for our boy. he has kept us going. if he was lying there suffering, we would not be here now. it's a story with another twist today. the high court will look once more at whether or not the 11—month—old born with a serious genetic condition that doctors believe mean he will never see, hear, move norspeak, should go to america for experimental treatment. so far the courts have agreed
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with the hospital that charlie's condition cannot be improved and he should instead be allowed to die. but support has grown for the family from all over the world including from president trump and the pope. and a glimmer of hope when seven specialists led by the vatican's children hospital signed a letter saying that treatment should be reconsidered following success in conditions similar to charlie's. chris and connie handed a petition in to great ormond street yesterday with over 350,000 signatures supporting them. the hospital has made clear that its position has not changed. treatment will be futile. it will be up to a judge to decide if once again that is true. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. mark lobel is outside great ormond street this morning, how significant could this court hearing be? definitely. in eight our high court
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judges will once again have to decide or start their decisions as to what's in the best interests of 11 to what's in the best interests of ii —month—old charlie, who as we have said has this rare syndrome which means he needs help even to breathe in the hospital behind me. great ormond street hospital said this new discovery, potential new discovery, of this oral medication used by just 18 people discovery, of this oral medication used byjust 18 people which could potentially help charlie, some people said he would stand a one in ten chance of this helping him, would be allowed to be tried and if so would be allowed to be tried and if so charlie could go to america. but there are strict criteria for allowing that to happen and this has failed in the past. it matters because if that fails then it could mean that they turn off charlie's ventilator here. if he can go to america, his parents have raised £1.73 america, his parents have raised £1.3 million to help him to do so, and there's talk from a congressman
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of making the parents citizens in america to try to bypass this process. one uk leading paediatrician has said all this outside influence on the congressman to donald trump to the pope is to this process. for charlie's parents today, what matters and what will be quite agonising for them, is once again the fate of their son is in the hands of others. mark lobel, thanks very much indeed. we will be speaking to gard's month conservative later on bbc breakfast. —— mum connie. theresa may is to signal a change in her style of government, calling for a cross—party consensus on some policy ideas, in her first major speech since last month's general election. she'll admit her approach to government will have to change, and is urging her opponents to come forward and contribute. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. iain, is this an attempt to put the events of the last month behind her?
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is an opportunity for theresa may to change direction of her leadership? i'm not sure how much direction she will change, she is making a victory of necessity, she doesn't have an overall majority and she is trying to relaunch her leadership since the general election amid rumours some collea g u es general election amid rumours some colleagues wanted her gone by the end of the summer. she is saying to things, in these difficult circumstances you can either be timid or bold, she will be bold and she will renew her commitment she did a yearago she will renew her commitment she did a year ago on the steps of downing street to tackle injustice and vested interests. but there is the interesting development, she had been criticised for perhaps not listening to people inside her own party, she's gone beyond that and she is saying to people to contribute in other parties, don't criticise, and that clashes with this idea of boldness because already some newspapers are saying she is crying out for help and labour have approached this ungraciously saying that she's run out of ideas and she's begging for
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help from the opposition. not sure how well this has gone down. she'll be launching a review of working and employment practices tomorrow so she can do something solid to pack up the rhetoric and to show that she is attempting to move her party beyond its normal range of support and to help ordinary working families as she would put it. good to talk to you. we will speak to the first secretary of state damian green at 7:10am on breakfast. firefighters have been tackling a blaze overnight at london's popular camden lock market. 70 firefighters were sent to the scene after the fire broke out at around midnight. london fire brigade says the situation is now under control but the cause remains unknown. there are no reports of any casualties. the iraqi prime minister, haider al—abadi has congratulated his armed forces on their victory over islamic state militants. it's nine months since government forces launched an attack to liberate mosul.
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much of the city has been reduced to rubble, and thousands of people have lost their lives. the bbc understands a government inquiry into the so—called gig economy will call for flexible workers to be paid above the minimum wage. the taylor review, which is due to be published tomorrow, will affect firms like deliveroo and uber. it's expected to argue that additional wages will help to offset the lack of holiday and sick pay. counter—terror police have launched a film telling holiday—makers how to react in the event of a terrorist attack in their resort. we have to get out of here now! that's a bit of the video for you. the four—minute video shows families and hotel staff fleeing the sound of gunshots, barricading themselves into rooms and being treated as potential suspects by armed police. it repeats the advice
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to run, hide and tell. we will be getting more on this later in the programme. i've watched the video and it's interesting to watch but also alarming in some ways but it tells you what you should do. wildfires are raging across the us state of california as a record—breaking heat wave sends temperatures above a0 degrees celsius in many areas. more than 2,000 firefighters are attempting to contain nearly 20 large blazes which have forced hundreds of people to evacuate their homes. officials are warning that the weather conditions are set to continue over the weekend. sally has all the sport from wimbledon but one big story over the weekend was the return of wayne rooney to everton after he spent the last 13 years wearing the red shirt of manchester united. now wayne rooney has admitted to wearing everton pyjamas, even during his long spell away from his boyhood club, which he has now rejoined. i don't know why it makes me laugh!
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it's just the vision, buttoned up to the top! adam wild reports. wayne rooney, back in blue, back to his boyhood club. one of the finest of his generation, back to where it all began, announcing himself as a teenager in spectacularfashion. but his love for his club has clearly never gone away. i'm ecstatic, i can't wait to be back in. to be honest, i've kept it quiet for the last 13 years, but i've actually been wearing everton pyjamas. rooney left everton for old trafford in 2004, and it was there his career really took off. commentator: rooney! oh, that is absolutely fantastic! at manchester united, he won almost everything the club game has to offer, becoming their all—time leading scorer. his opportunities on the pitch, though, becoming increasingly limited, so time for a new challenge. his future now lies in his past. i'm absolutely made up he's coming
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back, yeah. i wasn't sure. obviously a lot has gone on over the years when he left, and things like that. i think it'sjust fantastic for everton. so a career gone full circle. rooney famously once announced, once a blue, always a blue. in football, such allegiances can be hard to shake off. adam wild, bbc news, at goodison park. i think we need to talk pyjamas today. do you think? send us in your pictures of your chilly pyjamas. as long as you're wearing them! that's right, we don't want any of that! it's the start of the final week of wimbledon today and the competition for brea kfast‘s game, set, mug challenge is heating up too. sally's there for us later on carol and i will be filling this up with coffee. 0ur mug
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challenge is still going on, it is manic monday here because the big players are still here, it is starting to get to a really crunch time, fantastic list of games on centre court today if you're lucky enough to be here, one of them is roger federer playing grigor dimitrov, who over the years has been an incredible player, fantastic game but does he have the skills for game, set, mug? we sent charlie stayt to find out. grigor, welcome, thank you for coming and lovely to see you. thank you for taking part in the game, set, mug challenge. are you in the mood? i'm getting their. you know how the rules work, 30 seconds, many balls as you can in the mug. you've beenin balls as you can in the mug. you've been in some type tennis situations in the past, how does this compare? this is one of the toughest tests i've ever been in. i've got the time
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here so i'm going to get you ready, steady, go! 0k, how are we doing so far? terrible. you're not going to talk and do this at the same time, are you? fears and do this at the same time, are you ? fears concentration. and do this at the same time, are you? fears concentration. ten seconds so far. he's got the rhythm going now, now he's got the rhythm going. a bit of the mood going here. we've got ten seconds left. i think there's a lot of balls in there. he's gone for an underarm there. two seconds now. your time is up. there we go. let's count them up. i think you got quite a few. i'm going to turn the clock off there. do you wa nt to turn the clock off there. do you want to count them up from me? how many can you see? one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine. nine balls. not too bad. are you happy? i could have done better but
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not too bad. lovely to see you. thanks for having me. isn't it interesting, did anyone else spot charlie's reaction? nine! let's look at why he might not have been too delighted why he got nine. andy murray still at the top of the leaderboard as you can see. james ward is behind him in second, he got ten. grigor dimitrov, nine balls into the giant mug, which means charlie stayt is back in joint fourth place with kyle edmund. charlie did well and got seven but dimitrov got nine, really good going, this challenge is tough, the toughest challenge at wimbledon so far! much more on the tennis throughout the day, coverage on bbc 5 live and bbc two starts this morning and if you're a big fan of carol kirkwood, you can keep watching her because she is on all day and here she is now! a lovely here this morning? the
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temperature is 17 celsius, it feels quite warm, and it will get warmer as we go through the day. the forecast for wimbledon is one of sunshine and showers. the showers will begin lightly, then we will have a respite, and then we will get more in the late afternoon and into the early evening. there is a 30% chance of a shower today. temperature—wise up to about 22 celsius. the forecast for the uk as a whole has one also of sunshine and showers, and some of the showers will be happy. if we started the south at 9am, you can see showers coming up from the near continent, and a lot of dry weather around. a warm start to the day, with gentle breezes. some little beasties out this morning. as we move further north, a similar story until we get to northern england and southern scotland. here we have more cloud and splashes of rain, nothing too heavy. northern scotland quite cloudy, northern ireland a damp
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start with some rain and drizzle and a slow start, so it will brighten up. as we coming to wales in south—west england, quite a bit of cloud around first thing, with some spots of rain. again, nothing too heavy. drifting eastwards we are back into the bright and sunny skies and a pleasantly warm start. as we head through the course of the day, those showers are mentioned coming in from the near continent will get going, especially so across the south—east and east anglia where they will be heavy and thundery. you could see some torrential downpours ina could see some torrential downpours in a short span of time, and a yellow warning from the met office until about six p. m.. yellow warning from the met office until about six p.m.. a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers and hires up to the mid—20s. maybe 26, possibly 27 in the south—east. lower than that as we drift further north. through the evening and overnight we eventually lose a lot of the showers. there will be a dry interlude at the cloud will be producing rain across england and wales, and still a few showers in
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the north. a fresh night for many of us. the north. a fresh night for many of us. in the south it will be quite mild. perhaps not quite as much as the one just mild. perhaps not quite as much as the onejust gone. mild. perhaps not quite as much as the one just gone. tomorrow we start off with quite a lot of dry weather in northern and eastern areas, but we see showers as we go through the day. meanwhile, the rain coming in across england and wales from the west will turn heavier and more persistent as we go through the course of the day, as it continues to journey eastwards across the southern half of england and wales. if you are under that, it will feel a bit cooler than it has done. that clears early on and on wednesday morning and a ridge of high pressure builds in, keeping things fine and settled. a lot of dry weather around on wednesday, but you will notice the temperature is a little bit lower than it has been. that does not mean that summer is over by any stretch. if you like it that bit hotter, he looks like later on this month we might see a return of those higher temperatures. it has been
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absolutely glorious, and i am happy to say that you and i have noticed the memo about floral dresses. dan has let us down, not wearing a floral tie. just to clarify, it is not the same dress, and there wasn't a memo, and we don't have a stylist, do we, carol? ithink a memo, and we don't have a stylist, do we, carol? i think most viewers can tell that we don't have one, from my point of view! you both look lovely, and it is not the same dress. let's have a look at the front pages this morning. kicking off with the times, a really wonderful front—page. july's full moon, the buck moon, so named because it is when do you begin to grow their new antlers. talking about theresa may, with an
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extraordinary call for cross—party unity. —— when deer begin to grow their new antlers. the parents of charlie gard, and we will be speaking to this mother at 8:10am. at the front page of the daily telegraph, theresa may's cry for help tojeremy telegraph, theresa may's cry for help to jeremy corbyn, and loads of pictures from mosul on the front page of many of the papers, where the iraqi prime minister is celebrating. ozil is free after three years under isil's shadow. and iraq celebrating victory —— mosul is free. charlie gard, they talk about it being this day of destiny and
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there have been so many of those daysin there have been so many of those days in court. another one to the pa rents, days in court. another one to the parents, 350,000 names on a petition to the hospital to ask charlie gard to the hospital to ask charlie gard to be allowed to fly to america, and we will speak to this mother a little bit later on breakfast. there is another picture, i am not sure if i should show you, but it is such a graphic image, it is from mosul. you can see how much the city has been destroyed in the last few years, and this is a picture of a woman carrying a baby, and in this hand she has actually got the trigger for a bomb and a few minutes after this was taken she detonated the bomb. it isa was taken she detonated the bomb. it is a horrible picture, but it shows you the full barbarity of what is taking place in mosul, and why the iraqi prime minister, as we were hearing earlier, is celebrating the liberation of the city from the islamic state. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the case of terminally ill charlie gard returns to the high court today, as his parents continue theirfight to be allowed to take him abroad for treatment.
