Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 11, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

2:00 pm
applause new umpire: new balls, please. and almost there. i think the umpire is calling for the doctor again for djokovic. hejust said is calling for the doctor again for djokovic. he just said something is calling for the doctor again for djokovic. hejust said something in this is bbc news. the prime minister orders... a major review into workers' rights says flexible workers need better borisjohnson agrees with a conservative mp that the european union can "go whistle" for any brexit divorce payment. the new york times says it has evidence that president trump's team knew the russian government was involved in the us presidential election last year. amanita. and also in the next hour. the organizer is jailed for two yea rs. the organizer is jailed for two years. 12 others are sentenced to a years. 12 others are sentenced to a year each after admitting causing a public nuisance. and plans to
2:01 pm
preserve the welsh language. the government aims to double the number of speakers by 2050. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister has ordered an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal that left 2,400 people dead. many of them were haemophiliacs who died from hepatitis c and aids—related illnesses after receiving contaminated blood products from the nhs in the 1970s and 1980s. we can speak to liz carroll who is the chief executive. in central london. good afternoon. what is your reaction to this? of course we are
2:02 pm
really pleased that this announcement has been made today, but also relieved for the many many people who are affected by this tragedy. and the campaign has been working tirelessly for years. there has been... days see this progressing from here this way? the most important thing is that this inquiry looks at what has happened to our community over many many yea rs. to our community over many many years. it needs to go back to the early days of the 1950s when infections was understood. it needs to involve a community in what happened, what happened then and what happened after their treatment and how they had been treated. as well as looking at how companies such as pharmaceutical companies are involved, government decisions. it needs to compel witnesses to come and give evidence. that has never happened before in 2017, this is
2:03 pm
backin happened before in 2017, this is back in the 1970s why has it taken so back in the 1970s why has it taken so long? it is difficult to know. i think more and more information comes to light. recently some documents put into the national archives which has enlightened the community a bit more about what has happened. and working together with the community that we support, people were affected, we have been really a ble people were affected, we have been really able to work with mps to bring this about and i think it is a really important for our committee. you mentioned recent document is this what. .. you you mentioned recent document is this what... you explain that. there's the information in their medical notes, but there still are some documents that have been held back because of commercial reasons that haven't yet been released. it is important this inquiry looks at that as well. you talked about the breast of what you hope this inquiry
2:04 pm
will be. which means it could take a long time. does that worry you at all? the important thing is this inquiry doesn't change the work that is going on to ensure that this community get the financial support that they need right now. as long as this inquiry doesn't stop that process happening, i think of course people want something to happen and quickly, but they also wanted to be done well. to have an inquiry that ta kes done well. to have an inquiry that takes time, that is done thoroughly will be better than something is done really quickly. even though we are talking about events that date back several decades, you think this could make a huge difference to people today? absolutely. people's lives were devastated. 0ur people today? absolutely. people's lives were devastated. our community had a whole generation almost wiped out. it is unbelievable the number of people this has affected. and those people who are living today with the severe grief of having lost
2:05 pm
someone with the severe grief of having lost someone they love is as rock today as it was the day they lost them. we have many people who are very sick living in poverty, not really understanding what happened to them today. wanting to understand and to know and to feel competent that this will never happen again. thank you very much. and also says he would like to see an end to the cash economy. matthew taylor who is a former adviser to tony blair say that cash jobs are worth up to many billion dollars a year —— million pounds a year. fairplay should pay national insurance. doesn't say zero hour should be banned. more details now. those are the ambitious goals of the
2:06 pm
review of world of work ordered by the government. too often they are not good jobs. that work is bad for as the world of work changes, our practices and laws must properly reflect and accommodate those changes. because good work is in the interest of good business. these licensed cabs really are self—employed, they own their cars and get work from anyone that books them. what would change that, is if they were controlled and supervised by a company? report says, in that case, that company should pay benefits, like sick pay and holiday pay, and pay national insurance, as if they were employees. the report says an equal tax treatment creates distortions. the government loses out on £5.1 billion a yearfrom lower rates of national insurance paid
2:07 pm
on self—employed labour. by 2020, we will lose another 3.5 billion a year because people form their own companies to avoid tax. so it calls for companies using self—employed labour, who paid no national insurance, to pay more. the government should look at new rights for this employer, like parental leave. some work isn't taxed at all, cash in hand, which deprives the government and other taxpayers £6 billion a year. some cleaners, decorators, or gardeners, are paid cash in hand. the others that aren't evading tax are at a disadvantage, it is harder to compete on price. moving to electronic payments can tackle that. there is a huge black market economy, where there are lots of crash transactions. workers will be going into people's homes on recommendation, but also we are up against the new gig economy, which is digital platforms that link customers to consumers, and also agencies, which i called
2:08 pm
grey market, because they often subcontract and unregulated workforce. that can keep costs down, because they don't have all of these additional employment costs. the report says that workers like curry is paid by the task, they have two proved they can come to be make a fifth more than the minimum wage. maggie took the courier firm that she works for to caught. we have been fighting for two years, a bit over two years to get to a point where we can access justice and make things better for a whole new generation of people. and it seems like they are rubber—stamping a lot of the awful operations that already exist. the report has drawn a disappointed response from workplace unions, who say it is not the game changers a hub for to end insecurity at work.
