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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 11, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. plans to change the way we work. a review for the government calls for the end of the cash in hand economy. with suggestions for tackling low—paid jobs, zero hours contracts and the gig economy, it says the government should strive for good work for all. good morning, it's tuesday the 11th ofjuly. also this morning: for the first time since 1984 there's a british woman wimbledon quarter finals. that's right, johanna konta will play simona halep on centre court at wimbledon later on this afternoon. andy murray is also through. what a
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match last night, rafa nadal knocked out after five hours and five sets. how coffee could be more than just a pick—me—up. now two major studies say it may help us live longer. cla p clap your hands together... one, two, three. closing the age gap. we'll find out about the new nursery opening on the same site as a care home. there's a call for british businesses to do more to boost the productivity of their workers. i'll be finding out why it's so important, and why the uk lags so far behind. and carol has the weather. carol has the weather, good morning. good morning from wimbledon, much cooler today than of late, the risk of interruption today. early afternoon, a dry slot, heavy and persistent rain. we're likely to see significant rain for the first time ina significant rain for the first time in a while in southern parts of england and wales. for the rest of the country, sunshine and showers. we will be back with more details
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later in the programme. thank you so much, see you later. good morning. first, our main story. an end to cash—in—hand jobs and changing the rules on the gig economy, just two of the recommendations in a major review into the way we work. the matthew taylor review also says there are too many people who are being treated like cogs in a machine rather than human beings. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. in the last ten years the economy's generated record number of jobs in the last ten years the economy's generated record number ofjobs and the lowest unemployment rate in nearly half a century. but according to the man who led a government commission review, more jobs to the man who led a government commission review, morejobs hasn't a lwa ys commission review, morejobs hasn't always meant good jobs. in my view, there is too much work, particularly at the bottom end of the labour market, that isn't of high enough quality and there's too many people not having their rights fully respected and there are too many people treated at work like cogs in a machine rather than human beings and there are too many people who
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don't see a route from their current job to progress and earn more and do better. the review will recommend that if someone is controlled and supervised then there are classified asa supervised then there are classified as a worker or dependent contractor rather than self employed. those workers may be entitled to benefits like holiday plague and employers might have to pay national insurance at 13.8%. that's broadly in line with a landmark court ruling in a case brought by this former uber driver. uber is appealing the ruling. i don't think it helps me as a workerfor ruling. i don't think it helps me as a worker for what i've been fighting for in the tribunal and that's what's concerning because the workers haven't been involved in the process in this report. the review also makes a bigger point that self—employed work from plumbers to painters yields far less tax for the treasury, especially of the work is cash in hand. for consumers, though, the recommendations are likely to mean inexpensive services will no longer be as cheap. andy verity, bbc
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news. and we'll be talking to matthew taylor, the author of that report, in an hour. that's at 7:10am. theresa may will make her first big speech later this morning since being re—elected as prime minister injune. her party is coming under pressure with no outright majority, and yesterday conservative mp anne marie morris was suspended after a recording emerged of her using a racially—offensive term. our political correspondent chris masonjoins us now from westminster. chris, an important morning for the prime minister. but will this fresh controversy affect the tiny majority she is clinging onto? yes, good morning. the whole perspective that the prime minister hoped to focus on today is exactly what we've been hearing about, this report into working conditions and taxes and national insurance and all the rest of it as the economy changes. but instead all of the focus was already on the prime minister and herfuture focus was already on the prime minister and her future and the
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extent to which there is still so much gossip going on within conservative ranks as to how long she can last in downing street. then throw into the mix this emerging yesterday of this recording from a conservative backbencher making these gratuitously racially insensitive remarks in the context ofa insensitive remarks in the context of a debate about brexit. lots of other mps, conservative and otherwise, after that were condemning the language of anne—marie morris. the prime minister acted very quickly, to use westminster‘s terminology, in removing the whip from her, in other words she's no longer officially a conservative mp, effectively sitting as an independent. that chips away yet further at the conservative' non—existent majority, a very small majority, with the help of northern ireland's democratic unionist party. in time she may well be restored to the conservative party and even if she isn't she may still decide to vote with them, but in authority
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terms, yet another awkward day for the prime minister. you're probably counting them knowing you, chris! much, we will speak will speak to you later. a man has been charged over an acid attack on a woman and her cousin in london three weeks ago. john tomlin, who's 2a, is alleged to have thrown acid at resham khan and jameel muhktar through their car window. both suffered severe burns to the face and body. an american military aircraft has crashed in the state of mississippi, killing at least 16 people, according to us media. it crashed about 100 miles north of jackson, the state capital. the type of aircraft is one of the most extensively used in the military, but they can also be modified to transport cargo and troops. a bbc investigation has found nearly 500 children aged 12 and under have been questioned by police for sexting since 2013. the practice is when someone uses a mobile phone to send indecent pictures of themselves to others. figures obtained by bbc newcastle show there's been a steady increase in the number of people being investigated, with a boy aged five among the youngest.
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clearly the nspcc don't want children criminalised for this sort of behaviour and it's really important that police are talking to children in a restorative way, looking at the safeguarding issues for that child, making sure that the child isn't criminalised. you know i don't drink coffee? this is coffee number one. how many do you go through in the programme?” only have one otherwise i go slightly over the edge. if you are reaching for your second or even your third cup of coffee this morning, there's good news. it could help you live longer. scientists behind two new studies say they've uncovered the clearest evidence yet that the beverage could be beneficial to health. but others have urged caution, saying there's no actual proof coffee—drinking is good for you. sarah smith reports. it's the news every coffee addict
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will be delighted to hear. their daily, or better still thrice daily, brew might be a reason they could live for longer. previous research has suggested drinking coffee could reduce risk of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers. now two studies, one american and one european, have both come up with results that seem to show coffee drinkers live longer. the study of more than 500,000 people from ten european countries found men who downed more than three cups of coffee a day were 18% less likely to die from any cause than non— coffee drinkers. women drinking the same amount benefited less but still experienced an 8% reduction in mortality. what the study doesn't show is what could be causing any apparent benefits. it's thought it could be the antioxidants that coffee contains. what it isn't is caffeine.
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the results came out the same for people who drank regular or decaf. word the figures don't prove that ranking coffee will make you live longer, there is no cause and effect shown, just a study of the lifespans ofan shown, just a study of the lifespans of an awful lot of coffee drinkers. sarah smith, bbc news. the answer is i'm going to drink a lot more coffee. can we get her a second one? plans to almost double the number of welsh speakers are being announced today. the welsh government wants one million people to be using the language by 2050. there will be more teaching at an earlier age, and more welsh—speaking teachers in primary and secondary schools. my my mother is welsh, she didn't speak injewish my mother is welsh, she didn't speak in jewish until she was my mother is welsh, she didn't speak injewish until she was about 1k. my mother is welsh, she didn't speak in jewish until she was about 14. -- didn't speak english. for the first time in history, scientists got a close up look of one of the most recognisable features of jupiter, the centuries—old storm known
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as the great red spot. we'll see the first images of the storm later this week. the aim is to collect data about the composition of the clouds and find out what lies beneath them. need to find out some facts on jupiterfor need to find out some facts on jupiter for today. we've got some, it is... the storm is twice the size of earth. that is a good fact. good one to kick things off with. if you have any others then let us know. what a day at wimbledon yesterday. rafa nadal must be exhausted. that stole the headlines after a great day forjohanna konta and andy murray and five ridiculous hours, if you stayed up to watch it last night, for us it was quite late but for most people it was normal, it finished at 8:45 p.m., sally is reflecting on all the wimbledon news and johanna konta goes again, sally? she does, how did that happen? i honestly think for once i'm going to say i hope she's not watching, i hope she is fast asleep in bed and resting, another big day.
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i have to say apologies to carol kirkwood's neighbours, who heard me shouting at the tv until late last night, we stayed up and watched it an my goodness, the nadal match had us on an my goodness, the nadal match had us on the edge of our seats, it was a great game! a great day yesterday forjohanna konta, andy murray almost through, they're making history, aren't they? i hesitate to mention this too much aboutjo but the way she approaches wimbledon, her attitude, is changing because in previous years her attitude, is changing because in revious ears it's her attitude, is changing because in previous years it's been a tricky time for her and she hasn't always had the best time and she hasn't a lwa ys had the best time and she hasn't always loved it but i tell you what, something has changed, the crowd is helping her and it's been amazing to see. great to see. we've spent a lot of time with jo see. great to see. we've spent a lot of time withjo over the last see. great to see. we've spent a lot of time with jo over the last few weeks so great to see her and andy murray having a good run. but to the most important business of the day, i know you want to know who is where in ourgame said i know you want to know who is where in our game said mike bbc breakfast
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challenge? we've asked the great and good of tennis to have a go at getting as many tennis balls they can intoa getting as many tennis balls they can into a giant bbc breakfast mug in 30 seconds, let's see how the great three—time grand slam winning champion kim kleist is not on. so, kim kleist is, welcome to bbc brea kfast. so, kim kleist is, welcome to bbc breakfast. thank you. you are a former world number one, four grandslam titles under your belt, including three us opens, one australian open, but nothing co m pa res to australian open, but nothing compares to the challenge of facing today. how are you feeling? pressure, a lot of pressure, a little bit nervous. huge pressure, are you excited? are you excited. you know the rules, as many balls into our mug as you can in 30 seconds. have you got the time? i've got the time. kim, three, two, one, go. good start, i'm liking the technique, strong technique. it's
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been successful in the past, one has definitely gone in. nearly ten seconds down, kim. to call in now. i think we've got her in her stride. she's not going to change up this technique, definitely working for her, this is going to be a strong performance from the former world number one kim clijsters hear. 0k, kim, five seconds left. four, three, two, one... just about, well done, kim, five seconds left. four, three, two, one... justabout, well done, i think that was a fantastic performance. how do you feel? pretty good. shall we go and check it out? feeling confident about this?” good. shall we go and check it out? feeling confident about this? i have no idea how many. one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten. excellent result. you must be pleased with that? i'm happy with that, 0k. pleased with that? i'm happy with that, ok. i didn't beat andy but i'll give him the win. well done for having a go at our game, set, mug challenge. didn't she do brilliantly? shall we
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have a look at the leaderboard and see how kim measures up against eve ryo ne see how kim measures up against everyone else is. —— everyone else. she's done really well and i'm already taking a grandslam title off her, she has 14, not three as i mentioned a moment ago. —— won four. before we go to carol, for once we have this gorgeous weight of muffins, not just breakfast have this gorgeous weight of muffins, notjust breakfast for me, there's a reason, every day after she finishes playing, johanna konta has been baking muffins for her team —— plate of muffins. she has been relaxing with the baking. i thought i would try my own speciality member here, carol kirkwood, do you want one? notjust yet but i want to say these aren't just for one? notjust yet but i want to say these aren'tjust for me, this is a light snack for you. we must have a word with our team to see if they can do some baking! not looking too
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promising! let's get on with the weather because it could be changing? were starting to get spots in the error and it is cooler today. the forecast is just that, noticeably cooler with more cloud around, rain in the early afternoon and then a dry slot and then some heavy persistent rain in the late afternoon into the evening. highs today roundabout 20 celsius, a drop compared to what we have been used toa compared to what we have been used to a bear that in mind if you coming down today. for all of us we have some weight on the forecast either of these showers in the north or persistent rain moving eastwards through the day. if we start in the south at nine a.m. there is a lot of dry weather around but there are splashes of rain that holds through east anglia into the midlands. more coherent rain in north england around the pennines and the wash and
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the far north of england into scotland, again there are dry interludes with cloud and bright spells, showery outbreaks in scotland. northern ireland has dry in the north, cloud in the south. as the come across wales and into england and parts of the midlands, we are again looking at some rain. not particularly heavy but more persistent. drifting eastwards again there is a lot of cloud around, and a few splashes of rain here and there. that if the picture at nine o'clock. through the course of the day, for scotland and northern ireland and northern england there isa ireland and northern england there is a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers for wales in the southern half of england we have significant rain. more than we have seen significant rain. more than we have seen for a while for some of us. that moves from the west to the east through the day. that will have an adverse affect on the temperature, a high of 20 in london, fresher elsewhere. innocent china will not fill too bad further north. into the
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evening and overnight the rain d rifts eastwards evening and overnight the rain drifts eastwards getting into south—east, east anglia and by the time it gets to us some of us will have 40 millimetres of rain fall, some 01’ more, some a have 40 millimetres of rain fall, some or more, some a little left. north of that clearing skies and the temperature low enough for a touch of frost in sheltered lend. a fresh night for sleeping in the south where it has been muggy and we start tomorrow on that note with the rain and breathes it quickly clearing away from the south—east and high pressure building in. a lot of settled weather to marvel —— tomorrow. a better day for wimbledon tomorrow, a high of 23. as we head into thursday, again a lot of dry weather around. some showers, particularly in the north and west and lead in the day the weather front shows its hand across the far north—west with temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage injuly. we where they should be at this stage in july. we can where they should be at this stage injuly. we can tell you, we fill a
