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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 10, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines at three: the high court is, right now, beginning to hear new claims that an experimental treatment could improve the brain condition of seriously ill 11—month—old charlie gard. police now say they estimate about 255 people survived the grenfell tower fire, the first time they have given such a figure. theresa may calls for unity in a change to her government style. she will challenge rival parties to contribute and notjust criticise. it is an ambitious agenda which is there to address the big challenges that the country faces. one of those is getting the brexit negotiations right, but there are other challenges we face as a country as well. as the iraqi army fights the last pockets of is resistance in the city, iraq's prime minister stops short of declaring victory. there is still a battle ahead, there are still is fighters out there and this battle for mosul is not over. in the next hour, 70 firefighters have battled to control a massive blaze in london's camden market.
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while it took several hours to bring the blaze under control, there are no reports of any casualties. a disabled coldplay fan who crowd surfed in his wheelchair at the band's recent dublin concert has been invited on stage to perform with the band. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the parents of charlie gard have returned to the high court this afternoon where fresh medical evidence is being heard about their terminally ill son, who is being cared for at great ormond street hospital. an earlier ruling supported the view of his doctors that nothing could be done to improve his quality of life, and they should be allowed to switch off his life support systems. butjudges will now evaluate new, unpublished data
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about an experimental treatment which his parents want their 11—month old son to receive. our correspondent daniela relph reports. for charlie gard's parents, today's court hearing offers some hope, when they thought all hope had gone. the court will hear fresh submissions this afternoon about the experimental treatment available. doctors still believe this treatment won't help 11—month—old charlie. it's untested on a child as unwell as he is. but medics have again turned to the courts, and left it to the legal system to make the final decision on the future of charlie gard. yesterday, his parents chris and connie delivered a petition of 350,000 signatures to great ormond street, calling for him to be able to travel to america for the experimental treatment. everything now hangs on the decision of the court this week. we're just hoping that thejudge, you know, sees that this is worth a chance. because he said last
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time it was futile. but clearly it is not futile, it has a chance. and charlie deserves that chance. he's been lying there for months now, when he should have been given this chance. so far, everyjudge to hear this case, right up to the european court of human rights, has ruled against the wishes of charlie's family and in favour of great ormond street. his parents believe the new treatment could prolong charlie's life and should be explored. for doctors, the situation is both a medical and moral dilemma. medical science has moved a long way, and there is really, it feels, there is an expectation of cure, of sending out completely normal again. and sadly, that isn't the case. we only wish we could have all those therapies to sort all of those things. as the legal system again decides what happens next, 11 month —year—old charlie gard remains on a ventilator in hospital. doctors say he can't see or move, and any treatment would be futile.
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but his parents think differently and believe their sun is not and believe their son is not in pain, nor is he suffering. they want him to be given one last chance. daniela relph, bbc news. fergus walsh has been tweeting from the high court where the judge, the samejudge who the high court where the judge, the same judge who heard the the high court where the judge, the samejudge who heard the previous hearing, and he said there is no one alive who would not want to save charlie. his welfare is of paramount consideration, but something dramatic and new needed to make him change his mind. if we go up to the last few minutes, we are hearing that lawyers for the family have proposed a full hearing for the 25th and the 27th ofjuly. the judge says he is very troubled by that timetable, given charlie's parlous
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condition. that is our correspondent inside the court. that is our correspondent inside the court. our correspondent, keith doyle, is outside the high court now. during this exchange, the lawyers representing the family asks for a change ofjudge. yes, they did. i have just come out of court a7. there is a lot of press and there are some supporters here, so people are some supporters here, so people are walking in and around us, so we will be disturbed. yes, the lawyers for the family asked for a change of judge. thejudge said he had sat through the trial and he knew the evidence more than anyone else and he said there was no real case to change thejudge. he said there was no real case to change the judge. he also went on to say that there was no one alive who wa nted say that there was no one alive who wanted not to save charlie. his welfare was of paramount
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consideration. the legal team for the family are giving evidence now to this tribunal. we are hearing from the court that it could well be adjourned for a full hearing on the 25th or the 26th, i do not have the exact date, but later on this month. thejudge said there exact date, but later on this month. the judge said there is some evidence that they need more time to gather it. this could actually be wrapped up today and postponed until later on in the month. given the huge interest, now international, the involvement of the pope and president trump, i wonder how much international press and media attention this case is getting. when we try to get into the court around two o'clock, usually the queens building at the high court is for family affairs and appeals and that kind of thing and there is usually lots of space for media. today it
