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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 11, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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this is bbc news at three. the headlines: the prime minister orders an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and ‘80s — which left nearly 2500 people dead. a major review into working practices recommends better protection for gig—economy workers — and an end to cash—in—hand jobs. borisjohnson agrees with a conservative mp that the european union can "go whistle" for any brexit brexit divorce payment. the new york times says it has evidence that president trump's team knew the russian government was involved in the us presidential election last year. and in the next hour...the halloween ride—out that brought leeds city centre to a stand—still. the organiser is jailed for two years — 12 others are sentenced to a year each after admitting causing a public nuisance uncertainty over the future of the
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british grand prix at silverstone triggers a close to stop posting the race ina triggers a close to stop posting the race in a year's time. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister has ordered an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal that left 2,400 people dead. many of them were haemophiliacs who died from hepatitis c and aids—related illnesses after receiving contaminated blood products from the nhs in the 1970s and 1980s. they had been imported from abroad.
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a recent report found 7500 people we re a recent report found 7500 people were infected. labour leaderjeremy corbyn has welcomed the announcement of the inquiry, which he said should have the potential to trigger prosecutions. i think we need a thoroughgoing enquiry into this. i pay huge tribute to diana johnson, one of our labour mps, for the huge amount of work she has done on this. 2400 people have died as a result of this contaminated blood. it has caused unbelievable stress to many, many more people. it was obviously a serious systemic failure. i think we need the strongest possible enquiry that can, if necessary, lead to prosecution and actions as a result of it. above all, get to the bottom of it. so a broad, public, inquisitive enquiry is very important. but i do think we should congratulate all those who have worked so hard to bring this about. it was in our manifesto, and i welcome the fact that it is now going to take place. of course we are really
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pleased that this announcement has been made today, but also relieved for the many people who are affected by this tragedy. and the campaign has been working tirelessly for years. diana johnson was talking about a hillsborough style enquiry. diana johnson was talking about a hillsborough style enquirym diana johnson was talking about a hillsborough style enquiry. it must look at a broad remit over what has happened to our community for many yea rs, happened to our community for many years, going back to the early days of the 1950s when infection through blood was first understood. it needs to involve the community in what happens then and what happened after and how they had been treated, as well as looking at how companies such as pharmaceutical companies are
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involved, government decisions. it needs to be a really broad remit to compel witnesses to come and give evidence. that has never happened before. in 2017, here we were in the 19705 before. in 2017, here we were in the 1970s and 1980s. why has it taken so long? difficult to know. more and more information comes to light. recently, documents were put into the national archives which have enlightened the community in its more about what has happened. working together with the community we support, people who were infected, we have been able to work with mps and others to bring this about and it is a important moment for our community. you mentioned documents. is that what diana johnson was talking about with new evidence? that some of it. also, medical evidence in their notes, they have been able to find information. there have still been documents held back because of
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commercial reasons that have not yet been released and it is important that this enquiry looks at that. you spoke about the breadth of the enquiry. that means it could take a long time. does that worry you? the important thing is that this enquiry does not change the work that is going on to ensure this community gets the financial support they need right now. as long as this enquiry doesn't stop this process happening, of course people want something to happen quickly, but they also want it done well. to have an enquiry that takes time and is done thoroughly will be better than something done really quickly. even though we are talking about events dating back several decades, you will argue this could make a huge difference to people last night lives today? no question about that absolutely. people's lies were devastated. we had almost a
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generation wiped out at the haemophilia society. people living with the severe grief of having lost someone with the severe grief of having lost someone they love is as role today as the day they lost someone. many people are very sick, living in poverty. not really understanding what happened to them. wanting to understand and feel confident that this won't happen again. we are aware that there have been several calls for a full independent enquiry over the years. in addition to these reports, the department of health has worked to bring greater transparency to the events at the time. many documents related to blood safety covering the period from 1970 to 1995 have been published and are available on the national archives website. these documents provide a comprehensive picture of events and decisions made.