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d raft injuly. we can tell you, we fill a draft here this morning. it has been so draft here this morning. it has been so muggy and the temperature high for this stage of the day injuly. but today it is a different feel. and we can see you, you even had to wear a coat. my goodness.” and we can see you, you even had to wear a coat. my goodness. i am interested in the construction of the muffins. the large ones on the base, the mini ones on the top. quite impressive. do you know what? there will not be this many muffins the next time you cross to me.” there will not be this many muffins the next time you cross to me. i can already see that one has been taken, carol. just like you talking about ta ke carol. just like you talking about take yesterday. show we have a look at the papers? the front page of the guardian talking about the reason may. a lot of the papers have pictures of joanna quant the front page and this is an interesting one at the bottom
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of the guardian as well. this is an expert in ecology and wildlife, a biological annihilation of wildlife in recent decades means a sixth mass extinction in the cosmic history is well under way. this has been published in a national academy of sciences. it says it is the tone i am struck by. they say that actually, because of what is happening, the biological annihilation is right to call it that because it is an assault on the foundation of humid civilisation. front page of the mail this morning has a story about charlie guard, the judge saying he will not be swayed by tweets. a picture thereof pippa middleton on the front page of the daily mail. the daily mirror, again, talking about charlie on the front page and a story about anne—marie morris using a quite offensive phrase at a meeting and she has had
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the whip removed by the tory party and theresa may has spoken out about it as well. i love this picture of johanna konta. relief as she throws her racquet enjoyed. this is my favourite story of the day, i am a coffee drinker, drinking coffee for a long life. look at this. the front page of the express. your favourite story. and a picture of andy murray and johanna konta who had a brilliant day to the british yesterday. johanna konta is on centre court later and andy murray tomorrow. the big story you have been discussing already today is the review about the way that we were. that is in all of the business pages today. the telegraph here, talking about a jobs supremo defending zero hour deals. basically the labour party were hoping that zero hour we re party were hoping that zero hour were contacts would be scrapped. he
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has not gone that far, saying that they can be useful at times but people need more rights and more pay if they are working in that more vulnerable kind of area. another quick story is well about craft beer. here saying that the big distilleries perhaps should not be calling there be a craft beer and it should only be small companies and small distilleries, perhaps companies like guinness should not be classified as a craft beer. another quick one. look at these world war two gadgets going on sale at auction today. they should reach about £5,000. this is a razor, little spy gadgets, a razor that is an assassination punch that the. this is a pipe with a dagger in it. a matchbox with a secret compass. quite a lot of daggers. a pen with a
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dagger in it as well. essentially daggers concealed in normal household items. radio in a biscuit tin as well. that is quite clever. they will go on auction today, expected to reach £5,000. they might be places that you assume are generations apart — but for the first time in the uk, a nursery and a care home are closing the age gap. it's an idea which has already been adopted by other countries, such as the united states and japan, but from september, britain willjoin them by opening a joint site for youngsters and elderly residents. brea kfast‘s graham satchell went to find out more. a large care home in south london and the sound of the nursery rhyme. young and old singing, playing, interacting together. when it
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officially opens in september, this will be the first nursery in the country to be placed on the grounds ofa country to be placed on the grounds of a care home. children spend more of a care home. children spend more of their time away from other age groups and the elderly spend time away from everybody. there is something quite natural about bringing them together.l something quite natural about bringing them together. a sports day to celebrate the opening and 87—year—old faye is showing off her 999 87—year—old faye is showing off her egg and spoon skills. children from a nearby nursery have been coming here on a weekly trip since january and faye has loved it. some of them sing and dance and we play games. it is fabulous. so most of the residents, they have a great time. they come alive. bringing young and old together like this already happens in america, canada and japan. experts say the advantages
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are clear, particularly for the elderly in tackling isolation and loneliness. there are challenges as well. finding the right places and making sure both children and adults are safe. the benefits really do our way the disadvantages. this is a model for other care home providers and nurseries across the uk. it certainly works in the rest of the world, there is no reason why would could not see many more of these in the uk. back inside, 90 walter is classes out of play—doh and passing on years of wisdom. careful play arranged by grown—ups is teaching them many things they don't know. how to handle things and handle situations. as an old person, i am coming to the end of my life, it is a greatjoy to see new human being
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is growing and growing slowly into people, into humanity, into maturity. it's a wonderful thing. i'm very privileged. irene and helen... is this a model for the future? there are certainly hope here that will benefit young and old. i think it is a wonderful idea. quite clever, isn't it? it seems to be working well. i was going to say its four minutes after half past six... sorry, no, it is 626, the conventional way of saying things. still to come this morning, this year marks a century since the first mass—produced tractor in the uk. breakfast‘s tim muffett's taking a look at the machine's history in yorkshire for us. good morning, tim. good morning to you. the great yorkshire show first
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staged in 1838 to celebrate agricultural excellence. ben, a tractor was something science—fiction —based. it was way off in the future. this year they are celebrating 100 years of mass—produced tractors. how have they changed the agricultural industry? we will find out a little later. first of all, news and weather from where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. bogus self—employment and exploitative conditions have been exposed at a top—end cosmetics chain by a bbc london undercover investigation. a bbc researcher worked at soap and co, which has outlets at westfield and other central london locations. workers were told to sign up as self—employed but made to be at work for around sixty hours per week and forbidden from taking more than one day off. this is false self—employment. this
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is much more an employment relationship banned any i have seen but, unfortunately, quite an exploitative employment relationship. soap and co said they were extremely concerned about the allegations and are reviewing the employment status of those who work with them. you can see more on this story on bbc london news at 6:30 this evening. brent council has announced a £10 million investment in fire safety improvements for high—rise blocks across the borough. councillors agreed the new measures in a council meeting last night. the money will pay for the instillation of new sprinklers, —— the installation of new sprinklers, smoke detectors and fire alarms. none of the council's 37 towers are covered in dangerous cladding but councillors said they wanted to go "above and beyond". let's have a look at the travel situation now. south—eastern, have no trains into
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cannon street. reports of a fire on the tracks. va 13 is busy in town as you can see from this picture, traffic is still moving. and caledonian road is closed near pentonville prison. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. it will become progressively wetter as we had through today. we begin on a fairly cloudy night to make note with our brea ks cloudy night to make note with our breaks of rain but they should be few and far between through the morning and they should even be brea ks to morning and they should even be breaks to give us the odd glimpse of brightness. but that cloud will be building as we had through the day and by this afternoon we will see the rain become more persistent. temperatures reaching 20, 20 two degrees. it is likely to affect play at wimbledon today that the bulk of the rain will be coming through the night. it could be heavy locally as well. temperatures reaching 14 celsius. it is still with us
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tomorrow morning but only very first thing as it clears early on and the cloud melts away through the morning, leaving us with a largely dry and bright day. which is reaching 22 celsius, a great deal of sunshine but feeling fresh and co mforta ble sunshine but feeling fresh and comfortable as well. on thursday there will be a few showers around, a little brightness as well. friday looks dry at still be odd outbreak of rain. as we head towards the weekend, fairly breezy and showers never too far away but they should bea never too far away but they should be a lot of dry weather on offer. 0ver be a lot of dry weather on offer. over the next few days we see these temperatures around the 22, 20 three degrees mark. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. it's tuesday 11th july. coming up on breakfast today: it's been in use for hundreds of years, but there are concerns about the future of
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the welsh language. we'll be finding out about plans to double the number of speakers by 2050. in the early hours of this morning, scientists had the very first close up look atjupiter‘s 10,000 mile wide storm. we'll speak to one of the team behind the mission. and, she's the former world number one, but kim clijsters really felt the pressure when she took on our challenge game, set, mug. see how she did a little later. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. an end to cash—in—hand jobs and changing the rules on the minimum wage, just two of the recommendations in a major review into the way we work. the study, led by a former adviser to tony blair, matthew taylor, recommends that people working in what's known as the gig economy, where workers get paid per task, should receive new legal protections and their employers should make national insurance contributions. in my view, there's too much work, particularly at the bottom end
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of the labour market, that isn't of a high enough quality and there's too many people not having their rights fully respected and there are too many people treated at work like cogs in a machine rather than being human beings and there are too many people who don't see a route from their currentjob to progress and earn more and to do better. i think we can improve all of that if we put our minds to it. and we'll be talking to matthew taylor, the author of that report, in an hour. that's at 7:10am. theresa may will make her first big speech later this morning since being re—elected as prime minister injune. her party is coming under pressure with no outright majority, and just yesterday conservative mp anne marie morris was suspended, after a recording emerged of her using a racially—offensive term, during a public discussion about brexit. an american military aircraft has crashed in the state of mississippi, killing at least 16 people, according to us media. it crashed about 100 miles north of jackson, the state capital. the type of aircraft is one of the most extensively used
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in the military, but they can also be modified to transport cargo and troops. a man has been charged over an acid attack on a woman and her cousin in london three weeks ago. john tomlin, who's 24, is alleged to have thrown acid at resham khan and jameel muhktar through their car window. both suffered severe burns to the face and body. president trump's eldest son is facing further allegations about a meeting he held with a russian lawyer during last year's us election. the new york times says donald trump jr was informed in advance by e—mail that the information offered by the woman was part of a russian government effort to help his father's campaign. the senate intelligence committee wants to speak to him about the meeting, which in a tweet he's described as going nowhere. if you are reaching for your second or even your third cup of coffee this morning, there's good news.
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it could help you live longer. scientists behind two new studies say they've uncovered the clearest evidence yet that the beverage could be beneficial to health. but others are saying there's no actual proof coffee—drinking is good for you. there are two studies of lots of different european countries.” there are two studies of lots of different european countries. i have genuinely never ever had a sip of coffee. how can you have done that? it is the with, the pong. i'm sorry, i'm not going to change my ways because you don't like the smell —— whiff. would you like some puppy news? we all know that puppies can be naughty and chew or eat things they shouldn't, but this puppy definitely bit off more than it could chew. this is dougie. he managed to swallow three dog leads while playing with his brother and sister.
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unsurprisingly they didn't go down very well and he was taken to the vets. although he had to have emergency surgery, he's made a full recovery. he is also... absolutely gorgeous, nothing to do with the news story but he is gorgeous. thank you for that! he is a locker, isn't he? coffee and dougie news, what else do you need? —— lukka. johanna konta is back on court today, what a day at wimbledon, rafa nadal to talk about but we need to get to the bottom of the fact that sal and carol are living together during wimbledon. are they, though? which is magnificent news in chez kirkwood. it's a challenge, it is raucous, the
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parties, the wild evenings, no, nothing like that! we had a story yesterday about wayne rooney and his pyjamas, we we re yesterday about wayne rooney and his pyjamas, we were attempted to take a picture of us in matching pyjamas watching the tennis, we didn't do it, we saved the world from that fate! week two at wimbledon, dramatic day yesterday. they are just taking the covers down on court 14 at the moment, just think to get ready for the day ahead, a little bit of rain in the air as carol has mentioned, and here's something, i wonder if you know this, there's a la st wonder if you know this, there's a last eight clubs here, did you know this? i thought it was one of those things we were talking about, johanna konta and andy murray going for it, round the corner there is a private suite you can only get into and watch the tennis if you have made it to the last eight in the
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competition so we are looking good, first british man and woman into the quarter—finals in 44 years. a whopping day yesterday. the last woman to make it to the quarter—finals was virginia wade in 1977, not all of us will remember that, ido, 1977, not all of us will remember that, i do, the year of the queen's silverjubilee, konta that, i do, the year of the queen's silver jubilee, konta takes that, i do, the year of the queen's silverjubilee, konta takes on simona halep this afternoon after a really tough 3—set win yesterday over carolyn garcia. it's those positions, those situations that i dream of or dreamed of when i was a little girl and even now to be part of those battles on big stages, so i think that's really what it's about to be a professional athlete. andy murray reached the quarter—finals for the 10th year in a row thanks to a relatively straight—forward win over benoit paire. he'll take on sam querry tomorrow. after all the injury worries before the tournament started, he feels he's back on track. two weeks ago i was resting, so i
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was also a little bit concerned when you're having issuesjust a was also a little bit concerned when you're having issues just a few days before a big event, it's frustrating but i managed it well and i think i played some good stuff. today, like isaid, was played some good stuff. today, like i said, was the best i've played so far in the tournament and, yeah, i'm doing well, so hopefully i keep it up. roger federer is through but rafael nadal is out. gilles muller beat the two—time champion in an epic five—setter. it was 15—13 in the decider and the pair were on court for nearly five hours, meaning novak djokovic's match had to be held over until today. there was some criticism of the scheduling of matches yesterday, world number one angelique kerber said she was really surprised to find herself on court two after she lost to garbine mugaruza. only two of the eight women's singles matches were on the show courts. we will be talking about that later
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in the programme. away from wimbledon, romelu lukaku has completed his £75 million move from everton to manchester united. he trained with his new team—mates for the first time yesterday on united's pre—season tour of the usa. we told you yesterday about wayne rooney wearing his everton pyjamas in secret for the last 13 years, now he's got his hands on the offical kit after returning from manchester united. he says he wants to win trophies at his boyhood club and force his way back into the national team, so pyjamas might not be appropriate. i'm not going into retirement, i'm ready to play. i want to win and be successful at this football club and that's what i'll do. i feel good. it will build up in the next few weeks and i'm excited. after a rest day, the tour de france resumes today with a stage to favour the sprinters. chris froome holds the overall lead but he'll have to make do without team—mate geraint thomas who crashed out on sunday with a broken collarbone.