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theresa may signals a new style of government, as she calls for cross— party support on big issues. the mother of a british backpacker who was stabbed to death in australia last year has made an emotionaljourney to the place where her daughter died. mia ayliffe—chung was killed at a hostel in queensland. another british traveller, tom jackson, died trying to help her. mia's mother rosie wanted to retrace her daughter's steps and learn more about the welfare of backpackers in australia. 0ur correspondent hywel griffith went with her. this isn't a journey any parent would want to make. 10,000 miles from home, rosie ayliffe has come to learn about her daughter mia's final days. imagine mia working in that field. that was way over her head. 20—year—old mia was working in queensland to gain a visa. she was attacked at her hostel. 30—year—old tom jackson
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from cheshire tried to help her. a french national has been charged with their murders. the hostel is still open and, without the cameras following her, rosie was allowed to enter and see mia's room, and the place where she died. and i sat in a cubicle and i thought about mia dying in that room. and she's gone, you know, and it's tough. it's tough to be here. i knew it would be, but i'm so glad i came, because i feel like... ifeel like i owed it to mia. but this isn't only about commemoration. rosie wants to meet other backpackers, and learn exactly what kind of a life her daughter had here. every year, 200,000 people come to australia for a working holiday. if they want to stay for a second year, then they have to come and work in regional australia. many, like mia, come to queensland, where the farmers use the backpackers to pick their fruit and tend their fields.
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an investigation by australia's fair work ombudsman has found many backpackers are being exploited. two thirds say employers take advantage by underpaying them. some have their passports taken away. djuro, from denmark, has just finished the 88 days of rural work needed to gain a second—year visa. it was almost like being in prison, rather than being in australia. treatment will be so bad, you're being pushed to your very limit. now, we're speaking about people working in a0 degrees. some of them are 18, 19 years old. and to the amount of capacity that you're working, one or two months, some people collapse, mentally. theyjust break down. the australian government says it recognises migrant workers are vulnerable to exploitation. it has set up a taskforce, but while she is in the country, rosie is anxious to push for more change.
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we are propping up their agricultural industry, in effect, you know. people are making huge amounts of money out of our backpackers. and it's got to stop, really. and, you know, their days are numbered. but i can feel a fight coming on, i really can. it is one which may bring rosie back to australia several times to lobby and campaign, and to give tom and mia a legacy. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: its clear waters and stunning views have earned the lake district a place on the list of unesco world heritage sites. it is great news, isn't it?|j it is great news, isn't it? i was actually surprised that it wasn't already. time to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are
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watching us. see you in a couple of minutes. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. police investigating an acid attack in beckton last month have arrested a man. resham khan and her cousin jameel mukhtar suffered face and neck injuries when the acid was thrown through their car window on ms khan's 21st birthday. 24—year—old john tomlin handed himself in to an east london police station yesterday. control of the skills system should be given to the mayor, according to a cross—party group of london mps. it said that the capital could lose out if eu migration drops after brexit, because the city doesn't have the ability to teach its population new skills. they warned that new talent being pulled into london from around the country will come at the expense of other uk regions. he has been looking after 2,500 acres for over 30 years, but now the richmond park gamekeeper, john bartram, is retiring. he is written a book about his time there,
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calling it the best job in the world. it involved tending to the park's 600 deer, which included the controversial annual cull. years ago, the queen would then distribute the proceeds to politicians. the queen would draw up a warrant list, and on that list, would be all members of parliament, whoever was in power at the time. so it would be from the lowest minister up to the prime minister, and they would all get a free haunch, which was a back leg to the first rib. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there is a good service running on all lines. 0n the trains, trains in and out of king's cross are disrupted because of trespassers on the track at welwyn garden city. 0n great northern, no trains on the moorgate line, because of over—running engineering works. 0n the roads, camden high street is closed from the tube station to chalk farm, because of the fire. new southgate, aa06 down to one lane westbound at bounds green road because of a burst watermain. let's have a check on the weather now, with georgina burnett. good morning. some changeable
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weather for the week ahead, and a drop in temperatures from tomorrow. but today, still feeling fairly humid, and the met office has a yellow weather warnings in place, for heavy showers from 10am to six p.m.. but it is not all doom and gloom. we do have some sunny spells around, in between the showers. in fa ct, around, in between the showers. in fact, for many of us, starting off the day, it is looking largely dry and bright, with some sunshine. however, that cloud will increase through the day. and a few of the showers coming through. not all of us will see them, of course, temperatures getting up to 25 or 26 celsius. a high pollen count and high uv celsius. a high pollen count and high uv levels. as we head through the night, most of those showers fade away, leaving us with some clear spells at a largely dry night. temperatures getting down to 15 or 16 degrees celsius. still a fairly muqqy 16 degrees celsius. still a fairly muggy night, and some patchy rain moving on in the early hours of the morning. that is how we start out
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tomorrow. a few breaks in a cloud, but the cloud increasing as we move through the day, and heavy rain a bit more persistent, with temperatures about 21 celsius. so you can see those temperatures sticking in the low 20s for the rest of the week, and really, some wet weather is never going to be too far away. so real change in the field the weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: as a fresh court hearing begins to decide the fate of charlie gard, we'll speak to his mother about herfight for her son's life. also this morning, once mocked by its more famous european cousins, now english wine is experiencing a bit of a boom. what's behind its sparkling sales? and after 9am, it's a murder case that hinged on a rare copy of the wind of the willows. we'll speak to the bafta—award winning film maker behind
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a new documentary following the investigation into the death of book—dealer adrian greenwood. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. the case of the terminally ill 11—month—old boy, charlie gard, is going back to the high court today. great ormond street hospital in london has asked judges to consider new evidence relating to potential treatment for his condition abroad. an earlier ruling supported the view of his doctors that nothing can be done to improve his quality of life and they should be allowed to switch off his life support systems. we will speak to charlie gard's mum a little bit later. theresa may is to call on rival political parties to contribute and notjust criticise. in herfirst major speech since the general election, the prime minister will say her commitment to change britain is undimmed. but with the conservatives losing their overall majority, she'll say the reality she faces means she has to approach politics differently. labour said mrs may's speech proved her party had completely run out of ideas.
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the iraqi prime minister, haider al—abadi, has congratulated his armed forces on their victory over islamic state militants. it's nine months since government forces launched an attack to liberate mosul. much of the city has been reduced to rubble, and thousands of people have lost their lives. the bbc understands a government inquiry into the so—called gig economy will call for flexible workers to be paid above the minimum wage. the taylor review, which is due to be published tomorrow, will affect firms like deliveroo and uber. it's expected to argue that additional wages will help to offset the lack of holiday and sick pay. firefighters have been tackling a blaze overnight at london's popular camden lock market, which attracts 28 million visitors a year. 70 firefighters were sent to the scene after the fire broke out at around midnight. london fire brigade says the situation is now under control but the cause remains unknown. there are no reports of any casualties. counter—terror police have launched
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a film telling holiday—makers how to react in the event of a terrorist attack in their resort. woman: we have to get out of here now! the four—minute video shows families and hotel staff fleeing the sound of gunshots, barricading themselves into rooms and being treated as potential suspects by armed police. it repeats the advice to run, hide and tell. and we will be speaking to travel journalist simon calder about this in just over five minutes. wildfires are raging across the us state of california as a record—breaking heat wave sends temperatures above a0 degrees celsius in many areas. more than 2,000 firefighters are attempting to contain nearly 20 large blazes which have forced hundreds of people to evacuate their homes. officials are warning that the weather conditions are set to continue over the weekend.
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we are over the weekend, maybe the next weekend! is i have checked and the weekend is over! it is monday, it is 6:30am —— i have checked. a coldplay fan who went to the band's recent concert at croke park in dublin became more involved than he expected. rob had been crowd—surfing in his wheelchair when he was spotted by lead singer, chris martin. he was then invited on stage and drew huge cheers from the crowd of more than 70,000 people, when he brought out a harmonica to play along. rob described his experience as amazing. brilliant! i bet it was! the other story we are talking about, and there are is numerous stories today, pyjamas! wayne rooney has revealed that he wore everton pyjamas
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during his 13 years at manchester united. the striker re—joined everton yesterday after leaving united. he grew up supporting the liverpool club and made his debut for the first team at the age of 16. to be honest, i've kept it quiet for the last 13 years, but i've actually been wearing everton pyjamas. at home with my kids. i had to keep that a bit quiet but it's great, it feels... you know, especially as it was 30 years ago. we definitely need some pyjama news today, as long at it is appropriate! he looks so happy, it really does! —— as long as. andy murray and johanna konta both in action today here at wimbledon, with a spot in the quarter—finals on offer. sally's there for us this morning,
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what else can we expect? look, i've got a really lovely... 0h, look, i've got a really lovely... oh, no, nothing in it, completely empty! hoping i might geta oh, no, nothing in it, completely empty! hoping i might get a cup of tea in it. i wonder what pyjamas andy murray wares, nabi hibs pyjamas? i think we need to find that out —— may be kids. it is manic monday, monday of week two, and a busy one —— maybe hibs. murray was here practising for his match over the weekend and looking good. he was limping a little bit last week but of course he is playing the frenchman benoit paire later, expected on centre court around 3pm. konta returns to court number one today after her third round win on friday. she's against caroline garcia, also french. she is first on
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court 1 at garcia, also french. she is first on court1at1pm. garcia, also french. she is first on court1 at 1pm. away garcia, also french. she is first on court 1 at 1pm. away from garcia, also french. she is first on court1 at 1pm. away from the tennis, joe root‘s reign as england captain started with a brilliant win. england beat south africa by 211 runs with a day to spare at lords. the second test gets under way in just five days time. in the women's world cup, england beat defending champions australia in a tense match in bristol. australia could have won with a six off the final ball but couldn't manage it to give england a fourth straight win at the tournament. chris froome still leads the tour de france but will have to race the rest of it without team—mate geraint thomas, who broke his collarbone after a collision with another rider on stage nine yesterday. pre—race favourite ritchie porte's tour is also over. he has a fractured shoulder and pelvis, after crashing at 45mph, but won't need surgery and could be back on his bike next month. he's lucky that wasn't even worse. valtteri bottas claimed the second win of his formula 1 career at the austrian grand prix. the finn lead most of the race from pole to take the chequered flag ahead of ferrari's sebastian vettel.
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lewis hamilton fought back from eighth on the grid to finish fourth and now trails vettel by twenty points in the championship. david weir ended his track career with victory at the london anniversary games at the olympic stadium. the six time paralympic gold—medallist will concentrate on road racing in the final stage of his career. he was on the programme recently announcing that, so great to see him victorious yesterday. that's just about it from me but i should tell you, this is one of our favourite days at wimbledon for carol and myself because for the rest of this morning we will be talking about food. they're going to let us inside the players' restaurant and they're going to tell us what you need to eat if you want to be a top—notch athlete, how they eat, how often, what's in it and maybe we can convince them to give us some brea kfast convince them to give us some breakfast or at least a tea! that sounds delicious, thanks very much!
