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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 12, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines. four weeks after the fire at grenfell tower, the new council leader promises to build homes for those who no longer have one — saying it will take a generation to rebuild trust. the community is strong, the cousin is between the community, whether rich or poor, it is between then and the state. whether they have lost trust in local government or central government. that is what we have to restore. donald trump defences son who was under pressure after discussions with russian lawyer. he said his son was being subjected to a witchhunt. a gay man wins a landmark ruling at the supreme court about equal pensions. thousands of married gay couples will now have the same pension entitlements as heterosexual couples. the eu's chief negotiator warns the uk must recognise its financial obligations to the union. in response to comments from the borisjohnson — michel barnier says he can't hear any whistling, only a clock ticking.
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a royal procession for the king and queen of spain. the queen formally welcomes king felipe and queen letizia to the uk as they begin a three—day visit. and will andy murray joinjohanna konta in the wimbledon semi—finals? this is the scene at sw19 on centre court — we'll keep you update to with how the world number one is getting on. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. exactly four weeks after the fire at grenfell tower which killed at least 80 people, the new leader of kensington & chelsea has promised
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that the council will use some of its reserves to build homes, to help the families who've lost theirs. elizabeth campbell said people who survived the fire will take a generation to trust the council again. mps are debating the inquiry into the fire this afternoon — and tonight the community in west london will hold a vigil for those killed and injured. frankie mccamley reports. i have been here in the community for some weeks speaking to those who escaped from the terror and people in the community have been pulling together and they have been giving much—needed help. the russians or all as people try to come to terms with what has happened. there is still a long way to go after police said this morning the recovery operation inside the tower is not going to be complete until the end of the year. stepping into grenfell tower, climbing the stairs to what was people's homes. investigators have so far recovered 32 bodies out of at least 80
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believed to be dead still missing. it is a meticulous process. some victims may never be identified. i feel passionate about getting those people back to their loved ones. i understand how frustrating it is for people outside this environment to sit and wait and say, "why can't i have my family back? surely it is easy?" it isn't. the magnitude started to become apparent even before we got there. inspector nick thatcher was in charge of the first officers on the scene. it is very much a case of, you six, you ten, 12 or two, whatever numbers they arrived in, there's a problem there, this is as much as i can tell you, off you go, if you need help, let me know. my briefings to the officers were not great but it was moving so fast because again, as people were arriving, the fire was so aggressive. most who used to live in the tower are still waiting
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for permanent homes. many are in hotels and four weeks on, it is taking its toll. it will be with me forever. i dream about it. every night it comes back to me. but you can't change it. it is going to haunt me for the rest of my life. following a series of failings by kensington and chelsea council, elizabeth campbell takes her position as leader next week and admits there is a lot of work to be done. the community is strong. the chasm is between the community, whether they are rich or poor, it is between them and the state, whether they've lost trust in local government and they've lost trust in central government. that is what we've got to restore. but some think the council is still out of touch with residents here. the public has not got confidence in the new leadership. she is tainted by her connection with the previous leader, fairly or unfairly and i'm afraid what local residents don't want is an out of touch leader who does
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not understand their concerns and what they are going through. elsewhere, tests have been carried out on 200 buildings with similar cladding to grenfell tower. all have failed safety checks. labour has called for the process to be speeded up, saying the government has been too slow at letting others know whether their homes are safe. later today, there will be a debate in the commons over the public inquiry into the disaster and tonight, the community will once again come together for a vigil, a chance to reflect and show unity following a tragedy that has torn so many lives apart. this afternoon the inquests into nine victims will open to give families some of those much—needed a nswe i’s families some of those much—needed answers but there are still many questions being asked. where will people be living, what is going to happen to the tower so for weeks on this feels like very much the
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beginning. the trauma has had a huge impact on the community, particularly on children. our correspondent graham satchell has been to meet some of them, and find out how they're coping in the aftermath of the fire. in sight of grenfell tower, fun and laughter. this is kids on the green, a safe space where children are encouraged to be children. the football's really fun. there's a lot of food and, yeah, just really fun overall. the first week was pretty hard. then, it got a bit easier after a few weeks. then, when this started happening, you just come here, it distracts you a lot. kids on the green is run by volunteers, teachers, therapists, entertainers, even hairdressers. children can play and be supported. parents can get some respite. i've got two boys and also an older girl, who is 13. and a couple of her friends were in the tower, so she's been really affected by it, as well, and upset. it is hard to know that some of the neighbours, a teacher,