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even without geraint yesterday, he crashed early on, the team is extremely capable. as the rest of the teammates are. everyone has upped their game to defend the yellow easy. and finally... careful when you're warming up to play in court 1. as rafa nadal found out to his cost because the door frames aren't that tall! he and gilles muller saw the funny side, and the spaniard seemed to have no after effects during his epic last 16 match. mind the gap rafa! it's awkward because we know that he knows we are watching, he had to style it out somewhat!” knows we are watching, he had to style it out somewhat! i haven't seen
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style it out somewhat! i haven't seen that before, sal, that would have properly hurt! terrible! you have properly hurt! terrible! you have to grin and get on with it. really bad. exactly. before we go, i've been talking about the muffins, johanna konta has been baking muffins, the favourite ones she has made our white chocolate and raspberry, i will try to get hold of some of them. sounds great, see you later! a bbc investigation‘s found nearly 500 children under the age of 12 have been investigated by police for sexting in england and wales since 2013. sexting is when someone uses a mobile phone to send indecent pictures of themselves to others. figures from a bbc newcastle freedom of information request show there's been a steady rise in cases. david smellie is the head of child protection at law firm farrer and co and joins us. these figures are stark, they are shocking and probably they are the tip of the iceberg in some ways,
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what do you make of them? i'm not surprised the figures are increasing, but it's important to remember it's not an epidemic that is happening. in an nspcc survey of last year, they estimate approximately 13% of children have taken images of themselves topless and about 3% have taken images fully naked. that's the scale of the problem but i'm not surprised by the figures you quote. you're saying some of those are sending those images to people they don't know? the survey says about 55% of children who have taken those images have shared them with another person. about 30% have actually shared them with someone they don't know. again, which is pretty shocking. very serious. what crime are they committing when they do that? the law of the land was created before anyone thought about the idea of sharing naked images on a phone. the laws which are broken
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are the taking of an indecent photograph of a child and that law is broken even if the image you're taking is one of yourself. the possession of that image and the sharing and distribution of that image is breaking the law. the police are changing the way they are dealing with it, what is the change and is it helpful? the home office and is it helpful? the home office and police have done an excellent job. chief constable simon bailey and his team have been in charge of and his team have been in charge of a change in public policy on this. what they're seeking to do is separate out low—risk cases, for example where the activity is consensual and age—appropriate, and seek not to criminalise those cases, and higher risk cases, where there are adults involved and coercion and blackmail, and there's age inappropriate activity, those are
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the ones they will seek to take forward. it would be handy to get advice, no doubt many parents watching this morning, what advice would you give? the advice i would give is to talk, tried to tour de yorkshire aldonin about this. —— try to talk to your children. it's futile from preventing technology happening and creeping up. the other day i spoke to my children in the carandi day i spoke to my children in the car and i asked them, how common is sexting? you car and i asked them, how common is sexting ? you know car and i asked them, how common is sexting? you know when you've got your children trapped in the car, that's the perfect time for that discussion so i would say to parents to talk to your children and get it out into a family discussion rather than keeping it under wraps. the important thing about the police change is otherwise you would see possibly hundreds of children with criminal records from this? that's why i think the police changes are so why i think the police changes are so good, because the changes do two things. first they encourage schools
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and other organisations not to report cases that are low risk, and secondly when they are reported to the police, the police have to deal with them as a crime but now they have something called 0utcome 21 which enables no further outcome and no criminal record. they take it seriously but don't pursue it. thanks more. —— tank through much. —— thanks very much. and we've put some advice on our twitter and facebook pages on how to talk to your child about ‘sexting'. carol's at wimbledon with a look at this morning's weather. it is certainly noticeably chilly here. we can also see interruption to play but behind me you can see the court still covered, outside courts, we are likely to have some covers going on for much of today. there will be a dry interlude in the afternoon. if we look at the forecast for wimbledon today, what
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we have is a cloudy start. a little spot of drizzle this morning and as we head into the early part of the afternoon we will see rain. a dry interlude again and later some heavy and persistent rain coming our way into the evening as well. more than some parts of seen for a while. that is the forecast for the southern parts, rain drifts eastward for scotland. northern england has sunshine and showers. if you start across southern england this morning at nine o'clock, there are bright spells of sunshine and showers. that holds true to east anglia into the midlands and then as we drift to northern england that there is a coherent band of rain. persistent though not heavy. in scotland, heavy showers and cloudy. northern ireland has sunshine in the north, cloud south with not far away. in wales, heavy outbursts of rain around cardiff and we also have rain coming
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in across south—west england. the first band of rain this morning is going to be moving from the west to the east. currently across counties, for example gloucestershire to the home counties, it is largely dry. the rain is coming through the course of the morning, getting over into eastern areas. and we have a lull and already worrying coming in across wales. that will also drift eastwards and that is heavy and persistent rain. feeling cool in that rain band. as we head into the evening the rain will continue to push over towards east anglia, the south—east, kent, and by the end of the day some of us will of had about 40 millimetres of rainfall, some a little more, some a little less. 0vernight little more, some a little less. overnight in the northern half of the country there are clear skies with temperatures falling to single figures. enough here and there have in sheltered glenn's great touch of frost. a fresh night whereas it has been muggy lately. far more
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co mforta ble. been muggy lately. far more comfortable. tomorrow morning we begin with rain in the south—east that these rapidly and in high—pressure will settle in. fine with a lot of sunshine. temperatures up with a lot of sunshine. temperatures up are not compare to what we are looking at. a high of 23. as we head into thursday, again, a lot of dry weather with a lot of sunshine. some showers in the north and west and later on in the day a new weather front shows its hand across north—west scotland. that will be introducing some rain. temperature white come again, roughly where we should be at this stage injuly. before i go, pollen levels today. they have been high but with all the rain around they will not be quite so rain around they will not be quite so high. they will be moderate. that at least as good news for some of us. at least as good news for some of us. i love how you always send an good news. thank you. how interesting to see the workings of wimbledon behind her. there's a call from business leaders today for companies to do more to make uk workers more productive.
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the group says it could add as much as £130 billion to the economy. radio 5 live wake up to money's colletta smith is with us on business with more. good morning. yes, that's right — the uk's low productivity is a puzzle that politicians and businesses are very keen to solve — but first let's have a look first at how we got to this point. productivity is the measure of how much one person can contribute to our economy. so it's a glance at how hard we're working — but also how smart — and how much we're investing in new technology and ideas. since the financial crisis the uk has been falling behind a lot of our neighbours in this—it takes a german worker just four days to produce what we make in five. finding out why is tricky. the uk has very high employment but it's the quality of those jobs that is worrying politicians and businesses. firms not having the money to invest in new machinery is another factor. it's important because raising productivity should mean getting
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better pay and living standards. but since the financial crisis — productivity hasn't really improved and the latest figures for the first three months of this year show a drop again. two years ago, the government asked a group of businesses to look at why the uk lags behind and how businesses can be more productive. they were led by sir charlie mayfield, the chairman of thejohn lewis partnership and he isjoining us now. lewis partnership and he isjoining us now. good morning. first of all, businesses, chancellors have all been scratching their heads trying to solve this. are you any closer to finding an answer? what we want to do is move this from being a puzzle to an opportunity. it is an important one, like you say, because although productivity sounds like a word that economists use, it really
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matters to things like wages and competitiveness and growth and ultimately to employment. so what we have identified is that there are... if we can get many businesses to do a little bit better, we can make a huge difference to the economy and affect all those things. are you putting emphasis then on the business to do the work rather than, necessarily, calling on the government to improve infrastructure 01’ government to improve infrastructure or to spend any more muggy on technology? the government has an important role to play. it needs to put in place those conditions. that most of the problem has to be solved by business. it happens in companies at firm level. that is where action needs to be taken. what we have discovered is that a lot of the opportunity can be grasped not by companies having to go from, sort of, making widgets to winches or something completely new, theyjust have to do a bit more of what companies are already doing in their sector, and the companies of the same size. could make an enormous
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difference to this is about taking thousands of companies are moving up by an inch, rather than by the match ito by an inch, rather than by the match i to take by an inch, rather than by the match ito take a by an inch, rather than by the match i to take a few by an inch, rather than by the match ito take a few up by a mile. how do you do that? have you encourage to be more productive? first of all, business is not good at being told what to do. we want to engage them and today we launch a movement. a movement that we want to engage thousands of businesses across the uk. we will have a small organisation at the centre of this, but of will work with thousands of different employers across the uk. basically we will provide three things. we have modern tools which companies to figure out how good they are at some of those management practices. things like colour management, leadership, future planning, some good but basic stuff that people can do things about. we will provide them with data and analytics to help the measure productivity and figure out what best practice looks like. and then we will also help them to get in touch with other people so that they can work out how they can make
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improvements and encourage communities of businesses across the country to come together and share ideas and figure out how they can make what we hope will be a big improvement. it is interesting that you were saying it is about management and leadership style. at a time when we have seen that workers pay stick at a level and, yet, the bosses and managers at ward level have seen their pay rise. the thing about productivity is that everybody wants to be paid more, and thatis everybody wants to be paid more, and that is a good thing, that wages are rising. the wages can only rise in jobs can only stay at their level of you can dry productivity at the same time. so, you know, the two go very much hand in hand. i also think it is important to think about the workplace and the role of work in a wider context. people go to work for lots of reason that much of it is a sense of the film and. i think matthew taylor's report today would discuss the importance of good work. a lot of what we do today in launching this movement is very much
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is in line with a. -- that. thank you very much, we will see later. it's100 years since the first mass—produced tractors came to the uk. they were sent to help during the first world war, when many farmers were on the frontline. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at the great yorkshire show where the centenary is being marked. i would be disappointed, tim, iwould be disappointed, tim, if i would be disappointed, tim, if you we re i would be disappointed, tim, if you were not riding a tractor. i am so selling a boyhood dream. the great yorkshire show, first held in 1838 but this year's showers celebrating 100 years, as you say, of the mass—produced tractor. i'm currently writing a ford, built in the 1970s. these machines, they transformed agriculture. they transformed the
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way a farming community worked. i. it now and put the clutch on and pull that. safety checks, complete. i will pull that. safety checks, complete. iwilljump off pull that. safety checks, complete. i willjump off and walk down here and we will go and find a man who knows a thing or two about the vintage tractors. this collection is something and it ranges right through the past 100 years. brines stood proudly by... what is this? this is a 1917 ford ministry of munitions tractor that we brought overin munitions tractor that we brought over in the first world war to help british agriculture, because all of the men and horses had gone off to the men and horses had gone off to the first world war. henry ford, we know of him as the person who made a model t car and know of him as the person who made a modecharandi know of him as the person who made a model t car and i did know of him as the person who made a modelt carand i did not know of him as the person who made a model t car and i did not know he was a big deal in the world of tractors. this was this first tractor. who was raised on a farm and wanted to get rid of the drudgery associated with the horse. he put this mind to building a
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tractor and this is what happened. and it transformed the world of agriculture, didn't it? yes, it did. he got rid of veal... horses were still raw used until the 1940s and 19505 still raw used until the 1940s and 1950s but mechanisation had come to could not be stopped. thank you. we will talk more later. as we walk along here we can see a chronological display, if you like, of the way that tractors have changed over the years. of course, when it comes to modern day farming, they are an integral part of the way a farm is run. and you are a farmer, what impact they have on the farm? it is massive. they are used every day and the amount of work that they actually do, the amount of manpower they have taken out over the years is phenomenal, really. 0ne tractor now can do the work of what 50 people used to do. and as far as the future goes, what changes are coming? everything is getting
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automated now with autos via so you are able to put your wheels within two centimetres of where they were before and it is all about efficiency, really. we will talk later. i am in tractor heaven here. we will talk more to those who run them and whose careers, really, are dependent upon tractors and their success. thank you very much. lovely to see them this morning. up close and personal with a tractor. that was a full frontal at the end that. time now for news, travel and weather whether the watching —— wherever you are watching. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. bogus self—employment and exploitative conditions have been exposed at a top—end cosmetics chain by a bbc london undercover investigation. a bbc researcher worked at soap and co, which has outlets at westfield and other central london locations. workers were told to sign up as self—employed but made to be at work for around sixty hours per week and forbidden from taking more than one day off.