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and many of them were included in the documents reviewed by the penrose enquiry. however, i recognise that for those affected, these steps do not go far enough to provide the answer that they want and to get to the truth of what happened. in light of these concerns, and reports of new evidence and allegations of potential criminality, we think it is important to understand the extent of what is claimed and the wider issues that arise. i am going to make some quick progress to get to the nub of the statement i am making. mr speaker, i am pleased to be able to confirm to the house that the government intends to call an enquiry into the events that led to so many people being infected with hiv and, or hepatitis c through nhs—supplied blood and products. let's speak now to andy evans
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who is chairman of the tainted blood campaign and has been campaigning foran inquiryfor the last 20 years. hejoins me on webcam from worcestershire. given the length of time you have been campaigning, i am assuming this isa been campaigning, i am assuming this is a good day? this is an incredible day but we need to be consciously celebrating this, absolutely clear that the terms of reference for this enquiry are right and that we actually get to the truth and justice at the end of it. tell us about your circumstances. why has this impacted your life so much?” was infected with hepatitis when i
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was infected with hepatitis when i was five. and full—blown aids when i was five. and full—blown aids when i was 16. there was no medication to speak of iran. a huge struggle to survive but the next four or five yea rs survive but the next four or five years while medications became more wide. ever since then, years while medications became more wide. eversince then, i have years while medications became more wide. ever since then, i have been able to recover a bit of it but also to campaignfor able to recover a bit of it but also to campaign for truth and justice in this scandal. what sort of treatment we re this scandal. what sort of treatment were you able to receive when you are seriously ill, as you must have been? the only treatment available at that point where drugs like azt. they came through quickly in the checking process and they did not know what they were doing with them really. they were given out in strong doses. it was responsible for people being pushed over to full—blown aids and the side—effects we re full—blown aids and the side—effects were horrendous. it was about
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managing the symptoms of opportunistic infections that came along. what about the more recent treatments, how effective have they been? for the hiv, the actual virus itself is under control now. i won't say that the treatment is free of side effects because it is not. it is still a daily struggle to try and live a healthy and normal life, said he met. those with hepatitis c, it isa he met. those with hepatitis c, it is a slow burning disease that can rear its head later in life and that has been the case with me. i have had to undergo some horrendous treatment and that has had many members of the campaign recently. against the backdrop, there you have been campaigning for many years. take us back to where the conversation began and where your
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hopes are as regards the remit of this enquiry. what do you want to know that you do not know now? what i want to know is who is responsible for the infections of a800 people with hepatitis c and 12a3 people with hepatitis c and 12a3 people with hiv. i want to know whose decision was it to ignore the warnings that these products were infected and contaminated, and who decided to not tell patients of their conditions and then ultimately who decided to cover this up for 35 yea rs ? who decided to cover this up for 35 years? thank you for coming along, andy. 0f years? thank you for coming along, andy. of the tainted blood campaign. the author of a government review into working practices says he'd like to see an end to the cash—in—hand economy. matthew taylor, who's a former adviser to tony blair, said cash jobs such as window cleaning and decorating are worth up to £6 billion a year,
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much of it untaxed. his reports recommends that people in the so—called gig economy should have better protections, and that their employers should pay national insurance contributions — but doesn't say zero hours contracts should be banned. more details from our economics correspondent andy verity. tackling exploitation at work, clarifying the law, and removing distortions in the labour market created by the tax system — those are the ambitious goals of the review of the world of work ordered by the government. its author matthew taylor says the economy has created a record quantity ofjobs. too often, they are not good jobs. the bad work — insecure, exploitative, controlling — is bad for health and well—being, something that generates costs for vulnerable individuals but also for wider society. as the world of work changes, our practices and laws must properly reflect and accommodate those changes, because good work is in the interests of good business. these licensed cabs really are self—employed,
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they own their cars and get their work from anyone that books them. what would change that is if they were controlled and supervised, dependent on just one company. the report says, in that case, that company should pay them benefits, like sick pay and holiday pay, and pay national insurance, as if they were employees. the report says unequal tax treatment creates distortions. the government loses out on £5.1 billion a year from the lower rates of national insurance paid on self—employed labour. by 2020, it will lose another 3.5 billion a year because people form their own companies to avoid tax. so it calls for companies using self—employed labour, who currently pay no national insurance, to pay more. the government should look at new rights for the self—employed, like parental leave. some work isn't taxed at all — cash in hand, which deprives the government and other taxpayers
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of £6 billion a year. some cleaners, decorators, or gardeners are paid cash in hand. the others that aren't evading tax are at a disadvantage, it's harder to compete on price. by moving to electronic payments, mr taylor says, you can tackle that. there is a huge black market economy, where there are lots of crash transactions. workers willjust be going into people's homes on recommendation, but also we are up against the new gig economy, which is digital platforms that link customers to consumers. and also agencies, which i call grey market, because they often subcontract an unregulated workforce. both the black market and grey gig economy can keep their costs down, because they don't have all of these additional employment costs. the report says if workers like couriers are paid by the task, they have to prove they can comfortably make a fifth more than the minimum wage. maggie dewhurst successfully took the courier firm who pays her to court. she's disappointed in the report. we have been fighting for two years,
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or a bit over two years now, to get to a point where we can accessjustice and can make things better for a whole new generation of people. and it seems like they're just rubber—stamping a lot of the awful operations that already exist. the report has drawn a disappointed response from workplace unions, who say it's not the game changer they hoped for to end insecurity at work. less disappointed will be the treasury, which if recommendations are adopted, stands to receive billions more in tax, so there is less of a need to cut spending. with me is tim roache, general secretary of the gmb. the trade union. broadly, the response has been this is a missed opportunity. why are? undoubtably, what's the report contains will help
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some people in this casual iced jake economy. it does not go far enough. people need to understand that over the last seven or eight years under the last seven or eight years under the conservative government we have seen the explosion of casual, caught ina trap. seen the explosion of casual, caught in a trap. home care workers, delivery drivers, taxi drivers who depends on a bit of work, a hand—out from their employer. this report identifies many issues but not solutions. earlier it was said there is time to underpin flexible working. you are saying that dose not do that. why does it offers solutions? it's reinforces the right ofa solutions? it's reinforces the right of a worker... to be on a zero hours contract of a worker... to be on a zero hours co ntra ct to of a worker... to be on a zero hours contract to be on a decent and secure contract. and an agency worker to as for a proper contract was upa worker to as for a proper contract was up a gear as a worker to as for a proper contract was up a gear as a long time on a casual contact. the buyers, given the choice, have made the choice.
