Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 14, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. new measures to tackle a rise in drug—related deaths. the government says it will target so—called legal highs and provide more help for addicts in its first strategy re—think for seven years. good morning, it's friday the 14th ofjuly. also this morning: five people are attacked with corrosive substances in london in the space of 90 minutes, police say one person has received life—changing injuries. actor mark rylance tells us how he thinks the spirit of dunkirk depicted in his latest film has been reflected in recent events. these recent disasters in manchester and london, the two disasters in london, have made us all so much more aware of civilian involvement
6:01 am
and the selflessness and bravery of the civilian rescue services. good morning, everyone. one for live music fans today. those controversial ticket re—selling websites. i'll be finding out whether gig—goers are getting a raw deal. at wimbledon the dream is over for johanna konta but she remains defiant. the british number one remains confident she can win the women's singles one—day in years to come after she lost her semi—final yesterday to the five—time champion venus williams. venus is rising again and given i'm squinting, so is the son? today for many after a cloudy start we're looking at a sunny day, sunny intervals, a few showers but later we will see rain coming into the north—west and later mike andi coming into the north—west and later mike and i will be back with more later in the programme. good morning. first, our main story. the home secretary amber rudd has launched a new strategy to tackle illegal drug use after what the home office calls a dramatic increase in the number of deaths from drugs in england
6:02 am
and wales since 2012. the strategy focuses on helping addicts to recover and makes clear there'll be no legal changes to decriminalise the use of drugs. the entire strategy applies to england, some parts of it also affect the rest of the uk. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, reports. enforcing the law on drugs. police raids against dealers have been the traditional way of clamping down on the drugs trade. it's estimated to cost the uk £io.7 the drugs trade. it's estimated to cost the uk £10.7 billion a year. and the new government drugs strategy says that approach will continue along with renewed efforts to get people off drugs. that's what they do at the harbour centre in london. support people affected by drugs and help them rebuild their lives. the home secretary amber rudd visited the centre this week. she said her drugs strategy will focus on recovery. people who are recovering from drugs
6:03 am
often need help with housing, they need help with employment, they might have mental health difficulties and with this strategy we've acknowledged that, we've embraced that, i set out clear expectations for local authorities about working with recovery to make sure that these additional elements are supplied. the 2017 drug strategy is the first for seven years. it says there should be treatment tailored to the needs of drug users. a new national recovery champion will help to automate services. and there will be measures to deal with new drug threats, including services intended to enhance the experience of having sex. amber rudd's involvement in a new cross government drugs strategy board will give the plans political impetus, but she is said to disappoint people who say drug possession should no longer be a crime. danny shaw, bbc news. we'll be speaking to the home office minister sarah newton about this ataround 6:40am. police in east london
6:04 am
are investigating five attacks which involved corrosive substances being thrown in people's faces. one of the victims has what's been described as life changing injuries. they all happened within 90 minutes in hackney and stoke newington last night. this was the scene of the most serious attack last night, the victim was delivering takeaway food when a victim was delivering takeaway food whena pairof victim was delivering takeaway food when a pair of men try to steal his mopeds. police say a corrosive substance was growing in his face. lee was taken to hospital with what they described as life changing injuries. in the space ofjust over an hour police were alerted to five similar attacks, the motive on each occasion seems to be robbery. police believe they are linked. acid attacks in england have doubled since 2012. 21—year—old resham khan
6:05 am
and her cousin jameel muhktar were attacked shortly after they had been celebrating her 21st birthday in east londonderry. acid was burning through the window of her car —— is london. my face started melting, my clothes started to burn, my clothes started sticking to me and there was smoke coming out of the seats. mopeds crime is also on the increase, especially in london. delivery drivers in east london say they've been faced by an escalating crime wave from knife wielding gangs. andy moore, bbc news. the scottish and welsh governments have threatened to block the key brexit bill which will convert all existing eu laws into uk law over what they say is a power grab by westminster. the repeal bill is also facing opposition from labour and other parties in the commons. our political correspondent chris mason joins us now from westminster. good morning, chris. this is seeming to bea good morning, chris. this is seeming to be a thing attack from all sides here? 360 degrees of scrutiny for the government on its blueprint for
6:06 am
brexit, outlined yesterday in the european union withdrawal bill, the repeal bill, the big cut and paste exercise where all of those laws the uk signed up to as part of being a member of the european union get cut and pasted, so on our first day outside the eu there are still laws covering all the areas the eu up to now has been power to set laws on. but also some controversy about that process. as you were saying, concern from the scottish and welsh governments, concern from labour and some conservatives about exactly how it might work. concern from others about the lack of opportunity to scrutinise some of the changes because of how much has to happen so quickly. one remark i will bring you from a labour peer, lord adonis, gives you a sense of the heightened language about this. he compares leaving the economic institutions of the eu, the single market and customs union, as being as big a mistake as appeasement in the 1930s.
6:07 am
chris, thanks very much. chris mayne send there. crowds are expected to line the streets for the funeral of bradley lowery later today. the six—year—old sunderland fan won a legion of supporters across the country, including footballerjermain defoe who has left training in spain to be at the funeral. bradley died last friday after suffering from a rare cancer. president trump will be the guest of honour at the bastille day celebrations in paris today. he's marking france's national day at the invitation of the country's president, emmanuel macron. the two leaders will watch the traditional military parade which, this year, has french soldiers marching alongside us troops. hugh schofield joins us from paris. there will be some extraordinary scenes today, we can see some of the buildup behind you? indeed. i'm on the champs—elysee and you can see preparations were under way, they've been under way all—night. as i cycled in half an hour ago there
6:08 am
we re cycled in half an hour ago there were military police has issued over the city marshalling the tanks, troops, the rest of the kit into bits around the champs—elysee and in a couple of hours from now they will stop processing down and you can see a line of apcs and other vehicles, in that direction i can see men in uniform, they look like firefighters and sailors gathering. the big event in the national year will take place, a couple of hours from now, with donald trump at the far end at the place de la concorde sitting in the place de la concorde sitting in the place of honour next to emmanuel macron. 200 american soldiers leading off the parade, which of course marks 100 years since the entry of america in world war i. for the moment, thank you. police in the south—west of england have launched the uk's first dedicated drone—unit to help them find missing people, deal with road accidents and tackle major incidents. a helicopter can cost hundreds of pounds per hour
6:09 am
but the remote—controlled, miniature alternative, provides an eye—in—the—sky for a fraction of the price. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has more. police drones seemed like a novelty only a few years ago, but devon and cornwall police and dorset police have now jointly launched britain's first dedicated drone unit. soon they'll have five aerial cameras available 2a hours a day. it can do exactly the same as a helicopter with the cameras, with the zoom, the thermal and it will give us it quicker if we are dealing with an incident in penzance we have one in the back of a car. we can put the drone out as quick as we can and request a helicopter. the unit recorded these incredible pictures of a fire in exeter last october and are doing more and morejobs which previously could only be done with a police helicopter, which costs £800 an hour. put simply, a drone is a cost—effective way for police to get a completely
6:10 am
different perspective on an area that's searching for a missing person or in crime scenes or the scene of a disaster or road traffic accident. and officers are hoping that soon they will be able to download live pictures from drones direct to the force's main control rooms. there's a patent for a mini drone, perched on a police officer's shoulder, which can be voice activated to help gather evidence. in whatever form, these drones with flying cameras are about to become an everyday sight in british policing. daniel sandford, bbc news, exeter. a heatwave across southern europe has forced some of the region's most famous tourist sites to close during peak holiday season. more than twenty fires have started near naples and sicily where the temperatures have climbed above a0 degrees celsius this week. the greek government has ordered that popular archaeological sites close during the hot weather, and in southern spain,
6:11 am
the drought has devastated crops and seven provinces are on their highest heat alert. temperatures will reach 46 degrees in cordoba today. an engaged couple from bristol landed themselves in hospital after practicing the famous lift from dirty dancing in their local beer garden. both andy and sharon were released a few hours later unharmed. they have settled on something a little less strenuous for the big day. i think they said he was knocked out. it's one of those things you sort of look back on and have a laugh but you don't expect it to happen. perhaps we're getting a bit too old for it! sometimes it's almost better when they go wrong than when they go right! let's go over to wimbledon, we are
6:12 am
in that kind of mood. who are you playing with? i've made friends with a carp, a fish, it has disappeared, oh, no, there he is. he keeps talking, opening his mouth, do it again, there we are, can you see him? beautiful. on the top of henman hill, murray mouth, the water features there, a friendly carp, very calming by the water feature because after the tension of yesterday, johanna konta's semi—final, so tense but in the end the dream is over. disappointment but there's beaming chic and one day go on and win the title —— there's a feeling here one—day. venus williams is the oldest finalist since navratilova in 1994. she was beaten by one of those people that has
6:13 am
ruled the courts over these years so no shame. johanna konta was roared on by thousands are peer on henman hill, murray mount, and also those on centre court and we caught up with some of those fans after the match. she played well but obviously not well enough. disappointing. gutted. gutted, but she'll be back. i was gutted, but she'll be back. iwasa gutted, but she'll be back. i was a bit sceptical when the draw came out that she would manage to win at all, but she put up a good fight. she was slightly overawed by the occasion. venus williams is no slouch. bit devastating to seaport konta lose but venus is on top form as ever so fair enough for her to be backin as ever so fair enough for her to be back in the final i guess —— see poon back in the final i guess —— see poor. venus read the serbs really well, stepping in and hitting early and konta didn't have the time to react. impressed with venus, sad konta didn't make it, but good luck to venus in the final —— serves.