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this is false self—employment. this is much more an employment relationship than any i have seen but, unfortunately, quite an exploitative employment relationship. soap and co said they were extremely concerned about the allegations and are reviewing the employment status of those who work with them. you can see more on this story on bbc london news at 6:30 this evening. brent council has announced a £10 million investment in fire safety improvements for high—rise blocks across the borough. councillors agreed the new measures in a council meeting last night. the money will pay for the installation of new sprinklers, smoke detectors and fire alarms. none of the council's 37 towers are covered in dangerous cladding but councillors said they wanted to go "above and beyond". let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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0n the tube the metropolitan line has severe delays and the victoria line also severe. southeastern, have no trains into cannon street. reports of a fire on the tracks between new cross and cannon street. the a13 is busy into town through dagenham. and caledonian road is closed near pentonville prison for repairs to a burst water main. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. it will become progressively wetter as we head through today. we begin on a fairly cloudy note with outbreaks of rain but they should be few and far between through the morning and there should even be breaks to give us the odd glimpse of brightness. but that cloud will be building as we head through the day and by this afternoon we will see the rain become more persistent. temperatures reaching 20, 22 degrees. it is unlikely to affect play at wimbledon today but the bulk of the rain will be
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coming through the night. it could be heavy locally as well. temperatures reaching 14 celsius. it is still with us tomorrow morning but only very first thing as it clears early on and the cloud melts away through the morning, leaving us with a largely dry and bright day. temperatures reaching 22 celsius, a great deal of sunshine but feeling fresher and more comfortable as well. on thursday there will be a few showers around, a little brightness as well. friday looks dry but still be odd outbreak of rain. as we head towards the weekend, fairly breezy and showers never too far away but they should be a lot of dry weather on offer. over the next few days we see these temperatures around the 22, 23 degrees mark. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. plans to change the way we work.
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a review for the government calls for the end of the cash in hand economy. with suggestions for tackling low—paid jobs, zero hours contracts and the gig economy, it says the government should strive for good work for all. and from paying more wages to providing things like sick pay, i'll be finding out what it could mean for businesses and getting some of their reaction to the proposals. good morning, it's tuesday the 11th ofjuly. also this morning: for the first time since 1984 there's a british woman wimbledon quarter finals. yes, that woman isjohanna konta. she's due to play simona halep on centre court later this afternoon.
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monza is also through. that means is the first time in 44 years there's been a british man and woman in the quarter—finals. —— andy murray. what a night last night for rafa nadal, he went out of wimbledon losing in five sets in just under five hours. dealing with dementia, how new technology could help people cope with the condition at home. from farmers on the frontline to modern day machinery, we'll find out about 100 years of mass produced tractors. and carol has the weather. good morning from wimbledon. much cooler today than of late, the risk of interruption today. heavy rain cracking from the west to the east causing interruptions. a lot of surface water and spray on the roads. in northern england, northern ireland and scotland there will be sunshine and showers. more with that and sal later in the
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programme. thank you so much, see you later. good morning. first, our main story. an end to cash—in—hand jobs and changing the rules on the gig economy, just two of the recommendations in a major review into the way we work. the matthew taylor review also says there are too many people who are being treated like cogs in a machine rather than human beings. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity reports. in the last ten years, the economy's generated record numbers ofjobs and the lowest unemployment rate in nearly half a century. but according to the man who led a government—commissioned review, more jobs hasn't always meant good jobs. in my view, there's too much work, particularly at the bottom end of the labour market, that isn't of a high enough quality and there's too many people not having their rights fully respected and there are too many people treated at work like cogs in a machine rather than being human beings and there are too many people who don't see a route from their currentjob to progress and earn more and to do better. the review will recommend that
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if someone is controlled and supervised then they're classified as a worker, or dependent contractor, rather than self—employed. those workers may be entitled to benefits like holiday pay and employers may have to pay national insurance at 13.8%. that's broadly in line with a landmark court ruling in a case brought by this former uber driver yaseen aslam. uber is appealing the ruling. i don't think it helps me as a worker for what i've been fighting for in the tribunal, and that's what's concerning because the workers haven't been involved in the process in this report. the review also makes a bigger point that self—employed work from plumbers to painters yields far less tax for the treasury, especially if the work is cash in hand. for consumers, though, the recommendations are likely to mean inexpensive services will no longer be as cheap. andy verity, bbc news. and we'll be talking to matthew taylor, the author of that report, in a few minutes.
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that's at 7:10am. theresa may will make her first big speech later this morning since being re—elected as prime minister injune. her party is coming under pressure with no outright majority, and yesterday conservative mp anne marie morris was suspended after a recording emerged of her using a racially—offensive term. 0ur political correspondent chris masonjoins us now from westminster. how does this latest controversy affect this tiny majority? good morning, two things matter in politics, majority and authority. what happened yesterday with the conservative mp, it arguably chips away at both elements of those things for the conservatives. firstly technically because, to use the westminster jargon, firstly technically because, to use the westminsterjargon, she has had the westminsterjargon, she has had the whip removed, that means she's no longer a conservative mp. she is an mp, still in the house of
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commons, but she isn't a conservative mp any more but in all likelihood she is still pretty likely to vote with the conservatives in crucial votes. that may not make any difference in terms of the numbers and the majority. in terms of authority, the prime minister wanted to be seen to react very quickly to this yesterday in suspending her membership of the parliamentary party, but nonetheless, it is very much yet again another headline that theresa may would have rather not seem. the speech she is giving later this morning, the context of which is what you'd been talking about, this business of working practices, in reality all of the questions are around theresa may and how long she can last as prime minister. thursday marks her first anniversary in 10 downing street, plenty are wondering if she will be around long enough to see a second. thanks very much, chris. britain will have men's and women's quarter—finalists at wimbledon for the first time since 1973 after wins forjohanna konta and andy murray.
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sixth seed konta beat france's caroline garcia on court1 yesterday afternoon, she's the first british woman to reach the last eight since 1984. it's those positions, those situations that i dream of, or dreamed of, when i was a little girl and even now to be part of those battles on big stages, so i think that's really what it's about to be a professional athlete. back at wimbledon later with sally and carol ann johanna konta back at wimbledon later with sally and carol annjohanna konta goes again today to try to reach the last four of wimbledon, takes on simona halep to get into the last four. and clearly enjoying it —— carol and johanna konta. a man has been charged over an acid attack on a woman and her cousin in london three weeks ago. john tomlin, who's 24, is alleged to have thrown acid at resham khan and jameel muhktar through their car window. both suffered severe burns to the face and body. an american military aircraft has
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crashed in the state of mississippi, killing at least 16 people, according to us media. it crashed about 100 miles north of jackson, the state capital. the type of aircraft is one of the most extensively used in the military, but they can also be modified to transport cargo and troops. a bbc investigation has found nearly 500 children aged 12 and under have been questioned by police for sexting since 2013. the practice is when someone uses a mobile phone to send indecent pictures of themselves to others. figures obtained by bbc newcastle show there's been a steady increase in the number of people being investigated, with a boy aged five among the youngest. clearly the nspcc don't want children criminalised for this sort of behaviour and it's really important that police are talking to children in a restorative way, looking at the safeguarding issues for that child, making sure that the child isn't criminalised. president trump's eldest son is facing further allegations about a meeting he held with a russian lawyer during last
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year's us election. the new york times says donald trump jr was informed in advance by e—mail that the information offered by the woman was part of a russian government effort to help his father's campaign. the senate intelligence committee wants to speak to him about the meeting, which in a tweet he's described as "going nowhere." this is my favourite news story of the day. if you are reaching for your second or even your third cup of coffee this morning, there's good news. it could help you live longer. scientists behind two new studies say they've uncovered the clearest evidence yet that the beverage could be beneficial to health. but others have urged caution, saying there's no actual proof coffee—drinking is good for you. two studies, across europe, i'm in! i have to say, you are a different
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human once you've had one. i don't drink it, never have, probably never will, you try every day to get me to get involved. you are different after you've had one. that's not good, is it? your quiet! plans to almost double the number of welsh speakers are being announced today. the welsh government wants one million people to be using the language by 2050. there will be more teaching at an earlier age, and more welsh—speaking teachers in primary and secondary schools. 0ur wales correspondent sian lloyd reports. at this school, children's lessons are taught through welsh. leaders from the welsh government came to spread the word about their welsh language goal, supported by a guest popular with the pupils. we've laid down the gauntlet if you like. it's a big task, but it's achievable. we really believe we can do it. expanding welsh medium education is at the heart of the strategy. it includes creating 150 welsh language nursery groups over the next decade and increasing
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the number of welsh speaking teachers. they have recognised that there must be opportunities to learn and use welsh outside of school. there is also a recognition that they need support from parents. for the parents, they need to be encouraged. some parents will say, will all the correspondence be in welsh? we wa nt we want to take parents with us. the welsh language has equal status with english. if you're living in wales then it's voluntary. it makes sense, doesn't it, to keep the language alive. brought up and have family in wales but don't speak welsh, wasn't forced on me sol wales but don't speak welsh, wasn't forced on me so i don't want to do it. the welsh language is celebrated
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every year at a cultural festival, which welcomes both those who do and do not speak welsh. the welsh government wants more people to be able to communicate in welsh. but the public‘s appetite for change remains to be seen. sian lloyd, bbc news, cardiff. for the first time in history, scientists got a close up look of one of the most recognisable features of jupiter, the centuries—old storm known as the great red spot. doesn't sound grand enough, does it? should have a better name. we'll see the first images of the storm later this week. the aim is to collect data about the composition of the clouds and find out what lies beneath them. thank you for all yourjupiter based fa cts thank you for all yourjupiter based facts this morning. it takes 12 earth years to orbit the sun and a day on jupiter is earth years to orbit the sun and a day onjupiter is ten hours long. just ten hours! imagine how much you would be missing out on. it means a
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shift would be quite short, a ten hour day. up shift would be quite short, a ten hourday. up i'm shift would be quite short, a ten hour day. up i'm up for that! shift would be quite short, a ten hour day. up i'm upforthat! —— i'm up hour day. up i'm upforthat! —— i'm upfor hour day. up i'm upforthat! —— i'm up for that. workers should be treated like human beings and not like cogs in a machine, that's the conclusion of a review in to the state of the british workplace. the report also called for an end to the cash—in—hand economy, which is worth about £6 billion a year. matthew taylor wrote the report. hejoins us now from central london. matthew, good morning, lovely to speak to you on breakfast this morning. an end to the cash in hand economy, how would that work and what with that look like? this morning as people are hearing this i'm sure they're thinking about handymen, window cleaners, cleaners, childminders, people like that, how do you end an economy like that? this is a small part of a report which is about how we improve the quality of work in the british economy, but one of the points we make is when we talk about
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technology in jobs, we're often pessimistic about the impact of technology in terms of losing jobs but technology can make things easierfor people at but technology can make things easier for people at work and one of the suggestions we make is over time we can move to a situation where when we pay for labour, self—employed labour, a window cleaner, we can do it without cash and that will allow that person to pay their tax as they are and, as we do as employees so they don't have to fill in the own risk tax returns and it means at the same time they can save money for a pension or insure them against sickness and one of moving to a system like that it means for those that want to make sure when we pay for those services the person we are paying is paying their taxes, that system would make that more likely. you say it's a small part of a bigger study, let's talk about the study, you have spoken to hundreds of workers, what are the main messages they say they wa nt are the main messages they say they want from the people that employ them? we're really good as a country in creating jobs. were seeing more people in work than ever before, low
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unemployment, lots of flexible work and those inflexible work like it but there's a problem about quality of work especially among lower paid lower skilled workers. we have to tackle exploitation. there are too many people who suffer one—sided flexibility, the employers have lots of flexibility but that isn't how it feels to them. they are insecure and they don't feel like they have a voice at work. secondly our system isa voice at work. secondly our system is a bit out of date. we need more clarity about four example who is self—employed and who is a worker, who should pay national insurance and who shouldn't. thirdly there are some bigger underlying things we need to do if we want a good work economy, things like improving people's employability and working in sectors, because certain sectors like social care, hospitality has a proponent saw people in lower paid, lower skilled work so we need to work in those sectors to make sure those people have good jobs and have the possibility to progress to