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was absolutely packed. there were huge crowds outside. everyone was pushing. you can see there are a lot of people here. there is a lot of drama here outside the court. i am not quite sure what was going on there. a lot of groups, a lot of supporters, a lot of media attention and many cameras around us here and many reporters. as i say, lots of activity outside the court. we will bring you the full details when it isa bring you the full details when it is a little less chaotic here.|j will come back to you later. we have just had a tweet from fergus walsh who is in court and tweeting from the court. thejudge has said, it is deplorable that legal aid is not available to clients. the parents' lawyers are acting pro bono, so not
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charging. thejudge lawyers are acting pro bono, so not charging. the judge commented that legal aid should be available. they have raised £i.3 legal aid should be available. they have raised £1.3 million through a crowdfunding source to send charlie abroad, but that money is not being used for the legal case. we will bring you much more from the high court a little later this afternoon. 255 people survived the grenfell tower fire — that's the first time such a figure has been given by the metropolitan police. as a result estimates of the the number of dead and missing, remains at approximately 80. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds is at new scotland yard. there are still people who simply do not believe the figures the police have put out to reporters this morning. let me give you some idea of how they have reached them. some have said between 500 and 600 people might have been living in grenfell tower. the police have investigated that closely and they spoke to the occu pa nts of that closely and they spoke to the occupants of the 106 of the 127
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flats in the building. they say they believe 350 people were living in g re nfell tower, believe 350 people were living in grenfell tower, or should have been there on the night. they say the reason they believe that is a flat is made up of one and two bedroom flats, the building is made up of one and two bedroom flat in the main. they believe 1a people were not there on the night, said that ta kes you not there on the night, said that takes you down to a lower number. then they say 255 of that 350 survived the fire. they are confident of that figure, they identified those people. they found people who do not want it to be known they were in the fire at the time and have not come forward, and they have identified ten people in that category. that leaves the figure of 81, approximately 80 people who are dead or missing as a result of the fire. the police have been very clear about what they say the figure is at this stage. but they believe the final figures will
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be in that ballpark. what they are underlining is the huge scale of the task they still face. it is huge. they finished phase one of the recovery operation and that means removing identifiable human remains from the tower. now they are on phase two and some of the details the police have asked us not to report because they are distressing for people who have lost loved ones in the fire. they say that is a very detailed process. for example, taking the rubble from buildings in the tower and saving it to make sure they have looked at every inch of they have looked at every inch of the tower. the rubble removed will be kept for future analysis, perhaps as part of the public inquiry. any remains they are taking away are being subjected to a ct scan, they are looking for evidence of internal surgery are looking for evidence of internal surgery that might provide a clue as to provide identity. they are working to international protocol
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and they have specialist identification officers doing this work. forensics officers are also looking at proving who people are. a coroner makes the eventual decision about the identities and cause of death. all that work is going on, very detailed and very sensitive, and they are keeping those who have lost friends and relatives in the fire closely involved. australian prime minister malcolm turnbull has said australia is "very keen" to secure a trade deal with the post—brexit uk "as quickly as possible". mr turnbull made the comments at a press conference at downing street, during a visit to the uk. we recognise that as britain moves to completing its exit from the european union, we stand ready to enter into a free—trade agreement with the united kingdom as soon as the uk is able to do so. once that brexit has been achieved, then we look forward to speedily concluding
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a free—trade agreement with australia. we were the first on the phone to offer our support and assistance in that regard. at the same timei assistance in that regard. at the same time i should say we are looking forward to the early conclusion of a free—trade agreement with the european union. joining me now from central london is the australian high commissioner to the uk, alexander downer. the prime minister was saying we move quickly, we do not muck around, we will move as quickly as possible. how quickly do you think that means there could be an agreement? we cannot conclude an agreement and to the uk has left the european union, but in the meantime we have set up a working group. it has had its first meeting and we will be looking to have further meetings of that working group to discuss the scope ofa working group to discuss the scope of a free—trade agreement before the point of departure. after the point of departure, provided britain does not want to put in place too many