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children that my kids were friends with, are no longer with us and also, the building being right there, in our faces, it doesn't help. a month after the fire, the impact on some of the children is only now starting to show. the last week, some of the symptoms have become kind of more severe. we find that a lot of kids have been scared to go to bed. they have been scared to fall asleep. so we are giving parents a lot of practical support in resetting their routines and making the children feel safe. in the art tent, children can paint anything they want. most draw the tower. we have a team of art therapists on site all the time so that if children are drawing disturbing pictures, that they are supported and perhaps they might want to talk. it is very sad that so many children witnessed it. such widespread sadness and horror, it's. .. all the children here have witnessed
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unimaginable horror. this isjust the beginning of a healing process. but we know that healing is going to take years. it's going to take a very long time. graham satchell, bbc news, west london. the supreme court has unanimously ruled in favour of a gay man who argued that he and his husband should have the same pension rights as those enjoyed by heterosexual couples. the case was brought by a former cavalry officerjohn walker, who challenged the rule which limited access to pension funds accrued before 2005, when civil partnerships were introduced. our legal affairs correspondent clive coleman reports from the supreme court. victory after an 11 year legal battle. john walker worked for the company innaspec for 23 years, paying
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into the firm's pension scheme. mr walker and his now husband became civil partners in 2006. that was shortly after the partnerships became legal. but the company, relying on an exception in domestic law, refused to take account of his pension contributions before that date. however, the court ruled eu law trumped that. mr walker's husband will be entitled to a spouse's pension on mr walker's death, provided of course that they remained married. it would be the same with anybody, whether it is a heterosexual couple or a same—sex couple, someone you love, that person you want to make sure is looked after as long as they are alive. i'm olderthan him, therefore statistically, the chances are that iwill die before him. i wanted to ensure he was looked after. the effect of today's ruling is massive. it does notjust affectjohn walker but everyone who is in a civil
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partnership or same—sex marriage and that is whether they are paying into an occupational pension scheme with a private employer or within the public sector. supporters were thrilled but there is a possible storm cloud on the horizon. it is only eu law that allowed him to win today. so obviously, what mr walker wants to know and what we want to know is what is going to happen to these rights when we leave the european union. and the uk courts will no longer have the power to apply eu law to british law. john walker is happy that equality at the heart of civil partnerships and same—sex marriage has finally caught up with pensions and there is a pot at the end of the rainbow. clive coleman, bbc news. president trump's eldest son has said he didn't tell his father about a meeting last year with a russian lawyer — who was apparently offering to help the trump election campaign. yesterday donald trump junior released emails which showed he was keen to meet the lawyer, who allegedly had kremlin ties and material damaging to hillary clinton.
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our washington correspondent gary o'donoghue has more. how much trouble is donald trump junior in having released the e—mails? junior in having released the e-mails? i think it depends who you ask. clearly those people who think there is a bad smell about donald trump and his election campaign and connection with russia cbs is getting quite close to a smoking gun. those who support the president theatre just as part of the general media conspiracy, witchhunt, nick hewer insult of the day. i think the difference here is that we have had before records of meetings between trump officials in the campaign and the russian ambassador and the odd banker here and there but here we have actually in his own words donald trump junior reaching have actually in his own words donald trumpjunior reaching out to someone, donald trumpjunior reaching out to someone, responding to someone who said look, i have a connection with the russian state, i have some search for you on hillary clinton,
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would you like it. and him saying i love it. to me that seems like a qualitative difference to what has gone before. you've had some pretty robust defence of it by donald trump junior himself and his father this morning on twitter. saying that he did a greatjob, he's innocent, transparent, etc. but it will fuel the investigation is taking place here on capitol hill and all these committees in the senate of the house and of course that special prosecutor, special counsel appointed by the department of justice that has the power to bring prosecutions. these e-mails but he has admitted to but the question must be asked are there any more? he says not. he was asked about last night and said there are no other contacts night and said there are no other co nta cts he night and said there are no other contacts he can recall of that nature. he says he did not tell his father about it. but the other factor about what has happened is
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that this was not regarded by him as a low—level thing, isjust part that this was not regarded by him as a low—level thing, is just part of the run—of—the—mill of the campaign, he got this person to come to trump tower, he caught paul monfort into the meeting, the campaign chairman and be son—in—law of the president, jared kushner. he got the inner circle together in anticipation of this meeting and i think that is a problem for donald trump junior and indeed the campaign. i'm sure it is something the investigators will wa nt to something the investigators will want to look at. and i think it will reinvigorate some of those people looking for other potential connections as well. of course if you're in the white house you see this just as part of the drip drip conspiracy trying to bring down this administration and they have brought down the shutters. yesterday at the white house briefing sarah sanders, the deputy press secretary, gave us basically a one line statement and then just refuse to say anything more, referring it all to lawyers.