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better paid jobs. you say in terms of bringing about that change you say that's required, it's not about national regulation but responsible corporate governance. how do you make sure these companies solve a regular? how do you promote that, how can that change take place —— self—regulatory? how can that change take place —— self-regulatory? -- self regulate. what we say in the report is the most important thing is the way people are treated by their managers and their company but we're not saying we can rely on salt regulation, there are a number of things that will protect people, especially people working in these flexible ways, zero hours workers, agency workers, people who don't have the security and certainty of people who are full employees so there are a range of measures we suggest to improve the way we protect those people to make sure they understand their rights and they understand their rights and they can exorcise those rights. can
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i bring forward a point the tuc said, the balance of power will shift under your recommendations and the unite union have compare them to a dog that is all bark and no bite, are you confident your review can bring about change? are you confident your review can bring about change ?” are you confident your review can bring about change? i think my review if it was fully implemented would be the biggest reset of the way we think about work and regulate work for a generation. we're talking about fundamental shifts. media view about fundamental shifts. media view a couple of examples. at the moment the threshold for independent representation at work, someone who represents you, for rights to consultation is 10% of employees have to vote for that, we want that at 2% so it is easy for people to get independent representation. we are talking about the idea of a higher minimum wage for people on lower hours contracts for the extra hours they get, so in a sense we are saying if you are only guaranteed no hours or two or three hours and you
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are asked to work more then you should get paid more, that's partly to persuade organisations to think harder about how they can give people more certainty. we're talking about a range of measures to make it easierfor people to about a range of measures to make it easier for people to enforce their rights and to ensure that everybody understands they have holiday pay and statutory sick pay and they can exercise those rights. it's up to the trade unions to determine their position, but there's no question worthy report to be fully implemented it would be a major step forward for workers and vulnerable workers. fascinating to talk to you this morning and interesting to see what the economy will look like in the future. carol is at wimbledon again for us this morning. quite chilly this morning, she is wearing her coat. certainly is. good morning and welcome. notjust a little bit chilly but we expect some rain. currently they are taking the covers of some of the outside courts but they will probably be in use as we
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go through the course of today. especially later on. centre court was the first court to have the cover on, way back in 1922 but all courts that covers since 1971. of course, the roof on centre court was first used in 2009, ensuring the play continued. you can see behind me the roof being built across court number one. that will be completed in 2019. the forecast for wimbledon todayis in 2019. the forecast for wimbledon today is a varied one. we begin with a dry weather, a bit of cloud around. we see some rain early afternoon and then another dry slot and then later in the afternoon and into the evening we will return to heavy and persistent rain is feeling notably cooler than it was yesterday. today we have got that rain, it will also affect us moving from west to east across parts of wales in southern england were as the scotland and northern ireland had sunshine and showers. this morning at nine across southern england we have bright spells, sunny spells and we have showers that is
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the same to east anglia and midlands. to the far north of northern england into scotland, a lot of cloud, a couple of bright brea ks lot of cloud, a couple of bright breaks and some showers in scotland. for northern ireland, the northern half has sunshine this thing, the south seas more cloud. rain not too far away. for wales, a lot of cloud and persistent rain, not particularly heavy for most of wales although in the south it is. for south—west england, a similar story, there is a lot of cloud around and we also have some rain moving in. that band of rain will continue to journey eastwards, so to start the day across gloucestershire and into dorset, hampshire, the home counties, the forecast is similar to what we have here. bright spells with showers. will not be long before the rain moves over from the west towards the east. there will be a dry load and then rain across wales and the south—west. heavy and more persistent rain and zooms across as well. north of that,
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scotla nd across as well. north of that, scotland and northern ireland, northern england, sunshine and showers. as we have through the evening in overnight with the heavy rain continuing to move eastwards. some into the north sea. by the time it does some parts of the south will add 40 millimetres of rain, possibly more, some a little less. north of that again, from northern england and northern ireland, scotland, there will be some clear skies, temperatures dipping in scotland into single figures. a touch of frost in some short of glen stick in the south, a much more comfortable night for sleeping where it has been so night for sleeping where it has been so muggy oblate. tomorrow we begin with rain in the south—east first thing. that will clear, high pressure builds in and then we all have a dry day with sunny spells. temperatures are responding accordingly. we are at a high of 22 or 23 deep as we head into thursday, again, a lot of dry weather. sunshine around, some showers, particularly in the north and the west and then later in the day, again, a new weatherfront west and then later in the day, again, a new weather front shows west and then later in the day, again, a new weatherfront shows its hand, coming in across north—west
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scotland. temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage in july. just before i go, one more thing, if you have an allergy to pollen today, the levels across the uk today are low or moderate. music to my ears. look at that, ending with some good news. i am looking at the flowers, so wonderful to have you their. i was watching wimbledon yesterday, carol, i know you extend on through the day and you got told off by sue for mentioning the r word. she was not happy when you mentioned rain. she is lovely but it will rain today. don't you worry, carol, now that you have said it is well. it is 722, we will be back wimbledon in about ten minutes time. this morning we are looking at the way dementia patients can stay at home for longer than using new technology. the idea is being trialled in the uk and means people with the condition will be monitored remotely by a team
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that can track physical activity, location and blood pressure. brea kfast‘s john maguire's been to take a look. fulfil in june bell, fulfil injune bell, for whom the home they have lived end four years is where their hearts are. they are trialling technology that should help june to stay trialling technology that should helpjune to stay here as long as possible. she was diagnosed with dementia one year ago. one of our aims has always been to stay as long as we can within the home. our home. and what the technology has done has enabled us to do that. because we intend to die in our beds, so to speak. it makes you feel safer, doesn't it? it does. it does to think that somebody is out there, concerned about me. i think that is, you know, it is quite touching, really. that people are so kind.
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this is how the system works. various sensors in the house monitor the movements ofjune and also readily check the hills cloud pressure, to a cloud oxygen levels for example. that information is immediately sent to this clinical monitoring team and staff here can combine gin's medical and environment or data to build up a fuller picture of her hills. if you look at some of the motion data here with you can see she is moving in the living room, hallway, you also see how often she was in bed. you can look at some body temperature and all this data could suggest comic issue being agitated? is there infection? putting everything together could give us a good picture about how well she is. there are currently 200 patients with mild or moderate dementia on the trial, based in the surrey in north east hampshire nhs area. they're looking
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for more volunteers. the red stethoscope and an on—screen alert warms the team of potential problems. they may then called the household, from medical teams or ask staff on the outside the society to pay a visit. another so sleepout has been going off a lot. the technology is also useful for gps and hospital staff. this contained injune's recent readings, a day by day patient record with a better insight into her health. it has been an important aspect of this project that people on the trial have been able to take their data to their gp or consultant so that they have that set of data to make clinical judgement in a much more effective way. the results of the trial, the first of its kind in the uk, will not be known until next year. but early indicators are positive. these gadgets are helping people stay
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longer in their homes, safe and secure in the knowledge that helped, if needed, is just a secure in the knowledge that helped, if needed, isjust a phone secure in the knowledge that helped, if needed, is just a phone call or secure in the knowledge that helped, if needed, isjust a phone call or a mouse click away. we will be looking at that, if you have questions for later on, get in contact with us via the usual numbers and social media is well. 25 minutes past seven, and marks & spencer have just relieved their latest profits. best of the big it is slowly turning around marks & spencer. they released their results last three months and they seem results last three months and they seem overall an increase of 2.7% in profit. most of that is thanks to their strong food sale, but the big four we had previously seen in their clothes has improved a little. the boss says they have not needed to fail the season, so they sell more things at full price. that positive news seems to be reflected more
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widely as well with figures from the british retail consortium showing that retail sales were up by 2% last month which is one of the warmest june is on record. the weather is believed to have led to more people spending on summer clothing, health and beauty products. there is a call from business leaders this morning for companies to do more to make workers more productive. they say it could add up to £130 billion to the economy. the group, led by thejohn lewis chairman was set up by the government in nine years ago to look at how to boost the uk's productivity which lags behind many other countries. thank you very much. title is fine by this morning. it is nearly half past seven. time for news, travel and weather from around the uk. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. bogus self—employment
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and exploitative conditions have been exposed at a top—end cosmetics chain by a bbc london undercover investigation. a bbc researcher worked at soap and co, which has outlets at westfield and other central london locations. workers were told to sign up as self—employed but made to be at work for around sixty hours per week and forbidden from taking more than one day off. this is false self—employment. this is much more an employment relationship than any i have seen but, unfortunately, quite an exploitative employment relationship. soap and co said they were extremely concerned about the allegations and are reviewing the employment status of those who work with them. you can see more on this story on bbc london news at 6:30 this evening. brent council has announced a £10 million investment in fire safety improvements for high—rise blocks across the borough. councillors agreed the new measures in a council meeting last night.
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the money will pay for the installation of new sprinklers, smoke detectors and fire alarms. none of the council's 37 towers are covered in dangerous cladding but councillors said they wanted to go "above and beyond". network rail are warning passengers to expect severe disruption if they use many of the capital's mainline stations over the august bank holiday weekend. services from waterloo, london bridge, euston and liverpool street will all be affected by engineering work. network rail says the changes are to deliver "essential upgrades to the rail network" let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube at the moment, all lines are running a good service. the 84 is slow into town,. and caledonian road is closed near pentonville prison for repairs to a burst water main. good morning. it will become progressively wetter as we head through today. we begin on a fairly cloudy note with outbreaks of rain but they should be few and far
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between through the morning and there should even be breaks to give us the odd glimpse of brightness. but that cloud will be building as we head through the day and by this afternoon we will see the rain become more persistent. temperatures reaching 20, 22 degrees. it is unlikely to affect play at wimbledon today but the bulk of the rain will be coming through the night. it could be heavy locally as well. temperatures reaching 14 celsius. it is still with us tomorrow morning but only very first thing as it clears early on and the cloud melts away through the morning, leaving us with a largely dry and bright day. temperatures reaching 22 celsius, a great deal of sunshine but feeling fresher and more comfortable as well. on thursday there will be a few showers around, a little brightness as well. friday looks dry but still the odd outbreak of rain. as we head towards the weekend, fairly breezy and showers never too far away but they should be a lot of dry weather on offer. over the next few days we see these temperatures around the 22, 23 degrees mark. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. i miss imiss time i miss time that! no time to drink that! -- i miss time that! no time to drink that! —— miss timed. let's tell you about the latest news: an end to cash—in—hand jobs and changing the rules on the minimum wage, just two of the recommendations in a major review into the way we work. the study, led by a former adviser to tony blair, matthew taylor, recommends that people working in what's known as the gig economy, where workers get paid per task, should receive new legal protections and their employers should make national insurance contributions. speaking earlier on breakfast, the report author matthew taylor told us he hopes to stop employers taking advantage of their workforces. there's a problem about quality
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of work especially among lower paid lower skilled workers. we have to tackle exploitation. there are too many people who suffer one—sided flexibility, the employers have lots of flexibility but that isn't how it feels to them. they are insecure and they don't feel like they have a voice at work. theresa may will make her first big speech later this morning since being re—elected as prime minister injune. her party is coming under pressure with no outright majority, and just yesterday conservative mp anne marie morris was suspended, after a recording emerged of her using a racially—offensive term, during a public discussion about brexit. an american military aircraft has crashed in the state of mississippi, killing at least 16 people, according to us media. it crashed about 100 miles north of jackson, the state capital. the type of aircraft is one of the most extensively used in the military, but they can also be modified to transport cargo
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and troops. a man has been charged over an acid attack on a woman and her cousin in london three weeks ago. john tomlin, who's 24, is alleged to have thrown acid at resham khan and jameel muhktar through their car window. both suffered severe burns to the face and body. a bbc investigation has found nearly 500 children aged 12 and under have been questioned by police for sexting since 2013. the practice is when someone uses a mobile phone to send indecent pictures of themselves to others. figures obtained by bbc newcastle show there's been a steady increase in the number of people being investigated, with a boy aged five among the youngest. president trump's eldest son is facing further allegations about a meeting he held with a russian lawyer during last year's us election.