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enough of an editors on employers to give his protection? 10 million people, this report won't stay with the scourge of casualisation of employment. we're not talking about the ban on zero hours like new zealand. is wider. up to 50% of their work force, that is not lazy management, they can employ them. that is lazy management. —— that is abusive management. the fact ability of zero hours contracts, the use of agency contracts in some senses are right. field beggars. in harvest and, of course you need workers then. but with this gig economy model, you need day in day out a proper business up. it cannot
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continue. —— field pictures. —— pickers. the basis of reform, it was said, could be a game changer. it is thought the rest of the commons will make sure that that will happen. does that encourages? words of encouragement but i do not think the report goes far enough in its current context. if the prime minister is serious about tackling exploitative arrangements, my door is open. there are thousands who work in these casual iced sector. we have real experiences of what it is like to live day in and day out. a mortgage and rent. change in employment law is needed? this reinforces the right of employees to ask your employer, how many times,
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how sweetly, the employers have made their choice to go for profit rather than people. and we'll be speaking to the report author matthew taylor at a quarter to four. the prime minister has ordered an enquiry into the contaminated blood scandal which left nearly 2500 people dead in the 1970s and 1980s. and as you just said, the prime minister calls for —— it is called for a crackdown on cash in hand jobs and the gig economy. and djokovic is through to the
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quarterfinals. and jamie murray is through in straight sets. and a contract that could cancel the british grand prix in 2019. silverstone has been home to the race since 1987 but there is a clause in the contract that has been triggered. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has agreed with a conservative mp that the european union can "go whistle" for any final payment from the uk when it leaves. speaking in the house of commons, he also said there was no plan for what to do in the event that britain fails to strike a deal with the eu, because the government was confident of securing a strong settlement. he is basically telling the eu to ta ke he is basically telling the eu to take a running he is basically telling the eu to takea runningjump he is basically telling the eu to take a running jump if they think
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the uk government will pay vast sums of money for the privilege of leaving the eu. we are at the start of difficult brexit negotiations. some concerns that borisjohnson is blundering in in his classic colourful blundering in in his classic colou rful style blundering in in his classic colourful style and that's partly eases the brexit secretary's path in managing the exit from the eu. the british government have been told there is no prospect of getting a trade deal until we have agreed to divorce terms. at the front of those, agreeing the amount of money we are prepared to pay. if you listen to borisjohnson, he is clearly not inclined to pay very much at all. the sums that i have seen that they have proposed to demand from this country seem to me to be extortionate. "go whistle" is an entirely appropriate expression. the other area where he caused some concern is when he was pressed about
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what is the uk government's strategy for no deal. what happens if we cannot get a deal? as theresa may has want, we will walk away. various committees have said the government has to come up with a plan b in case we cannot get a deal. the foreign affa i rs we cannot get a deal. the foreign affairs committee i think in december said not to have a plan b would be a dereliction of duty. borisjohnson would be a dereliction of duty. boris johnson candidly said, would be a dereliction of duty. borisjohnson candidly said, we have no plan. if we do not get a deal, we do not have a plan. that will have caused some consternation among some mps because that would suggest we would fall out with that contingency measures, nothing in place at all. to round off mrjohnson's interventions, he also suggested that the european commission, brussels, egypt is to show more su btlety brussels, egypt is to show more subtlety in negotiations and i suspect they will think he needs to show that. —— they need to show more su btlety. it is said that look rather
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—— trump —— trumer is one of a number of british people who have volunteered and have been killed fighting islamic state. it is says it happened last week during the battle for the liberation of... the report said he trains with the military academy at despite lacking military background he was among the best in training and it says the thoughts
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and prayers go to his family. the foreign office here has issued a numberof one foreign office here has issued a number of one not to go and fight in foreign wars. they have been mostly men, and one women, who have done this. and luke rutter is the fourth man to have died in this way. people would have followed that cause so closely from here? the headlines have been filled with stories about so—called islamic state for the best pa rt of so—called islamic state for the best part of the three or four years now. we do sometimes interview people who have gone to fight against islamic state and they often have different motivations for doing so. in this
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case, the statement says here that luke rutter believed that fighting with the trump —— ypg. many have said wanting to fight with the trump jr is said wanting to fight with the trump jrisa said wanting to fight with the trump jr is a way of fighting in the battle that we watch in the news —— ypg, fighting with them. they will be described as maters by the kurdish forces. people have gone to ta ke kurdish forces. people have gone to take part in this conflict in this very difficult part of the world and that this is another reminder of the risks they take. a large number of bikers — on a halloween ride out — who brought leeds city centre to a standstill have been sentenced.