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and in the sense when even the white house is saying we're not answering, talked of the lawyers, you know there is trouble. and in the next hour or so we're waiting for the senatejudiciary hour or so we're waiting for the senate judiciary committee hour or so we're waiting for the senatejudiciary committee to give the 0k senatejudiciary committee to give the ok to the nomination for the next head of the fbi. and what a job thatis next head of the fbi. and what a job that is to take on at this point in time given what happened to the previous incumbent. he was fired by donald unceremoniously in may having accused donald trump of demanding loyalty as a price for keeping his job. so james comey went out, this is kissed —— chris marais, a pretty low— key is kissed —— chris marais, a pretty low—key character, not a flamboyant character in any sense. but someone who is going to face serious questions this morning about what the president has said to you in preparation for taking on this job for, what has he asked of you if anything and how independent are you prepared to be. with saying that the special counsel, robert mueller, he
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will be the one who decides on potential charges in the russian investigation but in a sense it is christopher ray, his foot soldiers that will do a lot of the work. so the democrats will see this as another chance to keep this whole thing going and my goodness, it does keep going. you need a break soon! thank you very much. and we'll be showing live coverage of the fbi senatejudiciary committee hearing at three o'clock, where democrats are expected to ask more questions about whether president trump has any ties to russia. the european union's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier has said britain must recognise the existence of its financial obligations to the eu. yesterday the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, suggested the eu could ‘go whistle' for what he described as extortionate financial demands. at a news conference in the last hour, mr barnier said he can't hear any whistling — just the clock ticking. during his news conference — the chief negotiator for the eu said
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they were ready for the next round of negotiations. we need to engage substantially in all the issues of the first phase of negotiations as agreed with the uk on the 19th ofjune. citizens rights, the single financial settlement, the new borders in particular in ireland, and the other separation issues like your item and the treatment of goods placed on the market before the brexit day. we have so far published nine eu position papers on the different issues. and eu positions are clear. we now need to know the uk position
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on each of these issues in order to make progress. we need to know on which points we agree and on which points we disagree. so that we can negotiate in earnest. my aim is to make good progress next week and at oui’ make good progress next week and at our next make good progress next week and at oui’ next sessions make good progress next week and at our next sessions in august on all issues. we cannot remain idle as the clock is ticking. adam fleming are brussels correspondent said earlier that the exchanges showed that tension was building between the sides. michel barnier was unruffled as usual, but there was some frustration from what he sees as the fact that the uk site
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has not been as transparent and open as he has in terms of what their position is on a range of issues. michel barnier pointing out his side has published loads of papers covering loads of different areas of the brexit negotiations. he repeated his criticism of theresa may and her proposalfor his criticism of theresa may and her proposal for the rights of eu nationals living in the uk after brexit. he said they do not go far enough and do not give a role to the european court of justice enough and do not give a role to the european court ofjustice which is one of the red line for theresa may. as you mention the big sticking point now edging is this idea of the financial settlement, should the uk pay a bill for its financial obligations it had as a member of the eu. michel barnier saying until david davies acknowledges the principle but there is a bill to be paid there will be a lack of trust between the two sides and they cannot have talks about the future relationship between the eu and the uk. the headlines on bbc news. as police continue their search of
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g re nfell tower as police continue their search of grenfell tower the new council leader promises money from reserves to build more homes in the borough. donald trump has insisted his eldest son is innocent after donald trump junior admitted meeting a russian lawyer during the presidential election campaign. the supreme court has ruled that a man in a same—sex marriage is entitled to full spouse pension when his died. and in sport andy murray is pushing to reach the wimbledon semifinals and is up against sam querrey on centre court ). he took the first set but lost second. and in the mixed doubles the brothers lost on straight sets. and england women are aiming for the fifth consecutive win at the cricket world cup today. they were up against new zealand in derby. they finished 280 449. ——
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against new zealand in derby. they finished 280 449. -- 284-9. against new zealand in derby. they finished 280 449. —— 284—9. some breaking news and a home office review into extremism which has been reported, the government concluded that islamic extremist organisations in the uk are mostly funded by small donations from within the uk rather than from groups or states overseas. the review said overseas funding was a significant source of funding for a significant source of funding for a small number of organisations with extremism concerns but this was not true for the vast majority of extremist groups in the uk. the home secretary amber rudd published a 2—page summary of the review which was ordered by david cameron in 2015. but she said she would not publish the full report for national security reasons because it contained personal information. another report coming in from home
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affairs correspondent danny shaw who has been looking at a report from the chief inspector of borders and immigration david bolt was that half of the small ports, marinas and docs on the coast of england and scotland, had received no visits from any border force staff for more than a year. of course coming at a time when border staff said they are particularly pushed and understaffed. and also the number of crime—buster arrivals identified by border closed at east coast ports had increased and border force was dealing appropriately with individuals it says whether they claimed asylum or agree to be removed immediately. the overall sense he says was that the border force was stretched and in some insta nces force was stretched and in some instances stretched too thinly. the home office said they accepted the findings of the report. there's been another drop in unemployment — it fell by 64,000 to 1.49 million in the three months to may, according to the latest officialfigures. this means the unemployment
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rate of 4.5% is now at its lowest since 1975. but wage increases continue to fall further behind inflation — earnings rose by 2% year—on—year, below the current rate of inflation. here's our economics correspondent andy verity. turn to page four, everybody. teaching english has been a growing industry in the last 12 years, as the job market keeps generating new vacancies — many of them filled by people who grew up speaking other european languages. they willjoin a record workforce of 32 million. as a proportion of that, unemployment is at its lowest for 42 years. but the number of new students is not growing as fast now and the owner of this bristol language school fears she will have to tell her teachers why their pay will not beat inflation. it is the most difficult thing i have to do. these people have given me loyalty and their hard work and to tell them i cannot reward that as i would like to is really frustrating, especially as it is beyond my control. unemployment is just under 1.49 million. that is 4.5%.