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i'm sorry about the tea, i can't really help from here! you also need a bit of talent, though, to be a top tennis player! if you can't put a ball over the net at 100 mph you've got no chance! you make a very good point. talent goes a long way. i.e. very well... hard work, a bit of talent and the right grub and your there —— i eat very well. when it comes to planning our summer holidays, most of us will be focused on sun, sea and sight—seeing. but today a campaign has been launched urging us to think about how we would react if there was a terror attack on the resort where we were staying. simon calder is with us. if you watch the full four—minute video, it is harrowing and trying to get an important message across? very graphic images in the film and it's very much something that will raise memories of the appalling attack in tunisia in 2015just over two years
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ago in which 30 british holidaymakers died when a lone gunmen went on the rampage through a holiday hotel in sousse. there was some really worrying stuff but clearly the timing is designed to persuade holidaymakers who have just moved into the peak season, most schools are breaking up in the next couple of weeks, to say look, be aware of what you need to do. very straightforward, run if you can see a safe escape route, if you can't then find somewhere secure to hide and tell the police when you get the chance. but in terms of the overall risk, terrorism, despite the awful things we have seen in manchester, london and almost a year ago in nice, remainsa london and almost a year ago in nice, remains a very small risk compared with all the other possibilities that might come to harm you a broad. it's interesting because i have watched the video in full and it gives you more details
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about what you could do, you might have thought about running but really specific details, if you have to hide, and that's not the first option, they say where you could hide. certainly. and how to react when the police arrive and that's really interesting, because the police can't tell whether you're actually an attacker or whether you are an innocent victim and they will assume you are an attacker and instruct you accordingly. that's a really important part of the thing. but taking basic steps is clearly important. it's good they've got a public information film out there and it will make people think. i guess i'm worried that people will be so focused on terrorism that they won't think about the far more likely things, road safety, accidents and water. there will be some people watching this morning thinking this is my time to relax, i don't want to go on this one holiday with my family and then think about
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escape routes from the hotel —— in water. and people shouldn't, as with any hotel, be aware of the fire exits, if something happened, where would you go? it's far more important for people to have a great time and not to be constantly focused on the risk of anything happening. 0f focused on the risk of anything happening. of course terrorism does happen, it's awful when it does, we've seen terrible tragedies, but if you're a british holidaymaker going abroad i would put it in the same category as plane crashes, they happen, they're awful, but the chances of one happening to me and my family chances of one happening to me and myfamily are chances of one happening to me and my family are so low that i'm more focused on not texting when crossing the road, understanding how a rip current works, and the most valuable piece of advice to anyone travelling, don't have a couple of drinks and then ride your scooter around a greek or thai island. extremely good advice. tell us about the specific travel advice at the moment? we mentioned tunisia, that is completely off the agenda for
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british holiday companies, the government still thinks it is too risky a destination and sharm el—sheikh, the premier egyptian resort, still a ban on uk airlines flying there. not a ban on people going, just a matter of weeping there is still a threat at the airport because a russian plane two yea rs airport because a russian plane two years ago was downed by what appears to bea years ago was downed by what appears to be a bomb placed on board at the airport ——... you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: charlie gard returns to the high court today as his parents continue theirfight to be allowed to take him abroad for treatment. theresa may signals a new style of government as she calls for cross—party support on big issues. shall we go to a lovely view? what
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have you got for us? this is the view of the uk's newest unesco world heritage site. the lake district hasjoined the likes of the taj mahal and the great wall of china. we will be live there a bit later on and carol is with us in wimbledon. a bit of missed to be burnt off this morning. looks gorgeous. —— a bit of missed. what's the weather like this morning? a mixture of sunshine and showers but i'm standing on henman hill or murray mound, depending on the name you want, but it is actually known as aorangi tennis, thatis actually known as aorangi tennis, that is still its name, and that goes back to 1967 when the cloud bought the land and leased it to the new zealand sports and social cloud and aorangi means cloud in the sky, the maori name for mount cook, it is
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lovely and warm here, 17, not many clouds in the sky, it won't rise as much as last week, though. the forecast today is a mixture, we start on this beautiful note, the risk of showers early afternoon then it should recede and then we see the risk comeback again late afternoon, early evening. there's a 30% chance of showers today, 70% chance it could stay dry. highs up to around 23 or 24. today for most of the uk the forecast is one of sunshine and showers with a few nuances. 9am across the south, there is some thundery showers not too far away, coming up from the near continent but a lot of drier and brighter weather and sunshine. that extends through east anglia to the midlands heading north. for northern england and southern scotland, some cloud, a weather front and patchy light rain. in northern ireland, low cloud this morning, drizzle and rain in the
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east, that will clear and brighten up east, that will clear and brighten upfor east, that will clear and brighten up for you with a few showers and then in wales and south—west england, we are back under the influence of a weather front so here too a bit more cloud and also like outbreaks of rain. as we drift further east, again through the south midlands, south coast, southern counties generally, back towards the london area, we're back into the warm temperatures and also sunshine. through the course of the day the thunderstorms that aren't too far away from the south coast will migrate northwards, especially across the south—east and east anglia. some of those could be particularly heavy and produce a lot of water in a short amount of time. for the rest of the uk, a mixture of brighter spells, sunshine and showers with temperatures highest in the south—east, 26 or 27. as we head on through the evening and overnight, the thundery showers tend to move away, a drier interlude then thicker cloud will come in across england and wales, particularly the
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southern half, and that will introduce some rain. still quite a warm night in the south, not quite as warm as the one just gone, but fresher conditions for most of us. tomorrow we start in northern and eastern areas with sunshine and showers. the rain across england and wales turning that bit more heavy and more persistent through the day and more persistent through the day and it's going to be drifting steadily eastwards. temperatures tomorrow down a touch on today and certainly we're looking at highs of up certainly we're looking at highs of up to probably the low 20s. that leads into a fresh start for wednesday, so more culpable for sleeping. the rain we have in the south—east clears, a ridge of high pressure builds in and that means we're looking at a fresher day with more sunshine and again temperatures ata more sunshine and again temperatures at a more comfortable level. as for the pollen, today's levels are high or very high across eastern and central and some southern parts of england. for western england and wales, northern england, northern ireland and most of scotland, they
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are moderate, and in the far north of scotla nd are moderate, and in the far north of scotland that they are low. if you're heading out and you have an allergy to pollen, bear that in mind. handy advice! we will see you a little bit later, thank you very much. it has been just glorious at wimbledon. this is very strange, it doesn't normally happen. i love it, it is so gorgeous. 0ne extra slice of wimbledon news. someone getting very excited. michelle from nottingham has sent us this gorgeous picture of her dog flossie, who has amassed quite a lot of tennis balls. it is all about the angled head to add to the cuteness. we are also talking about wine. english wine used to be a bit of a joke among connoisseurs, but the industry could be about to have the last laugh.
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it was the fastest—growing sector in the uk's food and drinks industry last year. sean is at a vineyard for us in kent this morning, to see what has put the fizz into sales. good morning, they are bubbling with confidence, it is a sparkling performance. we will get that out of the way early on. figures out this morning show that the amount of money taken by english wine producers was up nearly 20% last year, to just over £130 million. there are now around 500 commercial vineyards in england and wales, like this one. annually they are producing over five million bottles, up from three million in 2011. but, although there is more wine being produced, the market for english wine is still tiny, making up less than 1% of the wine consumed in the uk. so still plenty to play for. simon, you run this place. why the growth? i think what we are seeing is more
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and more people getting to actually taste our wine. they are realising it is as good as anywhere that we taste wine from in the world. so we are seeing more and more people coming to the vineyard, more and more people tasting the wine and realising it is good stuff and they need to drink more of it. what has taken the industry so long, then? because it looks like a standard vineyard in the south of england, shouldn't we have been doing that for decades? yes, and in fact they have been growing grapes here since roman times. it is just taking the industry from what we have in the past and turning it into a proper commercial industry. we have got a few hurdles to get through. how economies of scale are not the same as the rest of the world. but across the rest of europe you will see that we are starting to perform much better than we have done before. but it is expensive, isn't it? relative toa it is expensive, isn't it? relative to a bottle of wine people might be used to buying on a friday night, you are paying a bit more. what puts the prices up? there are three
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things. one is we are a cool climate so we have much more volatility in the weather. the second thing is that economy of scale i talked about. the average size of a vineyard in the uk is much smaller than the rest of the world, and thirdly the duty prices in england, and especially for producers, they are so much higher than the rest of the world. we pay at least £2.60 a bottle on each bottle of wine we drink in the uk, and in france it is a few cents. we will talk later about how that tough frost might have made things a bit difficult. some industries would kill for 20% growth in the year. the english wine industry clearly doing well, but let's speak to ten. a beautiful place here. not industry can have something like this to show people -- tim. something like this to show people —— tim. what can other industries learn from them? what you have seen all around this morning typifies the
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british manufacturing industry. it is all about quality and innovation and is really focused on delivering what the consumer wants. consumers see that and that is why they are responding not only to english wine, at british food, in terms of cheese, fish, these are things that british customers want to buy and the world wa nts to customers want to buy and the world wants to buy. you say it is what consumers want, but what consumers really wa nt consumers want, but what consumers really want is low prices. the former boss of sainsbury is worth saying that brexit will mean higher prices, lower quality and less choice. would you agree with him?|j think choice. would you agree with him?” think he is only right if we don't get that free trade deal which eve ryo ne get that free trade deal which everyone says is very important. we know that tariffs are very, very high on meat, fish and dairy. if you look at what happened since the referendum, when the value of the pound has gone down, food prices have risen only relatively modestly. we think that will continue, but both the retailers in manufacturers are trying really hard to make sure
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that those food price increases do not feed through to consumers. he thinks consumers are not aware of how much food prices could be going up. have how much food prices could be going up. have consumers how much food prices could be going up. have consumers got used to that? i think consumers are noticing price rises after they have been falling for several years. there is an awareness of that and they don't know how far that will go, but they are hoping like us that they will quickly work out what the final trade deal looks like and what the transition to that trade deal looks like. we will return to you later in the morning, and also looking at the reason why some of these plants have not grown as well as they have in recent yea rs. not grown as well as they have in recent years. i will learn how frost affects the venue here. and education for you, sean. underworld is one of the most successful electronic acts of the last 25 years, so much so, danny boyle chose them to look after all the music for the opening of the 2012 olympics. their new work for the manchester
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international festival is rather different. manchester street poem turns interviews with people who have been homeless into a piece of music, and as audiences listen, they can watch karl hyde from the group paint what was said. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson went to see the work in action. nobody wants to see people on the street, and if they do, they're not going to ask them their story. in paint and in music, the words of people who have been homeless, given a whole new audience by underworld. i was just curious about why people were sleeping in doorways. and, you know, my kids were asking me what's going on, and i couldn't — i didn't have a satisfactory answer. i've come close to being lost enough to have lost everything, and i don't see any difference between the people who are living on the streets and me, just because i've got a job. and it was when underworld
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were at their most popular that karl thought he might end up on the streets. how close did you come to being homeless? close, because i was losing everything. it came to pieces quite a lot of times. i had real problems. it was in the most successful of those times that i was at my lowest. and i came very close, and it looked like a really good option, to throw in the towel. the dance duo worked with the charity mustard tree to record the stories of 35 former rough sleepers. i see you in them streets. you're vulnerable, and you're scared, and your dignity is stripped away from you. the aim — to make people think about the homeless not as a group but as individuals. jo is one of the voices. she is now housed, but shared her story with us. it was worse when i had addiction problems. a couple of years ago, ended up losing somejobs, ended up committing crimes over christmas. went to prison, came out or prison with nowhere to live. how do you look back
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at that period now? it's scary, it's frightening to be out on the streets, especially in a big city like manchester. and if it's a weekend, as well, people coming past drunk, and i know people get abused, and i know people that have been urinated on, and thrown food at, and it's not nice. underworld have taken over a shop in the centre of manchester until friday. anyone can pop in for a listen, and watch karl in action. you read it and go on a journey. mooch been off the streets for three years. he is one of the voices on the soundtrack, and thinks that manchester street poem really can bring about change. this gives people the opportunity to know what — people out on the streets, they've all have a story to tell. they're all someone. and at the end, i want someone to have come off the streets, turned their life around by the help of all this. which will happen, and i know it's happening now. and as forjo... what does it mean to you, to have your story now being told by underworld? it's great to be a part of something like this, you know.
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it's good to see that people can see that, you know, you're a person. you're notjust something that's sat on the street, that you walk past. and, if you can't make it to the shop to see and hear manchester street poem, you can hear it on bbc 6 music this sunday at1:00pm. 0ne one thing we are talking about his pyjamas. some people have asking about our pyjamas, but we are not. it would be difficult, wouldn't it? the reason we are talking about are charmers is that wayne rooney has been talking about the fact that he wears everton pyjamas. there was no picture available, but we made this one. so obviously we imagine that some of you might possibly, given it is breakfasttime some of you might possibly, given it is brea kfasttime and just some of you might possibly, given it is breakfasttime and just before 7am, be watching in your pyjamas, and it would cheer us up immensely
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if you would send us pictures of your pyjamas. the e—mail addresses are on the screen. fire away if you feel you are able to. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. police investigating an acid attack in beckton last month have arrested a man. resham khan and her cousin jameel mukhtar suffered face and neck injuries when the acid was thrown through their car window on ms khan's 21st birthday. 24—year—old john tomlin handed himself in to an east london police station yesterday. control of the skills system should be given to the mayor, according to a cross—party group of london mps. it said that the capital could lose out if eu migration drops after brexit, because the city doesn't have the ability to teach its population new skills. they warned that new talent being pulled into london from around
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the country will come at the expense of other uk regions. the gamekeeper who has been looking after 2,500 acres of richmond park for over 30 years is retiring. john bartram has written a book about his time there, calling it the best job in the world. it involved tending to the park's 600 deer, which included the controversial annual cull, and its ancient traditions. the queen would draw up a warrant list, and on that list would be all members of parliament, whoever was in power at the time. so it'd be from the lowest minister up to the prime minister, and they would all get a free haunch, which was a back leg to the first rib. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there is a good service running on all lines. 0n the trains, trains in and out of king's cross are disrupted because of trespassers on the track at welwyn garden city. 0n great northern, no trains on the moorgate line, because of over—running engineering works. in new southgate, the a406 down to one lane westbound, at bounds green road,
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because of a burst watermain. let's have a check on the weather now, with georgina burnett. good morning. some changeable weather for the week ahead, and a drop in temperatures from tomorrow. but today still feeling fairly humid, and the met office has a yellow warning in place, for heavy showers from 10:00am to 6:00pm. but it is not all doom and gloom. we do have some sunny spells around, in between the showers. in fact, for many of us, starting off the day it's looking largely dry and bright, with some sunshine. however, that cloud will increase through the day, and a few of these showers coming through. not all of us will see them, of course. temperatures getting up to 25 or 26 celsius, with a high pollen count, and high uv levels. as we head through the night, well, most of those showers fade away, leaving us with some clear spells and a largely dry night. temperatures getting down to about 15 or 16 degrees celsius.