2:09 pm
less disappointed will be the treasury, which if recommendations are adopted stands to gain more from tax, so there is less of a need to cut spending. let's talk now to labour mp. who through a number of ports on this. good afternoon to you. in case anyone isn't sure what we're talking about when we talk about the gig economy it is where people work flexible hours on short—term or freelance contracts without the right of permanent employees. do you think today's report the basis of reform? i do. but it is only the basis of reform and that reform began to develop than the house look —— house of commons earlier today when we received a statement from the minister about the report itself. one of the key questions she
2:10 pm
faced i along with other members asked her whether in fact if there was a trade—off between keeping the labor market flexible or using the government's national living wage as one of the main ways of giving protection to the weak underbelly of the labor market. the minister said that the government would choose the trade—off of the national protection rather... were opposed to continuing flexibility. so already, the report —— it's already helping. flexibility. so already, the report -- it's already helping. many are wondering can you really have flexibility and protection at the same time. i'm sure you can for most of thejobs same time. i'm sure you can for most of the jobs we're about. the exception that i gather is in the report was carried by the media when matthew taylor talks about those wishing to work in the odd hours of
2:11 pm
the day when there is not a great demand for their service. whether it is driving cars that they might wish to work below the national minimum so they get some work. the evidence that we put forth to the prime minister asking for this inquiry which she agreed we would have the inquiry suggested that there was this division between those who probably have got full—time jobs and to use the gig economy as a overtime agent and those who actually are in the gig economy full—time and they do need the protection. at the very beginning of the national living wage and i'm sure when the government presents its bill to the house of commons, if it doesn't listen carefully to the points that the workforce are now making, we heard it just before the workforce are now making, we heard itjust before i came on, then in fact the house of commons is going to take control of that bill
2:12 pm
and will actually perform it for the better. you say the report is the basis of reform what precisely is it going to take to bring it to fruition in your opinion? we don't know how the six—month consultation the government wants to have on this. very sensible first move. before... then draws up its own built. what the government must understand that when it comes to the house of commons, it hasn't actually made this the game changer that the work force wanted to be, then the government won't have a majority. the unions are going to vote on our size —— our side. so the trade—off does the government bring a bill forward which makes it a game changer or will thatjob he forward which makes it a game changer or will that job he left forward which makes it a game changer or will thatjob he left to the house of commons? it will
2:13 pm
happen. it will be a game changer. the only question is whether it will be the government or the house of commons. because more and more workers are becoming aware of their rights, what they can ask for that is making a game changer. do you think that employers will release it up think that employers will release it up and take of this also or will there be some who are still looking for ways to exploit the system? sadly, employers... some will try to exploit the position of vulnerable workers. either the government itself or with the help of the house of commons —— house of commons makes a bill that is a real game chamber — game a bill that is a real game chamber —— game changer. then in fact those days will be numbered. the net
2:14 pm
result will be greater security, there will be an extension of normal coverage of sick pay and of pensions and above all these companies won't be taking us for a ride, taxpayers, they will actually be making their contributions in tax, international insurance and in vat. a real relief for taxpayers. above all, what result at the end of the day is a big step forward in protection for vulnerable workers. as i see it at the moment there is not yet the basis for the taylor report. there will be when the bill leaves the house of commons and goes to the house of commons and goes to the house of commons and goes to the house of lords. 0k, thank you very much. thank you. and we'll be speaking to the report author matthew taylor at 3:45pm. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has agreed
2:15 pm
with a conservative mp that the european union can "go whistle" for any final payment from the uk when it leaves. speaking in the house of commons, he also said there was no plan for what to do in the event that britain fails to strike a deal with the eu. because the government was confident of getting a strong deal. they make a lot of noise but they don't get what they want is where that is heading? to put it another way boris johnson is basically saying no way. the uk is going to be paying large sums of money. we are at the start of very difficult brexit negotiations. and there will be some worry that borisjohnson is butting in. that hardly eases the brexit
2:16 pm
secretary's path. in trying to manage the departure. the british government have been told in clear terms there is no prospect of getting a trade deal which is what we really want until we agree to the divorce turns. we must agree to the amount of money we are agreed to p5y~ amount of money we are agreed to pay. if you listen to borisjohnson, he is clearly not inclined to pay very much at all. the sums that i have seen that they have proposed to demand from this country seem to me to be extortionate. "go whistle" is an entirely appropriate expression. the other area where borisjohnson causes some concern is the other area where borisjohnson causes some concern is where he was pressed about what is the uk's government strategy, what happens if we can't get a deal? and he has warned, well we walk away. now various committees have said the government has to come up with a plan b in case we can't get a deal.