6:14 am
those sentiments reflected in the morning papers, one of the back pages, i will win it one day, konta's vow after crashing out to venus. a warning from greg rusedski to andy murray, who went out in the quarter—finals, he is warning that murray should take a big rest or perhaps run the gauntlet of never winning again and greg rusedski is urging murray he should miss the us in september. that's to try to recover properly now he's in his thirties. this is interesting in the guardian, i've featured this before, on the training course i've been for ball boys and bald hills, may will have to be trained for the superstitions some players have —— ball girl is superstitions some players have —— ballgirl is —— superstitions some players have —— ball girl is —— they will. rafa nadal has water bottles all lined up ina certain nadal has water bottles all lined up in a certain order —— ball girl is. in the future they will have to train the ball boys and ball girl is
6:15 am
to deal with those strippers did in is. carol hasjoined me by our pond, it does say deep water, no bathing, you can come and meet konta the carp. not looking to healthy! i think you have put her off! talking of dazzling, the sunshine will be dazzling. today is not looking bad. in wimbledon, it is dry with some cloud around and further cloud through the day, that is the forecast for wimbledon. there will also be sunny spells as well. temperatures around 20— 21, maybe more, with a late is. some of us start with a little cloud this morning. —— late breezes. there will be sunny spells and just a few showers developing. we start across the south of england at 9am. similar to wimbledon, blue skies, cloud, one
6:16 am
or two showers, by no means is eve ryo ne or two showers, by no means is everyone seeing them. then into northern england, we have breaks in the cloud, sunshine first thing. not feeling chilly for most of us. scotla nd feeling chilly for most of us. scotland could catch a shallow but the odd one only, with a dry and bright start with sunshine —— shower. the same for northern ireland. in the sunshine, temperatures pick up quickly. the odd shower in wales coming out of the thick cloud but we will see that brighten up through the day. south—west england, heading towards gloucestershire, hampshire, we are looking at the mixture of sunny spells, bright spells, meaning you will see a little cloud in the sky. in the sunshine, september to picking up nicely. through the course of the day for many of us, especially late morning into the afternoon, the sun will come out, the cloud will break and as temperatures rise we are looking at a few showers developing. they will be fairly scattered. and a weather
6:17 am
front coming across western scotland and northern ireland. that is going to introduce a range. in the sunshine, highs of up to 20— 22, maybe 23. through the evening and overnight this front in scotland and northern ireland moves south eastwards, taking rain with it. it won't be as cold in the north as the onejust gone. it won't be as cold in the north as the one just gone. it will be dry further south and it will be cooler than the one just gone. tomorrow we have to front coming this way, the first continuing into the east, with a lot of cloud and drizzle, as it moves away we see bright spells behind it and then another fund comes in across the north—west, introducing cloud and splashes of rain -- introducing cloud and splashes of rain —— front. in wales, it will be dry with sunshine and it will start to feel more humid. as we move into sunday, we have that weather front of sinking southwards, it is a weak creature, so it will produce cloud
6:18 am
and drizzle. for northern england it will brighten up with one or two showers —— it is a weak feature. as the weather front sinks south as a wea k feature the weather front sinks south as a weak feature it will introduce cloud and showers. temperatures climbing. we could hit 27 in the south—east on sunday. if you like it hot, on tuesday, somewhere around london area might be back up close to the 30 mark, if not 30 mark itself. then we will see thunderstorms. that is how it is looking at the moment. thank you very much. see you later on. don't step backwards, please. thank you very much. see you later on. don't step backwards, pleaselj will bejoining the on. don't step backwards, pleaselj will be joining the fish. maybe not. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a rise in drug related deaths prompts a new government strategy to provide more help for addicts and target legal highs. five people are attacked with corrosive substances in london in the space of 90 minutes — police say one person has received life changing injuries. good morning. we will take a look at
6:19 am
the front pages. the daily mail looking at a shakeup of 999 and it says that means that there could be slow response times. it says a major overhaul of the 999 service says that the eight minute response target will be scrapped and people will have to wait 18 minutes and it says those at risk, those at threat with a heart attack. the times has an image on the trump visit to paris, and wrecks it, in relation to the bill on eu laws on the front of the bill on eu laws on the front of the telegraph, also showing pictures of the trump visit. at a picture of her on the front of the daily mail, and the front of the guardian, johanna konta losing 6—4, 6—2 to
6:20 am
venus williams, despite the crowd being with her. she has said she had has it in her to win the ladies‘ final at wimbledon. the story, the pm's eu final at wimbledon. the story, the pm‘s eu repeal bill dismissed as a power grab. we will speak to people through the day on how they feel about that. it is hot today. yes. 46 degrees in spain? very hot. just... i thought that was a bit... a bit saucy for a moment. it is ok. it is fine. he has his trunks on. it is absolutely fine. ijust had to double take that one. looking at the business pages today, lots of them focusing on the same story, the warning from the bank of england yesterday about households going... well, defaulting on credit card debts. that means if you are 90 days late for payment. it seems to be
6:21 am
that we are getting to the highest rate since the financial crisis in 2009. not great news. the bank of england are concerned more families will get into that situation in the coming months. have you pick something up on the inside? do you remember the whole macaque monkey selfie, where the monkey grab the photographer‘s camera. well, this photographer‘s camera. well, this photographer is now being taken through the courts by the people for ethical treatment of animals on behalf of the macaque, and they say that it was an abuse of the animal. he is talking about the consequences of that. and that was the selfie which, as people remember, was very good. and that row over who owned the picture. this is it. did the macaque monkey have the rights?m isa macaque monkey have the rights?m is a peculiar story. there is a lot of interest in president trump‘s
6:22 am
visit to paris. this is a still from the dinner they had halfway up the eiffel tower. if you are interested ina mealat eiffel tower. if you are interested in a meal at the daily mail says a five course meal halfway up the eiffel tower, £170 ahead. 170 — i don‘t know. eiffel tower, £170 ahead. 170 — i don't know. i would have thought it would be more. last night, acting royalty mingled with, well, royalty at the premiere of the new world war two blockbuster dunkirk. here‘s the moment harry met harry. singer harry styles, who is making his acting debut in the film, shaking hands with prince harry on the red carpet. the film focuses on the dunkirk evacuation, when civilian sailors crossed the english channel to rescue troops trapped at the french port. i spoke to director christopher nolan and actor sir mark rylance, who told me the bravery shown during the recent disasters in london and manchester was reminiscent of that famous dunkirk spirit. the enemy tanks have stopped. why?
6:23 am
why waste precious tanks when they can pick us off in the air like fish ina can pick us off in the air like fish in a barrel? what was the moment for you as a director, or a human being, the moment when you thought there is a story about dunkirk, well—known as it is historically, a story that i can tell? for me it was myself and emma, my producer, we made a trip 20 yea rs emma, my producer, we made a trip 20 years ago on a friend‘s small boat. he wanted to make a crossing at the time the evacuation had taken place. it was incredibly rough felt very difficult, very dangerous, and that was without people dropping bombs on us. we were not heading to a war zone, we were going to present—day dunkirk. a call went out. we have to go to dunkirk. ready. what are you doing? where are we going? into war,
6:24 am
george. these recent disasters in manchester and london, the two disasters in london, have made us so much more aware of civilian involvement and the selflessness and bravery of the civilian rescue services. where are we going? dunkirk. they will come back. there is no hiding from this.|j dunkirk. they will come back. there is no hiding from this. i wanted to build a story using three different timelines land, sea and air. you are ina timelines land, sea and air. you are in a spitfire, you are on the beach, you are on a boat with mark rylance, coming to help with the evacuation. we cross cut between these timelines to try to build up a coherent picture of the bigger events of dunkirk without jumping out of the intense human experience. dunkirk without jumping out of the intense human experiencem dunkirk without jumping out of the intense human experience. it is a film that begs questions of
6:25 am
yourself. what would you have done? yeah, i have a cousin who was among the first rescue services in the g re nfell tower. the first rescue services in the grenfell tower. and he accounted decision is fine and had to make in that terrible staircase on whether to carry on or rescue people who we re to carry on or rescue people who were there. and the film, for each of the three stories in the film, the characters get to a moment where they have to make a crucial decision, which will affect some people and other people. and someone ora people and other people. and someone or a view people will be sacrificed in order to save other people. terrible, terrible decision. torpedo! we need to send more ships. you have made some huge films in the past, but making a film about a real—life event, especially this event, brings with it extra responsibilities in terms of what
6:26 am
you are depicting and whether it is true and what you are trying to do. how do you handle that? well, you do a lot of research, you do a lot of reading. you try to get it under your fingers. reading. you try to get it under yourfingers. and then i chose fictional characters to guide us through those events and that freed me up asa through those events and that freed me up as a filmmaker. i wasn‘t putting words into people‘s males who existed. i wasn‘t speaking for people who couldn‘t speak for themselves. last week i did a screening for veterans and people who had been there on the beach and standing in front of that audience about to show the film was one of the most daunting professional experiences i have had. christopher, thank you very much. it isa it is a film on an extraordinary scale and very interesting christopher nolan, the way he told the story through the eyes of two young soldiers. we will hear more from the actors who played those roles, fin whitehead, and harry styles, who is acting and there will
6:27 am
be more on tomorrow‘s programme —— finn whitehead. that story is told through their eyes. looks like a very big production. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. the bbc has learned the government is preparing a review of building regulations in england in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster. since the fire, about 200 high—rise buildings have been found to be using combustible material in cladding and insulation. there are claims that the number of people who could contract cancer from asbestos poisoning in london‘s hospitals is a ticking time bomb. bbc london has found 94% of hospitals in the capital contain asbestos, which is deemed safe as long as it‘s not disturbed. but the unite union, and a leading lawyer in asbestos, both claim the number of people dying from a form of lung cancer is increasing.
6:28 am
we have to remove the danger. it kills people. it is not a joke. people will die from there. not today, 20— 30 years unless we take action. an nhs improvement spokesperson says asbestos is safe unless disturbed, and if building work is carried out experts are brought in to dispose of it. the proms is returning today for its 123rd year and will have a packed schedule of classical music. this year there will be over 90 concerts during its eight—week run. for the first time ever a prom will take place at the tanks in tate modern, wilton‘s music hall, southwark cathedral, and will return to a multi—storey car park in peckham. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. let‘s start with the tube, no reported problems on any of those lines there. south west trains into london are running at a reduced speed and minor delays on services via surbiton due to track problems. this is how it looks at the blackwlal tunnel, northbound traffic is building from the woolwich road flyover.