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still fairly muggy tonight, and some patchy rain moving on in the early hours of the morning. that is how we start out tomorrow. a few breaks in a cloud for brightness, but the cloud increasing as we move through the day. and heavy rain, a bit more persistent, with temperatures up to about 21 celsius. so you can see those temperatures, sticking in the low 20s for the rest of the week. and really, some wet weather is never going to be too far away. so a real change in the feel of the weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. a crucial day for the parents
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of charlie gard as they return to court in the hope he'll be allowed to travel to the usa for treatment. judges will assess claims of new evidence which suggests the 11—month—old's quality of life could be improved. this morning we'll talk to charlie's mum connie yates. good morning, it's monday the 10th ofjuly. also this morning: theresa may faces up to her disappointing general election result with a call to rival parties to work with her on issues like brexit and social care. 75 firefighters have spent the early hours of the morning tackling a fire at london's popular camden lock market. good morning.
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the english wine industry has grown by nearly 20% in the last year so i'm at this vineyard in kent looking at what's been behind that sparkling performance. millions of us already know how beautiful the lake district is, now the rest of the world does too. we are live there this morning as the united nations gives it world heritage status. i'm at wimbledon where a place in the quarter—finals is on offer for britain's best. andy murray and johanna konta are both in action today and both looking to get into the last eight here at the all england club. weather—wise, we're looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers, a 30% chance of showers through the afternoon. for the uk as a whole, sunshine and showers but some of the showers will be heavy and thundery in east anglia and the south—east. more later in the programme. good morning.
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first, our main story. the case of the terminally ill 11—month—old boy, charlie gard, returns to the high court today as judges consider new evidence relating to potential treatment for his condition. an earlier ruling supported the view of his doctors that nothing can be done to improve his quality of life and they should be allowed to switch off his life support systems. mark lobel is outside great ormond street this morning, how significant could this court hearing be? that's right. after much pushing from charlie's parents and some members of the medical community, in seven hours high courtjudges will once again have to work out what's in the best interests of 11 —month—old charlie murphy is behind me, but being kept alive because he has a rare syndrome, being helped to
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breathe by the hospital. great 0rmond breathe by the hospital. great ormond street hospital says new evidence have come to light that all medication, which has only been taken by 18 medication, which has only been ta ken by 18 people medication, which has only been taken by 18 people in the world at the moment, but something that would give charlie a one in ten chance of getting better, whether that should be taken and if so whether he's allowed to travel to america to have it. but there are strict criteria here as to whether treatments for children are allowed and they've already tried to get permission for charlie to fly to america from the high court before and that's failed. there's a high hurdle for the pa rents to there's a high hurdle for the parents to overcome and it matters because if charlie can't go then it's possible they might turn off his ventilator here. the parents are ready and hoping that he would be able to travel, they've raised £1.3 million to go to america and there's even a congressman that's preparing to make the parents citizens to
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bypass the system but that's led to criticism from a leading british paediatrician who says all this outside involvement from donald trump to the pope to the congressman isn't helping. for charlie's pa rents, isn't helping. for charlie's parents, what matters today and what they will go through, is another agonising wait as to what happens to their son and that power is once again in the hands of others. thank you very much, mark. we will be speaking to charlie gard's mother at around 8am in the continued fight for her son's life. we'll be speaking to charlie gard's motherjust after eight about the continued fight for her son's life. theresa may is to signal a change in her style of government, calling for a cross—party consensus on some policy ideas, in her first major speech since last month's general election. she'll admit her approach to government will have to change, and is urging her opponents to come forward and contribute. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. iain, is this an attempt to put the events of the last month behind her? it is unusual, but she has to make a
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victory of necessity. she is recognising she'll know longer has an overall majority and it's very read to be in that position —— she no longer. the last time was in the coalition —— very rare. to some extent she has to ask if other people have ideas and can they get involved but equally they are facing other challenges with brexit and she may need the help of labour‘s front bench to get the legislation through against some of her own rebels and some of labour's of levels. to some extent it's natural she would say this but we could be getting a mixed message from theresa may, in these difficult times she is saying she can either be timid or bold, she is saying she is being bowled, but then she is saying to come and help and not criticise, that is seen as a sign of weakness from conservative criticising newspapers. labour
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aren't joining criticising newspapers. labour aren'tjoining in the spirit of this, they are saying theresa may has run out of ideas and she is begging for help. if she is hoping to create this new consensus then that will be difficult. the key challenge for her is to put policies behind some of her rhetoric and to see if she can get some cross—party support, that could be possible when she launches a review of employment practices, something that should appeal to people on the labour benches tomorrow. more on that from damian green in a few moments so stay with us for that on the programme. the iraqi prime minister, haider al—abadi, the iraqi prime minister has visited mosul to congratulate his armed forces on their victory over the islamic state group, nine months after they launched the offensive to liberate the city. in the capital, baghdad, people sang and danced on the streets. many areas of mosul have been reduced to rubble in the fight, as caroline davies reports. fireworks over baghdad last night.
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iraq is celebrating the defeat of so—called islamic state in mosul. but it's come at a cost. this is iraq's second biggest city. homes, streets, shops. reduced to ruins and dust. it's brought thousands have been killed, some will have been pa rt been killed, some will have been part of is, others were civilians. search and rescue teams continue to pull bodies from the rubble. these families have survived three years under is. now they're able to leave following nearly a million people who've already left their homes here. it may be a while until they can return. the fighting is ending but the humanitarian crisis is not. it will take months, maybe even years, for the people who have fled from their homes, they have lost everything, it will take months for them to go back to the damaged neighbourhoods. the un estimates it will cost at least £770 million to restore the
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city's basic infrastructure, such as clea n water city's basic infrastructure, such as clean water and electricity. is still hold territory to the west and south of mosul, as well as elsewhere in iraq. some experts have warned if games are not secured properly, is could retake cities again —— gains. although this city is liberated, for these families it came at a price. caroline davies, bbc news. the bbc understands a government inquiry into the so—called gig economy will call for flexible workers to be paid above the minimum wage. the taylor review, which is due to be published tomorrow, will affect firms like deliveroo and uber. it's expected to argue that additional wages will help to offset the lack of holiday and sick pay. firefighters have been tackling a blaze overnight at london's popular camden lock market. 70 firefighters were sent to the scene after the fire broke out at around midnight.
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london fire brigade says the situation is now under control but the cause remains unknown. there are no reports of any casualties. counter—terror police have launched a film telling holiday—makers how to react in the event of a terrorist attack in their resort. woman: we have to get out of here now! that's a bit of the video for you. the four—minute video shows families and hotel staff fleeing the sound of gunshots, barricading themselves into rooms and being treated as potential suspects by armed police. it repeats the advice to run, hide and tell. wildfires are raging across the us state of california as a record—breaking heat wave sends temperatures above 40 degrees celsius in many areas. more than 2,000 firefighters are attempting to contain nearly 20 large blazes which have forced hundreds of people to evacuate their homes. officials are warning that the weather conditions are set to continue over the weekend. he has spent the last 13 years
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wearing the red shirt of manchester united thaiday only we think. now wayne rooney has admitted to wearing evident pyjamas even during his long speu evident pyjamas even during his long spell away from his boyhood club, which he has now rejoined of course, adam wilde has more. wayne rooney, back in blue, back to his boyhood club. one of the finest of his generation, back to where it all began, announcing himself as a teenager in spectacularfashion. but his love for his club has clearly never gone away. i'm ecstatic, i can't wait to get back playing. to be honest, i've kept it quiet for the last 13 years, but i've actually been wearing everton pyjamas. rooney left everton for old trafford in 2004, and it was there his career really took off. commentator: rooney! oh, that is absolutely fantastic! at manchester united, he won almost everything the club game has to offer, becoming their all—time leading scorer. his opportunities on the pitch,
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though, becoming increasingly limited, so time for a new challenge. his future now lies in his past. i'm absolutely made up he's coming back, yeah. i wasn't sure. obviously a lot has gone on over the years when he left, and things like that. i think it'sjust fantastic for everton. so a career gone full circle. rooney famously once announced, once a blue, always a blue. in football, such allegiances can be hard to shake off. adam wild, bbc news, at goodison park. clearly there's other more important news around but it has made us... you don't have to defend it. news around but it has made us... you don't have to defend itm news around but it has made us... you don't have to defend it. it made us chuckle, though! this is something we mocked up earlier. this is what we think wayne rooney might look like in his everton pjs, very fetching. so are you or your kids pyjama fans? send us your pictures. mike has sent this one in. maybe
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this is the evident pyjamas that he is wearing. mary sent this picture of five—month—old bethany in her beautiful pyjamas. very sweet, thanks very much indeed! it's been a turbulent month for the prime minister following the shock election result in june. since then she has had to apologise to her own mps for the campaign, agree a billion—pound deal with the dup and now, in the week which marks herfirst anniversary in downing street, she faces criticism from the european parliament over her offer to eu citizens post brexit. so will a speech tomorrow mark a reboot of her premiership? joining us this morning from westminster is first secretary of state damian green. good morning to you, mr green. thanks for your time on this. a rebrand, a reboot, it doesn't feel like a year into the job there's much to celebrate for may. there's a
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lot to do, that's one of the points the prime minister will make tomorrow, her ambition for this country is the same as it was a year ago when she stood on the steps of downing street and said she wanted to make this a country that works for everyone and tomorrow for example she's launching matthew taylor's report on working practices. we all know the world of work has changed, he's been looking at what we call the gig economy, people working for companies like uberand people working for companies like uber and deliver a row and making suggestions about how we can benefit from the flexible world of work we have and make sure that people get good work and feel satisfied in theirjobs. good work and feel satisfied in their jobs. that's the good work and feel satisfied in theirjobs. that's the kind of big issue where politicians should address things and the prime minister is determined to do so. 0nly minister is determined to do so. only 12 weeks ago she called this snap general election to remove some of the noise holding her back from her plans in parliament, now she's reaching out to the other parties, it's easy to see how people will say
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she is begging and she is desperate and some have said she even can't survive as prime minister? that's all nonsense. why is that nonsense, why is she not begging for help and isn't desperate? she's not begging for help. there are big issues facing this country, notjust brexit, obviously the one that will dominate politics for the next few yea rs, dominate politics for the next few years, but counterterrorism, improving the world of work for millions of people, the issue of social care, i'm sure most of the people watching this programme will save you know what, it's possible no political party has the complete monopoly of wisdom, we want to see our politicians working together and that's the point the prime minister is making and that's one of the lessons you can draw from the general election result. it wasn't as good as we conservatives would have wanted, that's perfectly clear, but the message i take from it is people want politicians to address
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the big issues and if they can do it across the divide of parties then so be it. there must be things we can agree on in terms of fighting terrorism and dealing with social ca re terrorism and dealing with social care and getting the best brexit dealfor britain. care and getting the best brexit deal for britain. as we look at this reboot or revamp, whatever you want to call it, the prime minister was accused of being a bit robotic and looking remote and inaccessible in the election. you've known herfor an awfully long time, can she do warm and! an awfully long time, can she do warm and i she need to? she is a perfectly warm and compassionate human being —— does she need to. perfectly warm and compassionate human being -- does she need to. but that hasn't necessarily come across to some? the campaign had a number of problems, which we all know, and i think people see... they have seen already in her year as prime minister, and they will see in the yea rs minister, and they will see in the years to come, that she is not only resilient and determined and
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hard—working resilient and determined and ha rd—working and conscientious, resilient and determined and hard—working and conscientious, all the things people accept about her, but of course she is a warm and sympathetic woman as well and i think that is something... she is the right person in difficult times. we have a complicated brexit deal to negotiate, we have trade deals around the world we need to negotiate as well, it's her combination of qualities we need for the years to come. there is plenty of speculation about david davies being moved into position to being the next leader. it is all speculation which adds to theissues it is all speculation which adds to the issues she is facing.” it is all speculation which adds to the issues she is facing. i have been around westminster for long enough to know thatjuly is the time when everyone... it is warm press echo again, is it? it is the warm p rosecco echo again, is it? it is the warm prosecco problem, and after that all
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of it gets forgotten. just on the charlie gard situation, donald trump has commented, and we have heard from the pope in recent days, what is the government's edition on the case of charlie gard, which is going back to the courts? our position is precisely that this is a matter for... 0bviously precisely that this is a matter for... obviously it is hugely emotional, and none of us can imagine what charlie gard's parents must be going through, and the right place for this to be decided is between the medical experts, and there can be few, if any, hospitals and the world better at dealing with children, and the courts, to look at all the evidence, if there is new evidence from other parts of the world, than that should be looked at as well, to see if the clinicians at the hospital might change their position. it is important to let the