2:17 pm
in december they said not have a plan b would be a dereliction of duty. borisjohnson said we have no plan. if we don't get a plan, we don't have a plan. that i think will have caused some problem with some mps because that would suggestjust fall out with no contingency measures. and then to round off mr johnson's interventions he said that brussels needed to show more subtlety in the negotiation. i suspect that is something they think he may need to show. thank you. it is 17 minutes past two. the headlines on bbc news. that will be an inquiry into the blood scandal that left two and a half thousand people dead. a major review into working practices recommends better
2:18 pm
protections for gig economy workers and an end to cash in hand jobs. foreign secretary borisjohnson inquiries with —— that the european union can go whistle. and in sports. the quarter finals of wimbledon will be against... johanna konta just keeps getting better. she is hoping to reach the semifinals this afternoon. if she does, she will be the first british woman to do so in almost 40 years. and the owners are expected to announce they will activate a great clause in their contract would —— that would cancel the race after 2019. they want a new financial deal. this has been the home of the races 1987. why more stories that have passed. it is believed that women want
2:19 pm
family—planning and they still don't have access. they are hoping to get more have access. they are hoping to get m ore a ccess have access. they are hoping to get more access for women have access. they are hoping to get more access for women in the poorest country. some of that donors involved are bill gates. they are pledging millions of pounds in additionalfunding. pledging millions of pounds in additional funding. a patient having consultation in nepal. half of all pregnancies are unplanned. and worldwide there is an estimated 82 million unintended pregnancies every year. that is why today health ministers and global charities are getting together to a summit in london to look at how they can get more contraceptives to women and girls in the poorest countries. the foot —— the philanthropist believes
2:20 pm
that special attention needs to be given to teenagers. this is the biggest population of adolescents we've ever had. and they are coming from the developing world and if we don't offer them contraceptives, we are basically putting them into a life of destitute poverty whereas if you can offer them contraceptive, she will stay in school, she will tell you i want to stay in school. i don't want to have that first baby until i am ready. don't want to have that first baby untili am ready. earlier, donald trump announced controversial plans to cut aid budget and placed tough restrictions on how the remaining money gets used. britain is one of the countries that is worried about those changes. so -- there are many areas where we work with america and we will continue to do so, but this is one area where we are not seeing eye to eye. and we believe this is not an area where we can stand still because the human consequences are enormous. there are too many women and girls, 214 million that still
2:21 pm
don't get access to modern fleming —— family planning. don't get access to modern fleming -- family planning. the second biggest donor in family planning. it has announced more money today so it will now be spending £225 million a year. until 2022. the government says it hopes that money will empower more says it hopes that money will empower more women to have says it hopes that money will empower more women to have kids when they want. and to stay in education and employment if they wish. a large number of bikers — on a halloween ride out — who brought leeds city centre to a standstill have been sentenced. the incident saw a large number of bikers tear through streets and pedestrian areas in the city. police received 160 calls from the public, with some likening the scenes to the film mad max. 12 bikers were sent to prison for 12 months, with one otherjailed 0ur correspondent, ian white, is in leeds now. what happened ? what happened? it was halloween last
2:22 pm
year. at 515, so the rush hoursjust about to start. 100 bikers gathered in the city center at one of the main route in and out of the city they were encouraged to be there by a man called david. 26 or old who had organized this gathering of bikes and scooters via social media. he asked people on social media, facebook, to bring chaos to leeds. they say he got his wish that is what happened. many had their faces covered by masks and scarves and they had removed registration plates from their bikes. they cause chaos for over four from their bikes. they cause chaos for overfour hours, from their bikes. they cause chaos for over four hours, speeding, jumping red lights and writing on pavement and on the wrong side of the road. some even rode through a shopping arcade. police had to close the road after receiving 160 calls from the public. what of the
2:23 pm
sentencing? quite dramatic scenes and courts. i don't think the police we re eve n and courts. i don't think the police were even expecting the sentencing to be as tough. 13 defendants, 12 men and one woman were to be as tough. 13 defendants, 12 men and one woman were told they had all played a huge part in causing harm and distress and he said behavior of this sort cannot be tolerated. they all played —— pleaded guilty. the organizer. the biggest sentenced to years in jail. someone else was sentenced 18 months in jail someone else was sentenced 18 months injail because he perverted someone else was sentenced 18 months in jail because he perverted the course of justice in jail because he perverted the course ofjustice because he encouraged people to destroy evidence, their bikes and clothing. another was jailed for 14 months, the rest alljailed for 12 another was jailed for 14 months, the rest all jailed for 12 funds. and have been disqualified for driving for at least 18 months. the police investigation was praised and remarked many other people were involved were not brought before
2:24 pm
it's that courts. it was a tough investigation. it sent a very strong message that this behavior will not be tolerated. thank you. a man has appeared in court charged in connection with an acid attack on a woman and her cousin on her 21st birthday last month. both suffered severe burns to the face and body. joining us east london is our correspondent. tell us more about what happened there today. it all relates to the attack. 0n the 21st birthday she had come down from university to celebrate with her friends and she and her cousin had acid thrown on their faces through the window of their car at faces through the window of their carata faces through the window of their car at a traffic light and they both ended up with very, very severe acid burns to their face and neck. the police appealed for a man called john tomlin to hand himself in. he