6:29 am
and camberwell, denmark hill is down to one lane in both directions at coldharbour lane for works—there are delays at times to the south of camberwell green. let‘s have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. it isa it is a fairly humid field two things although today is looking decent with lots of dry weather around and the chance of the odd isolated shower first thing. fairly cloudy. there will be brace in the cloudy. there will be brace in the cloud and we will see a gradual brightening up. temperatures cooler with highs of 21 degrees and a north—westerly breeze. it will be present in the sunshine. if you‘re heading to wimbledon it looks like a decent day. lots of dry weather around. we will see a gradual brightening up and temperatures into the 20s. a light north—westerly breeze. we will see lots of play. through this evening and overnight, largely dry picture. variable amounts of cloud. there will be clear spells at times. it will be fairly muggy with lows of 14— 16 degrees. we start the day on saturday fairly cloudy. it will be
6:30 am
largely cloudy for the day. plenty of brightness in the morning, increasing through the day. temperatures at a maximum of 22 degrees. i will leave you with the outlook. sunday looks like a decent day. a lot of cloud around and the chance of the odd spot of light rain and drizzle. starting to feel increasingly humid through the weekend with highs of 44 degrees on sunday. —— 24 degrees. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it‘s back to charlie and naga. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we‘ll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: jo konta‘s wimbledon dream might be over but there‘s still plenty of tennis for us to get excited about. we‘ll be live on henman hill and looking ahead to the men‘s semi—finals. land of hope and glory...
6:31 am
from one great summer tradition to another. the proms begin tonight and we‘re behind the scenes at the royal albert hall for the start of the world‘s greatest classical music festival. and we‘ll also be speaking to the legendary sir david attenborough about his fears for the uk‘s butterfly population and what you can do to help stop their decline. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning‘s main news: the home office has launched a new strategy to tackle illegal drug use, with tailored treatment to be given to drug addicts. it follows a rise in drug—related deaths in england and wales and targets new psychoactive substances. the home secretary amber rudd said the plan will focus on recovery. enforcing the law on drugs. police raids against dealers have been the traditional way of clamping down on the drugs trade. it‘s estimated to cost the uk £10.7 billion a year. and the new government drug strategy says that approach will continue along with renewed efforts
6:32 am
to get people off drugs. that‘s what they do at the harbour centre in london. support people affected by drugs and help them rebuild their lives. the home secretary amber rudd visited the centre this week. she said her drugs strategy will focus on recovery. people who are recovering from drugs often need help with housing, they need help with employment, they might have mental health difficulties and in this strategy we‘ve acknowledged that, we‘ve embraced that, i‘ve set out clear expectations for local authorities about working with recovery to make sure that these additional elements are supplied. the 2017 drug strategy is the first for seven years. it says there should be treatment tailored to the needs of drug users. a new national recovery champion will help co—ordinate services. and there will be measures to deal with new drug threats, including substances intended to enhance the experience of having sex, known as chemsex drugs. amber rudd‘s involvement
6:33 am
in a new cross—government drug strategy board will give the plans political impetus, but she‘s set to disappoint people who say drug possession should no longer be a crime. danny shaw, bbc news. police in east london are investigating five attacks which involved corrosive substances being thrown in people‘s faces. they all happened within 90 minutes in hackney and stoke newington last night. one teenager has been arrested. one of the victims has what‘s been described as life—changing injuries. the scottish and welsh governments have threatened to block the key brexit bill which will convert all existing eu laws into uk law, that‘s over what they say is a power grab by westminster. the repeal bill is also facing opposition from labour and other parties in the commons. but brexit secretary david davis has rejected the criticism and described it as one of the most significant pieces of legislation to pass through parliament.
6:34 am
president trump will be the guest of honour at the bastille day celebrations in paris today. he‘s marking france‘s national day at the invitation of the country‘s president, emmanuel macron. the two leaders will watch the traditional military parade which, this year, has french soldiers marching alongside us troops to mark the centenary of america‘s entry into the first world war. crowds are expected to line the streets for the funeral of bradley lowery later today. the six—year—old sunderland fan won a legion of supporters across the country, including footballerjermain defoe who has left training in spain to be at the funeral. bradley died last friday after suffering from a rare cancer. a heatwave across southern europe has forced some of the region‘s most famous tourist sites to close during peak holiday season. more than twenty fires have started near naples and sicily where the temperatures have climbed above 40 degrees this week. the greek government has ordered that popular archaeological sites close, and in southern spain, the drought has devastated crops.
6:35 am
several spanish cities have experienced record temperatures forjuly. it will reach 46 degrees in cordoba today. anyone visiting stonehenge or loch ness earlier this week would have seen a bonus attraction if they‘d looked to the skies. the red arrows and their american counterparts, the thunderbirds, have been performing some stunning manoeuvres in a practice display from raf fairford in gloucestershire. they were rehearsing ahead of the royal international air tattoo this weekend which marks the 70th anniversary of the united states air force. those are the main stories this morning. leicester and attention now to the sport, mike is at wimbledon for us on henman hill —— let‘s turn our attention. all eyes i suppose on the men‘s semis, federer particularly, and yesterday was the
6:36 am
end of british interest effectively. that‘s not entirely fair because there is interest in the mixed doubles but in terms of the singles? that‘s right, heather watson and jamie murray to cheer on in the doubles. on henman hill next to the pond, haven‘t seen my friendly fish in 20 minutes ever since carol appeared with her bright dress. he seems to have gone back under for the moment. reflecting on yesterday, for the second day running, the big british hope, the british number one, went out. johanna konta, she says she is not too disappointed, because she remains upbeat and confident she can win the women‘s singles title in years to come. it was the first a final for her, a lwa ys was the first a final for her, always seen as a huge match, counter that against the vast experience of venus williams, who is now through to her ninth final, incredible, at the age of 37. this time though, her opponent venus williams,
6:37 am
the five—time champion, looked almost back to her best as she outplayed the british number one. konta lost in straight sets, losing 6—4, 6—2, much to the disappointment of the home fans here at the all england club. afterwards she thanked fans for their love and support and described the fortnight as a memorable experience. i‘ve definitely enjoyed every single moment i‘ve been here these past two weeks. so i don‘t think i need to much time for that to sink in for me to realise i‘ve made sure that i‘ve been very present with everything i‘ve done to make sure i have enjoyed and taken the most out of every opportunity and experience i‘ve had. venus williams will now play spain‘s garbine muguruza in tomorrow‘s final. the 14th seed thrashed the unseeded magdalena rybarikova in little over an hour to make it to her second wimbledon final. there remains some british interest here at wimbledon, though, jamie murray and his partner martina hingis are into the mixed doubles semi—finals after beating the all british pairing of ken skupski and jocelyn rae.
6:38 am
murray and hingis are top seeds and took the match in straight sets to book their place in the last four. and jamie could be facing a fellow briton across the net if he makes it to the final because there‘s a familiar british name in the other semi final, heather watson is through with her partner henri kontinen. they are the defending champions and could make it back to back titles after they won their match in three sets yesterday. the wheelchair tournaments started yesterday here but there was disappointment for defending champion britain‘s gordon reid. he lost in the singles in straight sets to sweden‘s steffan olsson, the man he beat to win the title last year. better news, though, for alfie hewett, he won his first singles win on grass. chris froome has lost the yellow jersey at the tour de france. the three—time race winner finished down in seventh on stage 12, handing the overall lead to rival fabio aru.