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medical experts and the parents, in a court of law, decide what best to do next. thank you for your time this morning. good to talk to you. and we will be speaking to charlie gard's mother in about one hour. carol is at wimbledon this morning with the weather. some people say we look like twins this morning. we are not wearing exactly the same dress, but it is the floral theme. a beautiful dress. i wouldn't mind being your twin at all. we are at wimbledon, of course, and we are in the dining area. this is where some of the players and theirfamily come is where some of the players and their family come to enjoy a snack while looking out over the course. they are enjoying a very tasty lunch, and wimbledon is the largest single annual sporting catering operation carried out in europe. around 2000 staff are required to operate the outlets during wimbledon
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fortnight and about 16,000 portions of fish and chips are served. there is none of that this morning. what we are looking at is the covers on the courts, they have just come off court number three, and they might be on again later on today, because the forecast for wimbledon is a more u nsettled the forecast for wimbledon is a more unsettled one. what we have is the risk of some showers as we go into the early part of the afternoon. that risk will then fade, but it will come back in the late afternoon and early evening. having said that, it is only a 30% risk, so there is a 70% chance we could mist it altogether. the forecast across the uk generally as one of sunshine and some heavy showers. if we start in southern england, this morning at 9am there is a lot of sunshine around. we have blue skies which continues as we drift further north through east anglia, into the midlands, and for northern england and southern scotland there is more cloud and a weather front producing spots of rain. a chilly start in northern scotland. here there is
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some sunshine. the temperature will pick up quite quickly and for northern ireland you have a lot of low cloud, some rain in the east but it will brighten up and you will see some sunshine. for wales in south—west england there is again some showery outbreaks of rain, but as we push across the south midlands, across southern counties of england generally, in the direction of london, we are back in the dry conditions with some sunshine. we are importing some thunderstorms from the near continent which will likely move from south—east england and east anglia in particular, where some of them could be heavy, and we could see some torrential downpours, but they are showers, so not all of us will see them. highs up to around 25 or26, will see them. highs up to around 25 or 26, possibly a little bit more than that in the south—east. now, through this evening and overnight, we lose most of those showers, the thundery ones. there is a dry interlude. still some showers in the north, and by the end of the night we do have another weather front coming in from the west, introducing
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thicker cloud and some rain. the rain at this stage will not be particularly heavy. a fresh night for the particularly heavy. a fresh night forthe uk, particularly heavy. a fresh night for the uk, temperatures down a touch in the south—east, but it will still not be a cool night in the south—east. so tomorrow we start off ona south—east. so tomorrow we start off on a largely dry note, with some showers across northern ireland, scotland, northern england, eastern england, and southern england. meanwhile, rain across the south moves heavier and more persistent as a drift east over the course of the day. that could cause some disruption to wimbledon through the course of tomorrow, and temperatures will be down a little bit on today. that leads us into a cool night further south—east compared with what we have had. we lose the rain quite early on from the south—east as well. a ridge of high pressure builds in and for most of the uk it will be a dry and sunny day, but feeling more pleasant if you don't like it so hot. just before i go, the pollen levels. well, across much of england, through the stone, central and southern areas today, it
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is high or very high. the rest of england, wales, northern ireland and most of scotland it is moderate, and across the far north of scotland it is low. and i don't know if you have been seeing in the papers all the news about how it is going to turn hot again, the trend looks like we will see a return, especially across england and wales, to those higher temperatures. it has been absolutely glorious. not good for the gardens, but glorious. we will see you a little later. now, look at this beautiful scene behind us this morning. the lake district, famed for its stunning scenery, has been awarded world heritage status. it puts it alongside the likes of the taj mahal, the great wall of china, and the grand canyon. 0ur reporter linsey smith is in one of the lake district's popular tourist spots this morning. good morning to you. good morning,
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welcome to lake windermere. this is the largest natural lake in the uk and it is at the heart of the new unesco heritage site. 100 delegates agreed that this was a worthy winner of the title. itjoins a prestigious list of iconic landmarks including the taj mahal, the grand canyon and the taj mahal, the grand canyon and the great barrier reef, and one person who helped to bring this title to the area is richard. thank you forjoining us. you are from the la ke you forjoining us. you are from the lake district national park. how long have you been working on bringing the title to the area? we have been working on this bid since 1986, so 31 years it has taken us to get here, and it is fantastic to receive global recognition of the la ke receive global recognition of the lake district national park is a world heritage site. i think we will be partying all week. one of the things the un committee spoke about was the need to monitor tourism in the area. how will you do that? we
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check our visitor numbers annually, and we know we have had 18 million this year, so it is already a really well visited national park, but we hope that with world heritage status we will be able to compete in international markets as well and we would like to encourage our visitors to get a little bit more under the skin of the place. really understand what makes it globally significant. stay a little longer and spend a little more money in our local economy. thank you very much for joining us. one of the reasons it was awarded the status was because of the stunning natural beauty. you can see a little bit of that today. it is also home to the uk's tallest mountain, and another one of the reasons it was so successful was because of the inspiration it has provided over centuries. to name some of the most famous artists who have been inspired, william wordsworth and beatrix potter. i am joined now by another guest, amanda shaw from the local hotel. your
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family have lived here for many yea rs, family have lived here for many years, haven't they? tell us a little bit about that, and how proud you are. we know that from church records we go back to about the 17005. records we go back to about the 1700s. very, very proud of this area. it is such a beautiful place. we have a farming background, and that has played a huge part in the cultural landscape, shaping this landscape that we see today. and so you must be keen that the area is preserved. yes, absolutely. it is one of the major attractions. world heritage status puts the lake district on the global platform and hopefully it will bring more visitors to the area. as you heard richard seah, there are 18 million visitors annually to the area, none of them have joined visitors annually to the area, none of them havejoined us visitors annually to the area, none of them have joined us yet this morning. they are probably having a sleep in —— richard say.
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english wine used to be mocked by its more famous european cousins, but that has started to change recently. sean is in a vineyard in kent to find out what is behind its sparkling sales figures. you can see why a potentially we can grow a lot of grapes in the uk. a very similar climate to the champagne region in france. it has not in this gorgeous all year around. this frost has affected a lot of it, and could affect the harvest. but don't worry, these grapes will be harvested later in the year. we will be looking more at how this industry has been growing so much, 20% growth in the last year alone. first the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins.
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a large fire in camden has led to road closures in the area. 70 firefighters tackled the blaze in a building in camden lock market just before midnight. camden high street is closed from the tube station to chalk farm, although the fire has now been brought under control. there was flames about five metres high, from the top point of the building at camden market. there was loads of smoke. like, you couldn't see clearly at all. the firefighters we re see clearly at all. the firefighters were amazing. there was about three crews when i got there, and within ten minutes, there was about 15. so it was a really rapid response. police investigating an acid attack in beckton last month have arrested a man. resham khan and her cousin jameel mukhtar suffered face and neck injuries when the acid was thrown through their car window on ms khan's 21st birthday. 24—year—old john tomlin handed himself in to an east london police station yesterday. an album of drawings by the 18th—century british painter thomas gainsborough has been discovered in the royal collection,
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at windsor castle. the drawings had been wrongly attributed to another artist for more than a century. it has been described as the very best collection of gainsborough's early drawings in existence. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there is a good service running on all lines. 0n the trains, trains in and out of king's cross are disrupted because of trespassers on the track at welwyn garden city. 0n great northern, no trains on the moorgate line, because of over—running engineering works. 0n the roads, this is the scene in camden, where the high street is closed from the tube station to chalk farm, because of the fire we mentioned earlier. in new southgate, the a406 is down to one lane westbound at bounds green road, because of a burst watermain. it is causing queues from the a10 great cambridge interchange. let's have a check on the weather now, with georgina burnett. good morning. some changeable weather for the week ahead, and a drop in temperatures from tomorrow. but today still feeling fairly humid, and the met office has a yellow warning in place, for heavy
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showers from 10:00am till 6:00pm. but it is not all doom and gloom. we do have some sunny spells around, in between the showers. in fact, for many of us, starting off the day it's looking largely dry and bright, with some sunshine. however, that cloud will increase through the day, and a few of these showers coming through. not all of us will see them, of course. temperatures getting up to 25 or 26 celsius, with a high pollen count, and high uv levels. as we head through the night, well, most of those showers fade away, leaving us with some clear spells and a largely dry night. temperatures getting down to about 15 or 16 degrees celsius. still fairly muggy tonight, and some patchy rain moving on in the early hours of the morning. that is how we start out tomorrow. a few breaks in a cloud for brightness, but the cloud increasing as we move through the day. and heavy rain, a bit more persistent, with temperatures up to about 21 celsius. so you can see those temperatures, sticking in the low 20s for the rest of the week.
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and really, some wet weather is never going to be too far away. so a real change in the feel to the weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. the case of the terminally ill 11—month—old boy, charlie gard, is going back to the high court today. great ormond street hospital in london has asked judges to consider new evidence relating to potential treatment for his condition abroad. an earlier ruling supported the view of his doctors that nothing can be done to improve his quality of life and they should be allowed to switch off his life support systems. theresa may is to call on rival political parties to contribute and notjust criticise. in herfirst major speech since the general election, the prime minister will say her commitment to change
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britain is undimmed. but with the conservatives losing their overall majority, she'll say the reality she faces means she has to approach politics differently. labour said mrs may's speech proved her party had completely run out of ideas. the iraqi prime minister, haider al—abadi, has congratulated his armed forces on their victory over islamic state militants. it's nine months since government forces launched an attack to liberate mosul. much of the city has been reduced to rubble, and thousands of people have lost their lives. the bbc understands a government inquiry into the so—called gig economy will call for flexible workers to be paid above the minimum wage. the taylor review, which is due to be published tomorrow, will affect firms like deliveroo and uber. it's expected to argue that additional wages will help to offset the lack of holiday and sick pay. firefighters have been tackling a blaze overnight at london's popular camden lock market, which attracts 28 million
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visitors a year. 70 firefighters were sent to the scene after the fire broke out at around midnight. london fire brigade says the situation is now under control but the cause remains unknown. there are no reports of any casualties. a coldplay fan who went to the band's recent concert at croke park in dublin became more involved than he expected. rob had been crowd—surfing in his wheelchair when he was spotted by lead singer, chris martin. he was then invited on stage and drew huge cheers from the crowd of more than 70,000 people, when he brought out a harmonica to play along. rob described his experience as amazing. if you can play a harmonica, then
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ta ke if you can play a harmonica, then take it just in if you can play a harmonica, then take itjust in case! wonderful! brilliant! wayne rooney has revealed that he wore everton pyjamas during his 13 years at manchester united. the striker re—joined everton yesterday after leaving united. he grew up supporting the merseyside club and made his debut for the first team at the age of 16. to be honest, i've kept it quiet for the last 13 years, but i've actually been wearing everton pyjamasa at home with my kids. so i had to keep that a bit quiet but it's great, it feels... you know, as special it did 13 years ago. i love the way he smiles as he reveals the big secret! he knows it's interesting! we have been talking pyjamas this morning amongst other things. we thought what we would do is seeing there's no picture of wine in everton pyjamas, we have mocked one up for you. ——
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wayne. mike has sent in this picture of him wearing evident pjs, maybe wayne has the same ones? and sent in this picture of her and her nine—month—old son, ben —— anna. clearly woken up in a good mood in his pyjamas! what a lovely big smile, ben, lovely to see you! send us your pictures, we love seeing them! second week of wimbledon, always a big day, manic monday. the first week didn't disappoint, loads of british excess in the first week, we still have johanna british excess in the first week, we still havejohanna konta and mother. that british success. —— british success. is this their canteen? hard—boiled egg please! success. is this their canteen? hard-boiled egg please! well spotted! do you know what, walker, you could have 20 boiled eggs, they
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are looking fantastic! isn't this marvellous? we are in the players' canteen, signs saying only players after midday so thankfully no players at the moment so we can have a good nose around. you might think this is what i expect from a tennis players' canteen, leaves, salad, spinach, isn't it all very, very healthy? some seeds and dressing. tha nkfully healthy? some seeds and dressing. thankfully over here it gets a bit more exciting. scramble date being made, smoked salmon, really important what the players it, i interviewed johanna konta recently in birmingham when she was playing and before she talked to us she had to have a huge meal after she came off court —— players eat. there's a new trend of really carb loading and eating lots and lots of healthy, delicious food which they can do here, as dan said, we havejohanna konta and mars are both on manic
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monday or magic monday, andy murray was here on saturday practising on one of the outside courts preparing for his clash with benoit paire from france —— johanna konta for his clash with benoit paire from france ——johanna konta and for his clash with benoit paire from france —— johanna konta and andy murray. he is expected at around 3pm on court1. murray. he is expected at around 3pm on court 1. johanna konta is playing caroline garcia after her win on friday against french opponent at 1pm. joe root‘s reign as england captain has started with a win. england beat south africa by 211 runs with a day to spare at lord's. the second test gets under way in just five days time. we know they're going to come back ha rd we know they're going to come back hard at trent bridge and we're going to have to play really well but to be1—0 up, it's to have to play really well but to be 1—0 up, it's the first time we've beaten them here for a long time. everything i've asked from the lads this week they've dived straight into and they've gone about it in a very, very, just a brilliant way really and made my life a lot easier. in the women's world cup, england beat defending champions australia in a tense match in bristol.