2:25 pm
did that at the weekend. last night he was charged with with grievous bodily harm with intent. early this afternoon he appeared in court. it was a very brief hearing. he was handcuffed throughout. he was asked to confirm his name, to give his date of birth and his address weird he waved to his family, blew kisses to his family and was then told he would stay in prison until his first appearance at the crown court. on august the 8th. 0k. thank you for that. veterans who through -- flew in the warare that. veterans who through -- flew in the war are leading prince william. today is the 60th anniversary. i am pleased to say they probably managed to dodge the rain. but it is coming down here. it
2:26 pm
didn't stop the displays taking place a little bit earlier on. this isa place a little bit earlier on. this is a hurricane behind me. we had spitfires up as well. we have the lancaster bomber flying its well for a very special celebration to mark the 60th anniversary. for 60 years, the raf has had a special squadron of preserved world war ii planes. it remembers the veterans who flew in these aircraft and those killed in action. i was at the front. i was in control of the engineering aspect of the aircraft, yes. would you love to still go up in it again? i would. grab your parachute, turn it to the left. drop out. bernie harris was a rear gunner in a lancaster bomber. he's thrilled that such a plane is still flying. it would be great. it's a real memory. i mean, it's the only thing... i actually flew in tiger moths, andersons, wellingtons and this.
2:27 pm
and out of them, this is the best one. it's really got character. it was a joy. the battle of britain took place in the summer and autumn of 1940. fought in the skies over southern england, it was a won by a handful of raf pilots. such was the achievements of the raf that in the late 1950s, a small site of spitfires and hurricanes was formed to preserve the memory of the service's finest hour. in later years, the ever popular lancaster bomber was added to what had become known as the battle of britain memorial flight. today, prince william, the patron of the flight, came to coningsby to mark 60 years of displays by the vintage aircraft. the prince himself a former raf pilot spent time talking to the veterans and this afternoon will watch a display. lovingly preserved flying machines that will hopefully
2:28 pm
educate and inform for many more years yet. this commemorates everybody who has lost their lives in service with the raf. we go further back than that, to the royal flying corps, our predecessor. 1940 up until today, everybody that has lost their lives in service with the raf. and that's got to be important. the battle of britain memorial flight is described as a museum without walls. it will be seen in the skies above us this summer. it's priceless artefacts aim to inspire future generations and remember those who gave their lives for freedom. of course is notjust of course is not just the of course is notjust the battle here. you can hear the typhoons as well. the noisy neighbors. hangar
2:29 pm
here. there was a really nice atmosphere here today and the sad fa ct atmosphere here today and the sad fact is there are fewer and fewer veterans that come to these occasions because of the passage of time. andl occasions because of the passage of time. and i think it was made a great deal to them that prince william was here to mark the anniversary with them. to mark 60 years of this quadrant and the hope and 60 or hundred years' time, these planes will still be fine. thank you very much. danny rattling noise and rain. now the british grand prix comes to silverstein. could it be one of the last? the owners are expected to start a break laws. were gonna speak to our correspondent. the problem is it all boils down to money. the owners are saying that they can't —— they can't make the
2:30 pm
sums add up and that's in spite of it being one of the best races of the entire student ethnic season. 17 million this year, that is going to rise even with a full house this sunday it could be looking at losses of £4 million. the contract for them isjust not of £4 million. the contract for them is just not viable. of £4 million. the contract for them isjust not viable. it is also of £4 million. the contract for them is just not viable. it is also the only one of the 20 circuits during the season around the world that doesn't receive any government support. david —— need to renegotiate. if they can't, the rays will be dropped entirely. what is the alternative? right now there isn't one. there isn't another racecourse in this country that could do this country. they know that that is why we have this fa ce — off that that is why we have this face—off between them and the media —— the owners of formula 1. the owners have insisted that this place is critical to them they would want to make a deal and do work as it is with silverstein, but they also say there is interest from other places
2:31 pm
in the uk. where could that be? potentially in east london. at the moment they are not viable alternatives. we are nowhere near close to that happening. at the moment, when we should be talking about lewis hamilton going for his fifth win, his... we are instead talking about potentially using the british grand prix for the first time since 1950. as we are talking they have triggered the break was. you said it was evident, it has happened. i give very much indeed. thank you. hi there. for those of you who enjoy getting out in the garden, good news. there is wet weather on the way across england and wales. if you
2:32 pm
don't have a garden, it is probably less exciting news that we have heavy rain coming in across this afternoon. rain already coming in heavy across south wales. it becomes extensive through the afternoon. showers moving into south—east england and we will see the main rain band arriving at about 3:30pm. we are expecting interruptions at wimbledon today. overnight the band of rain could end up across parts of lincolnshire and yorkshire before slowly pulling away from the south—east. maybe some rain across south—east. maybe some rain across south—east england for wednesday morning. i pressure builds in full stop all others will see a decent day with a lengthy spells of sunshine. it is a decent kind of day. as of 19 in glasgow and 23 in london. hello. good afternoon. this is bbc news.