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the incident saw a large number of bikers tear through streets and pedestrian areas in the city. police received 160 calls from the public, with some likening the scenes to the film mad max. 12 bikers were sent to prison for 12 months, it was halloween last year. at 5:15, so the rush hours just about to start. 100 bikers gathered in the city center at one of the main route in and out of the city they were encouraged to be there by a man called david. david armitage. 26 or old who had organized this gathering of bikes and scooters via social media. he asked people on social media, facebook, to bring chaos to leeds. he got his wish — that is what happened. many had their faces covered by masks and scarves and
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they had removed registration plates from their bikes. they caused chaos for over four hours, speeding, jumping red lights and riding on pavements and on the wrong side of the road. some even rode through a shopping arcade. police had to close the road after receiving 160 calls from the public. quite dramatic scenes in court. i don't think the police were even expecting the sentencing to be as tough. 13 defendants, 12 men and one woman were told they had all played a huge part in causing harm and distress and he said behavior of this sort cannot be tolerated. they all had pleaded guilty to causing public nuisance. the organizer. the biggest sentenced to years injail. someone else was sentenced 18 months injail because he perverted the course ofjustice because he encouraged people to destroy evidence, their bikes and clothing.
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another was jailed for 1a months, the rest all jailed for 12 funds. —— 12 months. and have been disqualified for driving for at least 18 months. the police investigation was praised and remarked many other people were involved were not brought before the court. it was a tough investigation. it sent a very strong message that this behavior will not be tolerated. president trump's state visit to britain is likely to be delayed until next year — he had accepted the queen's invitation for a state visit when theresa may visited washington in january. but the president may have other issues on his mind, a us newspaper says it has evidence that donald trump's election team knew the russian government was trying to help him win the presidency. the new york times says his eldest son was told that a russian lawyer he met during the campaign was acting on behalf of president putin. wyre davies reports. the bbc‘s gary o'donoghue is in washington for us. this new york times article and the
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claims, how much consternation is this costing four presidentjohn's tea m this costing four presidentjohn's team and how interested are the people investigating these alleged links between russia and the campaign? this has been dominating for the last four years or so, various stages of the meeting had been revealed by the new york times in particular. it took place injune of last year, around the time donald trump had won the republican nomination for the presidency. donald trump junior was there, nomination for the presidency. donald trumpjunior was there, his campaign chairman and his son and law. it was a high—powered meeting at trump tower. the lawyer wanted to speak to them because she had evidence useful to them about
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damaging hillary clinton. that is what donald trump junior damaging hillary clinton. that is what donald trumpjunior has originally set. the lawyer is alleged to have ties to the kremlin and russia. she has denied that. the kremlin has denied that. she also said she wanted to talk about russian sanctions, not hillary clinton. the take away from it is that these three members of the inner circle were meeting with a russian national to talk about the election. that has been the problem all along for donald trump. this thing has overshadowed the whole presidency so far. was there any kind of collusion between his campaign and a foreign power? that is something those investigating this on capitol hill and the special counsel appointed by the justice department will want to look at. that is still playing out. talk about the delay of the state visit
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by donald trump to the uk. what's more are you hearing about the delay there? we knew this was on the cards. some top out of the white house about donald trump being concerned, that he might face significant protests in britain. when the queen made her speech at the opening of parliament after the general election in the uk, she did not mention a state visit by donald trump. that was seen as an indication there was a degree of uncertainty. she normally mentioned state visits. so that was obviously an indication. and now it looks as if it is being put off until next year, until the landscape looks a bit more certain. so, no date at this point in time, but it is clearly something that the british prime minister wants to bring about, and it is not an easy
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invitation to withdraw once you have offered a state visit. gary, 90 very much. —— thank you. now, a look at the weather. quite a change in our weather. northern ireland keeping dry weather for the time being, but it is across england and wales where we are seeing some heavy rain moving in at the moment. the rain is coming down pretty heavily in the likes of south wales. this was the scene a few hours ago, and this weather is driving across england and wales. quite a complicated set of fronts merging together to bring a prolonged spell of rain. the rain is about an hour away from london's other will be some wet weather and persistent main heading into wimbledon over the next hour. the rain set in for much of the night. it will move up to lincolnshire and yorkshire before pulling back down towards south—east england with clearer skies across the north west. tomorrow, this band of rain will