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australia could have won with a six off the final ball but couldn't manage it to give england a fourth straight win at the tournament. valtteri bottas claimed the second win of his formula 1 career at the austrian grand prix. the finn lead most of the race from pole to take the chequered flag ahead of ferrari's sebastian vettel. lewis hamilton fought back from eighth on the grid to finish fourth and now trails vettel by twenty points in the championship. in the beginning i could control the pace, the backmarkers raided really tricky, the second win in my career so thank you, guys, for the support and thanks to the team to make it possible. let's get back to the food, my favourite subject, this is lunch getting prepared. wimbledon is siksika the chef is with us to explain why this is so important for the players —— wimbledon's centre
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court the chef. they are a fussy bunch so it's a tough job? -- wimbledon executive chef. they can create their own dishes, there is no set menu, they can pretty much have what they want. what do most people have? on trend at the moment is the queen hour with all the veg and the proteins and that. —— quinoa. we've had one request for quinoa with cinnamon, a bizarre combination. but they can have anything they want. are they coming in before their match and eating a big meal? i was talking aboutjohanna match and eating a big meal? i was talking about johanna konta match and eating a big meal? i was talking aboutjohanna konta having a big meal after she played? they are eating an hour and a half or two hours before they are on court and that gives them the time for their bodies to absorb the goodness. we all love a smoothie bar, let's have all love a smoothie bar, let's have a look, what have we got here? we
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have a range of fruits and we have set menus but players can create their own smoothies. we have wheatgrass as well to add to it. what does that do? it is a health thing. what else are they putting in, yoghurt? protein? yoghurt, fruit, coconut water, everything. who is the fussiest person you have fed? they are all special! special? has anyone ever come in and said i wa nt has anyone ever come in and said i want bacon, eggs and a sausage? no, no, they are all healthy. that is why they are all winning tennis tournament is perhaps! thanks, gary! i want to show you this overhear, it isn't all super healthy, a lovely brea kfast isn't all super healthy, a lovely breakfast pop, scones, strawberries
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—— breakfast pots. —— over here. but keep coming, down here, some cakes, and who is this? carol kirkwood! do you know what, i thought if we going to find steph mcgovern then it will be here! where is she? i don't know, you might want to check out the strawberrynet orangs, the chocolate, look at the size of the croissants, they are enormous! —— strawberry orangs. the temperature will rise through this morning and the afternoon and the forecast today, the temperature getting up to 23, but there's the risk of a shower. that risk is into the afternoon, then there is a bit of respite and then there is a bit of respite and then we see the risk return late afternoon, early evening. a 30% risk so there's a 70% chance that it will stay dry. the forecast for the uk is one of sunshine and showers and some
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of those showers will be heavy and thundery. if we start the forecast at 9am in southern england, a lot of sunshine around and in the sunshine temperatures pick up really quickly. that holds true for east anglia and the midlands but for northern england and southern scotland we have a weather front so here a bit more cloud around and light and patchy rain. northern scotland, chilly start for you but sunshine from the word goes over temperatures will pick up rapidly. in northern ireland this morning, a cloudy start, drizzle and rain in the east —— from the word go so temperatures. in through the south midlands, southern counties, the home counties, a lot of dry weather, sunshine and the temperature is responding accordingly. as we go through the day, thundery showers will come through from the near continent. through east anglia and the south—east in particular. some
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of those will be torrential and some will miss them altogether. the forecast for the uk as a whole will be sunshine and showers. temperatures in the high teens and low to mid 20s but a bit higher in the south—east. as we head through the south—east. as we head through the course of this evening and overnight, thundery showers push away into the north sea, a drier interlude, still showers in scotland and northern ireland and thicker cloud brings in rain. not heavy at this time in wales and southern england. that's how we start tomorrow. with that rain coming in across wales and southern england. it will pep up through the day and it will be drifting eastwards. ahead of it in eastern and northern parts of it in eastern and northern parts of the country, there will be showers and one or two of those could be heavy. again not all of us will catch them. fresher, especially if you're stuck under that band of rain, noticeably in the south—east where it's been so hot and muggy recently but that rain could well in
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the wimbledon. a fresher night for sleeping on tuesday into wednesday in the south—east, the rain clearing early on and as the ridge of high pressure m oves early on and as the ridge of high pressure moves in things settle down and lots of sunshine. temperatures down a touch compared to what we've been used to but still not too bad for this time injuly. if you think that's it, is that some? it's not, it looks like as we head into the latter pa rt it looks like as we head into the latter part of next week, temperatures across england and wales are set to rise rapidly once again. hang on, hang on, hang on... look at that! we have been sent over with a little surprise for carol from ian. look at that, how good does that look? thank you, ian, thank you very much! get a slice of cake on the side of that, perfect! that is the perfect brea kfast. that, perfect! that is the perfect breakfast. you would just have cake, wouldn't you ? breakfast. you would just have cake,
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wouldn't you? i would be rifling through that in the morning. look at that! i was staring at the cake through the entire report. he wasn't just staring at it, he was talking about eating the whole thing! soap murray and konta on court, and the men's doubles. they are on court 14 at 11:30 a.m.. there is a lot of television watching to be done. sort yourself out, find a pew. if you are at work, find a radio. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the case of terminally ill charlie gard returns to the high court today, as his parents continue theirfight to be allowed to take him abroad for treatment. theresa may signals a new style of government, as she calls for cross— party support on big issues. it seems that everybody on this
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programme apart from us is out and about. the english wine industry grew nearly 20% last year, making it one of the fastest—growing sectors in the uk's food and drinks industry. sean is at a vineyard for us in kent. iam in i am in kent, iam in kent, the i am in kent, the m25, would you believe, is only a few miles that way. lots of commuters travelling into london at the minute, but it is a pretty good region for making wine. you can see the soil, this kind of stone is the same as they have in the champagne region in france. they only get four days lest sunlight than that area as well. there has been 20% growth over the last year. to just over £130 million.
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there are now around 500 commercial vineyards in england and wales, like this one. annually, they are producing over five million bottles, up from three million in 2011. you keep track of these things for a magazine. it looks like they have everything in place, why is it only 20%? it is great, a lot of people just don't know it is here. 25 years ago there were no commercial vineyards in the uk. it is something people are still getting to know. that is changing with the amount of competition is that english sparkling wine is winning. it is the case of being aware of it, and people do want to support local producers, and i think the sparkling industry, their success in general is helping people to come across from prosecco, so that tells you how much brits love sparkling.” from prosecco, so that tells you how much brits love sparkling. . there isn't that bottle of english wine for five isn't that bottle of english wine forfive or £6 isn't that bottle of english wine for five or £6 you can get from
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every supermarket, that you can see with a lot of winds around the world. at i think with english sparkling wine there is no entry level. you are not going to see much change from £25 for a bottle of english sparkling, and the challenge is to get people to move on from prosecco and trade up. we know people want to explore. the premium shift is having an influence, people wa nt to shift is having an influence, people want to explore outside their comfort zone, but people need to be convinced to trade up outside of prosecco's price racket, not the champagne but the english sparkling wine. it is notjust the wine, as well, you can get a train from anywhere around the country and you are here in half an hour. is there more of the tourism industry around english wine? absolutely, people wa nt english wine? absolutely, people wantan english wine? absolutely, people want an excuse to come out to the country, and all this beautiful greenery is here. i think, you know, we don't really have a huge
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manufacturing industry any more, so it is really encouraging and exciting, the fact that we have a new agricultural industry, really, and that is a lot of potential worldwide. brand britain has a lot of capital around the world. thank you very much for that. a lot of parts of the industry would love 20% growth. it is not quite happening everywhere. you are from the food and drink federation. what has english wine had in the last few yea rs english wine had in the last few years which other factors haven't been able to match, 20% growth? english food and drink is a boom industry, it is our biggest manufacturing sector, contributes hugely to the economy and employs 4 million people. its success is driven by innovation, quality and consumer focus. you say that success , consumer focus. you say that success, but we import a lot of food and with brexit we are expecting higher prices, lower quality, less choice. so is it as much of a
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powerhouse as we needed to be? well, about half of the food in supermarkets is imported. there is a huge amount at stake in the brexit negotiations. we have to get a conference of free trade deal. we need frictionless trade. if not they will be serious consequences for food andrecht and beyond. there you go. the sun has gone down a little bit, but it is glorious this morning. hope you are enjoying yourselves on the sofa. we have been appreciating everyone else's views, especially carol's. hopefully you could hear him very clearly, we have a little bit of trouble with the microphone but hopefully you got the message. when it comes to planning a summer holidays, most of us focus on sun, sea and sightseeing. but a public information campaign has been launched urging us to think about how we would react if there was a terrorist attack on the resort where
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we we re terrorist attack on the resort where we were staying. a look at that film. if you hear a gunshot, if there is a safe route, run. this is the best option. lock yourself in and move away from the door. barricade yourself thin if you can. turn your mobile phone to silent and switch off vibrate. when the police arrived, they will be armed. they will deal with the immediate threat first, to prevent further casualties. these kinds of attacks are rare, but having a plan, knowing how to respond, and being prepared will help you stay safe, and could save your life. so run, hyde, tell. scott wilson is
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the national counterterrorism co—ordinator of the protect and prepare a strategy. and people got a feel of the film there. in some ways it is quite frightening. do you think people need this information? we really do think that people do need this information. if you look in the same context as when you have an aeroplane you watch the safety briefing. it is giving people the knowledge of what to do or what not to do. it does give you more details about, for example, hiding. what are the standout bits of information people should take away? what we are trying to say to people, there is no point trying to surrender or negotiate. you have to get yourself out of the danger zone first of all, and if you can get out, what we are asking people as the barricade
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yourself into a room and then notify authorities of the location of the offenders, how many offenders, and where you actually are. so in the first instance, you are concerned, you hear noises, you run. you get yourself out of there. these people are not here to steal a phone or a watch, they are here to kill you, so get yourself out of that danger zone. and what about for the elderly and infirm? well, within hotel complex as we have trained 20,000 representatives, within the hotels themselves, training has been taking place, and they can assist others. and how many people have you trained, and where are they? there are 23,000 representatives from the major holiday companies, who have received not just this major holiday companies, who have received notjust this training but also in how to identify suspicious behaviour, how to identify suspicious items. they have received the training and are working in resorts all over the world. and one
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of the messages in the film is, when the authorities arrived, people might be treated as suspects. and thatis might be treated as suspects. and that is also... can be quite frightening. it can, but what we don't want you to do is become a victim. we want you to stay calm and listen to what the authorities are telling you to do, so you don't become a victim. just tell us a little bit about the public appetite for this, as well. do you think there is a public appetite for this kind of information? well, as we have seen in the atrocities in 2015, and more recently in london, we feel it is only right that we make people aware and give them that knowledge of what they should and shouldn't do it caught up in such an act. and tell us, because you put out this kind of information, and people will be scared going on holiday, but what is the actual reality? how likely is it that people will be involved in this kind of situation? it is very unlikely, but as i said it is like
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the safety briefing you get on an aeroplane before you take off. it is unlikely you are going to crash but it is important you argument that knowledge of what you should and shouldn't do. and talk about a little bit of if you are with your children? what would you say to pa rents, children? what would you say to parents, for example, with young children? i would say to all pa rents, children? i would say to all parents, before you go on holiday, look at the travel advice for the location and look at this video, it will only take four minutes before you go to make you and yourfamily safe. thank you for your time. we have been out and about this morning, in kent, with sean, at wimbledon with carol, the lake district, and on windermere, the la ke district, and on windermere, the lake district has been named as a world heritage site. they have been waiting for 30 odd years. thank you
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for all the photos that you have sent us over the weekend. what a lovely weekend it was. these are pictures taken by paul hewitt. it was actually a while ago. they are from a vineyard in hampshire where he works. they ran out of candles on the third night and had to resort to straw bales. just to keep the temperature above freezing. this is a beautiful picture taking on the brecon beacons by david pearce. we will get to it in a moment, there was a great one of sunrise. here it is. look at that. ten firefighters completing the first of three welsh peaksin completing the first of three welsh peaks in the day. if you remember band of brothers, it looks like that. always impressed by the wonderful talent of our breakfast viewers when it comes to taking those pictures.