2:33 pm
let's bring you date with the headlines. let's bring you date with the headlines. the prime minister orders an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and 80s — which left nearly two and a half thousand people dead. thousands of nhs patients were given blood products from abroad that were infected with hepatitis c and hiv. the author of a government review into working practices says he'd like to see an end to the cash—in—hand economy. matthew taylor, who's a former adviser to tony blair, said cash jobs such as window cleaning and decorating are worth up to £6 billion a year, much of it untaxed. borisjohnson, has agreed with a conservative mp that the european union can "go whistle" for any final payment from the uk when it leaves. brussels has yet to reveal what it wants from britain by way of a divorce bill. a us newspaper says it has evidence that donald trump's election team knew the russian government was trying to help him win the presidency. the new york times says his eldest son was told that a russian lawyer he met during the campaign was acting on behalf of president putin.
2:34 pm
the halloween ride—out that brought leeds city centre to a stand—still — the organiser is jailed for 2 years — 12 others are sentenced to a year each after admitting causing a public nuisance. we're going to have spot view in a moment but first more on our main story. the prime minister has ordered an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal that left 2400 people dead. many of them were haemophiliacs who died from hepatitis c and aids related illness is after receiving contaminated blood products from the nhs in the 19705 blood products from the nhs in the 1970s and the 1980s. we can speak now to lord owen who was health minister in the 1970s. thank you for your time this afternoon. when did it first become apparent that there was a problem with these blood products. in the early 70s. i was
2:35 pm
minister of health in 1975 and i announced to parliament that we were going to go for self—sufficiency and that we were going to try and meet the demands on as from our own transfusion service because we knew it was more likely not to be contaminated. people were more likely to be truthful when asked questions, screening questions, like have you ever been yellow which is jaundice which could come from hepatitis. it was a real problem because in those days we couldn't detect viruses. we knew they were at risk of contamination and we thought it would be wisest to do it within a national health service. parliament was never national health service. parliament was never told that in fact after a few years, financially, they started to slow down the self—sufficiency programme and we then became more and more dependent on market health service provisions of blood
2:36 pm
transfusions from commercial companies and not from the nhs. did you say parliament wasn't told? parliament was never told when i a nswered parliament was never told when i answered written questions saying we we re answered written questions saying we were going to self—sufficiency and they were never told we are not going to be self—sufficient we are going to be self—sufficient we are going a different route. and that in pa rt going a different route. and that in part contributed to the problems and the deaths of semi—people.” part contributed to the problems and the deaths of semi-people. i tried for many, many years to get an inquiry. people like carol grayson wrote a ph.d. thesis on this. there was a private inquiry led by former attorney general peter archer. it was pushed very hard in the house of lords. it did a bit of good but it got some of the facts out but we have never been able to get successive governments to enquire into this. of course it is a scandal
2:37 pm
around the world. but why has it taken so long in your opinion? my own papers were scrapped after 15 yea rs own papers were scrapped after 15 years without any consultations with me even years without any consultations with me even though i was active in politics. why did the secretary of state afterwards not, why couldn't he find the answers and raise questions? what sort of remit is this inquiry going to have to have if it is going to be successful? and a nswer if it is going to be successful? and answer some of the questions that you have just mentioned ?m answer some of the questions that you have just mentioned? if there is any hint of a cover—up then i think people must give evidence under oath, but remember an awful lot of these people are no longer alive. if it's wise to use a panel which some people think is a helpful technique, a very good idea. whether it should bea high a very good idea. whether it should be a high courtjudge sitting on it, i will leave to the government. the
2:38 pm
government may well have evidence. we know that 300 people have got together and brought a case and government has problem be seen some of these government and they may find in these documents one or two very troubling things. i don't know. but something has triggered this after all these years of refusing to have an inquiry. i went to the health ombudsman time and time again with an individual case from a constituency of a person who had hiv and the health ombudsman would not look at clear evidence of bad administration. a lot of questions to be answered. thank you very much. now let's bring you up with the afternoon's sports news. hello. thank you very much. it's another big day at wimbledon today with the women's quarter finals. ifjohanna konta wins her match she'll become the first british woman through to the semifinals in nearly 40 years. hugh woozencroft is live at wimbledon for us