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clear away, then a big area of high pressure building behind. this is how tomorrow looks. cloud and rain to start the day, moving away to the near confidence, then we will get a lot of sunshine all of the uk. —— near continent. in the sunshine, temperatures near average, highs of 19 in glasgow and 23 around london. the headlines: the prime minister orders an enquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and ‘80s, which left nearly 2500 people dead. many of those were haemophiliacs who died from hepatitis c and aids—related illnesses. it was obviously a serious systemic failure. i think we need the strong as possible enquiry that can, if
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necessary , as possible enquiry that can, if necessary, lead to prosecution and actions as a result of it. the author of a government review into working practices says he would like to see an end to the cash—in—hand economy. matthew taylor, who's a former adviser to tony blair, is recommending a new legal status of "dependent contractor", with workers able to get benefits such as holiday and sick pay. borisjohnson has agreed with a conservative mp that the european union can "go whistle" for any final payment from the uk when it leaves. brussels has yet to reveal what it wants from britain by way of a divorce bill. a us newspaper says it has evidence that donald trump's election team knew the russian government was trying to help him win the presidency. the new york times says his eldest son was told that a russian lawyer he met during the campaign was acting on behalf of president putin. the halloween ride—out that brought leeds city centre to a standstill — the organiser is jailed for two years, 12 others are sentenced to a year each after admitting causing a public nuisance. it's time for the sport. i suspect
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we are starting with wimbledon? thank you. it's another big day at wimbledon today with the women's quarterfinals. but everyone's been talking about novak djokovic. hugh woozencroft is live at wimbledon for us with the latest. hello, yes, novak djokovic will not have been happy that he was made to wait until today for his much, but he made a very quick time of things on centre court brother, reaching the men's quarterfinals, straight sets win. he took it 6—2, 7—6. he goes through to play tomas berdych in the quarterfinals tomorrow. so a very good win for djokovic alongside andre agassi, he has turned around his form. after the match he had something to say about the condition of the court, something that has
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been receiving criticism so far at this year's tournament. the courts honestly not that great this year. many players feel the same it is what it is. the weather also affects the grass. i'm sure the grounds men, they know theirjob the best in the world, but the grass is probably the most complex surface to maintain. it is not easy and they are trying their best. but i have played on better courts. we have our first semifinalist threw in the women's singles. the 1ath seed, muguruza. she beat lana kuznetsova and will go back into the world's top ten. right now on centre court, venus williams is in action against the french open winnerjelena 0stapenko. she took
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the first set in that 16—2. in the second,it the first set in that 16—2. in the second, it is a break each, venus williams hoping to make it through. she could face the british number one, johanna konta. it is going to bea one, johanna konta. it is going to be a very difficult match for johanna konta, she is aiming to be the first british woman to reach a semifinal in the women's singles since 1978. it would be fantastic for the british fans here. they are waiting for that match a little later on. but there has been a bit of success but already, jamie murray is through in the mixed doubles. he is through in the mixed doubles. he is through in the mixed doubles. he is through to round four alongside his partner martina hingis, 20 years after she won a singles title here. the brothers are through in the men's doubles as well so a little bit of british success as well. so we wait with bated breath to see if johanna konta can make it through into the semifinals of this year's
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wimbledon, but will be later on at centre court. the future of the british grand prix has been left uncertain after silverstone's owner confirmed they have activated a break clause to stop hosting the race after 2019. silverstone has been home to the race every year since 1987. however, the british racing drivers' club, which owns the circuit, is struggling with the financial cost of hosting it. running the british grand prix, we sustained net losses of £2.8 million in 2015, and £a.8 million in 2016. that is a total of £7.6 million just over the last two years. and we expect to lose a similar amount this year. to continue on this path is not only unsustainable, it would put at risk the future of silverstone, which is the home of british motor racing. adam gemili has missed out on a place in the individual events for this year's
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world championships in london. gemili, who was a finalist in the 200 metres in rio last year, missed out on automatic selection at the british team trials. full details are on the bbc sport website. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. thank you very much. more now on our main story. the prime minister has ordered an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal that left 2,a00 people dead. many of them were haemophiliacs who died from hepatitis c and aids—related illnesses after receiving contaminated blood products from the nhs in the 1970s and 1980s. we can now speak to to the conservative mp alistair burt, who was health minister in the 1990s and had been called for an inquiry. he's in our westminster studio. good afternoon. when you made those calls for an enquiry, are we talking back when you are health minister or what sort of timescale? before that.