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you are watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: grigor dimitrov will be hoping it is game, set and match when he takes on roger federer later today, but how will he get on with our mug challenge? we will find out if he can knock andy murray off the top spot just before 9:00am. he didn't even watch anyone else's technique, just smashed it. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. a large fire in camden has led to road closures in the area. 70 firefighters tackled the blaze in a building in camden lock market just before midnight. camden high street is closed from the tube station to chalk farm, although the fire has now been brought under control.
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there was flames about five metres high, from the top point of the building at camden market. there was loads of smoke, like, you couldn't see clearly at all. the firefighters were amazing. there was about three crews when i got there, and within ten minutes there was about 15. so it was a really rapid response. police investigating an acid attack in beckton last month have arrested a man. resham khan and her cousin jameel mukhtar suffered face and neck injuries when the acid was thrown through their car window on ms khan's 21st birthday. 24—year—old john tomlin handed himself in to an east london police station yesterday. an album of drawings by the 18th—century british painter thomas gainsborough has been discovered in the royal collection at windsor castle. the drawings had been wrongly attributed to another artist for more than a century. it has been described as the very best collection of gainsborough's early drawings in existence. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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0n the tube, there is a good service running on all lines. 0n great northern, no trains on the moorgate line because of over—running engineering works. 0n southern and gatwick express, amended timetable because of industrial action. 0n the roads, this is the scene in camden, where the high street is closed from the tube station to chalk farm, because of the fire we mentioned earlier. in new southgate, the a406 is down to one lane westbound, at bounds green road, because of a burst watermain. queues from edmonton. let's have a check on the weather now, with georgina burnett. good morning. some changeable weather for the week ahead, and a drop in temperatures from tomorrow. but today still feeling fairly humid, and the met office has a yellow warning in place, for heavy showers from 10:00am till 6:00pm. but it is not all doom and gloom. we do have some sunny spells around, in between those showers. in fact, for many of us, starting off the day it's looking largely dry and bright, with some sunshine. however, that cloud will increase through the day, and a few of these showers coming through. not all of us will see them, of course. temperatures, though, getting up to 25 or 26 degrees
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celsius, with a high pollen count, and high uv levels. as we head through the night, well, most of those showers fade away, leaving us with some clear spells and a largely dry night. temperatures getting down to about 15 or 16 degrees celsius. still fairly muggy tonight, and then we'll have some patchy rain moving in in the early hours of the morning. that is how we start out tomorrow. a few breaks in that cloud for brightness, but the cloud increasing as we move through the day. and heavy rain, a bit more persistent, with temperatures up to about 21 degrees celsius. so you can see those temperatures, sticking in the low 20s for the rest of the week. and really, some wet weather is never going to be too far away. so a real change in the feel to the weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast,
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with dan walker and louise minchin. a crucial day for the parents of charlie gard, as they return to court in the hope he'll be allowed to travel to the usa for treatment. judges will assess claims of new evidence which suggests the 11—month—old's quality of life could be improved. this morning, we'll talk to charlie's mum, connie yates. good morning. it's monday 10th july. also this morning: theresa may faces up to her disappointing general election result with a call to rival parties to work with her on issues like brexit and social care. 70 firefighters have spent the early hours of the morning tackling a fire at london's popular camden lock market. the english wine industry grew nearly 20% last year, making it one
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of the fastest growing sectors in the uk's food and drinks industry. so what's behind this growth? i'll be finding out later. millions of you already know how beautiful the lake district is, and now the rest of the world does too. we're live there this morning as the united nations gives it world heritage status. i'm at wimbledon, where a place in the quarter—finals is on offer for britain's best. andy murray and johanna konta are both in action today — and both looking to get into the last eight here at the all england club. weather—wise, there is the risk of a shower today. early afternoon and late afternoon into the early evening. but it is only a 30% risk. for the evening. but it is only a 30% risk. forthe uk, evening. but it is only a 30% risk. for the uk, the forecast is for sunshine and showers, but some of the showers will be heavy and thundery, particularly across the south—east and east anglia. more
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details later. good morning. first, our main story. the case of the terminally ill 11—month—old boy, charlie gard, returns to the high court today, as judges consider new evidence relating to potential treatment for his condition. an earlier ruling supported the view of his doctors that nothing can be done to improve his quality of life, and they should be allowed to switch off his life support systems. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. "he's still fighting, so we're still fighting." a phrase that chris and connie gard have used many times as they battle to keep their baby son charlie alive. this could happen to anyone. we are just two normal, everyday people. we're not strong people. what is strong is the love we have for our boy. he's kept us going through all this. if he was lying there suffering, we wouldn't be here now. it's a story with another twist today. the high court will look once more at whether or not the 11—month—old whowas born with a serious genetic condition that doctors believe mean
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he will never see, hear, move or speak, should go to america for experimental treatment. so far, the courts have agreed with the hospital that charlie's condition cannot be improved and he should instead be allowed to die. but support has grown for the family from all over the world, including from president trump and the pope. and a glimmer of hope when seven specialists led by the vatican children hospital signed a letter saying that treatment should be reconsidered following success in conditions similar to charlie's. chris and connie handed a petition in to great ormond street yesterday with over 350,000 signatures backing them. but the hospital has made clear that its position has not changed. treatment would be futile. it will be up to a judge to decide if once again that is true. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. and we will be speaking to charlie gard's mother in just under 10 minutes. theresa may is to signal a change in her style of government, calling for a cross—party consensus on some policy ideas
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in her first major speech since last month's general election. she'll admit her approach to government will have to change, and is urging her opponents to come forward and contribute. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. this is an interesting change, asking other parties to help. is it significant? it is unusual, but these are unusual circumstances. she has a very slim majority even with the help of the dup and the £1 billion she gave them. even then, they will only give her limited support. she is not in the same position david cameron was in in 2010 with a formal coalition with the liberal democrats, so she's making a victory of necessity. she's changing her leadership style, which had been criticised as being too remote. she is now say to others, contribute
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and don't criticise. but some are saying she needs to relaunch her leadership because at the moment, there is talk at westminster of whether she will last the summer or whether she will last the summer or whether the brexit secretary david davis might succeed her. one cabinet minister said that all this talk was down to some of his colleagues perhaps having too much sun and too much one prosecco. interestingly, damian green, on this programme, theresa may's deputy, also blend that talk on the bubbly.” theresa may's deputy, also blend that talk on the bubbly. i have been in westminster long enough to know thatjuly is the in westminster long enough to know that july is the time in westminster long enough to know thatjuly is the time of summer parties. so it is one prosecco? it is the prosecco problem, yes. by the time everyone goes on holiday, all thisjuly gossip gets time everyone goes on holiday, all this july gossip gets forgotten. so a p pa re ntly this july gossip gets forgotten. so apparently when we are back here in the autumn, theresa may will still be in place according to damian green. but there has been a sober reaction to her offer to work with
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other parties today. labour said she was running out of ideas and suggested that she was begging for help but even some usually conservative supporting newspapers are using similar language, a plea for help. she says she wants to be bold and has a vision for the country that goes beyond brexit. her critics say this demonstrates wea kness critics say this demonstrates weakness instead. the iraqi prime minister, haider al—abadi, has congratulated his armed forces on their victory over islamic state militants. it's nine months since government forces launched an attack to liberate mosul. much of the city has been reduced to rubble, and thousands of people have lost their lives. the bbc understands a government inquiry into the so—called gig economy will call for flexible workers to be paid above the minimum wage. the taylor review, which is due to be published tomorrow, will affect firms like deliveroo and uber. 0ur economics editor kamal ahmed is in london to tell us more. kamal, what's the background to the taylor review
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and what does it recommend? theresa may set this report up last november, before the election. it was to look at this big new economy we work in, which is companies like uberand we work in, which is companies like uber and deliveroo, the 0ndemand economy, people who deliver food and drive our taxes. another big area is zero hours contracts, people who are not guaranteed any hours of work. she asked matthew taylor, the head of the royal society of arts, to look at this issue. that was before the election. his report comes out tomorrow and it will have some pretty radical reforms recommended in there. one will be that many of these riders and drivers are not guaranteed the minimum wage at the moment because they are described as self—employed. he will say that that
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categorisation should be changed to what he describes as a dependent contractor. that will mean that person will get some rights to the minimum wage and rights to sickness benefit and holiday pay, for example. that has been the controversy, that people who work in this very flexible way, delivering food and driving taxis, seem to have to sacrifice the benefits we get as full—time employees for working flexibly. i think mr taylor will suggest that that should be changed. thank you for that. firefighters have been tackling a blaze overnight at london's popular camden lock market, which attracts 28 million visitors a year. 70 firefighters were sent to the scene after the fire broke out at around midnight. london fire brigade says the situation is now under control but the cause remains unknown. there are no reports of any casualties. wildfires are raging across the us state of california
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as a record—breaking heatwave sends temperatures above 40 degrees celsius in many areas. more than 2,000 firefighters are attempting to contain nearly 20 large blazes which have forced hundreds of people to evacuate their homes. officials are warning that the weather conditions are set to continue. let's return to our main story. injust over six hours, the case of terminally ill baby charlie gard will return once more to the high court. doctors treating the 11—month—old have applied for a fresh hearing in the light of what it calls the "claims of new evidence" from italy and the us. let's talk to charlie's mum connie yates, who's in a radio car outside great ormond street hospital. what do you hope will happen today?