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pay rises improved to 2%. that is higher than the last figures, but not enough to keep up with prices. this chart shows you what has happened to earnings over the last 12 years. so, we have had pay rises, the yellow line coming up here, but to take into account inflation, you have to look at the blue line. that is where we are now. we are up about 3.8% from the trough, but we are down about 3.2% from the peak in march 2008. if you look at where we are now, we are earning no more, in real terms, than we were way back in 2006. we need to keep driving wages forward and, fundamentally, that is about productivity and about the skills base. and underpinning those things is investment. with consumer price inflation accelerating and newjobs not really paying that much more, it is clear that real wages, consumer purchasing power, is going to be tightening, which creates real questions
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about the longevity of the consumer—led recovery. economists used to think low unemployment would lead workers to lose their fear of the dole queue and demand inflation—beating pay rises. but in post—financial crisis britain, that theory can seem out of line with the facts. andy verity, bbc news. the charity citizens advice is calling for all energy customers to be given a rebate of £285 — because it says the companies which manage the gas and electricity grids and local networks have been allowed to charge people too much, even though their prices are controlled by the energy regulator, ofgem. here's our business correspondent, theo leggett. pylons and pipelines. the cost of transporting electricity and gas makes up a quarter of our energy bills. these networks are looked after by national grid, along with a number of local network companies. because they don't face any competition, the prices they can charge are vetted by the regulator, ofgem, and approved for an eight—year period.
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but citizens advice estimates that, during the current period, which we are halfway through, the network companies will make too much money — £7.5 billion of excess profits. so they want each household to get a rebate of £285 to be deducted from their bills. ofgem have overestimated the cost of investment and borrowing. for example, interest rates have not been as high as they expected. they have also allowed the companies to earn money at the rate that a much riskier company would be able to do and they have not been tough enough with the companies on sharing the benefits of any efficiency savings they have made. ofgem insists it is protecting the interests of bill payers and it has warned the network companies that the next set of price controls, from 2021, will be tougher. as ofgem, we are always looking at ways we can improve value for money for consumers. as part of that, there is a broad discussion about how we make these things work. we are keen to engage people like citizens advice. one thing i'm determined to make sure is that these
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next price controls will be consumer—led. therefore, we welcome interactions with people like citizens advice and other consumer bodies. the network companies themselves reject the calculations made by citizens advice and they point out that they are planning to invest huge sums in infrastructure over the next few years to help keep the lights on and our homes warm. theo leggett, bbc news. returning to news of that whole of review into extremism and the government has concluded islamic extremist organisations in the uk are mostly funded by small donations from within the uk rather than from groups or states overseas. the home office review of extremist funding said money from overseas was a significant source of revenue for small number of organisations with extremism concerns but it was not true for the vast majority of extremist groups in the uk. with me
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is our diplomatic correspondent james landale. this review ordered by david cameron back in november 2015, the home secretary amber rudd has published a summary of the review today. what have we found out that we did not already know? not a great deal. this isjust that we did not already know? not a great deal. this is just a summary of the full report, the home secretary is not publishing the full document because she says there is a volume of personal information and secondly for national security reasons. but will not satisfy the critics who have been pressing for this report to be published for a long time. the government has been sitting on it because the contents are believed by some to include quite critical remarks about foreign governments that have been accused or at least of allowing the funding of extremist groups in the uk by money that comes from their shores. particular countries in the gulf. so thatis particular countries in the gulf. so that is why people have been pushing for it. today we just got a summary, what it does is it tells us that in
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the review of this, essentially they're saying of most extremist groups in the uk, most of the funding comes from anonymous donations from within the uk. however for a donations from within the uk. howeverfor a small group donations from within the uk. however for a small group they do rely on overseas funding but it is just a small group. how is that information going to help with the fight against extremism? the government says it is going to crack on and use the information it has gathered to do several things. primarily saying let's see if we can get more transparency here. so expose a bit more about what these groups do because many of them call themselves charities. but there is a wide definition of what a charity is. so explain to the public what they are involved in and then get more transparency in terms of the financial services sector which supports these groups by allowing them to set up a financial
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instruments to process the money. crucially the government says it will ensure that the charity commission which regulates charities, all charities will have to declare their overseas funding now which i think will be quite a significant change. you mention this was just a summary, not the full report. mps will be able to see the full report on privy council times in other words, not allowed to reveal the content. but how much, how great will those concerns be over transparency or a lack of it in the fact that so far we have not got the fact that so far we have not got the full report and is there any prospect of the full bought eventually being published? on the evidence today i think very little suggestion that that will happen. there is tension between the government wanting to have transparency in this area but equally it wants to protect diplomatic relations with other countries. for example there was a large report out last week that made detailed accusations against saudi arabia and the funding that came