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i became what sort of timescale? before that. ibecame an what sort of timescale? before that. i became an mp in 2001 and had constituents who were caught up in this and i made requests both of conservative government and the then labour government to say we need to do more to support them. the course ofa do more to support them. the course of a public enquiry came from the fa ct of a public enquiry came from the fact that the department of health, although it had revealed information, had not answered questions in an enquiry form, and there were repeated questions about who knew what, and when did they know it, but the quality of blood and any risks attached to it when it was being used for transfusion. and i always felt there was something that needed to be investigated and i was one of a number of mps who did this, this has been a long process, andi this, this has been a long process, and i am pleased that the calls have been heeded and the government has made the announcement today. why do you think there was resistance to answering those questions before now? i don't know, is the short answer. because those who were
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responsible, i think, answer. because those who were responsible, ithink, have answer. because those who were responsible, i think, have long departed the scene. i could not understand why the department was so resista nt to understand why the department was so resistant to answering questions. more and more information was put into the public domain in terms of documents, documents were released by the peter archer enquiry, for the penrose enquiry in scotland, but the thing that seemed to be missing was people prepared to come forward and a nswer people prepared to come forward and answer questions, and what we have seen recently has been the revelation of more documents available from outside the department which cast new light and raised new questions on those crucial issues of what was known. many of those who have survived this will tell stories of what they heard in hospital when they were being treated, they were treated differently in different hospitals, and it was at a time when patients we re and it was at a time when patients were not given the sort of consideration we would expect them to have now and people felt they we re to have now and people felt they were treated perhaps as objects rather than as patients. and somehow, people have to find out
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what happened to them, why certain things happened and who knew what at a particular time. it does seem at best puzzling that it has taken this long. it a best puzzling that it has taken this long. ita part best puzzling that it has taken this long. it a part of you that suspects some sort of cover—up?” long. it a part of you that suspects some sort of cover-up? i don't know the answer to that, really. the penrose enquiry in scotland looked long and hard at the issue, people thought then there might be what was called a smoking gun but in the end was not. but all the time, people have been looking to see if there was anything new and the recent investigations mentioned by diana johnson, who has done so well as an mp representing people and paul goggins before her, the issues mentioned this afternoon suggest there may be more documents that indicate we still do not know everything about how the blood was transferred and what people knew about it. and that is so important to people who have suffered for so long. what of the breadth of this enquiry and what it might end up doing notjust in terms of answering
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questions, but if relevant, in handing out punishments to those who may have been responsible for something seriously amiss?” may have been responsible for something seriously amiss? i do not know and cannot prejudge what the enquiry will find or what the end result may be. i think those who have been involved now have to be consulted as the government has said very clearly they will be, to work out precisely what style of enquiry that might be. i know andy burnham was very that might be. i know andy burnham was very interested in the sort of enquiry that david cameron instigated into hillsborough, led by bishopjames instigated into hillsborough, led by bishop james jones, which found instigated into hillsborough, led by bishopjamesjones, which found a way of bringing information held without the full panoply of a public enquiry, but having a certainty that people needed to answer questions. so genuinely, it is not for me to decide what form the enquiry will take, you have to talk to those who have involved. i hope people come to a reasonable answer because we need to get moving on this. again, i would not lead to prejudge what will come out of it and i do not think
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people should go into it with an intention of delivering a particular answer. let us find out what happened, because that seems to me to be terribly imported as a constituency mp. and we will be talking to andy burnham and about half an hour. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour, but first, the headlines on bbc news. the prime minister orders an enquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and ‘80s, which left nearly 2500 people dead. a major review into working practices recommends better protection for so—called gig economy workers, and an end to cash—in—hand jobs. foreign secretary borisjohnson agrees with a conservative mp that the european union can "go whistle" for any brexit divorce payment. hello, the business news this afternoon...