6:39 am
he basically said he didn‘t have the legs when it mattered as the race got into the pyrenees. to football now and manchester city have agreed a fee of £50 million for the tottenham defender kyle walker. it‘s expected he‘ll sign in time tojoin his new team—mates before they leave for their pre—season tour of the united states. one player who is already making an impact at his new club is wayne rooney. he only signed for everton on sunday but has already scored his first goal, this brilliant long—range effort on his debut during their pre—season tour of tanzania. rory mcllroy is in danger of missing his third cut in four tournaments. the world number four is two over par, nine shots off the pace, after the first round of the scottish open. finland‘s mikko ilonen leads. the world para athletics
6:40 am
championships begins this evening at the london stadium. there‘ll be a minute‘s silence before competition to mark the death earlier this week of the uae athlete abdullah hayayei, who was killed during a training accident. there‘s plenty of british names competing at the championships, including sprinterjonnie peacock. this is worlds apart from every other medal you get, this is in london, this is world championships, on your home turf and i think you wa nt on your home turf and i think you want it more. i said to my mum for example last year, she‘s worried about coming out to rio, i said don‘t worry about it, be there in london 27, i want you there because it means something to me. rio was a job, this is for me, i want this more than i want rio. england captainjoe root says it‘s important the side don‘t rest on their laurels for the second test against south africa, folowing their emphatic
6:41 am
victory in the first. england have named an unchanged side for the match which begins today at trent bridge. at wimbledon, as you were saying, charlie, a huge day, men‘s semifinals day, so first up on centre court you‘ve got marian cilic, who is favourite going into the match against the american who beat andy murray in the last round, sam querrey. also roger federer against tomas berdych. federer will be the strong favourite there. coverage starts at 12:30pm on bbc two and then it continues on radio 5 live and the bbc sport website. hard to see beyond roger federer, isn‘t it? thanks very much, mike, see you later on. with its first new strategy for tackling illegal drug use in seven years, the home office says its plans will help addicts
6:42 am
recoverfrom drug dependence. we can get more details from sarah newton, the minister for safeguarding and vulnerability, who joins us from our westminster studio. thank you very much bought 14 to us this morning. pleased to be with you. -- for talking to us. how is this strategy going to cut the number of drug—related deaths? this strategy going to cut the number of drug-related deaths? we've learned a lot over the last few yea rs learned a lot over the last few years about how to give better treatment to people, you‘re right to point out there are different groups of people susceptible to different types of drug addiction and to reduce those deaths, we‘re really talking about people who tend to be older, whose been taking heroin, who are older, whose been taking heroin, who a re really ill older, whose been taking heroin, who are really ill and they need very particular treatment to help them with their recovery —— who‘s been. helping the recovery of the most vulnerable people at the heart of our strategy is going to make a real difference. how much will this cost the government and where is the money coming from? it's about joining up lots of budgets, we have
6:43 am
the public—health budget, used by local authorities to commission services, but also we‘ve learned over the while that a lot of people that have substance misuse problems have underlying mental health problems, the record amounts we are using for mental health will be used as well. we know some homeless people have substance misuse problems, so the money we are investing in homeless prevention can be brought to bear. it‘s about pooling across government and agencies in communities so we can smartly use the money available to really make a difference. no extra money? there is investment in parts of the strategy, new money with homeless prevention, mental health services. all so there is various and organised crime —— also. stopping it coming into the country. we are making a lot of investment there. investment with young people in schools so young people don‘t wa nt in schools so young people don‘t want drugs in the first place
6:44 am
because they‘ve had good education. investment in different pockets coming together brought to bear to make a big difference in an overarching strategy. no new specific money for this new drug strategy, the first new strategy in seven years? there's money in different parts of government which is all being used for this strategy. there are criticisms of this strategy, that you‘re not moving towards decriminalisation for those who use, and therefore those using are actually fearful of being targeted or called criminals and therefore are locked in to get help. people are saying perhaps you should have considered this more carefully. —— reluctant. what is your response to that? we have consulted carefully on the strategy involving a wide range of stakeholders. it‘s really important that we send out a very clear message to people, these drugs
6:45 am
are very harmful. that‘s why we make them illegal and that‘s why we put every effort into reducing demand by educating about the harms, reducing supply, by educating about the harms, reducing supply, by taking really world leading international effort to prevent the drugs coming into our country and it‘s quite right we have new powers through the psychoactive substance act which came in last year to crack down on new and emerging drugs, drugs like legal highs or chemsex drugs, the appalling zombie spice we saw last year, it‘s really damaging stuff and it‘s right we try to stop people taking it but i know there are many vulnerable people who do take drugs and that‘s why we have recovery at the centre of what we are doing so if people do start to take drugs, there are really good services for them to help them break their habit and lead a meaningful and full part in our society. there have been acid attacks in
6:46 am
london today, we understand five attacks, and one has suffered life changing injuries. can you give me an idea what strategy is going to be in place? we have seen a spate of the attacks and corrosive substances have been used as a weapon of choice. how are you going to tackle this as a government? this was a shocking attack last night. someone is left with life changing injuries. this is something we have been concerned about for some time. we have been working closely with collea g u es have been working closely with colleagues in law enforcement to get a better picture of what is happening, as you rightly say, in pockets of the country. there has been a state undoubtably in the east end of london recently. only last weekjointly end of london recently. only last week jointly with the end of london recently. only last weekjointly with the national crime lead, most senior police officer, we hosted a conference from retailers to the nhs and law enforcement, people working in communities, community policing, to have a
6:47 am
joined—up action plan for what we are working together taking forward to stop young people wanting to use this substance as a weapon, restricting supply and making sure the criminal justice restricting supply and making sure the criminaljustice system treats these serious offences with proper sentencing. a proper plan of action. thank you for talking to us. where going to have a look at the weather now. good morning from wimbledon. it is a mild start and you have been talking about heat in southern spain. yesterday in southern cordoba, it reached 46 degrees, which makes it a whopping 116 fahrenheit. i am telling you this because today it is
6:48 am
going to be more comfortable in the uk with a high of 23. into the middle of next week we are looking at temperatures in the south of england rising into the high 20s, possibly the 30 degrees mark. that is the same heat across spain at the moment. obviously we won‘t get heat like that. 30 will be roughly the highest temperature we will get. today at wimbledon it is a pleasant start to the day. the forecast is fairly cloudy first thing. there will be some sunny breaks coming later on in the day with highs of about 20— 21 in a gentle breeze. the uk as about 20— 21 in a gentle breeze. the ukasa about 20— 21 in a gentle breeze. the uk as a whole has a cloudy start with showers this morning. we will also see sunny spells develop. and for most it will be dry. in southern england we have variable cloud, sunny spells coming through. we have showers at the moment, with some at nine o‘clock as well. further north into east anglia, northern england,
6:49 am
a combination of more cloud at times, sunny breaks in the cloud, and the same for scotland. the cloud is thick enough to produce the odd rogue shower. northern ireland has a bright start with sunny spells. wales could catch the odd shower. the same for the midlands with bright spells of sunshine. the south—west bright spells and sunshine and the odd shower. it will brighten up nicely through the day. further east, through dorset into the home counties, the same again, bright spells, sunny skies. in the sunshine that are rich will pick up quickly. the cloud will break later into the afternoon. as temperatures rise it could spark some showers. consider yourself unlike eec. at the end of the day a weather front coming in across western scotland
6:50 am
and northern ireland introducing some rain. as we had on through the evening and overnight period the weather front will move south and swing east and take rain with it. in the north of the country it is going to bea the north of the country it is going to be a mild night than the onejust gone and in the south under clear skies it will be a cooler nights than the one just gone. tomorrow, two fronts affecting us, the first one swinging east, taking cloud and patchy light showers with it. it will brighten up operated with sunny spells developing and another front across the north—west. in the south, for much of england and wales, we are looking at a dry picture with a cloudy spite and sunny spells developing. maybe the odd shower. starting to turn humid in the south. as we head into sunday, the weather front coming south is a weak feature. it is going to introduce cloud, spots or drizzle and much brighterfor northern
6:51 am
cloud, spots or drizzle and much brighter for northern england, scotla nd brighter for northern england, scotland with sunshine. after a bright start, as the weak weather front comes south, more cloud and the odd shower. temperature—wise, look at the temperature, it is zooming up and it will be humid in the south with highs of 27. much more comfortable in the sunshine. thank you very much. we are going to talk now about how people get tickets. if you‘ve ever tried to buy tickets for a sold—out gig you might have turned to using a ticket re—selling website. we all know the feeling when you are absolutely gutted to find out it is sold out. morning, everyone. if you‘ve ever missed out on getting tickets to a gig or a festival, you might have turned to a re—selling website, where you stand a chance of getting that tickets, but it can often be for much more than the original price. well, a survey by the market researchers at yougov out today shows thatjust under half us thinks re—selling websites should be banned
6:52 am
altogether, and slightly more thought the government should intervene to make things fairer for genuine gig—owners over ticket touts. so which are the main ticket re—selling websites? well, there are four big ones, seatwave and getmein, which are both owned by ticketmaster, viagogo and stubhub, which is owned by ebay. they‘re all operating totally legally in the uk. but secondary ticket websites have been criticised by many in the music industry, notably adele and ed sheeran, for snapping up thousands of gig tickets when they go on sale online and selling them at inflated prices. adam webb is from the fanfair alliance who campaign against industrial—scale online ticket touting. what do you mean by industrial scale? it literally just
6:53 am
what do you mean by industrial scale? it literallyjust means that, we are not talking about one or two tickets, we are talking about before the tickets go on general sale thousands of tickets put onto the resale sites. these are put on by professional ticket touts who use these platforms, which enable their activity. not me realising i can't get a ticket? no. for a came in i googled the killers tickets, because they are going online at nine o‘clock, and thousands are available on secondary sites. the entry point is often google. they are at the top of the search engine. that is the main entry point for people. we have contacted the four reselling websites. they haven‘t got back to us. the defence is, this is totally legal. there is demand for it. people don‘t have to buy them if they don‘t want. people don‘t have to buy them if they don't want. it is legal to resell a ticket. and four our campaign we believe people should be
6:54 am
able to sell their ticket. we believe it should be controlled and regulated and at face value. not the system which is totally out of whack. and there are rules coming into force. will they go far enough, what kind of rules are coming in? we have quite a few consumer laws which should protect people but they haven‘t been enforced. governments haven‘t been enforced. governments have strengthened the consumer rights act, which is fantastic. we are waiting for that, for the guidelines for that to be published. and we need the laws properly enforced. if the ticket sales or the sites are banned, won‘t we go back to the days of ticket touts outside the venue? there will always be the demand for people who didn‘t get the tickets? we are not calling for the sites to be banned. we are calling for them to obey the law and become transparent. it is one of the only
6:55 am
markets, the peer—to—peer market, where you do not know who you are buying from. that is the problem. they are marketed as fan platforms. on the whole it is the hard—core ticket touts using them who are bulk buying masses of tickets in primary ticketing websites and are enabled to sell them at inflated prices. thank you forjoining us. so it is interesting. ed sheeran has introduced this idea of four forms of it before you can get into his next coming to. —— id. we might see some long queues in future?|j next coming to. —— id. we might see some long queues in future? i don't genuinely think that i do. maybe three. still to come:, we genuinely think that i do. maybe three. still to come: , we speak with sir david attenborough about his fears for the butterfly population and what people can do to help. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
6:56 am
i‘m sonja jessup. there are claims that the number of people who could contract cancer from asbestos poisoning in london‘s hospitals is a ticking time bomb. bbc london has found 94% of hospitals in the capital contain asbestos, which is deemed safe as long as it‘s not disturbed. but the unite union, and a leading lawyer in asbestos, both claim the number of people dying from a form of lung cancer is increasing. we have to remove the danger. it kills people. it is not a joke. people will die from this. not today, 20—30 years unless we take action. an nhs improvement spokesperson says asbestos is safe unless disturbed, and if building work is carried out experts are brought in to dispose of it. the bbc has learned the government is preparing a review of building regulations in england in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster. since the fire, about 200 high—rise buildings have been found to be
6:57 am
using combustible material in cladding and insulation. the proms is returning today for its 123rd year and will have a packed schedule of classical music. this year there will be over 90 concerts during its eight—week run. for the first time ever a prom will take place at the tanks in tate modern, wilton‘s music hall, southwark cathedral, and will return to a multi—storey car park in peckham. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. let‘s start with the tube, no reported problems on any of those lines there. it all appears to be running well. south west trains into london are running at a reduced speed and minor delays on services via surbiton due to track problems. this is how it looks at the blackwlal tunnel, northbound traffic is building from the woolwich road flyover. and it‘s slow on the m4 eastbound from junction 3 for heston towards the elevated section at brentford. let‘s have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. it is a fairly humid field to things as we move into the weekend,
6:58 am
although today is looking decent with lots of dry weather around and the chance of the odd isolated shower first thing. fairly cloudy. there will be brace in the cloud and we will see a gradual brightening up. temperatures today a little bit cooler than yesterday with highs of 21 degrees and a north—westerly breeze. it will be present in the sunshine. if you‘re heading to wimbledon it looks like a decent day. lots of dry weather around. we will see a gradual brightening up and temperatures edging into the 20s. again, a light north—westerly breeze. so it looks like we will see lots of play. through this evening and overnight, largely dry picture. variable amounts of cloud. there will be clear spells at times. it will be fairly muggy with overnight lows of 14—16 degrees. we start the day on saturday fairly cloudy. it will be a largely cloudy day. plenty of brightness in the morning, increasing through the day. temperatures at a maximum of 22 degrees. i will leave you with the outlook. sunday looks like a decent day. a lot of cloud around and the chance of seeing the odd spot of light rain and drizzle.