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from a country to extremist groups in the uk. the short document today made no mention of any other foreign country made no mention of any other foreign cou ntry let made no mention of any other foreign country let alone saudi arabia. so at the same time saudi arabia is a major ally of the uk and a source of intelligence, that is used to protect british citizens here in the uk. so that is the tension the government has to deal with. let's catch up with the weather. a very wet 24 hours across england and wales. some standing water puddles and parts of london but the cloud and rain has been moving away and most of us finished the day something like this. sunny skies and feeling pleasantly warm. through the rest of the day the clouds will continue to melt away and we are all in the same boat with the warm sunshine coming through. the temperature into the low 20s,
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peaking at 23 are soul. overnight the temperature at the thing away solely called one with pockets of approval ground frost 12 temperatures in the towns and cities up temperatures in the towns and cities up into double figures. more dry weather to start the morning but a few changes with showers breaking out across england and wales and eastern scotland and the band of rain arriving for east scotland and northern ireland. the temperature similarto northern ireland. the temperature similar to today. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines at 14:31. one month on from the grenfell fire, search teams are still working inside the tower. it comes as the new council leader has promised to build homes for those who no longer have one. donald trump has defended his son, who's under pressure after his discussions
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with a russian lawyer. the president says donald junior is being subjected to a witch hunt. an ex—cavalry officer has won a landmark ruling at the supreme court — giving his husband the same pension rights as a wife would receive. the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has said britain must recognise its financial obligations to the union — after borisjohnson suggested it could ‘go whistle' in regards to paying the divorce bill. the queen and prince philip have formally welcomed the king and queen of spain to the uk — as they begin a three—day state visit. it's expected this will be the duke of edinburgh's last state visit before he retires from official duties later this year. time for sport and no doubt straight to wimbledon news. andy murray continues the defence of his wimbledon title this afternoon with a quarterfinal match on centre court right now against sam querry. how is
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andy doing? another big day for british hopes. afterjohanna konta's win yesterday, hoping to be the first two british people and semifinals since 1977. he took the first set but responded in the second. things finally balanced on the third but andy murray has the served to go 4—2 ahead but it could end up being very important solely bit of a tight match had andy murray at the moment but the coverage continues and we will see if andy murray can do it. over on court one, action going on between marin cilic and the conqueror of rafael nadal. he had that amazing win and is now
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looking to make it the first player from luxembourg ever to reach a grand slam semifinal. no player has ever got this far. it is now sex— sex and the into the tie—break into the second, marin cilic serving, so another tight match going on at the moment, and for a british hopes earlier, we had the brothers from liverpool playing in the men's doubles semifinal against the number four seeds, but unfortunately it was a straight sets defeat so they are now about what it was a good showing and they made it quite far in the tournament, but on court 12 they we re tournament, but on court 12 they were beaten. disappointment but murray mount behind me packed, waiting to see if two british players can make it into the semifinals for the first time in 50 yea rs. england's women are aiming for their fifth consecutive win
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at the cricket world cup today — new zealand in derby after their impressive win over australia at the weekend. tammy beaumont watched as wickets fell around her but reached her 50, from 58 balls. there was a disappointing end to her innings though, falling seven runs short of a century. natalie siver did reach 100 — her second century of this world cup. she finished on 129 and england made 284 for 9 from their 50 overs. and some sad news, days before the world para—athletics championships start in london on friday an athlete from the united arab emirates has died after a discus cage fell on him during training. abdullah hiyaye, who made his debut at the rio olympics, was training at newham leisure centre near the london stadium which will host the championships. the uae have decided to stay and compete in the championships as a tribute to their teammate. that's all the sport for now. you
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can find out more on those stories on the bbc sport website. more than an hour's time. let's get more now on the that meeting between donald trumpjunior and the russian lawyer during the us election campaign. with me is arkady ostrovsky, russia editor at the economist and author of the book invention of russia: the rise of putin and the age of fake news. so, are we looking at another example of fake news outlets this meeting something that raises more than eyebrows and something the kremlin would have been aware of before it happened? kremlin would have been aware of before it happened ?|j kremlin would have been aware of before it happened? i don't think it is fake news, it is real and that is very damaging to donald trump and his family. the way that the white house operates at the moment... why is it damaging to him? when donald trump says somebody rings un says i
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have information about your political rival you will see what have they got to say? what is wrong with that? a lot of donald trump's children have stayed at the centre of us politics past the elections and these were the people, as we heard from the story, donald trump's son who was meeting with a russian lawyer. this was the time when we already knew and the trump campaign knew there was a secret service operation into hacking american computers. whether that was connected to this particular meeting we don't know but they knew there was a hacking operation in place at the time and it was in that context that donald trump's son decided to meet a russian lawyer that was sold to him as a russian government representative, but she wasn't. she was actually selling fake goods. you are sure of that? this is very indicative of how russia operates.