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restrictions on trade, we really do meana restrictions on trade, we really do mean a free—trade agreement means free—trade and it should not take too long at all. we have a lot of experience of the source of agreements and it depends. some of them we have concluded very quickly. is that the approach you are using in the eu talks? you are having talks with them at the moment. yes, we are a bit ahead of where the uk is because we can begin negotiations straightaway with the eu and we are looking to begin those negotiations before the end of this year. the prime minister's ambition is to conclude those negotiations before the uk leaves the eu. we will see whether that is possible or not. we are doing our best. we have done scoping studies, so we know what the issues are and hopefully we can move forward on that negotiation pretty quickly. in terms of the prime minister's visit overall, what is
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the priority? is it security? is that what he is talking to theresa may about? there are many facets to our relationship with the uk. it is a great relationship of trust and intimacy. they have been talking about counterterrorism and even visiting the borough market were two australians were killed in the recent terrorist attacks. but they have had long discussions about counterterrorism issues like encryption, cooperation between our various agencies, our police and intelligence agencies, and they have talked about global issues, about china, the problem with north korea, as well as the international economic issues and obviously brexit and the free—trade agreement. economic issues and obviously brexit and the free—trade agreementm terms of brexit, what is the australian view about the uk out of the european union? well, a decision has been made, so it would be
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presumptuous of us to give a running commentary about it any more. we did before the referendum expressed the view that we would have preferred the uk to remain in the eu, but the decision has been made so there is nothing more to be said about it. we look to make the best of the new situation. we have a very old and trusting relationship with the uk, so we trusting relationship with the uk, so we should be able to put in place new economic arrangements through the free—trade agreement. there is a huge amount of australian investment in the uk and british investment in australia, and we would expect those investment relationships to remain strong regardless of the uk leaving the eu. you talk about the historical links between our countries and you know better than most. your post was held by your father between 1963 and 1972. if he was alive now, what would he make of this new and different relationship that we have? well, what his
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generation would make of it was that they felt very much let down by britain turning its back on commonwealth countries which had stood by britain through thick and thin through the 20th century, including people like my father who was india's trailing imperial force and ina was india's trailing imperial force and in a chinese prison of war camp for three and a half years. when britain turned its back on australia, canada and new zealand, they were not too impressed. my father was the high commissioner here when britain was negotiating entry into what became the european union and he was unhappy about it. but that is his view. we live in a different era with different circumstances and i think perhaps a lot of older australians would be pleased that it looked as though britain was turning back to some of its old friends and its brother countries. on the other hand, younger people might have a
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different view. i was born, obviously, well after the second world war! my generation and younger do not have the same experience as my father's generation had. do not have the same experience as my father's generation hadm do not have the same experience as my father's generation had. it is great you have given us your time this afternoon. "contribute, don'tjust criticise," that's the message from theresa may to opposition parties at the beginning of a week which marks her first anniversary as prime minister. the first secretary of state, damien green, said it was "a grown—up way of doing politics". labour says the prime minister has run out of ideas. our political correspondent iain watson reports. the prime minister was speaking at a news conference and this is what she said. the government has got an ambitious agenda to address the big challenges the country faces and one is getting the brexit negotiations right. there are other challenges we face as well. the public will want us face as well. the public will want us to get the broadest possible
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consensus in looking at those issues. i did this as home secretary on counterterrorism measures, working with other political parties to ensure we got that legislation right. i did to ensure we got that legislation right. i did it to ensure we got that legislation right. i did it on the modern slavery and, working with other parties to ensure that went onto the statute book. if you look at some of theissues statute book. if you look at some of the issues we will address in the future, matthew taylor's report is coming out tomorrow and i asked him to do that not long after becoming prime minister, to look at the gig economy, to look at the changing world of work in the uk, to ensure we have got those workers' protections right. who would not wa nt to protections right. who would not want to work to ensure that workers had the best possible rights and protections in the workplace as it changes? who would not want to work with us to ensure we have got the right counterterrorism powers and capabilities in place? there is another issue that has come up recently through the general election, this whole question of the abuse and harassment and bullying