6:59 am
starting to feel increasingly humid as we move through the weekend with highs of 24 degrees on sunday. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. five people are attacked with acid in london in the space of 90 minutes. one person has suffered life—changing injuries, the government tells this programme it‘s taking action to tackle a growing problem. good morning, it‘s friday the 14th ofjuly. also this morning: new measures to tackle a rise in drug related deaths are announced. they‘ll target so—called legal highs and provide more help for addicts. president trump and president macron
7:00 am
have dinner at the eiffel tower. lloyds banking group, which owns high street banks like halifax, bank of scotland and lloyds, is scrapping unauthorised overdraft fees. i‘ll have more on who will be better off. actor mark rylance tells us how he thinks the spirit of dunkirk depicted in his latest film has been reflected in recent events. these recent disasters in manchester and london, the two disasters in london, have made us all so much more aware of civilian involvement and the selflessness and bravery of the civilian rescue services. and we‘re live in the royal albert hall ahead of the first night of the 2017 proms. the 123rd season gets under way this evening. you‘re listening tojessica performing a piece byjohn williams.
7:01 am
she will make her proms debut this year, we will talk to her and many other musicians taking part in the world‘s largest classical music festival. here at wimbledon, the dream is over forjohanna konta but she remains defiant. the british number one says she can win the women‘s title in years to come, she lost her semi final yesterday to five—time champion venus williams. carol, it‘s gone a bit chilly, where is the sun? still in the sky but the cloud cover has come over and that is making it feel chilly. for many a chilly start and a lot of cloud around, one or two showers but it will brighten up in in sunny showers and if you‘re coming to wimbledon it should be dry and getting warmer by the time play starts. see you later on. good morning. first, our main story. police in east london are investigating five attacks which involved corrosive substances being thrown in people‘s faces.
7:02 am
one of the victims has suffered what‘s been described as life—changing injuries. the incidents all happened within 90 minutes in hackney and stoke newington last night. one teenager has been arrested. andy moore‘s report contains some distressing images. this was the scene of the most serious attack last night, the victim was apparantly delivering takeaway food when a pair of men tried to steal his moped. police say a corrosive substance was growing in his face. lee was taken to hospital with what they described as life—changing injuries. in the space ofjust over an hour police were alerted to five similar attacks, the motive on each occasion seems to be robbery. police believe they are linked. acid attacks in england have doubled since 2012. 21—year—old resham khan and her cousin jameel mukhtar were attacked shortly after they had been celebrating her 21st birthday in east london. acid was burning through the window of her car. my face started melting, my clothes started to burn,
7:03 am
my shorts started sticking to me and there was smoke coming out of the seats. moped crime is also on the increase, especially in london. delivery drivers in east london say they‘ve been faced by an escalating crime wave from knife—wielding gangs. andy moore, bbc news. earlier on this programme the home office minister sarah newton gave us her reaction to that attack. this was a shocking attack last night, someone is left with life changing injuries and this is something we‘ve been concerned about in the home office for some time. we‘ve been working very closely with our colleagues in law enforcement to get a better picture of actually what is happening, as you quite rightly say, it‘s happening in pockets of the country. the home secretary amber rudd has launched a new strategy to tackle illegal drug use after what the home office calls a dramatic increase in the number of deaths from drugs in england
7:04 am
and wales since 2012. the strategy focuses on helping addicts to recover and makes clear there‘ll be no legal changes to decriminalise the use of drugs. the entire strategy applies to england, some parts of it also affect the rest of the uk. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, reports. enforcing the law on drugs. police raids against dealers have been the traditional way of clamping down on the drugs trade. it‘s estimated to cost the uk £10.7 billion a year. and the new government drug strategy says that approach will continue along with renewed efforts to get people off drugs. that‘s what they do at the harbour centre in london. support people affected by drugs and help them rebuild their lives. the home secretary amber rudd visited the centre this week. she said her drugs strategy will focus on recovery. people who are recovering from drugs often need help with housing, they need help with employment, they might have mental health difficulties and in this strategy we‘ve acknowledged that, we‘ve embraced that, i‘ve set out clear expectations for local authorities about working with recovery to make sure that these additional elements are supplied. the 2017 drug strategy
7:05 am
is the first for seven years. it says there should be treatment tailored to the needs of drug users. a new national recovery champion will help co—ordinate services. and there will be measures to deal with new drug threats, including substances intended to enhance the experience of having sex, known as chemsex drugs. amber rudd‘s involvement in a new cross—government drug strategy board will give the plans political impetus, but she‘s set to disappoint people who say drug possession should no longer be a crime. danny shaw, bbc news. the scottish and welsh governments have threatened to block the key brexit bill which will convert all existing eu laws into uk law over what they say is a power grab by westminster. the repeal bill is also facing opposition from labour and other parties in the commons. our political correspondent chris mason joins us now from westminster.
7:06 am
good morning, chris. some of this stuff is, let‘s be honest, quite complicated, isn‘t it? to take us through that phrase, a threat to block, take us through that? good morning, complicated with a capital c, it definitely is and it will be four months and years to come. what we saw and what we will continue to see is 360 degrees scrutiny of brexit. on the specifics of that complaint from the first ministers of scotla nd complaint from the first ministers of scotland and wales, they say what the government has set out is a power grab from westminster. the way things will work is all of those laws brussels was in charge will be cut and paste and put into uk law at westminster. the government says there will then be a conversation about which bits of law are pa rcelled about which bits of law are parcelled up about which bits of law are pa rcelled up and about which bits of law are parcelled up and sent to edinburgh and cardiff and belfast but the
7:07 am
mechanics of that are highly controversial. real concern from the first ministers of scotland and wales and a real desire to flex their muscle and cause real anxiety for the british government. one strand of, as we were saying, a very complicated and convoluted argument to come. crowds are expected to line the streets for the funeral of bradley lowery later today. the six—year—old sunderland fan won a legion of supporters across the country, including footballerjermain defoe who has left training in spain to be at the funeral. bradley died last friday after suffering from a rare cancer. president trump will be the guest of honour at the bastille day celebrations in paris today. he‘s marking france‘s national day at the invitation of the country‘s president, emmanuel macron. the two leaders will watch the traditional military parade which, this year, has french soldiers marching alongside us troops. hugh schofield joins us from paris. you can see the preparations, but
7:08 am
can we start with how this meeting went? there were some interesting nuances and comments that have been picked up. there were, there were. i think the big picture is that it went very well, certainly there was a show of warmth which surprised many, surprised me. the two men have so little in common on the face of it but every effort was made on both sides to show that not only were they getting on but that they were friends. they were specifically asked at the press conference yesterday, how would you characterise the relationship, they both said it was friendly, we‘re going to dinner at the eiffel tower and it will be a dinner of friends.
7:09 am
these nuances, as you say, which came out, particularly on climate change, with donald trump hinting that he might even revisit his rejection of the paris climate accord. hugh, thanks very much, hugh schofield in paris. a heatwave across southern europe has forced some of the region‘s most famous tourist sites to close during peak holiday season. more than twenty fires have started near naples and sicily where the temperatures have climbed above 40 degrees celsius this week. the greek government has ordered that popular archaeological sites close during the hot weather, and in southern spain, the drought has devastated crops and seven provinces are on their highest heat alert. temperatures will reach 46 degrees in cordoba today. really is too hot! carol will have the weather in the uk a little later on. the scottish and welsh governments have threatened to block the key brexit bill which will convert all existing eu laws into uk law, claiming it undermines
7:10 am
the principles of devolution. it comes after first ministers nicola sturgeon and carwynjones met separately with eu chief brexit negotiator michel barnier yesterday to discuss their positions. but brexit secretary david davis has rejected claims ministers were giving themselves sweeping powers. joining us now from bangor is the first minister for wales, carwyn jones. chris mason, our political correspondent, said a moment ago that this stuff is complicated. can you explain in the most punter friendly way what your problem is? it means what is in brussels now should come back to cardiff, edinburgh and belfast where it affects devolved areas, the areas we are responsible for. we don‘t think it should stick in london. it means england can do what it once but wales, scotland and northern ireland have new restrictions, we can‘t accept that. the uk government
7:11 am
wouldn‘t accept that and obviously we can‘t do the same. wouldn‘t accept that and obviously we can't do the same. the procedure is straightforward, it‘s been detailed by the government, those eu laws come back to westminster if you like and then those that are appropriate will be passed out to the devolved nations. don‘t you trust the government to do that? no blu ntly. trust the government to do that? no bluntly. at the moment the position is, looking at agriculture and fisheries, watson brussels goes to wales —— what‘s in fisheries. for us it isa wales —— what‘s in fisheries. for us it is a power grab by whitehall and that‘s something we can‘t accept. we‘ve offered a solution, we have said the powers come back to the four different governments, let‘s agree not to change things until we getan agree not to change things until we get an agreement on the way forward. that‘s the mature thing to do. we‘re a partnership of four nations and we can‘t accept a situation where one says to the other three this is the way it‘s going to be and we‘re going to place restrictions on new. that‘s not what people voted for in the
7:12 am
referendum, they wanted to bring powers back to themselves andy mckay is of wales, to the welsh. you've made your case clearly that you don‘t trust theresa may to do what you think is the right thing. —— and in the case of wales. you said there isa in the case of wales. you said there is a threat to block this process. talk us through that, you don‘t have the power to block it, do you? we have to consider parts of the bill because the uk government needs to get what‘s called legislative consent, it needs our approval to move forward with parts of the bill and david davies, the brexit secretary, has said he‘s going to look for the consent of the different legislatures and different parliaments across the uk and i welcome that. that consent isn‘t going to be forthcoming if the bill stays as it is. we have the position in wales of not trying to block the bill, we want a bill that goes through that delivers a brexit that
7:13 am
is good for all nations in the uk but we‘re not going to support something that takes power away from wales. in 2011 we had a referendum where people voted overwhelmingly for new powers to come to wales, we aren‘t going to jeopardise that and those powers that would come back to wales from brussels, they need to come straight back rather than going through a middleman in london. come straight back rather than going through a middleman in londonm the interests of clarity, you used the interests of clarity, you used the phrase that they need your consent, but legally speaking, technically, they can go ahead. you‘re talking about the convention, the convention is they seek your consent and approval but in practice they can carry on regardless, theresa may and her government can carry on regardless, am i right?m they do that two things would happen, there would be a constitutional crisis because it would go against everything the uk is based on. we don‘t want that. and it would mean all the words they have used so far are worthless.