2:39 pm
with the latest. hugh? hello. well, it's a good day so far. plenty of play after the rain early run. novak djokovic made very light work of things today. he is through to the quarterfinals. he came through against the french man in sturridge steps —— straight sets. co mforta ble sturridge steps —— straight sets. comfortable work for novak djokovic aiming forafourth comfortable work for novak djokovic aiming for a fourth title here. on centre court venus williams. the winner of that match they could face johanna konta. she is playing later on on centre. she won't have to worry about the weather. it is going to bea worry about the weather. it is going to be a very difficult match for her of course. she is aiming to be the first british woman to make the
2:40 pm
quarterfinals here since 1978 —— semifinals. there are plenty of british fans out to see her. some good news for the fans today because jamie murray has been here in the doubles. they are through to the next doubles. a good day so far for some of those british fans and they will hope for more withjohanna konta. hugh, thank you. the future of the grand prix is uncertain as a break clause has been activated. silverstone has been home every year. however the british racing driving club who runs it is struggling with the cost of hosting it. british and irish lions prop kyle sinckler has apologised after he was arrested during a night out in auckland, following the drawn final test against the all blacks.
2:41 pm
police said a man was placed under arrest but not charged following a minor disorder in the early hours of sunday morning. the lions tour manager said sinckler had been reminded of his duties. arsenal manager arsene wenger says he expects alexis sanchez to stay at the club next season and could even sign a new contract. there's been much speculation the striker wants to leave but wenger says he's never asked him for a transfer. he has a year left on his current deal. and great britain's non stanford is likely to miss the next three rounds of the world triathlon series because of an achilles injury. she's withdrawn from this weekend's race in hamburg and is hoping to return in stockholm at the end of august — the penultimate world series event before the grand final. stanford won the world title in 2013. that's all sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website.
2:42 pm
that's bbc.co.uk/sport. and i'll have more in the next hour. more now about how to end the cash economy. he also called for greater protection for flexible workers and people on zero hours contracts. we can speak now to doctor carole easton who is the chief executive of the women's trust who represents some low weight paid workers. good afternoon. would you highlight from this report? we're very pleased that the government has this report and that basic pay and basic hours can be guaranteed, but we would like for
2:43 pm
the young women who we represent and you are more likely to be working in part—time roles, insecure, hairdressers, clearing all caring that the recommendations could go further to support them and make sure they can afford to make ends meet. and say what specifically? for example, many young women say they are forced to work as a self—employed. they want flexibility in employment, they would rather be employed. so we would like to see as a norm that roles could be offered ina a norm that roles could be offered in a part—time flexible basis rather than the other way round. we would also like to see that if women are in self—employment, that they receive the same sorts of rights as those who are employed, so that will be pay, statutory maternity pay is usually better than maternity allowa nce usually better than maternity allowance and keeping in touch days. really important if you're running your own business. so
2:44 pm
self—employment should be a choice rather than a point that people have to reach because the alternatives just don't measure up. yes. i can tell you about laura who i work with, said that when she asked if she could work flexibly after having her baby her employer said no. she would rather have had employment and being self—employed working on a zero hours contract. when you put that forward do you get a sympathetic response? that forward do you get a sympathetic response ?|j that forward do you get a sympathetic response? i think the other area is that young people are being paid less. they are paid than the minimum wage. employers have said that they don't necessarily think that's right and we are speaking to some employers who want to do right by young women but we also believe that there is more that the government needs to do to make sure that it happens. and that is
2:45 pm