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that people suffered in the general election. a number of mps have identified it happened to them. yvette cooper is clear we need to address this, and we need to work together to find a way to ensure that sort of behaviour which were targeted not just at that sort of behaviour which were targeted notjust at candidates, but at others during the election, we have to make sure the message goes out that that has no role in our democracy. joining me now from our westminster studio is the conservative mp ed vaizey. good afternoon. good afternoon. do you think she is saying this because she has run out of ideas as labour say? not at all. she was referring to the gig economy report that matthew taylor is due to publish tomorrow and it shows she still has an important agenda. what worries me about her remarks is if you say to the opposition, will you help us on everything? it looks a bit vague. prime minister ‘s past, present and
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future have always reached out to the opposition on key areas and this government has a history of appointing prominent labour people to important roles. we have got andrew adonis in charge of the entire country's infrastructure and he is deciding on things like a chess two and heathrow airport even though he is still loving hand grenades over it student tuition fees. brexit and social care seemed to be the two things where it is country first and party politics second. that is perhaps how voters would like to see it. care is another area and one of the reasons we got in trouble during the election was that what we promised in the manifesto what was very different to what andrew dillman on a cross—party basis had come up on social care. on brexit cross—party working needs to happen. i wrote a joint article this weekend with a labourmp, joint article this weekend with a labour mp, rachel reeves, calling
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for the issue of our cooperation with europe on nuclear power to be looked at very carefully. i hope the prime minister wants to work with her backbenchers as well who feel strongly on particular issues to do with brexit. there is the rub. you effectively are challenging her red line on the european court of justice because that covers the particular issue you are talking about. that means you are a rebel, that means she has to look over her shoulder every time to see if she will get stabbed in the back. this is the point. if i am going to be labelled as a rebel, someone who has been a member of the labour party for two thirds of my life, the conservative party, and i have stood for the conservatives for 32 years out of my very young a9 years, and i ama out of my very young a9 years, and i am a rebel for putting forward my own considered views on issues that affect my constituents because we
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have a lot of nuclear research in my pa rt have a lot of nuclear research in my part of the world, i think one has to be evenhanded. it is important to work with the opposition on critical issues like europe and some of the social issues you have mentioned, such as social care and employment rights. it is important to work with eve ryo ne rights. it is important to work with everyone on brexit and there is a very divisive tone that was adopted before the election and it now needs to go. there are a lot of people who feel very strongly, we respect the result of the referendum, but what we wa nt result of the referendum, but what we want is a practical brexit that does not willy—nilly affect people's jobs and livelihoods and futures because of a particular, rigid sta nce because of a particular, rigid stance it has taken. we need to look at some of these issues on a case—by—case basis and not me dismissed as rebels for racing genuine concerns. you dismissed as rebels for racing genuine concerns. you are dismissed as rebels for racing genuine concerns. you are making me feel old because i remember interviewing you when you first joint! given what you have said, has
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theresa may got a long time, let alone a short—term, future as prime minister when someone in your position says what you say and when she faces an opposition who smells blood, how damaged ishii?|j she faces an opposition who smells blood, how damaged ishii? i hope i have not come across as being disloyal. it cannot be anything else. given she says she wants one thing and then you say, i hope she ta kes thing and then you say, i hope she takes this into account because this is particular importance to me. takes this into account because this is particular importance to melj read at the weekend that we might leave parts of the custom union. i do not want to bore your viewers with brexit, but some people say we should stay in it and some people say we could stay out of it and some people say we could have bits of it, so there is a lack of clarity. that lack of clarity means we are all entitled to put our views across. i have never been disloyal to the
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prime minister. i was out in front of the tv cameras after the election saying she should stay on as our prime minister and i intend to support herfor as prime minister and i intend to support her for as long as she wants to be our prime minister. i am not pa rt to be our prime minister. i am not part of the dining clubs that meet and that may or may not speculate about our future. but i and that may or may not speculate about ourfuture. but i do hope and that may or may not speculate about our future. but i do hope that the term, you are either in or out in brexit, changes a bit and there isa in brexit, changes a bit and there is a recognition there are practical issues that need to be looked at in the spirit of cooperation that the prime minister is adopting in terms of her social agenda with the other opposition. after all these decades, it is still good to talk to you. in what's become britain's longest—running extradition case, a scottish man has lost his legal battle against being sent to the us. philip harkins, who's 38, denies shooting a man dead during a robbery in florida in 1999 and has been fighting extradition since 2003. the european court of human rights ruled that his rights would not be breached if he were jailed for life without parole in florida.