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to portray it as, some of the american pundits and media, as a directed action from the kremlin, the les vladimir putin sitting in the les vladimir putin sitting in the office directing various people to do various things to undermine hillary clinton, is in accurate. russia is a network, it operates in a way like a mafia, where there are different players all connected through a web of connections and corruption. this lawyer who met with donald trump jr was corruption. this lawyer who met with donald trumer was involved and was defending the most egregious and terrible case of corruption that involved the lawyer who was murdered effectively in a russian prison and became the subject of an outcry in the west end because of sanctions introduced in the us and in europe. she was working for that and it is
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through the sprawling network and corruption that is actually making its way into eating into the trump campaign and the us. that is absolutely the point because if he had done a quick internet search before meeting her he may have thought there is something here, and it is that belief that has landed him in trouble, the belief that she was some sort of conduit which made the meeting highly suspect. absolutely, and it is being com pletely absolutely, and it is being completely immune to those sorts of things and not doing due diligence. cani things and not doing due diligence. can i remind you, in 1946, george cannon, the great american diplomat, wrote that communist propaganda thrives on diseased tissue, and the same can now be said of kremlin corruption. it feeds on diseased tissue but that has to be diseased
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tissue but that has to be diseased tissue to be there, and it is the ease with which these russian corrupt connections are making their way into the us system and eating into the institutions, that is the most worrying aspect of the story. into the institutions, that is the most worrying aspect of the storylj just want to go to washington because we are awaiting the senate judiciary committee, getting underway now, but it is events like this. arab league kremlin watching this. arab league kremlin watching this now thinking we might be in trouble here or do they look on this with a slight sense of humour? the kremlin are looking at it with joy. it is the joy of recognition and a confirmation of something that vladimir putin has long maintained. the whole world operates exactly the way russia does. the speech donald trump made in warsaw was effectively a verbatim quotation of vladimir putin's: speech, about destabilisation and values, etc.
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both are very nationalist speeches, but it is a joy of recognition, both of donald trump's ideology, if you can call it that, judaeo—christian traditional conservatism, whatever you call it, and the recognition of the same sort of dodgy, sometimes corrupt deals that are based on properties and ceiling, told you so. america and the west are just as unprincipled and just as corrupt as we are. good of you to join us, thank you. we've had a quick look of washington and willjust show thank you. we've had a quick look of washington and will just show you what is going on because we will keep across the coverage of the fbi senatejudiciary keep across the coverage of the fbi senate judiciary committee keep across the coverage of the fbi senatejudiciary committee getting underway. they will be looking more into him and those rumours of further russian contact that may
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well come to the fore, so we will ta ke well come to the fore, so we will take you back to washington. the king and queen of spain are in london on the first day of a three—day state visit. king felipe vi and his wife queen letizia travelled by carriage to buckingham palace with the queen and the duke of edinburgh, in what is expected to be the duke's last state visit before he retires from official duties later this year. let's speak to professor pedro schwartz, the spanish economist and former politician, who helped to found spain's ruling popular party. hejoins me from our oxford studio. as the royals they have much in common but points of difference in their countries' respective views on brexit and gibraltar so this is happening in an interesting context? it isa happening in an interesting context? it is a really interesting context and almost didn't happen. it was supposed to happen in 2016 butler what political problems in spain and then last month but we had the
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general election so finally it did happen. the ceremonial welcome was carried out on horse guards parade as it always is, there are around two state visits every year. that happened just after 12 o'clock and as you were saying the duke of edinburgh led the inspection of the guard of honour alongside king felipe vi and those mail we —— those pictures may well be the last time we see the duke of edinburgh do that, but if there's a very big state visit last year he may be encouraged out of retirement but that was situation on horse guards, and after the anthems had been played, king felipe vi and the queen got into one carriage and they processed down the moll. those pictures you see with the carriages surrendered by the household cavalry and what these pictures are all about. these pictures go around the
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world, britain doing pomp and circumstance like not many other countries are able to, so it is about diplomacy. the royalfamilies have strong connections going back centuries but in this era, post brexit vote and with the issues with gibraltar are lots of connections that want to be made. britain wants to emphasise the economic ties between the two countries and don't forget our 300,000 british expats living in spain, 150,000 spaniards working in this country, so the economic ties are very important. vested interests on both sides. as you mentioned, the rock, gibraltar, whether that will be brought up, and they are currently having tea with prince charles and the duchess of cornwall but around about 3:30pm king felipe vi will be going to the palace of westminster and making a speech and the question is whether he will mention this issue of