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companies in the so—called gig economy have been reacting to a report into working practices that calls for greater protections for its workers. deliveroo has criticised any move that will restrict labour flexibility. ride—sharing app uber say their drivers earn well above the minimum wage. telecoms watchdogs have tightened the rules for a new auction of mobile airwaves, imposing new restrictions on the dominance of ee and vodafone as operators prepare for the shift to 5g technology. 0fcom said it would introduce a 37% cap on the total share of usable radio spectrum any operator can control. ee currently has a5% of the airwaves. sales at marks and spencer's clothing and home division fell at a slower rate than before in the first three months of the year. however, like—for—like food sales dipped by 0.1%, which was worse than expected. are the jobs of uber drivers or the riders who deliver takeaways for deliveroo flexible or are they insecure? by
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by the independent workers or unprotected, part of the so—called gig economy, and the on demand revolution? a report today says that these workers should have more rights like maternity pay and sick pay, minimum wage and national insurance. joining us now is sam james, managing director of the uk domestic cleaning app. your company would be considered part of the gig economy. what would paying national insurance, for example, maternity pay, doody business? well, ithink at the moment it is difficult to give a full definition of what it is going to do because we didn't have clear picture of what will happen. however, we already pay £9.a0 an hourin however, we already pay £9.a0 an hour in london, which is well above the minimum wage and well above what cleaning agency would pay. so we believe there should be plenty of room for us to give extra benefits, a national insurance, it is not
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something i'm particularly worried about. we always want to give a fair deal to our cleaners, they are the most important part of our business. if they are not interested in working for us, there is no app. so from that perspective we are happy to go with whatever the recommendations are. do you think your workers are entitled to these rights? dally—mac the result was a trade—off between the flexibility they get and the security they get currently. they are defined as self implode currently. the cleaners by what our model have a massive amount of flexibility, and unlike hooper or deliveroo, they do get paid a secure hourly rate for the work they accept. so we already offer some protection is mike insurance against damage, we also offer some support in terms of collecting payments for them if a customer does not pay. so we would be happy to look at extra benefits as is relevant to that. what do you think of the report,
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then? what would you say to the author, who will be on later on? yes, so, ithink, ispoke author, who will be on later on? yes, so, i think, i spoke to matthew during the process, i have spoke to some of his colleagues. i think he wa nts some of his colleagues. i think he wants clarity, what defines someone who is self—employed and what defines someone who is an independent contractor or worker? because at the moment we live in this kind of limbo and it is difficult to proceed with confidence. 0ne difficult to proceed with confidence. one such example is giving training to cleaners. we have been advised that could put their status as self—employed or workers in jeopardy, status as self—employed or workers injeopardy, so we do not do it. but we would love to give extra training to our cleaners, give extra support and how to do their taxes and how to find personal insurance, things like that. so, extra clarity allows us to proceed with more confidence to run our business with more confidence, and also give better support to the clea ners and also give better support to the cleaners who work for us. sam james,
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thank you very much. that's the business but this hour. —— for this hour. plans to almost double the number of welsh speakers having ruled out. the welsh speakers having ruled out. the welsh government has set out plans for more welsh speaking teachers in primary and secondary schools. 0ur wales correspondent sian lloyd reports. at this school, children's lessons are taught through welsh. members of the welsh government came here to spread the word about their new goal for the language, supported by a guest popular with the pupils. you have laid down the gauntlet, it is a big task but it is achievable and if we believe we can do it, we can do it. expanding welsh medium education is at the heart of the strategy, which includes creating 150 welsh
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language nasuwt groups over the next decade and increasing the number of welsh speaking primary and secondary teachers. but it is recognised that must be opportunities to learn and use welsh outside of school. there is also recognition they need support from parents. it is the vast majority of people but for some pa rents, majority of people but for some parents, they need to be encouraged. some people will say, if my kid goes toa some people will say, if my kid goes to a welsh speaking school, will they have more homework, will the correspondence will be in welsh? we wa nt to ta ke correspondence will be in welsh? we want to take parents with us. the welsh language has equal status with endless but while people may be used to seeing signs in both languages, how would these plans be received? if you live in wales, it is part of a territory. it makes sense to keep the language alive. i have a family in wales but i didn't want to speak welsh. the welsh language is celebrated every year at the
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national eisteddfod, a cultural festival which welcomes non—welsh speakers as well. the welsh government wants more people to be able to communicate in welsh, but the public‘s appetite for change remains to be seen. we drink 55 million cups of coffee every day in the uk, but the restore confusion about the impact it has on our health. two studies are today suggest coffee drinkers have longer life expectancy, but others have urged caution, saying there is no proof coffee drinking is good for you. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson investigates. it is estimated that more than 2 billion cups of coffee are drunk each day around the world, but is it good for you? today, two studies published in the journal annals of internal medicine claim an association between drinking coffee and living longer. sounds like good news? if this was related due to the coffee and the effects carried on
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through your life, we would estimate that every extra cup body would extend the life of a man by about three months and the left will woman by about a month. but the larger of the two studies, which examined data from half a million europeans, excluded people who had heart attacks, cancer and diabetes, excluded people who had heart attacks, cancerand diabetes, both studies, which lasted 16 years, only ask people once how much copy they drank. just because coffee drinkers live a bit longer, doesn't mean it is the coffee that is causing it. there may be other explanations, like their income, physical activities, and other studies try to ta ke activities, and other studies try to take these things into account the stop so, what do we know about copy? some studies have linked it to heart risk factors such as raised cholesterol or blood pressure. 0thers suggest it may offer some protection for the heart. but there is no conclusive evidence either way. confused? is no conclusive evidence either way. confused ? well, is no conclusive evidence either way. confused? well, too much coffee is bad, and pregnant women are advised to limit their intake.