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the high court has ruled that the sale of arms to saudi arabia is legal. the ruling comes after a case was brought by a pressure group, campaign against the arms trade. they argued that the uk had broken international humanitarian law by selling weapons which had been used to kill civilians in yemen, where the saudis have conducted air strikes against houthi rebels during the civil war there. a coldplay fan who went to the band's recent concert at croke park in dublin became more involved than he expected. rob o'byrne had been crowd—surfing in his wheelchair when he was spotted by lead singer, chris martin. he was then invited on stage and drew huge cheers from the crowd of over 70,000 people when he brought out his harmonica to play along. rob himselfjoins us now on webcam from dublin. your twitter account has gone mad. explain what happened. when did you
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realise you were going to be part of this concept? it was a spur of the moment thing, it was just spontaneous. two lads picked us up and the crowds were like the red sea opening and we went straight up to the stage. chris martin, it took him about ten or 15 seconds to clock me and he was great. he told the security guards that he wanted me on the stage. they were telling me to get down. i think the security guards got more of a fright because they had to lift me up onto the stage. once you were up there, how terrifying was that with thousands of people looking at you? does looking down all you can see is the light shining. you could see the cameras with the lights on them, so
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idid not cameras with the lights on them, so i did not know where to look and i went along with things. to the point you had your harmonica with you and you had your harmonica with you and you got to use it will stop i don't carry a harmonica in my pocket! he asked one of the stagehands to give them their harmonica and they handed it up to me. instead, what has this done for pop career? it has not stopped. telephone calls, tv, i have been on tv and i will be on tv next saturday in ireland on dublin tv, so it is great. what did chris martin say to you as you left the stage? he gave me a hug and said, i am sorry you have to go before the encore.
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great to top tier, thank you very much. cheers, you, mate. i can't follow that, but then well with the weather. thank you very much. we have got a mixture this week, quite changeable look to the weather and there are some hefty showers around in places this afternoon, particularly in south eastern areas. as you can see, they are quite well scattered and if you catch one you will know about it. a lot of rain in a short space of time, but many places will stay dry. through this evening and overnight cloud will thicken up from the west and patchy rain moves in, particularly in england and wales.
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that mixture of clear spells and showers continues. tomorrow there will be another day of sunshine and showers. in the south we see outbreaks of heavy rain developing. perhaps some rain into the midlands and northern england. a cooler, fresher feel for all of us. that is the thing this week, a cooler and fresher feel to the days and knights. some rain at times, but also spells of sunshine. the headlines at 3.30. the high court is hearing new claims that experimental treatment could improve the brain condition of seriously ill, 11—month old charlie gard. judges are evaluating unpublished data about an experimental treatment which charlie's parents want their son to receive. the metropolitan police have, for the first time, released figures estimating that 255 people survived the grenfell tower fire. the number of dead and missing, remains at approximately 80. theresa may called for rival parties to join her and "contribute", as she announced a change in leadership style. mrs may said the public want the broadest possible concensus on the challenges the country faces.
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iraq's prime minister has visited mosul, after claiming the city has been liberated following three years of occupation by the so—called islamic state. thousands have died in the battle to reclaim the city from the terrorist group. we can catch up with all the latest sports news now. hello. good afternoon. straight to wimbledon, now. it is week two, which is nicknamed manic monday at the all—england club. andy murray is now in action. hugh woozencroft is live at wimbledon for us. can you tell us how brilliant it was forjohanna konta? yes, you have given the game away. she is through to the quarterfinal. she was taken
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to the quarterfinal. she was taken to all three sets. it was a terrific match. she won the first set 7—6. she lost the second. she managed to break service in the final game to ta ke break service in the final game to take the match. she will know possibly play the number two seed, so things are going to get tougher. it is those situations that you dream of when i was a little girl. but even know, to be part of these big battles on the biggest stage, it is all about what it is about to be a professional athlete. we have not had the women's quarterfinalist at wimbledon since jo durie
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had the women's quarterfinalist at wimbledon sincejo durie back in the 19805. that wimbledon sincejo durie back in the 1980s. that is very special. i am looking forward to getting the chance to play again. a lot of big names have gone out in the women's singles, no bigger than the number one player in the world, kerber. she had not been playing particularly well going into the tournament, but had recovered a bit. it could be just a yearfor the had recovered a bit. it could be just a year for the british player. i was andy murray getting on? we can go over and get some live pictures. he hasjust go over and get some live pictures. he has just taken the opening set.
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he has just taken the opening set. he was a break down in the opening set but did manage to recover and won 7—6. he has gotten nearly break of serve in the second set and is no 2-0 of serve in the second set and is no 2—0 ahead. if he can win, it would be the first time that was two british players in the quarterfinals of the singles tournament for a0 yea rs. elsewhere today, after 13 years at manchester united, wayne rooney making the move back to his childhood club is notjust an emotional homecoming. he says he wants to win trophies at everton. it was very exciting for me to get back and meet everybody. it is not just an exciting time for me, but also for everton football club.