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the new york times says donald trump jr was informed in advance by e—mail that the information offered by the woman was part of a russian government effort to help his father's campaign. the senate intelligence committee wants to speak to him about the meeting, which in a tweet he's described as going nowhere. would you like some cute puppy news? we all know that puppies can be naughty and chew or eat things they shouldn't, but this puppy definitely bit off more than it could chew. this is dougie. he managed to swallow three dog leads while playing with his brother and sister. unsurprisingly they didn't go down very well and he was taken to the vets. although he had to have emergency surgery, he's made a full recovery. coming up on the programme: carol's at wimbledon with the weather. she is wearing a coat so there are
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warnings about rain on the way. there will be a roof on centre court and also there will eventually be won on court 1. johanna konta will play today, mother plays tomorrow, an amazing match for rafa nadal. sally has that and the rest of the sport for us —— andy murray. carol has been telling me because she knows a lot about this stuff, this is a tent cover, they have different types, i suggested this is because players camp out overnight under it, apparently not. the covers are coming off quite soon, people arriving all around, all around the whole place the covers are coming off. they will leave this on a bit longer, though. what a match last night for a fun at all, i was shouting at the tv. incredible to see him go out. a little bit sad to see him go out. a little bit sad to see him go out. a little bit sad to see him go out but fantastic performance from gilles simon last night, finishing quite late, a knock
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on effect to date. —— giles miller. jo konta will be playing again. and the last woman to win wimbledon was virginia wade in the year of the queen's silver jubilee back in 1977. could johanna konta be the next? she takes on simona halep this afternoon, after a really tough three—set win over caroleen garcia. it's those positions, those situations that i dream of, or dreamed of, when i was a little girl and even now to be part of those battles on big stages, so i think that's really what it's about to be a professional athlete. andy murray reached the quarter—finals for the 10th year in a row thanks to a relatively straight—forward win over benoit paire. he'll take on sam querry tomorrow. after all the injury worries before the tournament started, he feels he's back on track. two weeks ago i was resting, so i was also a little bit concerned. when you're having issues just a few days before a big event, it's frustrating but i managed it well and i think i played
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some good stuff. today, like i said, was the best i've played so far in the tournament and, yeah, i'm doing well, so hopefully i keep it up. roger federer is through but rafael nadal is out. gilles muller beat the two—time champion in an epic five—setter. it was 15—13 in the decider and the pair were on court for nearly five hours, meaning novak djokovic's match had to be held over until today. there was some criticism of the scheduling of matches yesterday, world number one angelique kerber said she was really surprised to find herself on court two after she lost to garbine mugaruza. only two of the eight women's singles matches were on the show courts. away from wimbledon, romelu lukaku has completed his £75 million move from everton to manchester united. he trained with his new team—mates for the first time yesterday on united's pre—season tour of the usa. we told you yesterday
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about wayne rooney wearing his everton pyjamas in secret for the last 13 years, now he's got his hands on the offical kit after returning from manchester united. he says he wants to win trophies at his boyhood club and force his way back into the national team, so pyjamas might not be appropriate. i'm not coming into a retirement home. i'm ready to play. i wanna win, i wanna be successful at this football club and that's what i'll do. i feel good. i feel... well, not fit at the minute, but that'll build up in the next few weeks, and i'm excited. after a rest day, the tour de france resumes today with a stage to favour the sprinters. chris froome holds the overall lead but he'll have to make do without team—mate geraint thomas who crashed out on sunday with a broken collarbone. and finally...
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careful when you're warming up to play in court 1. as rafa nadal found out to his cost because the door frames aren't that tall! he and gilles muller saw the funny side, and the spaniard seemed to have no after effects during his epic last 16 match. mind the gap, rafa! it could have been a sign it wasn't going to be his day yesterday. i'm sure he's woken up with sore legs, a sore knee, a saw everything and a sore knee, a saw everything and a sore head this morning! we're on centre court this morning and as you can hear, they're starting to work on removing the covers, gets a bit noisy but we love it at this time of day and i'm joined by chris clary from the new york times, tennis writer. good morning. i love this, they know we are here, they know we are live on tv and they have a competition to be as noisy as possible. that's what it
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sounds like. you were here late last night, rafa nadal, sad to see him go but incredible performance from both players? it was a lifetime match for gilles muller, i saw him play a lot, his mid— 30s, he will tell his grandchildren about that, incredible performance. zen master in the way he handled the pressure and kept sending of the breakpoints, he could sense the hunger of nadal but it wasn't enough, could have been the blow on the head! you're coming from an american perspective, but we get very excited about the british players at wimbledon and maybe this yearfor players at wimbledon and maybe this year for the first players at wimbledon and maybe this yearfor the first time players at wimbledon and maybe this year for the first time in a long time we have even more reason, a british man and woman through to this stage for the first time in 44 yea rs, this stage for the first time in 44 years, incredibly exciting! it's the same at all the slams, look at the scheduling for the main courts in australia, the french open, america, and as it should be. it's nice for andy for it not to be just about
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him, adding johanna konta. we had andy murray, we are blase about a successful british man, but in terms ofjo konta, in previous years she has struggled with the pressure, not a lwa ys has struggled with the pressure, not always looked particularly happy at wimbledon but something has changed this year. have you noticed that? it's been changing for a while with jo, it's been changing for a while with jo, ican't it's been changing for a while with jo, i can't see any weaknesses in her game, it's a big game, you don't know until she has done it, and he has done it in many venues including here but with konta it's a mystery. i've covered tennis for a long time and you see people who look great and you see people who look great and then something happens when the moment is in front of them. what about against halep, will she do 0k? jo won't change her game, she takes the ball aggressively off both sides, it's about what simone will do to defend against that. what does and the have to look out for against sam querrey, you know him well?l
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lot of big serves, he's a big favourite even though he isn't in great form right now. sam loves wimbledon but he has a back and you can exploit. you heard it here first, i wonder if they're watching! --. if first, i wonder if they're watching! ——. if you want to know more about wimbledon you can listen to the coverage live on radio 5 live through the day —— backhand. much more from here in the next hour. carol will have the weather in about ten minutes. but at that, the tent is removed from behind you! thanks very much, sal! it's a language that's been in use for hundreds of years, but the number of people speaking welsh has fallen over time. the latest statistics from the census in 2011 showjust under a fifth of people can speak the language. but now the government in wales has put forward its plans on how it will double the number of people who use the language by 2050. joining us now is the chair of the welsh language society. bore da! from your point of view,
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why is it important more people speak welsh? the welsh language isn't only a minority language, it's a language that has been minor retires in its own country, purposeful steps were taken by the english establishment since wales came under english rule in 1566 to raise the language. this is like people weren't allowed their administrativejobs, people weren't allowed their administrative jobs, names were taken from david to davis. there are lots of other examples. these purposeful steps to raise the welsh language. the welsh language, which we have to justify again this morning, we should not have to justify it, but it is our identity, it is our culture, we have literature, it's the way we look at the world, it's our window into the world and it's very important. to
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overturn all of this that i've just said needs radical steps, huge steps to overturn this, because it is a symptom of a, colonised nation is we don't pass the language our children —— a colonised nation. the language of the oppressor is bought more important than our language. we need this confidence to make sure we know we have a right to exist —— is thought. what happens at the moment in primary schools and secondary schools, what would you like to see changed? 0ne changed? one of the things the government needs to address in the announcement this morning is education. it's a big thing. baby viewers don't know that education is devolved to wales —— may be viewers. the situation in wales at the moment is different in different areas. for example in areas that are more populous, in the
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east, there aren't enough welsh schools. there's a demand but people are being turned away, which means the children leaving school at or 18 maybe mono got or bilingual children with their own language so the schools need to be on a continuing. we have welsh schools with four categories depending on the amount of welsh. they need to move to aim to become welsh schools. another problem is more in the west where some children leave school at 11 able to speak welsh but at 16 not able to speak welsh but at 16 not able because they have lost the skill because they went to an english school. this shouldn't happen. children should be going on one part and not losing the scale. you are passionate about this and you have three children yourself, they speak welsh and english? they speak welsh at home and in the
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community. but then once they are seven community. but then once they are seve n yea rs community. but then once they are seven years old they are being taught english in schools. of course, the english language will never be under this threat. we are a language that has been turned into a minority. certain steps must be taken to help the language. that is one thing. we are also glad to see that the government is addressing this by getting rid of welsh as a second language, as a subject, because at moment if you do welsh as a first language or second language which is more like french, but not even that. most children who studies second language come out unable to speak welsh. so we're glad that they are addressing that. also, of course, we need to normalise the language in all aspects of life. we need to change attitudes. to do
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that, we need to change their behaviour. and to do that we need to legislate. some legislation is in at the moment which covers the standards. for example, our councils, under these standards. they need to provide a certain number of services in welsh. we have the right to access those through welsh. these need to be extended, they need to be done quickly, they need to be extended. you mentioned the economy, there is a direct link between our economy and our language. in welsh, there is a huge number of people leaving wales every year and this has an effect on our community. it leaves a vacuum for english immigrants to move in. so many immigrants are moving in because of all of those moving out. we look forward to seeing more
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detail on that as well.” we look forward to seeing more detail on that as well. i love your passion. i don't know how to say thank you. diolch. carolynn has been a —— carol has been at wimbledon and she would tell us been at wimbledon and she would tell us how it will be. it will be wed in wales and at wimbledon. good morning to you both. if you look behind me, the cover is now off on centre court. they have been inspecting the court, and they seem quite happy with what they have seen so far. we have been lucky this year in terms of interruptions to play because of the rain. in fact there have been very few wimbledon championships without rain since 1922. only seven. the last one in 2010. the highest
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temperature we have ever recorded during the fortnight of wimbledon was 35.7 degrees, in 2015. of course, play is guaranteed on centre court which is a good thing because there is rain on the forecast for wimbledon. what we have a syllable more cloud around. we will also see some rain in the early afternoon, then a dry interlude and somewhat heavy and persistent rain will arrive late into the afternoon and in the evening. temperature wires, clearer than it has been. a maximum of 20. that same rain affecting wales and eastern england's drifts eastwards as a mixture of sunshine and showers. starting at nine o'clock across southern england there is a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of cloud and also the odd shower. bennett extends to east anglia and the midlands. northern england has a more coherent band of
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rain. not heavy but persistent. clouds are foremost in scotland with showers around. in northern ireland in the norcia have sunshine and in the south more out. the rain not too far away. for wales, a bitter cloud this morning with showery outbreaks of rain. a little heavier across south wales. for south—west england, a similar story south wales. for south—west england, a similarstory in south wales. for south—west england, a similar story in that it is a cloudy star with rain and as we drift further east it is dry but there are some showers and a bit of cloud. the rain that we have in the west at the moment will be pushing eastwards through the course of the day. behind it we have a dry and cloudy interlude and then we have already got heavy rain across south—west england and wales which will be following in hot pursuit eastwards and that will be the heavy and persistent rain. for scotland and persistent rain. for scotland and northern ireland in any sunshine will fill pleasant with rising into the high teens. as we come further south will be cooler than it has been and feeling so if you are stuck under the band of rain. the rain will be heavy, particularly south wales and some of us seeing a good
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40 millimetres at of rainfall. through the evening an overnight it stays heavy as rain drifts across the south towards the north sea. behind it, clear skies and the south towards the north sea. behind it, clearskies and in the south towards the north sea. behind it, clear skies and in parts of scotla nd behind it, clear skies and in parts of scotland in particular it will be cool enough for a touch of frost in sheltered glenn's. we start tomorrow with the remnants of the rain in the south—eastern corner. that will clear quickly. high pressure builds in and for most of the uk it will be a dry day with sunny intervals. temperature as a result will pick up, looking at highs up to 22 or 23 degrees. as we head on into thursday, still a lot of dry worth around, a lot of sunshine as well. there will be some showers especially in the north and the west and then later with the new weather front showing its hand, introducing rain across the north—west of scotla nd rain across the north—west of scotland and temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage injuly. thank you very much, carol. see when