specifically on pay or on other matters as well? on flexibility, pay, even a apprenticeships. it is about encouraging young women into areas where women are underrepresented. take them on a flexible apprenticeships and pay them a going rate. you said you welcome the fact that the government has gone into this territory, do you also says that on the basis you have heard politically in the run—up in what has been said today and subsequently that there is a willingness to take this further, because it is very easy for these kinds of reports to be smug about one day and kicks into the grass and other. i would have hoped it wouldn't have been commissioned if there wasn't an appetite for it and we're looking forward to the helping the government make sure these things happen. some newsjust coming
2:46 pm
in, we are hearing that a fourth british man has been killed fighting against so—called islamic state in syria. this is according to a statement from kurdish fighters passed to the bbc. the statement says that luke rutter who was 24 from birkenhead was killed on the 6th ofjuly in it a neighbour... in this is from a statement from kurdish fighters sent to the bbc. it went on to say that luke had a training in northern syria. despite lacking military background he was among the best in training and they are sending their thoughts to family and edinburgh response to what has happened there. the time is nowjust
2:47 pm
after 145. plans to almost double the number of welsh speakers have been set out as part of a target to get1 million people speaking the language by 2050. the welsh government have set out plans for more welsh—speaking teachers in primary and secondary schools — as our wales correspondent thank you very much forjoining us this afternoon. why did you decide to learn welsh? well it was an inevitability for me. my wife is a welsh speaker. when my first child was born in 15 years ago it was a natural thing to start learning the language so that we could speak welsh at home comfortably. we have three children now and they are all in welsh speaking education. i live and work in both welsh and english everyday. and are you don't start to enter competitions unless you are
2:48 pm
really passionate about the do you? no, no. it was actually suggested to me by some colleagues at work at the time. i decided to start using more welsh in myjob and since then my tutors, i was actually sitting at a local university at the time doing a course for adults, and they suggested i should go for it. it was a pleasure to go for it. it was won by very talented young man from patagonia. do you think of welsh very much as a living breathing language or is it a language is endangered and needs some sort of boost to revive it? clearly we as a plateau in terms of the number of welsh speakers and i think that is why the government has put forward an ambitious targets. the target when be realised unless there are big steps. those of us who live and work through the medium of welsh and english every day across wales it is
2:49 pm
very much a living language. i use it at home, in the office and in the community and socially. i think there are hundreds of thousands of us like that. i think sometimes it is perceived as an old language but it isa is perceived as an old language but it is a new, forward looking language in terms of technology and the use of welsh in social media and other news sites. that is very much beyond what a lot of people see. that is the bit wet their welsh government needs to think and develop some new ideas. we mentioned in the introduction that more welsh speaking in primary schools, what is it going to take to make this successful? i'm a governor in one of wales is biggest welsh beating premier schools. it has taken... i think the real issue is getting
2:50 pm
local authorities to accept a response ability that there is a demand for welsh speaking schools. a lot of people don't appreciate the chance that they can put their children through both welsh or english speaking school and that is the big challenge. getting the government to accept that if we are going to get1 million, we need to do together. do you think the local authorities are bored with this plan? do you think they're going to need a lot of help? over the last three orfour years, need a lot of help? over the last three or four years, the government has had local plans for every local authority across wales, i think at least be pushed further and enforced. we need to allow people to know that there is the option for them to live and work through the medium of welsh and for their children to be schooled in welsh. in these to be shown as an equal partner in wales. i certainly think that in the past five years there has been a dynamic change. welsh is seen to be one of the two languages that we live through. the main thing
2:51 pm
is they give people the chance to have that, not just is they give people the chance to have that, notjust the ones who can speak welsh and have learnt welsh but others as well. thank you very much indeed. good to talk to you. you're watching bbc news. the headlines. the prime minister orders an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and 80s — which left nearly 2,500 people dead. a major review into working practices recommends better protection for so—called gig—economy workers — and an end to cash—in—hand jobs. foreign secretary borisjohnson agrees with a conservative mp that the european union can "go whistle" for any brexit divorce payment. hello. and in the business news: companies in the gig economy have been reacting to a report into working practices that calls for greater protections for its workers. deliveroo has criticised any move that will restrict labour flexibility.