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today is a rest day on the tour de france. chris froome still holds the yellow jersey as the race leader, but it is one of the men who crashed out on sunday's dramatic stage getting the social media headlines. geraint thomas posted this picture, of his ripped team skyjersey after sunday's fall, in which he broke a collar bone, with the words, "only worn once. prime minister theresa may is updating mps on the g20 summit in a commons statement. we can cross there now. contributions which are in our international interest, but can only work with co—operation with our partners. as seen from the horrific attacks in manchester and london, we looked at the challenges needed to meet those threats. working through a detailed action plan with president macron, we put forward a
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plan to tackle the fit. at the summit, we set the agenda once again. we called on our partners to squeeze the late lifeblood out of terrorist networks by attacking the financial systems. we secured agreement on all of our proposals. we agreed to work together to make sure there are no safe spaces for terrorist finances and look to reason we worldwide. we wanted to bring law enforcement together with better tools to be able to identify low—cost terrorist attacks, such as those we have seen in the united kingdom. just as we set the agenda at the g7 commerce so all this
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initiative help curtail the fit out the terrorists pose. we agreed we would work to improve international information sharing on the movement of individuals moving to and from the affected deviants. working together, we can defeat this terrorist threat and make sure that our real life always prevails. coming to the global economy, we have seen some encouraging of recovery. many, both here in the united and across the g20 not in the growth. we need to make sure that trade is not just growth. we need to make sure that trade is notjust free, but fearfor all. that means fear for all people in the united kingdom, which is why we focused on an industrial strategy which would help bring benefits
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intrigued to all sectors of our economy. it aims to also help the poorest countries, and in team explore options to improve the trade access. it also means strengthening the international rules which make trade fair between countries. they said there was a reform of the trade system, is space and making sure that the world trade organisation kept on top of the sony would also be able to settle any disputes. we needed to make sure that there were problems with regard to the dumping of steel on international markets. not enough has been done since. if we are to avoid unilateral action by niche in seeking to protect themselves from unfair pricing, we
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need immediate action, so we agreed that the forum that we agreed last year needs to be more effective anti—peace of the work must quicken. in order that the works gets the most attention, i have placed releva nt most attention, i have placed relevant ministers from around the world to meet. the united kingdom will play a leading role in bringing forward these reforms. as we leave the european union, we will negotiate a new comprehensive, bold and ambitious free trade agreement with the european union. yes. but we will also sees the exciting opportunities to strike deals with all trains. at the summit, a held a number of meetings with other world leaders, all of whom make clear the strong desire to forge bilateral trading agreement with the united kingdom after we left the european
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union. these included america, japan, china and india. they also invited the australian prime minister to downing street today. he also repeated the wish to agree a fee trade agreement as soon as we had left the united —— european union. on climate change, the united kingdom reaffirmed our commitment to the paris agreement. there is not a choice between the harmonisation and economic growth is overall experience shows. we reduced our own emissions by around a0% in the last 16 years. ima counterparts at the 620 16 years. ima counterparts at the g20 undismayed by america's withdrawal from that agreement. i
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spoke personally to president trump to encourage him to rejoin the paris agreement and i hope that is what he will do. on international development, we reaffirmed our policy of spending 1.7% on international development. this focuses on creating new trade avenue, job growth and treating your investment. we welcome the german plan which recognises those principles. we also looked at the challenge facing italy. we said a uk expert delegation would travel to a toy to see how we could help. while leaving the european union, as the global britain we will continue to work closely with all of our european partners. the g20 also
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agreed to use the upcoming negotiations on the compact to ensure refugees claim asylum in the first safe country they reach, distinguishing between refugees and economic migrants and getting and developing a better overall approach to migration. it also means assisting development in the home region of the migrants. we are supporting the government of tanzania in the development and assisting refugees. in today's world, innocent men women and children are being enslaved or forced into ha rd children are being enslaved or forced into hard labour, rate and beaten and passed from abuser to abuse for profit. we will not ignore
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this barbaric trade. it is horrifying in its inhumanity. that is why a put this on the agenda at my first g20 summit one year ago. we wa nt to ta ke my first g20 summit one year ago. we want to take the supply chains which feed this modern—day slavery. we wa nt to feed this modern—day slavery. we want to look at all aspects of this. we will publish the results. i called on our partners to follow our lead and i welcome germany's proposed fund to which the uk is contributing as an important part of ensuring the health and safety of workers in these global supply chains. finally, we agreed to create betterjob opportunities chains. finally, we agreed to create better job opportunities for women, removing the legal barriers of gender based violence which restrict opportunity both home and abroad.