7:14 am
david davis himself and boris johnson have said the same thing in parliament, the consent of the national parliaments will be needed so in other words their words are worth nothing and they are prepared to override something that‘s been in place for 18 years. that does nothing to create trust and unity in the uk. we‘re not going to accept that. we are willing and we have offered to work with the uk government, it‘s not like we have said we won‘t talk, we have said let‘s talk and get to a position where we are all happy and the door has been shut. they can‘t expect us to support the bill when they aren‘t prepared to talk to all of us around the table. some of the mood music coming out of whitehall now suggests they are looking to work with us to make the bill acceptable, fine, i welcome that but they can‘t expect us to agree to something they themselves wouldn‘t touch in a month of sundays. it‘s not one rule for london and different rules for
7:15 am
eve ryo ne london and different rules for everyone else. the uk is a partnership of four nations all what is it? hugely important we work together to deliver a brexit that works for everyone and that means showing proper respect to scotland, wales and northern ireland. carwyn jones, thanks for your time, first minister of wales. thank you for your time. scorching temperatures across parts of southern europe. many thankful that it is cooler, it isa many thankful that it is cooler, it is a lot cooler, really, and it is in wimbledon for the tennis. carol is there. where are you? next to the rose arbor. look at it, it is beautiful. this is where you can come to relax, have a drink, something to eat, surrounded by magnificent flowers. when you think how far into the championships we are, the flowers are in good shape. i have seen people watering them, cleaning up, there are petunias, there is fearns, roses, and other plants as well, all
7:16 am
in wimbledon colours. 50,000 supplied for the championships each year. they have had a watering this morning. there will not be much coming out of the sky for most of the uk. although we are starting on a cloudy note. as a result it is cool with one or two showers around. the forecast for the gordon is largely dry. we have areas of cloud, we will see sunny spells and highs of around 20— 21 in the breeze. the forecast for the uk is mainly dry. there are sunny spells. temperatures rise and some of us will see showers. nine o‘clock this morning in the south we have quite a bit of cloud and some of us have seen some sunshine and there are also some showers dotted around. the same into east anglia and the midlands. and then into northern ireland, we have bright spells or sunny spells. and here and there the clout is thick
7:17 am
enough for the odd shower. across the irish sea into wales, south—west england, it is not much different. we are looking at bright spells, a bit of cloud like this, sunny spells or indeed cloud thick enough for the odd shower. parts of wales and south—west england will brighten up through the day and we will see quite a bit of sunshine. drifting eastwards to the home counties, a similar scenario. the clout is thick enough for the odd shower. they will fade. the cloud will turn over and sunny spells develop. late afternoon into the early afternoon we will start to see sunny spells develop. and as temperatures rise, showers also develop. we have a weather front moving into western scotland and northern ireland introducing some rain. through the evening and overnight we have the band of rain swinging south and starting to move eastwards. it will start to weaken as well. many parts of the north
7:18 am
will see some rain from that. it will see some rain from that. it will be a mild night in scotland, northern england and northern ireland. for the rest of england and wales, it will be a cooler nights than the one that was just gone. tomorrow, northern ireland, england and scotland, we start with the front drifting eastwards. it will brighten up behind it with some warm sunshine develop. then another front into the north—west. for the rest of england and wales we are looking at a cloudy start to the day with some sunshine developing. and it will start to feel a little bit more humid with temperatures rising. as we had into sunday the second front moves south as a weak feature. for scotland, northern england and northern ireland it will be bright with sunshine. and as the front heads south we are looking at a cloudy afternoon and morning. still, quite nice with a few showers and feeling much more humid. if you have an allergy to poland this will not
7:19 am
be music to your ears. today across south—east england and northern scotla nd south—east england and northern scotland the levels are high. the other places i mentioned are moderate. i had to copper tablet this morning straightaway and it is definitely not pleasant. thank you. see you later. if you are one of those people checking your watch, the train is weaving at 7:31am some were? do you trust them? that is the thing. commuters this morning word need me to tell them. good morning. punctuality on the railways is at the worst level in ten years. that‘s according to research from consumer group which. they also found that train operators handle passenger complaints and delays almost as badly as they did a decade ago. the number of people defaulting on their credit cards has reached it‘s highest level since the financial crash. and the bad news is that the bank of england don‘t think things will get easier.
7:20 am
they‘ve warned that more households are likely to miss payments over the next few months. and there‘s been a big jump in the number of tourists visiting the uk in the first three months of this year, according to official stats out yesterday. the office for national statistics found visits to the uk were up by a fifth to a record 8.3 million trips. the decline in the value of the pound has made it cheaper for foreign visitors to come to the uk, but more expensive for britons going the other way. so, yes, the peak tourist attractions in the uk bracing themselves for a bump in summer if those figures are anything to go by. thank you. it is one of the most inspirational stories of the second world war, civilian sailors crossing the english channel to rescue soldiers trapped at dunkirk. the iconic mission is the subject of a new film by the director christopher nolan. i spoke to him and one of the film‘s stars, sir mark rylance, who says
7:21 am
the bravery shown by the emergency services during the recent disasters in london and manchester shows that famous dunkirk spirit still exists today. the enemy tanks have stopped. why? why waste precious tanks when they can pick us off in the air like fish in a barrel? what was the moment for you as a director, i supposed, more importanlty, or a human being, the moment when you thought, there is a story about dunkirk, well—known as it is historically, a story that i can tell? for me it was myself and emma, my producer, we made a trip 20 years ago on a friend‘s small boat. he wanted to make a crossing at about the same time the evacuation had taken place. it was incredibly rough, felt very difficult, very dangerous, and that was without people dropping bombs on us. we weren‘t heading to a war zone, we were just going to present—day
7:22 am
dunkirk. a call went out. we have to go to dunkirk. ready on the stren line. what are you doing? where are we going? into war, george. these recent disasters in manchester and london, the two disasters in london, have made us all so much more aware of civilian involvement, and the selflessness and bravery of the civilian rescue services. where are we going? dunkirk. they‘ll come back. there's no hiding from this, son. what i wanted to do was build a story using three different timelines, you know, land, sea and air. you are in a spitfire, you are on the beach with the guys there, you are on a boat with mark rylance, coming to help with the evacuation. we cross—cut between these three timelines to try to build up a coherent
7:23 am
picture of the bigger events of dunkirk but without jumping out of the intense human experience. it‘s a film that begs questions of yourself. what would you have done? yeah, i have a cousin who was among the first rescue services in the grenfell tower. and he recounted, you know, decisions firefighters had to make in that terrible staircase on whether to carry on or rescue people who were there. and the film, for each of the three stories in the film, the characters get to a moment where they have to make a crucial decision, which will affect some people and other people. and someone or a few people will be sacrificed in order to save other people. terrible, terrible decisions. torpedo! they need to send more ships. you have made some huge films in the past, but making a film about a real—life event,
7:24 am
particularly this event, brings with it i imagine extra responsibilities in terms of what you are depicting and whether it‘s true and what you are trying to do. how do you, sort of, handle that? well, you do a lot of research, you do a lot of reading. you try and get it under yourfingers. and then what i did is i chose fictional characters to guide us through those events and that freed me up as a filmmaker. i wasn‘t putting words into people‘s mouths who existed. i wasn‘t speaking for people who couldn‘t speak for themselves. last week i did a screening for veterans, you know, people who‘d actually been there on the beach and standing in front of that audience about to show the film was one of the most daunting professional experiences i have had. christopher, thank you very much. thank you. you can get a sense of the scale of the film through the images, it is
7:25 am
massive in scale. you can see my interview with two of the younger stars of the film, fionn whitehead and singer harry styles, on tomorrow morning‘s show. dunkirk is out in cinemas next friday. we will be going behind the scenes of the world‘s greatest classical music festival. tim muffett is at the royal albert hall for us. good morning. good morning from the royal albert hall, listening to these fantastic first professional orchestra made up with a majority of musicians from a black or minority background and they are playing a piece on the 130th year of the
7:26 am
proms, and this has posted it for the 48 year. it is the largest classical music festival and we will speak with more of those taking part a little later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. there are claims that the number of people who could contract cancer from asbestos poisoning in london‘s hospitals is a ticking time bomb. bbc london has found 94% of hospitals in the capital contain asbestos, which is deemed safe as long as it‘s not disturbed. but the unite union, and a leading lawyer in asbestos, both claim the number of people dying from a form of lung cancer is increasing. we have to remove the danger. it kills people. it is not a joke. people will die from this. not today, 20—30 years unless we take action. an nhs improvement spokesperson says asbestos is safe unless disturbed,
7:27 am
and if building work is carried out experts are brought in to dispose of it. the bbc has learned the government is preparing a review of building regulations in england in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster. since the fire, about 200 high—rise buildings have been found to be using combustible material in cladding and insulation. the proms is returning today for its 123rd year and will have a packed schedule of classical music. this year there will be over 90 concerts during its eight—week run. for the first time ever a prom will take place at the tanks in tate modern, wilton‘s music hall, southwark cathedral, and will return to a multi—storey car park in peckham. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, the piccadily line has minor delays between uxbridge and acton town because of a signal problem. there are some delays on the heathrow express and heathrow connect services following a track fault.