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30 minutes to it does look promising there are wimbledon. this morning we are also talking about this... i am ready for it, a big review into how workers in the so—called gig economy are treated more rights and better conditions. collator is with us today speaking with the author of a report. we are looking at how businesses are responding. good morning, everyone. the government has asked matthew taylor, the head of the royal society of arts and a former adviser to tony blair to look at modern working practices. nine months ago. he will make this recommendations later this morning. it is all to do with the rise in people working as things like couriers and drivers or offering services on an ad hoc basis. 0ften offering services on an ad hoc basis. often for big companies. jennifer 0'donnell runs a cleaning firm did she contributed to the report and i'm pleased to say she is with us this morning. all of the
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clea ners with us this morning. all of the cleaners who work for you are technically employees so you pay them a little more. is a more difficult to compete with other countries are companies that don't. i began this business four years ago and when i began i felt quite strongly that all of my should be employed. i think if you go to work every day you need to make sure that you are protected and you have employment rights, the right to thick pay and holiday pay but also that you have the race to make right to grievance and hills and safety training. it was important to me that all of those factors were part of their working life. u nfortu nately, of their working life. unfortunately, what it means, particularly in the domestic side of the business, there is a huge black market economy where there are many cash transactions, workers going into people's homes on recommendation. we are also up against the new gig economy, digital platforms that link customers to consumer. and also agencies which i
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call greymarket because they often subcontract an unregulated workforce. both can keep their costs down because they do not have these additional employment costs. even those difficulties, you contributed to this report. are you happy with it? did it go far enough? it is good to see that it is a positive step, that cash transactions will be looked at. my concern is that culturally and certain set as it is so culturally and certain set as it is so acceptable to do a cash transaction and we think it is ok to do. how that will be enforced will be interesting. i am also very interested in the point about dependent contractors and creating a new category. that is interesting for me because it seems as though there is a category there that are going to be able to operate and still keep some cost out of their business, but because they offer flexibility to their workers they
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are going to be able to still kind of work in a self complete we. lots and lots of issues to work through. thank you very much forjoining us this morning to talk about that thorny issue of zero hours contract is and how we work in the future. very interesting to discuss a change of culture as well. it is 100 years since the first mass—produced tractor came to the uk. looker that blue ones are behind us. they were sent to help during the first world war when men and farmers were on the frontline. teens at the great yorkshire show, driving about whether centenary will be marked. good morning. the show first happened in 1838, designed to celebrate agricultural excellence. this year they are celebrating 100 yea rs of this year they are celebrating 100 years of the mass—produced tractor. sweep along this way and you will see some of the finest vintage
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tractors you will ever see. it all started in 1917 when there had been petrol driven tractors before but they were large and cumbersome things. henry ford changed things, didn't he? he was fed up with the drudgery that was commonplace on farms and he wanted to make life easierfor the farm. farms and he wanted to make life easier for the farm. city set to a daughter tractor. what impact did it have on agriculture? well, he mechanise the whole thing. from early beginnings right now when we cannot do anything without a tractor. look at this one here. this isa tractor. look at this one here. this is a 100—year—old tractor. before this and they were far bigger, they we re this and they were far bigger, they were far more cumbersome. this is merely the first lightweight tractor that many of the older tractors that we have, they were like steam engines, big heavy things unsuitable to the small fields of england. engines, big heavy things unsuitable
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to the small fields of englandm is fascinating stuff. let's swing the camera around and have a look at the camera around and have a look at the century of tractors and they are quite something. as we walk along here, the images you get... this one here, the images you get... this one here is something extraordinary. it makes you think of the prairies of america and that sort of thing. we will talk more about tractors a little later on. here is the news, weather and travel from where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. bogus self—employment and exploitative conditions have been exposed at a top—end cosmetics chain by a bbc london undercover investigation. a bbc researcher worked at soap and co, which has outlets at westfield and other central london locations. workers were told to sign up as self—employed but made to be at work for around sixty hours per week and forbidden from taking more than one day off. this is false self—employment.
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this is much more an employment relationship than any i have seen but, unfortunately, quite an exploitative employment relationship. soap and co said they were extremely concerned about the allegations and are reviewing the employment status of those who work with them. you can see more on this story on bbc london news at 6:30 this evening. brent council has announced a £10 million investment in fire safety improvements for high—rise blocks across the borough. councillors agreed the new measures in a council meeting last night. the money will pay for the installation of new sprinklers, smoke detectors and fire alarms. none of the council's 37 towers are covered in dangerous cladding but councillors said they wanted to go "above and beyond". network rail are warning passengers to expect severe disruption if they use many of the capital's mainline stations over the august bank holiday weekend. services from waterloo,
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london bridge, euston and liverpool street will all be affected by engineering work. network rail says the changes are to deliver "essential upgrades to the rail network" let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube at the moment, all lines are running a good service. the usual delays on the marylebone flyover. and caledonian road is closed near pentonville prison for repairs to a burst water main. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. it will become progressively wetter as we head through today. we begin on a fairly cloudy note with outbreaks of rain but they should be few and far between through the morning and there should even be breaks to give us the odd glimpse of brightness. but that cloud will be building as we head through the day and by this afternoon we will see the rain become more persistent. temperatures reaching 20, 22 degrees. it is unlikely to affect play at wimbledon today but the bulk of the rain will be coming through the night. it could be heavy locally as well. temperatures reaching 14 celsius.
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it is still with us tomorrow morning but only very first thing as it clears early on and the cloud melts away through the morning, leaving us with a largely dry and bright day. temperatures reaching 22 celsius, a great deal of sunshine but feeling fresher and more comfortable as well. on thursday there will be a few showers around, a little brightness as well. friday looks dry but still the odd outbreak of rain. as we head towards the weekend, fairly breezy and showers never too far away but they should be a lot of dry weather on offer. over the next few days we see these temperatures around the 22, 23 degrees mark. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. plans to change the way we work —
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a review for the government calls for the end of the cash—in—hand economy. with suggestions for tackling low—paid jobs, zero—hours contracts and the gig economy, it says the government should strive for good work for all. good morning, it's tuesday, 11th july. thank you for being with us on brea kfast. also this morning... for the first time since 1984, there's a british woman in the wimbledon quarterfinals. can she make the semis? yes, that woman isjo konta. she plays simona halep on centre later. she's joined in the quarterfinals by andy murray — the first time in 44 years a british man and woman have made it this far. but what a game last night. rafa nadal was knocked out of wimbledon after five sets and almost five hours. dealing with dementia — how new technology could help people to cope with the condition at home.
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profits at marks & spencer went up in the last three months, does that show a change in fortunes for the high street giant? i will be finally look. —— i will be finding out. we'll find out about 100 years of mass produced tractors, from farmers on the frontline to modern day machinery. and we will be joined by two actors after nine. and carol has the weather. we are expecting rain so there is likely to be interruption to play. heavy radius movies over the southern half of england and wales during the day —— heavy rain is
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moving. more details later. good morning. first, our main story.an end to cash—in—hand jobs, and changing the rules on the gig economy, where workers get paid per task — just two of the recommendations in a major report into the way we work. the matthew taylor review also says there are too many people who are being treated like cogs in a machine, rather than human beings. 0ur economics correspondent, andy verity, reports. in the last ten years, the economy's generated record numbers ofjobs and the lowest unemployment rate in nearly half a century. but according to the man who led a government—commissioned review, more jobs hasn't always meant more good jobs. in my view, there's too much work, particularly at the bottom end of the labour market, that isn't of a high enough quality and there's too many people not having their rights fully respected and there are too many people treated at work like cogs in a machine rather than being human beings and there are too many people who don't see a route from their currentjob to progress and earn more and to do better. the review will recommend that if someone is controlled and supervised, then they're
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classified as a worker, or dependent contractor, rather than self—employed. those workers may be entitled to benefits like holiday pay and employers may have to pay national insurance at 13.8%. that's broadly in line with a landmark court ruling in a case brought by this former uber driver, yaseen aslam. uber is appealing the ruling. i don't think it helps me as a worker for what i've been fighting for in tribunal, and that's what's concerning because the workers have not been involved in the process in this report. the review also makes a bigger point that self—employed work, from plumbers to painters, yields far less tax for the treasury, especially if the work is cash in hand. for consumers, though, the recommendations are likely to mean inexpensive services will no longer be as cheap. andy verity, bbc news. theresa may will make her first big speech later this morning, since being re—elected as prime minister injune.
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her party is coming under pressure with no outright majority, and yesterday, conservative mp anne marie morris was suspended, after a recording emerged of her using a racially offensive term. 0ur political correspondent, chris mason, joins us now from westminster. chris, an important morning for the prime minister. a chance to set the agenda again. a chance to set the agenda againm absolutely is. there are two rhyming words that matter in politics, majority and authority. the row yesterday over the conservative mp chips away technically at the wafer thin majority the prime minister has, although in all likelihood, even though anne marie morris is no longer a conservative mp, she is still an longer a conservative mp, she is stillan mp, she longer a conservative mp, she is still an mp, she is likely to vote, i suspect, with what was her party when votes come up in the house of commons. in terms of authority, the
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prime minister tried to react very quickly to what happened when the recording emerged, doing what is known in westminster is removing the whip, meaning anne marie morris sits as an independent mp effectively now. it is yet another incident that the may has had to deal with when there are all of these swirling questions about her credibility as prime minister and how long she can cling on for. this speech really does matter for her. cling on for. this speech really does matterfor her. she cling on for. this speech really does matter for her. she wanted cling on for. this speech really does matterfor her. she wanted it to focus on the issue of employment rights you were talking about a moment ago. but there are far bigger question is at stake for her, not least how long she will be prime minister for. coverage of that speech throughout the day on the bbc news channel. britain will have men's and women's quarterfinalists at wimbledon for the first time since 1973 after wins forjohanna konta and andy murray. sixth seed konta beat france's caroline garcia on court 0ne yesterday afternoon. she's the first british woman
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to reach the last eight since 1984. it's those positions, those situations that i dream of, or dreamed of, when i was a little girl and even now to be part of those battles on big stages, so i think that's really what it's about to be a professional athlete. you can follow that across the bbc today as well. a man has been charged over an acid attack on a woman and her cousin in london three weeks ago. john tomlin, who's 24, is alleged to have thrown acid at resham khan and jameel muhktar through their car window. both suffered severe burns to the face and body. an american military aircraft has crashed in the state of mississippi, killing at least 16 people, according to us media. it crashed about 100 miles north of jackson, the state capital. the type of aircraft is one of the most extensively used in the military, but they can also be modified
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to transport cargo and troops. a bbc investigation has found nearly 500 children aged 12 and under have been questioned by police for sexting since 2013. the practice is when someone uses a mobile phone to send indecent pictures of themselves to others. the guidance around the law changed last year in england and wales to say if it's a young person creating the images, the police can choose to record that as a crime, but that taking formal action isn't in the public interest. president trump's eldest son is facing further allegations about a meeting he held with a russian lawyer during last year's us election. the new york times says that donald trumpjunior was told before the meeting that the lawyer who was offering damaging information about hillary clinton was acting for the government in moscow. donald trumpjunior has insisted that the lawyer provided no meaningful information on his father's rival for the presidency. plans to almost double
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the number of welsh speakers are being announced today. the welsh government wants 1 million people to be using the language by 2050. we had a very passionate guest on the sofa a few minutes ago. there will be more teaching at an earlier age and more welsh—speaking teachers in primary and secondary schools as our wales correspondent, sian lloyd, reports. at ysgol glan morfa, children's lessons are taught through welsh. members of the welsh government came here to spread the word about their new goal for the language, supported by a guest popular with the pupils. we've laid down the gauntlet, if you like, it's a big task, but it's achievable. if we really want to do it and we believe we can do it, then that's what we'll do. expanding welsh medium education is at the heart of the strategy. it includes creating 150 welsh language nursery groups over the next decade and increasing the number of welsh speaking primary and secondary teachers.