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the united kingdom is contributing to the women's entrepreneur award been launched by the world bank. this is not just been launched by the world bank. this is notjust morally rate, it is economically essential. the united kingdom will continue to play a leading role in driving forward female empowerment across the world. we did not get everything we wanted on the summit with regard to climate change. but it is very important that we come forward in forums such as the g20 and we will try and bridge differences and come up with solutions to global problems which will shoot both the member states and our allies across the world. thank you mr speaker then i thank you the prime ministerfor
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thank you mr speaker then i thank you the prime minister for the advanced copy. i am surprised she had so much to contribute, since there was hardly a word of international policy and her ma nifesto. international policy and her manifesto. the government is a p pa re ntly manifesto. the government is apparently no asking other parties for the policy ideas. if the prime minister would like it, i am very happy to furnish her with a copy of our election manifesto. either that, or call another early election to let the people of this country decide. the government is run out of stea m decide. the government is run out of steam and in a pivotal moment in our country within the world, conflict in the gulf, brexit certainty, refugees can continuing to fully war zones, poverty and equality and the cause of climate change, just when we need strong government, we have wea kness we need strong government, we have weakness from this government. the
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united states president attempts to pull the plug on the paris climate change agreement and only a belated informal mention and brief meeting with them. no ability to sign a joint letter from the european leaders at the time he made the announcement. the uk's trade deficit is growing. it comes at a time when we are negotiating a one exit from the european union. the united kingdom backed saudi arabia watering yemen continues to kill thousands. 3000 cases of cholera. a man—made catastrophe. the government continues to sell arms to saudi arabia, one of the most repressive and brutal resumes financing terrorism and bleaching humanitarian law. it is not acting ethically. we
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other side welcome the ceasefire agreement between the united states and russia in the south west of syria. did the prime minister play any part in these talks? the attempt by the united states president to pull out of the paris climate change agreement are reckless and dangerous. it was founded to stop the world getting to the point of no return. the prime minister did not raise this any bilateral meeting but recent informally. i do not quite know what that means, but maybe the prime minister and tellers. —— can kill others. it was neglect to her people and to our planet. we need
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people to talk up our values of international cooperation. she now needs to listen. will she can then attem pts needs to listen. will she can then atte m pts to needs to listen. will she can then attempts to undermine global cooperation on climate change. will she take meaningful action against our country's role in global tax avoidance? that stars are many developing countries funding sustainable growth and also sucking investment out of our public services. will she offer european union nationals in britain the same rates as they have at the moment? what proposals though she have important discussions that you have on britain's membership? will she hoped the moral arms sales to saudi arabia as germany has done and back the call to end the bombing in yemen? we have felt the prime
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minister talking about safe spaces from terrorist finance. i have the september report on foreign funding of terrorist organisations within the united kingdom? when will this report be released ? report be released? what new regulations are being brought forward for uk companies and banks with regard to terrorist financing? keeping britain's global is one of our country's most urgent tasks, but the truth is the country needs a new approach to foreign policy and global cooperation. the conservative government simply cannot deliver. responding to the grotesque levels of inequality within countries and between them is important to the security and sustainability of our world. ina security and sustainability of our world. in a joint report published in april, the world bank, the imf and the world trade organisation recognised what the referred to as
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the long—lasting displacement and losses of workers. the negative experience of globalisation has informed the public ‘s rejection of the established political order. the prime minister talks about the dumping of steel in global markets, but why did the government feel to ta ke but why did the government feel to take action that the other european nations dead at the most acute time, when the steel industry is suffering? this government is the architect of the field posterity policies and no fate is to use the exit to turn britain into a low—wage, tax haven. a hopeless version on the potential of this country which will only serve the few, ruin industry, destroy innovation and the strip living standards. finally, the united states president said he trade deal between them and the united kingdom
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would happen quickly. could the prime minister give any timetable or the terms of this agreement with regard to environmental protection, workers' rights, product safety? these are issues which concern many people. the prime minister lost her mandate at home and know she is losing britain and its mandate abroad. can exceed see to the right honourable gentleman, on the issue of terrorist financing, it is the united kingdom which has been developing approaches within the united kingdom the figure to working within the financial sector, but is taking this internationally and as i said, we have a gleaming from other countries sitting around the g20 table. i think it was important we had the separate communique on counter terrorism which identified issues like working with the financial sector to identify