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gibraltar and he probably will. he has already mentioned that, speaking to the us assembly in september of last year. he said it was a colonial anachronism and he wanted to end the colonial anachronism, so that may make some interesting viewing and listening in the house of parliament later on this afternoon. it's been a year since the failed coup attempt in turkey — and in an exclusive interview with the bbc, president erdogan has rejected criticism of turkey's record on press freedom since the plot. he also criticised the eu for being insincere about possible turkish membership — and said he hoped for a post—brexit free trade deal with britain. mark lowen reports from istanbul. a year ago, turkey almost fell to the tanks. an attempted coup thwarted as turks resisted rogue soldiers, responding to their president's call. he evaded capture and emerged stronger. then came the purge —
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50,000 people arrested, 150,000 sacked or suspended, accused of links to the plotters. turkey again the world's leading jailer of journalists. at least 150 are in prison. but speaking to the bbc‘s hardtalk, president erdogan shook off criticism and denied that press freedom was under attack. translation: those people injail are not titled journalists. some of them collaborated with terror organisations, some of them were jailed for possession of a firearm. the past year has soured relations with europe. turkey furious at western criticism of the purge, mr erdogan slamming german and dutch leaders as "nazis". he said turkey's decades—long dream of eu membership is not absolute. translation: the majority of my people do not want eu anymore, they don't think its approach to turkey is sincere. despite this, we will continue on being sincere with the eu
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for a little more time. turkey's big economy is a prime trade target for post—brexit britain. the president said he wanted stronger relations — two countries at either door of the eu, striking a stronger relationship. this was vintage erdogan. pugnacious, delighting supporters, but it is proof of turkey's democratic decay. he has realigned the country. pugnacious, delighting his supporters, but to his critics, it is proof of turkey's democratic decay. it is less anchored to the west, but it is also more polarised. and for their eu and nato allies, he is not an easy partner. you can see the full interview this friday at 9:30pm on the bbc news channel. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first — the headlines on bbc news. police continue their search
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of grenfell tower — the new council leader promises money from reserves to build more homes in the borough. donald trump has insisted that his eldest son is innocent after donald junior admitted meeting a russian lawyer during the presidential election campaign. the supreme court has ruled that a man in a same—sex marriage is entitled to a full spouse's pension when his husband dies. in the business use this afternoon. the royal bank of scotland has been fined £3.65 billion by us authorities for its role in selling the risky mortgages that were at the centre of the financial crisis. although the fine is big, its not unexpected and rbs had already set aside £6.7 billion to settle their final bill. uk unemployment fell by 64,000 to 1.49 million in the three months to may — meaning the unemployment rate fell to its lowest since 1975, at 4.5%. but no improvement for real wages — that's wages taking into account the rate of inflation.
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excluding bonuses, average weekly earnings grew at 2%. fees for unplanned overdrafts are to be scrapped for the 20 million customers of lloyds banking group, which includes the halifax and bank of scotland. from november this year, any customer going over their overdraft limit will face no fees at all — but the bank may continue to block payments from the account until the overdraft is paid off. to the us now — and janet yellen, us federal reserve chair, begins her two—day semi—annual testimony before congress. with fed policymakers looking determined to tighten monetary policy despite disappointing inflation readings. let's get more from samira hussain who is in new york for us. when we talk about tightening
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monetary policy we often talk about hiking up interest rates and listening quantitative easing which is the buy—back of bonds. what will investors be looking for today? they will be looking for a few things. they will want to get a sense from her whether or not they are going to be seeing another rate rise. most people believe we will see one more interest rate rise in the coming year and it seems that we have already seen some of janet yellin's testimony that she will be presenting to congress in 15 minutes, and it seems she will also signal that the us economy is doing well. signs of real strength and that the economy can withstand another rate rise. another thing people will be looking at is more details and terms of what they are going to be doing in terms of reducing its portfolio. you will remember during the financial crisis, the federal reserve and to just a bunch of programmes to try to help stabilise the us economy and one of the things the dead was the
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bot massive amounts of bonds. it has been a few years since they stopped the bond buying programme but they still have all these bonds in their portfolios so janet yellin says they will start producing that portfolio so people and congress will be asking questions about how that is going to happen. what is the sense you get about her mission to bring the us economy off the bond buy—back programme and also increasing interest rates? so far, if you look at the us economy, the economy is doing well and there are concerns about inflation and it is nowhere near that 2% target rate by the federal reserve, but janet yellen has been doing a few things. she has been communicating very directly with investors and with the american people. the information has been cleared and you remember less idea of talking directly to people is
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something that is fairly new, so in terms of communications investigators have good idea of what is coming down the pipeline and nothing really comes out as too surprising but the bigger question in terms of janet yellen and her tenure is that it comes up in february and it is unclear whether she will remain in that post or whether donald trump will look to replace her. we are going to look at some other business news now. we will look at the markets. the ftse 100 is in the green at the moment. burberry added more than 4% after it reported healthy sales growth for the three months to 30 june. premier oiljumped 27% after it announced a "significant" oil discovery off the coast of mexico. that's it for me, back in an hour's time with more business news. for