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i hope thejudge what do you hope will happen today? i hope the judge will take into account the new evidence. he previously said that this is futile and that there is no chance. now that chance has been put up to 10%. we have seven doctors supporting us from all over the world. two from america, two from italy, one from england and two from spain. they are all experts in charlie's particular condition. so i hope they realise that this does have a chance. i have a lwa ys that this does have a chance. i have always known it has a chance, but now that chance is slightly higher, i hope my son gets that chance. this is of course not the first time you have been to court. you fought so ha rd have been to court. you fought so hard on behalf of charlie. what have been the toughest moments for you? it has been a living hell, to be honest. i couldn't watch him in pain or suffer. i promise you that i
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wouldn't. i think parents know when their children are the two go and when they have given up, and charlie is still fighting —— parents know when their children are ready to go. it is not just when their children are ready to go. it is notjust about busnari best, it is about having other hospitals and other doctors saying, we think it is the best thing to do to charlie. i have been fighting this since november. it is nowjuly. we are not slating great ormond street hospital. they do amazing things there, but the children in their are all on treatment and our son is not. he deserves that chance. you have had so much support. you have had people raising money and signing petitions. you have had donald trump on the pope talking
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about it. how does that impact on you? we are just so grateful for all the support we have got. it is astounding how much money we have raised to allow charlie to have this treatment. every person that has signed the petition and everyone that followed us, there are lots of vigils and protests going on. there are people outside court. there are people that are so touched by this story. someone even said to me, i have never met your son, but i love your son so much that it shows that ican your son so much that it shows that i can adopt. i can love another child that is not biologically mine. people have so much love for charlie, and they support us. the scary thing is that this could happen to anyone. we are just two normal people, and parents do know their children best sometimes. there
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was the story of ashya king, whose pa rents was the story of ashya king, whose parents wanted to take their child to proper treatment that was not available on the nhs. nhs doctors did not think it was best for him, and they ended up getting arrested, but that boy is now at school and doing well. and that treatment is coming to the nhs this year. so if there are doctors who think they can help, it is notjust about parents knowing best. we have now got seven experts agreeing with us. so we should be able to do so as long as it is not causing him harm. it is only oral medication. it willjust go in his ilk. the only known side effect is dose—related diarrhoea. that does not mean he will get that. -- it that does not mean he will get that. —— it would go in his milk. that does not mean he will get that. -- it would go in his milk. as a mum listening to you, you have taken this to the high court and the european court. at the same time, you are trying to look after your little boy. what has that been like? it isa little boy. what has that been like? it is a living hell. we are living ona it is a living hell. we are living on a knife edge. i can't put it into
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words. it is a nightmare. we have to stay strong. 0ur words. it is a nightmare. we have to stay strong. our love for charlie keeps us strong. i don't know what we would be like if we lose him. we can't think about that. we have to be very close to losing charlie recently be very close to losing charlie rece ntly o n be very close to losing charlie recently on a couple of occasions. we have been saying goodbye to him. but at the last minute, something happens. ijust but at the last minute, something happens. i just hope but at the last minute, something happens. ijust hope we get our miracle and we are allowed to take our son to another hospital that wa nt to our son to another hospital that want to help him. we know this goes to the high court today. if you were given permission for him to have this treatment, is it your hope that he would go abroad for it and have you got plans for that to happen? we have been speaking to air ambulance companies. they would pick him up at the bedside and take care of him. there would be doctors and nurses on board. it would bejust there would be doctors and nurses on board. it would be just for charlie. there is all the medical equipment
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you need. charlie just there is all the medical equipment you need. charliejust needs there is all the medical equipment you need. charlie just needs a ventilator. he doesn't have any intravenous lines are any needles. he is not even on oxygen. he'sjust on room air. and he has a feeding tube. so he is fit to fly. so they would take him bed to bed from one hospital to the other. we have two hospitals offering us treatment in italy and america. connie yates, i appreciate your time. thank you for talking to us. we're joined now by dr peter—marc fortune, head of the paediatric intensive care society, which represents those involved in caring for children in intensive care. thank you so much for being with us, i know you were listening to what connie yates was saying, i'm sure you have had to advise families in similar circumstances in the past. what do you say? sadly this is
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becoming very common, some people would say it is being convicted of our own success but medical technology has moved on to a point worth doing the medicine, giving the treatment, is probably the easiest pa rt treatment, is probably the easiest part of what we do. the ethical decisions where we start to think we may be crossing boundaries between doing good and doing harm is the most complicated, the most difficult part. it is unusualthat it most complicated, the most difficult part. it is unusual that it should go to the high court, the european court. how do you... parents obviously feel very strongly, you must be having some very difficult conversations? of course parents feel stronger. it feels to me that sometimes what is being missed here is that everybody involved feels strongly, we are all on the same side in that everybody want the best for charlie at the end of the day, and what is clearly different, everybody must understand this, is what the best thing for him is. it isa what the best thing for him is. it is a difficult process to work through and we try to do that and
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usually succeed in finding a commonplace with families at the bedside in the hospital involved, but where necessary we fortunately have a structure through the royal couege have a structure through the royal college of paediatrics and child health which allows us to follow guidelines about how we make these decisions and then we have a judiciary if it really comes to that point who take an objective external overview of all of the evidence and try to draw up the best evidence for the right thing to do. you mention those advances in medicine, part of the reason for cases like this. do you think we are almost at a stage where people are unwilling to accept there is no further treatment available because medicine has moved on so far? we are definitely at that stage, we have moved a huge distance in the last ten years and there really is an expectation of qr on every occasion, and i only wish that was true but sadly it isn't. —— an expectation of cure. it is a story that i'm sure people are talking
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about this morning and giving their opinion on what it means. thank you for coming in this morning and giving us your view. we have been out and about all morning, carol have had lovely views today, as usual. a beautiful view at wimbledon, the weather has been gorgeous throughout the first weekend into the second now, carol is there with the weather. they have let her inside the courts again. good morning, carol. good morning to you, it is beautiful here, 19 celsius at the moment, they are the electric lawn mower, the roof is open but today it may be employed because there is a risk of showers. let's start by taking a look at the forecast for wimbledon today, risk of showers early afternoon, then it fades and it comes back late afternoon early evening, but the risk is 30% which means there is a 70% chance it could dry. temperature is about 23 celsius at means there is a 70% chance it could dry. temperature is about 23 celsius at wimbledon, means there is a 70% chance it could dry. temperature is about 23 celsius at wimbledon, just means there is a 70% chance it could dry. temperature is about 23 celsius at wimbledon, just light means there is a 70% chance it could dry. temperature is about 23 celsius at wimbledon, just light breezes.
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the forecast for us all today is a mixture of sunshine and showers, some of the showers will be heavy and sundry, we have somejust some of the showers will be heavy and sundry, we have some just off the south coast of england at the moment, they will come up and will be heavy and sundry later on but just now it is dry, bright, sunny and temperatures are picking up nicely. that can be said across east anglia, the midlands, heading to northern england. but for northern england and southern scotland, more cloud and also some spots of rain. northern scotland get a cold start, the temperature picking up quickly in the sunshine and for northern ireland it is quite cloudy with drizzle and rain in the east but it will brighten. for wales and south—west england, fair bit of cloud this morning with some patchy outbreaks of brain. as we drift further east, gloucestershire to the home counties and seven counties generally, we are back into the dry, sunny and warm weather. through the course of the day the thunderstorms will come up across south—east
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england and east anglia, they will be heavy and thundery, not all of us will see a shower but you could see a lot of water coming out of the skies in a short amount of time. for the rest of the uk it is a mixture of sunshine and showers, temperatures up to the south—east around maybe 26, 20 seven. fresher than that as we push across the rest of the country. through this evening and overnight we eventually lose the risk of thunder showers, they push their way into the north sea, behind ita their way into the north sea, behind it a drier interlude but then we also have thicker cloud and rain across wales and southern parts of england, not particularly heavy at this stage, also showers across northern ireland and scotland, temperatures down the touch in the south—east compared to last night but still quite a warm night. for the rest of us, quite fresh. tomorrow we start up again on that note, looking at some showers around, but as we go through the course of the day what you find is the rain will move from the west, drifting eastward and ahead of it there will be showers in the east and sunshine and showers as we push further north. as a result it means it will not feel as oppressive as it
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has done where we had the muddy field. 0n has done where we had the muddy field. on wednesday morning a fresh start of the day in the south—east, much more comfortable for sleeping in overnight, the rain clears happily, high pressure behind and a settled day for most with a fair bit of sunshine and temperatures closer to where they should be at this stage injuly. to where they should be at this stage in july. if to where they should be at this stage injuly. if you are thinking, is batted for the high temperatures? it doesn't look like it is because towards the end of next week it looks like england and wales in particular will see a high temperatures, into the high 20s and possibly even the low 30s, so i will keep you posted on that. who needs to go on holiday?! we have got it all here, carol! absolutely! i don't like it so muddy, though. iagree, muddy, though. i agree, you just have to have a cold shower! it will be all right! we look like twins this morning, i'm happy with looking like your twin, to honest! just for clarity, it is not the same
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dressed, the light makes it look the same! the lake district, famed for its stunning scenery, has been awarded world heritage status. it puts it alongside the likes of the taj mahal, the great wall of china and the grand canyon. 0ur reporter linsey smith is in one of the lake district's popular tourist spots, bowness—on—windermere. it isa it is a little bit misty, to be honest! good morning, it is misty and reigning! but welcome to windermere, the largest natural mir in the uk, a stunning natural site whatever the weather and it is one of the reasons why the lake district was awarded world heritage site status. another is the pike, the tallest mountain in england. these sites bring millions of visitors to the lake district every year and it is expected now that they will bring many, many more. one of the people who will
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meet those visitors is tom mccann, a tourist guide. you were brought up in the area but worked as a diplomat aboard the 37 years. how important is it to be able to tell foreign visitors about world heritage site status? it is very important and we hope the world heritage site will bring a lot more of them. you have to set it in a different context for foreign visitors, they are not familiar with the history and geography in the way british visitors would be. we get a lot of british visitors as well but i think our skill is to be able to set that context to explain how we are links to the norse folk of scandinavia and links to the romantic poets and that sort of thing, coming right up to date with things like donald campbell's attempt on the world speed record, that is important to australians because he did a lot in australians because he did a lot in australia as well. that is great, thank you forjoining us. you said
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that this nowjoins a list of prestigious, iconic landmarks across the world, that visitors will now wa nt to the world, that visitors will now want to come and see on their bucket list, i'm told. 0ne want to come and see on their bucket list, i'm told. one person who will be working to keep them safe is richard, from the lake district mountain search and rescue. you will have many more visitors, many not from the uk and not familiar with the landscapes. does that pose a worry to you? i think it is great that we have put the heritage award, more people coming into the county, but there is a potential downside. more people coming in will mean more people on the mountains and that means potentially more injuries and people getting lost. viewers will know that mountain rescuers are all unpaid volunteers, there are 450 in the lake district. we are approaching 300 call—outs this year so far, 29 in the last few weeks, so what we don't want is people coming
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and not being aware, so preparedness is essential for preventing accidents. that is great, thank you. lots of celebrations here in the area because of this new state parked the message is clearly come prepared and be careful, because although the landscapes here are very beautiful, they can dangerous. it does look lovely there this morning, it doesn't matter that it is raining. no, you want to go and be out on one of the rowing boats, i want to be out for a swim, water is water. you are planning a dip for next year. yes, they have a fantastic race there. if you have just switched on, there. if you havejust switched on, we there. if you have just switched on, we are in the lake district this morning because it has been given world heritage status, the likes of the taj mahal and all of that. sally will have all of the sport for us in about ten minutes time, talking about the fact that andy murray is playing today, jo konta is playing today. they are playing at the same time. yes, at1pm.
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what are you going to do, flicking channels? double screen. 0ne channels? double screen. one on the tv, while on the... 0n the tablet or something? iamso 0n the tablet or something? i am so glad we have cleared this i i am so glad we have cleared this up! also marcus ellis and jade bridge may be in action at the same time in the men's doubles, so plenty to watch. iam to watch. i am really sorry if you are at work, we clearly will not be at work by then! and john ryan, the spaniard, won the open, what a sporting summer, i cannot wait, i love it! coming up in a moment on the bbc news channel is business live, but here on breakfast... underworld were one of the most successful electronic acts in the last 25 years but then new work is a bit different. we will be hearing how they turned interviews with people who have been homeless into a brand—new piece of music. that is coming up later, first the news, travel and weather wherever
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you are watching. it has been a pretty muggy night across the south—east and a fresh feel to the weather across northern parts. over the coming days, the weather is looking pretty mixed. we can look forward to some sunshine, but also the risk of a few showers or longer spells of rain. it will start to feel less humid and cooler as we head towards the end of the week. this morning, we have rain across western parts gradually making its way eastwards. sunshine across the south—east, with the potential for heavy, thundery showers across east anglia and the south—east, where we could see some surface water flooding. northern ireland has
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sunshine and showers. temperatures still warm across the south—east. if you are going to wimbledon, there is the risk of a few showers this afternoon. still feeling pretty warm, with sunshine between the showers. we will gradually lose the showers tonight. then all eyes to the west, where we have the next weatherfront coming in. with that, the rain intensifies into the early hours of tomorrow morning. temperatures are still muggy across the south. fresher in the north. tomorrow, a bit of a north—south split. in the north, we have a mixture of sunshine and showers. further south, the rain makes its way eastwards and loses intensity through the day. temperatures tomorrow are around the average orjust below. a better looking day by wednesday. once we lose this weather front across the south—east,
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high pressure takes charge of our weather. we can look forward to some sunshine, feeling pleasant in the sun. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and alice baxter. oil, oil in the well. will it rise or will it fall? as the industry gathers in turkey, will the second half of the year bring greater price stability? live from london, that's our top story on monday 10thjuly. oil prices have yet to show much of an increase despite the continued production cuts from 0pec. can the cartel make that change? also in the programme...
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full steam ahead for chinese shipping giant cosco. a $6 billion bid for rival 00|l would make it the world's third

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