7:28 am
this is how the a13 looks. it‘s getting busy westbound heading out of dagenham into barking. and there‘s been an accident on the m25. there are clockwise delays from junction 5 for sevenoaks towards junction 6 for godstone. let‘s have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. a fairly humid feel to things as we move into the weekend, today though looking decent with lots of dry weather around and the chance of the odd isolated shower first thing. fairly cloudy as well. there will be some breaks in the cloud and we will see a gradual brightening up. temperatures today a little bit cooler than yesterday with highs of 21 degrees and a north—westerly breeze. it will still feel present in the sunshine, which means if you‘re heading to wimbledon it looks like a decent day. lots of dry weather around. we will see a gradual brightening up and temperatures edging into the 20s. again, a light north—westerly breeze. so it looks like we will see lots of play. as we go through this evening and overnight, a largely dry picture. variable amounts of cloud. there will be clear spells at times. but it will be fairly
7:29 am
muggy with overnight lows of 14—16 degrees. we start off the day on saturday fairly cloudy. it will be a largely cloudy day. plenty of brightness in the morning, increasing through the day. temperatures at a maximum of 22 degrees. i‘ll leave you with the outlook, then. sunday looking like a decent day. a lot of cloud around and the chance of seeing the odd spot of light rain and drizzle. starting to feel increasingly humid as we move through the weekend with highs of 24 degrees on sunday. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. but now a summary of this morning‘s main news: police in east london are investigating five attacks which involved corrosive substances being thrown in people‘s faces. they all happened within 90 minutes in hackney and stoke newington last night.
7:30 am
one teenager has been arrested. one of the victims has what‘s been described as life—changing injuries. earlier, the government minister sarah newton told breakfast the home office is investigating why these type of attacks are happening. this was a shocking attack last night. you know, somebody‘s left with life changing injuries. this is something we‘ve been concerned about in the home office for some time. we‘ve been working very closely with our colleagues in law enforcement to get a better picture of actually what is happening, as you quite rightly say, it‘s happening in pockets of the country. the home office has launched a new strategy to tackle illegal drug use, with tailored treatment to be given to drug addicts. it follows a rise in drug—related deaths in england and wales and targets new psychoactive substances. the home secretary amber rudd said the plan will focus on recovery. the scottish and welsh governments have threatened to block the key brexit bill which will convert all existing eu laws into uk law, that‘s over what they say is a power grab by westminster.
7:31 am
the repeal bill is also facing opposition from labour and other parties in the commons. but brexit secretary david davis has rejected the criticism and described it as one of the most significant pieces of legislation to pass through parliament. president trump will be the guest of honour at the bastille day celebrations in paris today. he‘s marking france‘s national day at the invitation of the country‘s president, emmanuel macron. the two leaders will watch the traditional military parade which, this year, has french soldiers marching alongside us troops to mark the centenary of america‘s entry into the first world war. a heatwave across southern europe has forced some of the region‘s most famous tourist sites to close during peak holiday season. more than twenty fires have started near naples and sicily where the temperatures have climbed above 40 degrees this week. the greek government has ordered that popular archaeological sites close, and in southern spain, the drought has devastated crops. several spanish cities have experienced record temperatures forjuly. it will reach 46 degrees in cordoba today. anyone visiting stonehenge or loch
7:32 am
ness earlier this week would have seen a bonus attraction if they had looked up. the red arrows and their american counterparts, the thunderbirds, have been performing some stunning manoeuvres in a practice display from raf fairford in gloucestershire. they were rehearsing ahead of the royal international air tattoo this weekend which marks the 70th anniversary of the united states air force. those are the main stories. mike is at wimbledon for us as the ball bounces along and mike pops up, good morning. you‘re looking ahead to the men‘s semis and a lot of eyes on federer but you‘re starting with a look back at events yesterday? it's the time of day to draw breath and reflect with the cover is still on on centre court, a bit of a breeze whistling around, not as warm as it has been but hotter later on, as carol was saying —— covers.
7:33 am
yesterdayjohanna carol was saying —— covers. yesterday johanna konta, carol was saying —— covers. yesterdayjohanna konta, her carol was saying —— covers. yesterday johanna konta, her dream was ended by venus williams, the five—time champion, but we‘re not too downhearted, especially as through this tournament macrojoker has shown her potential and she believes one day she can go all the way and win the women‘s engels. it wasn‘t to be against venus williams, who at the age of 37 is the oldest finalist in the women‘s since navratilova in 1994 —— singles. she looked every bit the five—time champion, how playing konta, who lost in straight sets, 6—4, 6—2, much to the disappointment of home fa ns much to the disappointment of home fans at the all england club. afterwards she thanked fans for their love and support and described the fortnight as a memorable experience. i‘ve definitely enjoyed every single moment i‘ve been here these past two weeks. so i don‘t think i need too much time for that to sink in or me to analyse that, i‘ve made sure that i‘ve been very present with everything i‘ve done to make sure i have enjoyed and taken the most out of every opportunity and experience i‘ve had.
7:34 am
venus williams will now play spain‘s garbine muguruza in tomorrow‘s final. the 14th seed thrashed the unseeded magdalena rybarikova in little over an hour to make it to her second wimbledon final. there remains some british interest here at wimbledon, though, jamie murray and his partner martina hingis are into the mixed doubles semi—finals after beating the all british pairing of ken skupski and jocelyn rae. murray and hingis are top seeds and took the match in straight sets to book their place in the last four. and jamie could be facing a fellow briton across the net if he makes it to the final because there‘s a familiar british name in the other semi final, heather watson is through with her partner henri kontinen. they are the defending champions and could make it back to back titles after they won their match in three sets yesterday. the wheelchair tournaments started yesterday here but there was disappointment for defending champion britain‘s gordon reid. he lost in the singles in straight sets to sweden‘s steffan olsson,
7:35 am
the man he beat to win the title last year. better news, though, for alfie hewett, he won his first singles match on grass. away from wimbledon, the three—time tour de france winner chris froome has lost the leader‘s yellowjersey in this year‘s race after a gruelling day in the mountains on stage 12. froome said he just didn‘t have the legs as the race crossed into the pyrenees. he finished down in seventh, handing the overall lead to rival the italian fabio aru. to football now and manchester city have agreed a fee of £50 million for the tottenham defender kyle walker. it‘s expected he‘ll sign in time tojoin his new team—mates before they leave for their pre—season tour of the united states. one player who is already making an impact at his new club is wayne rooney. he only signed for everton on sunday but has already scored his first goal, this brilliant long—range effort on his debut during their pre—season tour of tanzania. back at wimbledon, i‘m delighted to
7:36 am
say to talk about the johanna konta match, pete mccraw, former australian national women‘s tennis coach and you discovered her, how was she? 12. yesterday watching coach and you discovered her, how was she ?. yesterday watching her here, was she 7. yesterday watching her here, did you have flashbacks to that will be rolled? what was ironic is the first time i saw that will be rolled? what was ironic is the first time i sano compete was the clay—court championships in mildura ——12—year—old. the irony of grass and grass is a great connection. what emotions did you go through yesterday watching her? she has done so well? she has, she has transformed her game, herself, a competitor, pride is the overwhelming emotion i have from the little girl i first saw at 12 or 13, the girl! little girl i first saw at 12 or 13, the girl i took to america for six weeks to play an international junior event and then to see her
7:37 am
shine on this stage over the last fortnight has been wonderful. did you think when you saw her when she was 12 that she could go all the way and win the women‘s singles at wimbledon? she definitely had the competitive traits, she definitely brought a sense of purpose and love to compete. while she needed to work on her game and while the transition has been a little longer than most of her peers, i think the process she has been through has really transform her as a competitor to what we see today. are you convinced even more now that she can bounce back having seen her play this week, especially the mental strength we saw a lot of the time, can she win it one day? no doubt, the best is yet to come. really? absolutely. wa da yet to come. really? absolutely. wada she knew to do to go the extra step to beat the likes of venus williams —— what toshi. step to beat the likes of venus williams -- what toshi. when you look at the experience of venus, a five—time champion, one ofjo‘s
7:38 am
assets is her ability to learn and adapt and she will learn a lot from these championships —— what does she. she will grow as a competitor and develop her game. standing closer on the baseline and taking the ball earlier will make a big difference against someone like venus. you can't underestimate the pressure of a first semi—final here and having done its o‘malley times like the nurse makes a difference? for some athletes support is... —— so many times —— like venus. to use the support of the crowd and the backing to get the best out of herself is the way forward. what about the final, muguruza has been there against serena, what about venus? the first semi was a bit difficult to gauge muguruza‘s form, given that it was one—sided. looking at venus‘s performance yesterday, you would have to say venus in straight and muguruza in three.