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otherwise, it seems, drinking coffee is fine. but then, so is abstaining. i don't drink any of the stuff. i like the aroma but i don't like the taste! i probably drink more than i'm supposed to. so i was quite encouraged when i first heard reports, but then there is the caveat that suggests we might not be able to trust everything. you know the old thing about everything in moderation! that is the plan. more now on the independent review that's called for the government to end the "cash—in—hand economy". matthew taylor, a former adviser to tony blair, says cash jobs such as window cleaning and decorating are worth up to £6 billion a year, much of it untaxed. he also called for greater protections for flexible workers, and people on zero hours contracts. we hope to speak soon to matthew
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taylor. it has already been described, the report, as the basis for reform. it has also been described as a missed opportunity to tackle the big picture. i think we can talk now to matty taylor. i hope you can hear me? —— matty taylor. i think we're having some technical issues with the line. but we hope to be back with him soon. yes, apologies about that, we definitely cannot speak to him at the moment. let's move on to another story. it's believed that more than 200 million women —— women worldwide who wa nt million women —— women worldwide who want family planning services still do not have them. today a london conference is aiming to improve access to contraception for millions of women in the poorest countries. the internal —— international donors involved are bill and melinda gates, who are pledging £290 million of additionalfunding. a patient having a consultation at
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an abortion clinic in nepal. hilly half of all pregnancies in this country are unplanned. and while —— worldwide there is an estimated 22 million unplanned pregnancies every year. that is why today, health ministers and global charities are getting together at a summit in london to look at how they can get more contraceptives to women and girls in the poorest countries. the philanthropist who is co—hosting the conference believes special attention needs to be given to teenagers. this is the biggest population of adolescence we have ever had in the history of the earth, it is now coming through the developing world and that we do not offer them contraceptives, you are basically putting them into a life of destitute poverty. whereas if you can offer a of destitute poverty. whereas if you can offera girl of destitute poverty. whereas if you can offer a girl contraceptives, she will stay in school, she will tell you, i want to stay in school, i don't want to have my first baby until i am ready. earlier
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don't want to have my first baby untili am ready. earlier this don't want to have my first baby until i am ready. earlier this year, donald trump announced controversial plans to cut america's aid budget forfamily plans to cut america's aid budget for family planning and plans to cut america's aid budget forfamily planning and plays plans to cut america's aid budget for family planning and plays tough restrictions on how the remaining money gets used. britain is one of the countries worried about the impact on those changes. there are many areas where we work with america and we will continue to work with america, but this is one area where we are not seeing eye to eye, and we believe this is not an era where we can stand still, because there are human consequences which are enormous, are too many women and girls, 21a million women and girls still do not get access to modern family planning methods. the uk is already the second biggest country donor in family planning. today it has announced more money so it will now be spending £225 million a year until 2022. the government says it hopes the money will empower more women to have kids when they want.
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and to stay in education and employment if they wish. we will have a check on the weather now. well, if the rain has not arrived where you are, just yet, it is well, if the rain has not arrived where you are, just yet, it is on the way! the rain coming down heavily on this was a shot earlier today in the south of wales. but the rain continues to move east. you can see on the radar picture, there are three bands, but it is all merging together now as admits across eastern england. not many people will escape, just north of england. scotla nd will escape, just north of england. scotland with a mixture of sunshine and showers, some drier weather in northern ireland. overnight, the rain getting into yorkshire and lincolnshire, then moving south—east. temperatures overnight between nine and 1a in towns and cities. tomorrow, the rain clears
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away, followed by high pressure. that means we will have some early rain to start across south—east england, clearing into the near continent. the clouds break up as the pressure rises and there will be lots more sunshine across the board. in the sunshine, highs between 19 and 23. about average for the time of year. but it will feel pleasantly warm in the sunshine. fresh sea breezes coming in off the north sea coast, keeping temperatures more pegged back for these coastal areas, about 15 in aberdeen. but wherever you are it will feel pleasantly warm in the sunshine. that's the latest weather. this is bbc news at a:00. the headlines: the prime minister orders an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and ‘80s — which left nearly 2500 people dead. a major review into working practices recommends better protection for gig—economy workers — and an end to cash—in—hand jobs. a fourth british man has been killed
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fighting against is in syria. according to kurdish forces. 13 bikers who brought leeds city centre to a standstill on a halloween ride—out are sentenced. also coming up — can konta conquer? it is the biggest day in the british women's tennis in a generation. johanna konta aims to become britain's first female wimbledon semi—finalist since 1978 when she steps out onto centre court shortly. and there's uncertainty over the future of the british grand prix
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