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weeks on from the grenfell tower to another of the victims has been formally identified. the metropolitan police releasing these details and issuing a stark statement from her parents who say it is with great sadness we can confirm that we zainab deeb died in the tragic g re nfell tower zainab deeb died in the tragic grenfell tower fire. the family asking to be allowed to grieve privately at this time. that is the latest victim, 22—year—old zainab deeb who died in the grenfell tower fire for weeks ago. political parties must do more to
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prepare candidates. one mp suffered an anti—semitic attack and another was targeted by racist graffiti and repeated death threats. shadow home secretary diane abbott said she has been the victim of some particularly offensive racial abuse including use offensive racial abuse including use of the n word. she spoke about how the abuse affected both herself and her team. it is demoralising for me because of the volume. when i first became an mp, if you wanted to abuse and mp you had to write a letter, put it in an envelope with the stamp on itand put it in an envelope with the stamp on it and what to the post office, but now you just press a button, and iam but now you just press a button, and i am flooded with horrible racist abuse. is this something that has
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got worse over your use of parliament? it has definitely got worse. when i was a new mpi maybe got one d week, maybe a few more if something was in the news, but now we are seeing stuff everyday in volume and it is very upsetting for my staff and very demoralising for me. and yet we as a society like to think of ourselves as becoming more tolera nt think of ourselves as becoming more tolerant in general and certainly less tolerant of things like racism. this would seem to suggest it is going the other way?|j this would seem to suggest it is going the other way? i think generally we are more tolerant but the advent of new media and also the anonymity of new media has opened the floodgates for this type of abuse. it is not that these people weren't there all along that it is with new media and the keys of abusing people, it has all achieved abusing people, it has all achieved a mask and a velocity which is quite crashing if you're on the other end of it. how much does any of this
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have to do with established parties? today, labour are seeing the conservatives should be doing more to control their own people.|j wouldn't blame any single party or any single faction of a party for this. this is a problem of the time, but i think that all parties have to try and ensure that they are supporters don't engage in mindless abuse online, because itjust drags down. is there anything your party can do other than say please don't do it? can they take stronger action? we are very clear in the labour party that if we find people... we are very clear in the labour party that if you are known
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and you are peddling racist, homophobic, anti—semitic abuse, you will face a penalty. the problem with a lot of this abuse is that it is anonymous. not all of it is, of course, and that was the case of the conservative mp only this week who used incredibly vile language. what should happen to have?” used incredibly vile language. what should happen to have? i think she has been suspended and i think that is right. i just has been suspended and i think that is right. ijust think has been suspended and i think that is right. i just think that all of us as is right. i just think that all of us as mps have a responsibility to mind the language because it sets a terrible example. that was diane abbott. very few of us have any nails left because we are watching the andy murray match out of the corner of her eye. it is 1—1 in the third set, and that is in the tie—break. it is not easy to watch so we are not watching it and we suggest you don't, stay with us. he is playing the number 28 seat sam
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querrey. we will bring you the result, that is all you want. let's get the weather forecast. a very wet 24 hours across england and wales with the rain leaving puddles of water and dangerous driving conditions to start the day in parts of london, but most of us will finish the day something like this. largely sunny skies and feeling pleasantly warm. we are all in the same boat with the warm sunshine coming through the temperature white late getting into the low 20s, peaking at around 23 in the low 20s, peaking at around 23 in the london area. overnight clear skies allow the temperature to do away so a cold one for northern england and scotland with pockets of rural ground frost while the temperature in towns and cities stays in double figures. the afternoon will see changes and a few
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showers breaking out across england and scotland and a band of rain arriving for a west scotland and northern ireland, the temperature similarto northern ireland, the temperature similar to those of today, that is your weather. this is bbc news, the headlines at 3pm. four weeks after the fire at grenfell tower, the new council leader promises to build homes for those who no longer have one, saying it will take a generation to rebuild trust with the residents. the community is strong, the chasm is between the community, then add the state. whether they've lost trust in local government and lost trust in local government and lost trust in local government and lost trust in central government. and that's what we've got to restore. donald trump defends his son over his meeting with a russian lawyer. the president says donald jr is being subjected to a witch hunt. a gay man wins a landmark court ruling on equal pensions — thousands of married gay couples will now have the same pension entitlements as heterosexual couples. donald trump's choice to replace sacked fbi directorjames comey has his confirmation hearing
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in front of the senate shortly.

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