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suspicious small flaws of funding. he talks about global tax avoidance. it is the united kingdom which has led on stopping global tax avoidance. it is only on the agenda of these meetings because my right honourable predecessor david cameron put it the. it is the united kingdom which has been leading. he talks about trade deals. i am very happy to tell them we are already working with the americans on what a trade deal may look like. we have the working group with the australians and india. we are out the. he says we need someone standing up and speaking about these things. what we need to do is do these things and thatis need to do is do these things and that is exactly what we are doing. on the issue of climate change, this country has a proud record on
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climate change. we secured the first to globally legally binding agreement. we have the third best country in the world for tackling climate change. we are at the leading of putting your own legislation through with regard to emissions and we will continue to lead on this issue. he talked about this sale of arms to saudi arabia. i welcome the high courtjudgment today. the defence secretary will be making a statement about this later this afternoon. we operate on the most robust export control resumes in the world. and the government agenda. we have and bishops agenda to change this country. —— an ambitious agenda. there are many issues. you are a cheeky umbrella
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over excitable. take some sort of soothing medication. there are many issues i hope we will be able to achieve consensus throughout this house. issues such as ensuring the police and security agencies have probably need to be able to face the terrorist threat. responding to the matthew taylor report. they initiated and commissioned it. we wa nt to initiated and commissioned it. we want to make sure workers have the works —— rates protected. we talked about female empowerment at the summit. one of the issues i have been concerned about is the fact that many female candidates during the general election found themselves bullied and harassed. i
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would have thought, as has been referred to by the right honourable lady for pontefract, i would have hoped that every reader of political parties in this house would stand up and condemn such action. it is time that he did so. i congratulate the prime minister on a very productive summit, particularly on the trade front. would she confirmed ministers are working not just front. would she confirmed ministers are working notjust on trade deals with countries we do not have at the moment but will have once we leave the european union, but once we can severely european union ones to the united kingdom on ice leaving?|j severely european union ones to the united kingdom on ice leaving? i am happy to give a confirmation. we are working on three areas. one is looking ahead at the trade agreements we can have with countries we did not currently have
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with as a member of the european union. the second as ensuring that delivers trade agreements with the european union, we move forward with them. the sound is moving forward with the likes of india and australia to see what changes we can make no before we leave the european union to improve our trade relationship. the g20 summit was an eye opening look at the united kingdom wandering around on the global stage time to win friends. we will just leave that the. global stage time to win friends. we willjust leave that the. they global stage time to win friends. we will just leave that the. they are just moving the state brexit negotiations, with regard to the other trade deals that the prime minister talked about, with the likes of india and australia.
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no, we will get a quick weather update. a lot of change under way. the one thing which is most definitely going down as the temperature. much cooler and in recent days. this was the scene in northern ireland. if you are looking at the re—read our picture, some rather vicious showers in the likes of east and gallia. —— east anglia. these will continue into the rush hour, so it could be
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some tricky travelling conditions. this will be the scene about six o'clock. some sunny spills in the north of england. again, just the odd shower. a fair amount of cloud and showers in northern ireland and scotland. the showers fizzling away, but cloud thickening up from the west, bringing in some cloud and rain overnight. overnight temperatures between 11—15dc. tomorrow, this area of pressure pushing in across the southern part of the united kingdom. the likes of wales and southern england, some heavy bursts of rain during the course of the day. for northern
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ireland and scotland, a mixture of sunshine and showers. so, certainly the chance of rain at wimbledon tomorrow. that could tom hillier is the day progresses. —— get heavier. but once that clears away, wins they should be a decent day. generally speaking, temperatures between 17-22dc. i'm the speaking, temperatures between 17—22dc. i'm the end of the week, some decent weather around, but still that cooler, fresher feel to things. this is bbc news, the headlines at four: the high court is, right now, beginning to hear new claims that an experimental treatment could improve the brain condition of seriously ill 11—month—old charlie gard. police now say they estimate about 255 people survived the grenfell
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tower fire, the first time they have given such a figure. theresa may calls for unity in a change to her government style. she will challenge rival parties to contribute and notjust criticise. it is an ambitious agenda which is there to address the big challenges that the country faces. one of those is getting the brexit negotiations right, but there are other challenges we face as a country as well. as the iraqi army fights the last pockets of is resistance in the city, iraq's prime minister stops short of declaring victory. there is still a battle ahead, there are still is fighters out there and this battle for mosul is not over.
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