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but it's recognised that there must be opportunities to learn and use welsh outside of school. there's also a recognition that they need support from parents. some parents need to be encouraged. some parents will say, you know, if my kids go to a welsh medium school, can i help them with their homework? will all the correspondence be in welsh from the school? of course that isn't the case. so of course we want to take parents with us. the welsh language is celebrated every year at the national eisteddfod, a cultural festival which welcomes non—welsh speakers alike. the welsh government wants more people to be able to communicate in welsh, but the public‘s appetite for change remains to be seen. sian lloyd, bbc news, cardiff. i have managed to... what have you done? i cannot hear the director. i have pulled out my earpiece. you are in charge! this is fun, i am
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are in charge! this is fun, iam in are in charge! this is fun, i am in charge! are in charge! this is fun, iam in charge! i are in charge! this is fun, i am in charge! i can do what i like. i am going to wimbledon because they are telling me too! i am not in control. all eyes onjo me too! i am not in control. all eyes on jo konta me too! i am not in control. all eyes onjo konta this afternoon. she will be in the quarterfinal with simona halep. andy murray place tomorrow. sally is at wimbledon, she can tell us all about it. she can't hear you, sally. can anyone hear me? good morning. we are on centre court, they are getting ready for the matches to start later. they are out with the mower. we are talking a lot this morning aboutjo konta because she has made history, the match she played, she played with heart and passion and it was so brilliant to see her play so confidently. 0ver the last couple of years, if you have been watching her play, there isa have been watching her play, there is a shift, she has always had a
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great game, the talent and the skill, but something mentally may have shifted this time. let us hear from clare balding who looks back at whatjo konta from clare balding who looks back at what jo konta has from clare balding who looks back at whatjo konta has been up to during this wimbledon. 0n court, she rarely lets the mask slip. we hardly get to peer beyond the professional veneer. what a battle! what resilience! but there is another side to her. to ta ke there is another side to her. to take a break, she bakes cakes. she has been handing out muffins to the coaching team, the best on tour, she claims. maybe it is useful preparation because wimbledon is all about rising at the right time. the last woman to reach this stage was the lovelyjo last woman to reach this stage was the lovely jo durie last woman to reach this stage was the lovelyjo durie in 1984. good morning. thank you for coming in. you are quite happy thatjo konta
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has equalled your record. of course iam has equalled your record. of course i am because we have got a successful british player who was playing in the second week, quarterfinals of wimbledon. it brings back the memories for me. people keep talking about it and i keep remembering when i was playing andi keep remembering when i was playing and ijust keep remembering when i was playing and i just think keep remembering when i was playing and ijust think it is fantastic. you never watched your much back, is that true? how do you know that? i haven't. why is that? in those days, you did not have the facilities. you played your match. if you are lucky, you sometimes got a vhs video. i have not got one. a few years ago, i saw my match from roland garros which i had never seen, the semifinal. you were quite good! i played quite well! she has the game, talent, skills, jo konta, but something has changed this year for her? it really hurts. she is co mforta ble her? it really hurts. she is comfortable now with the top
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players, being in the mix, the top ten —— it really has. she is not thinking, just doing. her preparation for the grass courts was superb because losing first round of roland garros, a lot of grass court practice. what do you think she has been doing differently?” practice. what do you think she has been doing differently? i do not know if it is differently, i think if you do things time and time again and you do it in a certain way and you put the work in, eventually, it becomes a habit and you do not think, you arejust doing it, she has the mindset which is very strong and she goes on court. at the moment, she is not blinking, getting to the crunch moments and going through them. how is she managing to not let nerves get to her? in the past, they did get to her. she has a process no of overcoming it. if she keeps rigidly to that process and does not look forward to much, it is working. when it pops up
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occasionally come you think, i am merely there. too much thinking, it all goes wrong. of all the places for her to do well and played, wimbledon will be the toughest because it is the home crowd. exactly. what are the expectations like? huge but also you are a big quarterfinal, the crowd want you to do well and that is what you feel and it really lifts you up. has the back of your neck stand up, they really do. fabulous feeling. what can she learn from the way andy murray has handled the pressure the yea rs ? murray has handled the pressure the years? i think he is still there, we are not talking about andy, it is amazing, also in the quarterfinals. to have someone else there who has studied. he said she should let go a little bit. i do not think she is quite like andy. she needs to keep everything close to her and do her thing. that is something he has
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successfully done, he has learned to let go. he has. sometimes he is a bit moany. let go. he has. sometimes he is a bit moa ny. but let go. he has. sometimes he is a bit moany. but he is a great tennis player! lovely to see you, thanks for joining player! lovely to see you, thanks forjoining us. we will go now to someone forjoining us. we will go now to someone who has never been moany, carol. u nless carol. unless you eat all the muffins! it's cloudy above centre court but it's it's cloudy above centre court but its bright. the forecast for wimbledon, we'll see some rain towards the afternoon. then we'll have a drier slot of weather. we see heavy and persistent rain return again later into the evening. it will feel much cooler than it has done. maximum temperature today, 20 celsius. that rain affecting
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wimbledon is also affecting parts of england and wales. moving towards the east for scotland and northern ireland and you have a day of sunshine and showers, some of those heavy. east anglia and the midlands, a lot of dry weather around and a few showers. quite a bit of cloud around with brighter breaks. for northern england, a more coherent band of rain. for northern ireland, some sunshine for you first thing. in the south, more cloud with rain not too far away. for wales, a bit of cloud with some rain. now, some heavier bursts across south wales. as we transfer into south—west england again, quite a bit of cloud with some outbreaks of rain, not particularly heavy at this stage. drifting further east, a lot of dry weather and a few showers. through the course of the day, the rain we currently have will quite quickly move to the east at the same time there's another band
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of heavier rain in the south—west of england and wales. that is moving east too. north of that for the far north of northern england, scotland and northern ireland, sunshine and showers. here in the sunshine it will feel pleasant enough. it will feel cooler if you are stuck under the band of rain. the rain will still be with us this evening, continuing it journey, still be with us this evening, continuing itjourney, eventually clearing from wales in the south—west. for the north, some brea ks south—west. for the north, some breaks in that cloud and in some sheltered glens in scotland, the brea ks sheltered glens in scotland, the breaks will be cool enough for a touch of frost. more comfortable night in the south for sleeping than those we have had recently. tomorrow we start off with the rain in the far south—east and east anglia. it clears quickly. high pressure builds in and most of us will have a dry sunny day. temperatures tomorrow up on today because the sun will be out, with highs up to 22, maybe 23. then for thursday, once again a lot of dry and sunny weather. some
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showers in the north and west. many of us will miss them. later in the day, we see a new weather front returning to north—west scotland. that will introduce some more rain. temperature—wise, roughly where we should be in july temperature—wise, roughly where we should be injuly again with highs of up to the low 20s in terms of celsius. before i go, if you have an allergy to pollen, today with all the weather going around, you will be pleased to hear the levels are moderate or low. i want a bit more information about what is happening tonight. is sal staying around yours again, what is on the menu, are you cooking something for the pair of you? i think sal said enough of my cooking, we had very basic cooking last night, chicken, broccoli and new potatoes. you didn't answer the other question though. did she? ! you can't skirt around the question. i don't want the political answer. 0h i don't want the political answer. oh yes! i don't want the political answer. oh yes i can, dan, oh, yes, i can.
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a major review into the way we work recommends rules for the gig economy. konta makes history at wimbledon today as she becomes the first player for over 30 years to represent great britain in the ladies quarter—finals. marks & spencers has been struggling in the last few years. here are the business stories. good news for marks & spencers at last. just over an hour ago they revealed that takings were up 2.7% in the last three months. most of thatis in the last three months. most of that is down to strong food sales. the big fall that we had been previously seeing in the clothing department has improved a little. the boss says they've not needed a
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sale this season and they've sold more at full price. that positive news seems to be reflected more widely with figures from the british retail consortium showing that retail sales were up 2% last month, one of the warmestjunes on record. the weather's believed to have led more people to spend on summer clothes, health and beauty products. there's a call from business leaders this morning for companies to do more to make workers more productive. they say it could add up to £130 billion to the economy. the group which was led by thejohn lewis chairman sir charlie mayfield was set up by the government two yea rs was set up by the government two years ago to look at how to boost the uk's productivity which lags behind many other countries at the moment. thank you very much. they might be places that you assume are generations apart but for the first time in the uk, a nursery and a care home
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are closing the age gap by spending time together every day as part of the curriculum. it's an idea which has already been adopted by other countries, such as the united states and japan, but from september, britain willjoin them. brea kfast‘s graham satchell went to find out more. singing. a large care home in south london and the sound of a nursery rhyme. young and old singing, playing, interacting together. when it officially opens in september, this will be the first nursery in the country to be sited on the grounds of a care home. children spend more of their time away from other age groups and the elderly spend time away from everybody. there is something quite natural about bringing them together. a sportsday to celebrate the opening and 87—year—old fay is showing off her egg and spoon skills. children from a nearby nursery have been coming here on a weekly trip
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since january and fay has loved it. some of them sing and dance and we play games. it is fabulous. so most of the residents, they have a great time. they come alive. bringing young and old together like this already happens in america, canada and japan. experts say the advantages are clear, particularly for the elderly, in tackling isolation and loneliness. there are challenges as well. finding the right places and making sure both children and adults are safe. the benefits really do outweigh the disadvantages. this is a model for other care home providers and nurseries across the uk. it certainly works in the rest of the world, there is no reason why we could not see many more of these in the uk. back inside, walter is making glasses out of play—doh and passing on years of wisdom.
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careful play arranged by grown—ups is teaching them many things they don't know. how to handle things and handle situations. as an old person, i am coming to the end of my life, it is a greatjoy to see new human being is growing and growing slowly into people, into humanity, into maturity. it's a wonderful thing. i'm very privileged. irene and helen... is this a model for the future? there are certainly hopes here that it will benefit young and old. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page.
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kim clijsters felt under pressure when she took on our challenge. we have andy murray right at the top of the leaderboard. jo konta despite being in the quarter—finals only got two. this game might not be the most important one ever. i think i've got a tactic. if i was to do it, i would go for the clijsters technique. that is how andy murray did it. she gets three balls in her hand at once and then bang, bang, bang. speed and accuracy. just like that! when can we have a go? ! do you think they're saving us from ourselves. for the final. we could team up. tim muffet is at harrogate at the
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yorkshire show. the idea of a tractor was something which was a distant futuristic dream. it wasn't until 1917 that tractors, as we know them today, first came about, the first mass produced tractor was created then. henry ford, best known to many for creating the model t car and popularising cars, he did the same for tractors because before then they were huge machines. he made them accessible and affordable forfarmers and made them accessible and affordable for farmers and it transformed the ago cultural industry. —— agricultural industry. the show
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jumping is also here, the sheep shearing competition is later on, and the various other displays. you don't often see these. they are celebrating 100 years of tractors. mighty fine they are too if i say so myself. we'll talk to the person that owns and runs these fine vintage machines. now here is the news, weather and travel where you are. the showers are like in nature and there will be some brightness between the showers as well. the best of the weather today across northern ireland and northern parts of england. across much of england and wales, we have this rain, feeling much fresher in the south—east today, temperatures at its best. the breeze picking up around the front as well. the rain will continue to track east this afternoon. the best of the drier and brighter weather across northern ireland and scotland, breezy in the
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south, certainly along the south coast. heading into rush—hour, surface water and spray. the rain fragmenting for a time, but it will start to intensify again this evening. a pretty wet night to come. the temperatures today at its best from 13 up to 20 degrees. if you are going to wimbledon, take your umbrella. some rain to come this afternoon. temperatures at its best around 20. tomorrow the weather front will clear and behind it, high—pressure building, so we can look forward to a fairly decent day. rain in the south—east first thing tomorrow. that will clear, feeling pleasa nt tomorrow. that will clear, feeling pleasant in the sunshine and lighter winds by the afternoon. temperatures from 14 to 22. thursday, the ridge of high pressure clearing away, low pressure started to take charge, we
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will see cloud, sunny spells and the risk of a few showers. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and rachel horne. getting the gig — the uk government review calls for better pay and conditions for the millions of people working in the gig economy. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday, the 11th ofjuly. the taylor review says there must be a focus on delivering quality as well as quantity when it comes to work in the modern economy. also in the programme... air india takes meat off the menu for most of its passengers as the country's top court considers a ban on selling cattle through animal markets. 0n money markets and equities,
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