2:52 pm
ride sharing app uber say their drivers earn well above the minimum wage. telecoms watchdogs have tightened the rules for a new auction of mobile airwaves, imposing new restrictions on the dominance of ee and vodafone as operators prepare for the shift to 5g technology. ofcom said it would introduce a 37% cap on the total share of usable radio spectrum any operator can control. ee currently has 45% of the airwaves. sales at marks and spencer's clothing and home division fell at a slower rate than before in the first three months of the year. however, like—for—like food sales dipped by 0.1% — which was worse than expected. shares in snap, the owner of snapchat, fell below their offer price for the first time yesterday. shares have been fairly volatile since the company made its debut. they are currently down 5% and even
2:53 pm
those who backed the company have downgraded their share... what is going on? it is down quite considerably. it is quite considerable and part of the reason is we are in the midst of earnings season so in the next few weeks we are going to see that snap is going to be recording earnings. the outlook is not that great for the last quarter. that coupled with the fa ct last quarter. that coupled with the fact that early investors and executives who have this shows they weren't allowed to cell before, they are going to be allowed to sell those shares so there is a lot of concern that some of these insiders are going to be looking at the prices and saying that it hit an all—time high and now it is trading below $16 a share realm. perhaps it
2:54 pm
is time to shed some of those shares. it is losing money and there is not a good outlook in terms of how much money it is going to be the make down the line. why is it losing money? there are some analysts saying that lots of companies have been copied and seeing —— copy. saying that lots of companies have been copied and seeing -- copy. the worry is that they are not going to be able to fend off some of the competition from the likes of facebook and instant ram. that is the worry. one of the new features is that location mapping feature that we have heard a lot about that pa rents that we have heard a lot about that parents have been concerned about, in terms of advertising that could bea in terms of advertising that could be a big boost. if they are able to have a go at location big advertising that could really help snap. that is really the key. they
2:55 pm
need to be able to modernise and that hasn't happened yet. need to be able to modernise and that hasn't happened yetm need to be able to modernise and that hasn't happened yet. it hasn't taken hold just yet. we were watching over the next few days. thank you. let's have a look at some of the stories. two companies promotion texts — they look a bit like this. they're refered to as premium texts. they're being investigated by a watchdog following complaints from recipients that they have been charged fees even though many believe they never opted into the service. the two companies pro money holdings and veo involved in the campaign deny any wrongdoing. air india has stopped serving non—vegetarian meals to save money. it'll effect passengers flying economy on domestic routes. air india's business isnt the best of shape and the government air india's business isn't the best of shape and the government there is considering ways to privatise the airline. it's a controversial move — diet is highly politicised in india
2:56 pm
where many hindus are vegetarian but muslims often eat meat. shares in pearson have risen after the company said it was selling a 22% stake in book publisher penguin random house. the sale, to its joint venture partner bertelsmann, is expected to raise about £776 million and pearson said it would return £300 million to shareholders. after the deal, pearson will still have a 25% stake in penguin random house. let's have a look at markets. the ftse is lower this afternoon because of the lower oil price. oil prices have fallen today as global oversupply encouraged several banks to cut their price forecasts. that's all the business news. thank you. see you then. whether time? it is. a little bit of a change. here is chris. hi there. a change. here is chris. hi there. a change in the weather with these sunny skies, it was pretty warm as well. temperatures around the greater london area reached 27 celsius in the sunshine, but today it's a different story. cloudy skies, outbreaks of rain on the way.
2:57 pm
because of this area of low pressure. it will be bringing the wet weather all across england. further north, the weather, a little bit drier at times. some of that rain has already arrived across southern wales. looking at this weather watcher picture, it has already turned pretty heavy. the rest of the afternoon, the band of rain will be swinging its way in. we will see showers getting into east anglia and southeast england before general outbreaks of lane arrived in outbreaks of rain arrived in london about half past three or there or about. it will continue to rain pretty heavily across southwest england and southern area of wales. rain moving through. skies getting a bit brighter. northern ireland should see sunny spells. brighter moments as well in scotland, but here one or two showers. looking at the forecast for wimbledon. the main rain band will arrive around 3:30pm and once the rain sets in, that could be it for the day's play. some limited drier windows possible, but a lot of rain on the way. in fact, this rain amounting
2:58 pm
to 20—40mm of rain. could move through southwest england to allow for some clearer weather during the second half of the night, but the rain could be a little bit farther northwards. heading into yorkshire for a time before clearing the way through wednesday as high pressure moves in. of course, that means early—morning rain will clear away pretty quickly. high pressure dominating the weather, most of us will have a glorious day tomorrow with lengthy spells of sunshine right across the country. a fresh feel to the weather. temperatures about average for this time of year, 19 in glasgow, feeling pleasant here at 23 in london. a little bit cooler with the onshore winds around the coast. high pressure keep skies cleared overnight. could be a chilly night until wednesday. thursday promises to be a dry day for most of us with sunshine. thursday afternoon, the clouds will thicken up across the far northwest of scotland as a band of rain begins to come in. similar temperatures, highs up to 23.
2:59 pm
this is bbc news at three. the headlines: the prime minister orders an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and ‘80s — which left nearly 2500 people dead. a major review into working practices recommends better protection for gig—economy workers — and an end to cash—in—hand jobs. borisjohnson agrees with a conservative mp that the european union can "go whistle" for any brexit brexit divorce payment. the new york times says it has evidence that president trump's team knew the russian government was involved in the us presidential election last year. and in the next hour...the halloween ride—out that brought leeds city centre to a stand—still. the organiser is jailed for two years — 12 others are sentenced to a year each after admitting
3:00 pm
causing a public nuisance

76 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on