7:39 am
about the men‘s, what about federer, now the other big three have gone? he is the sentimental favourite and he is also the actual favourite. for the benefit of the game it would be a fantastic achievement. they are second up, federer against berdych in the second semi—final on centre court, you can hear the covers are coming off. before that it is cilic against the man who knocked out andy murray, sam querrey. that‘s this afternoon, the coverage is on bbc. it starts at 12:30pm on bbc two. also across radio 5 live and the bbc sport website. will it be as hot as australia?” don‘t think so but it depends on where you are. it will be dry when play gets under way today at wimbledon. what we are looking at is not dissimilar to what we have got,
7:40 am
you can see through the roof of centre court it is cloudy, remaining cloudy for much of the morning, late morning in the early afternoon it will brighten up and sunshine will be present. the forecast for wimbledon this afternoon is dry. you will be very unlucky if you see a shower. temperatures today, up to 20 or 21 shower. temperatures today, up to 20 or21 in light shower. temperatures today, up to 20 or 21 in light winds, feeling quite pleasant. this morning there‘s a lot of cloud across the uk, some of us seeing showers and under the cloud it feels cool but the cloud will break and we will see sunny spells developing more less across—the—board developing more less across—the—boa rd and temperature wise showers will develop. this morning at 9am in southern england, cloud around, some will have sunny brea ks cloud around, some will have sunny breaks and there are a few showers. further north, east anglia into the midlands, the same holds true, the mixture of brighter spells, a few sunny spells and showers. further north into northern england, a drier start, scotland a drier start with a few showers and in northern ireland,
7:41 am
a bright start with sunny skies. into wales and south—west england, a bit more cloud around, again here and there you could get the odd shower this morning but equally some good brightness through the afternoon with good spells of sunshine developing. interesting further east through dorset and into hampshire and the home counties, similarto hampshire and the home counties, similar to what we have at wimbledon, variable amounts of cloud with a few brighter breaks but through the morning, especially late morning into the early afternoon, where we have the cloud at the moment it will turn over, sunny spells will develop and it will be pleasant. as temperatures rise at the top as i mentioned, there will bea the top as i mentioned, there will be a few showers but they will be scattered and most won‘t see them. by scattered and most won‘t see them. by the end of the day a new weather front in western scotland and northern ireland will build the abuse rain. temperatures up to 22 or 23 -- will abuse rain. temperatures up to 22 or 23 —— will introduce. through the evening and overnight the weather front in scotland and northern ireland sinks south and its east, taking the rain with it. not as cold a night in the north as the one just
7:42 am
gone, but under clearer skies as we come across the west of —— rest of england and wales, a cooler night than the one just gone so if you‘ve been having trouble sleeping in the night, this is good news. tomorrow we start with the weather front in parts of scotland and northern england, continuing to drift east, taking its cloud and patchy light rain and drizzle with it. behind it, brightening up with the sunshine and the next weather front comes to the north—west. in england and wales away from the north, starting with clear skies and the sun comes out, feeling more humid and the temperature rising. into sunday, remember the weather front in scotla nd remember the weather front in scotland and northern ireland? it moves south as a weak feature, so for scotland, england and northern ireland, more sunshine, the chance ofa ireland, more sunshine, the chance of a shower, a bright and right start in southern england and wales but as the front goes south as a wea k feature but as the front goes south as a weak feature it will introduce more cloud and maybe the odd shower. temperatures around london, 27. if you‘re coming to wimbledon for the
7:43 am
men‘s finals, bear that in mind, feeling humid. if you like it hot, as we head into the middle of next week, parts of southern england, especially the south—east, will be backin especially the south—east, will be back in the high 20s, maybe even 30, once again, but it does mean we will see thunderstorms again. always liked reliever or some relief after a spell of hot weather. lots of comments about the subjectivity of weather, what is hot —— always light relief. in meteorologicalterms we have standards by which we will say this is considered hot in the summer or this is considered hot in the winter. but personally, i like it about 28 in the summer, dry, sunny, rain at night to water the plants. i‘m a 23 girl i think, betterfor golf! carol, thanks very much! now many of us will have
7:44 am
been hit with a charge for going over our overdraft limit unexpectedly but for 20 million bank customers, that‘s all changing. yeah, morning everyone. this is all about going over an agreed overdraft limit, so we‘re talking about unplanned overd rafts. lloyds banking group, which owns lloyds, halifax and bank of scotland, has announced it‘s scrapping its fees for unplanned overd rafts altogether. at the moment, lloyds customers pay a daily charge if they go over their overdraft limit unexpectedly. if you go above your overdraft limit by between £10 and £25, you would be charged £5 a day. and if you blow your overdraft limit by more than that, it‘ll cost you £10 per day. from november, those charges will be scrapped. so, will more banks follow suit? sue hayward is a personalfinance expert and she is with us.
7:45 am
my my first question is whether this will encourage people into overspending. if there isn‘t a limit, if there isn‘t a threat of charge, will people spend too much? i don‘t think they will at all. what the banks are doing, with the lloyds group, the amount you can go over, they will cut the fees free buffer rather drastically, which means people won‘t have the option and in some cases they might have to clear the overdraft before they can spend more money. it is not an open bank account to spend as much as you like. and of course, don‘t forget, a lot of people have a fee free buffer zone. we might see people switching banks to go to a different bank that offers more for their money. will the banks be able to make the money back somehow? they are charging a little more in interest rates for
7:46 am
some overdrafts? they are. the banks are not that generous, they are not charities. they are there to make money. if they are going to lose money, in the sense they will not charge as much, we could see overcharges in credit cards. over the last couple of years we have seen the bank of england base rate go down. savings rates have been particular shabby. what has happened is interest rates on credit cards have been creeping up to over 20%. there might be little charges that they sneak in and we don‘t notice in they sneak in and we don‘t notice in the small print all the terms and conditions where we might get hit. we heard from the bank of england more concerns about people‘s personal debt, household debt. people seem to be using credit cards to pay other credit cards are today off other debts. that is a concern. it is, yes. the number of credit cards, these 0% deals, is being cut. there are some at the moment where you can get three and a half years of interest—free credit. those deals
7:47 am
are not available to everybody. it depends on your financial circumstances. the banks are cutting back on those as well. we might see less of those in future. are we likely to see the other banks follow suit? this is lloyds, will others be pressured into the same thing? the financial conduct authority is on their case and they say you have to do something about this. more will follow. thank you very much for joining us. good news for banking customers, especially those who may occasionally drift into the overdraft without necessarily planning to. thank you very much. we are very lucky on breakfast to go behind—the—scenes in places and here we are, this low shot this morning inside the hallowed surroundings of the royal albert hall. of course, the royal albert hall. of course, the proms about to start, returning for the 123rd year. and for the first time ever, breakfast is live inside the royal albert hall, home to the musical extravaganza since the second world war. so, there is history there. as well
7:48 am
as of course passion for music. that is nicola benedetti, i think. tim muffett is there for us. indeed, performing shosta kovich‘s violin concerto number one, one of the most successful violinist. it will be her sixth time at the proms. the 120 30 of the world‘s largest classical music festival. eight weeks of music ahead. very exciting. katie is one of the presenters, and also anushka, performing for the third time at the proms on the sitar. what are the highlights? welcome to our summer home. it is really rather nice. it will be a fabulous season. highlights from all sorts of young performers, world—class names you will have heard of, the best classical musicians in the world come here.
7:49 am
eight weeks this summer with over 90 concerts. what is wonderful is there is music for everyone. of course it is music for everyone. of course it is classical music, there isjazz, soul, pop, world music. you are going to hear more about that as well. and although most of the concerts are here, we go out and about, the proms on the road, and it is going out of london to hull. there are the attempts to make classical music more relevant to more people. what has happened this year specifically? i love this question. the proms started 123 yea rs question. the proms started 123 years ago with the sole intent of making classical music as outwardly diverse and accessible as possible. you can come here any night and get a ticket for just a couple you can come here any night and get a ticket forjust a couple of quid and stand here in the arena. there is never a sold—out concert because you can always have tickets in the day. that was the idea, get as many people to great music as possible. yes, a lot of youth appearing this year. we have the first black and
7:50 am
asian and ethnic minority orchestra, we have wonderful diversity from around the world. the whole idea is you can come along to the proms and have a great time for not free much money and just... get on to listen toa money and just... get on to listen to a lot of great music. it had been accusations that it is only test, although it has clearly changed, and has a change for ever? the proms have mashed up classical and pop music. it is different to what it was when it first began in 1895. well, of course it is, a lot has changed, tim, we can all agree since then. if you want to come and see tributes to ella fitzgerald. the late—night proms are amazing. one of the best nights i had was the ibetha from. you can‘t assume it isjust the best nights i had was the ibetha from. you can‘t assume it is just a whole load of stuff, you know, the
7:51 am
old—fashioned view that it is stuffy musicians. it really is not at all. it is great music. that is what you have to remember. whatever you music you come to watch, it is the best in the world. lovely. thank you very much. now, anushka, pass sister norahjones, much. now, anushka, pass sister norah jones, you will much. now, anushka, pass sister norahjones, you will perform on the sitarfor norahjones, you will perform on the sitar for the norahjones, you will perform on the sitarfor the third time norahjones, you will perform on the sitar for the third time at the proms. what is it like?” sitar for the third time at the proms. what is it like? i have played a couple of times outside the proms as well and it is incredible. just in and of itself. and the proms are something special. it is the most iconic classical musical festival in the world. to play it there is a special feeling and i think it is something that feels accessible. you can see the standing seats, it is a diverse group of people. not the same as other classical audiences. it feels a lot more diverse. that is exciting. your instrument, in india, is seen as a male instrument. that has changed
7:52 am
more recently. he performed with your late father as well. when you perform, does it feel special to perform, does it feel special to perform an instrument, non—traditional classical instrument, in the british sense in such an historic venue?” instrument, in the british sense in such an historic venue? i appreciate getting to present indian music in something like the proms. it is an important symbol of diversity to have that. this will be a special night, premiering music never performed live before. it is an album called passages with my father and philip glass. outside of that i am one of the few female instrumentalist outplay sitar but they do not have gender, so, you know, i just play they do not have gender, so, you know, ijust play this instrument.” will tell you what we should do, let‘s listen to the players as we chat a little longer, because, as you were saying, tell us about these musicians, they are very special in many ways. they are tremendous. you will have seen the base earlier, this was set up a couple of years
7:53 am
ago. fantastic musicians. so much work has been done to try to get away from the idea that classical music is for white old men. it really isn‘t. we all know that. there are a lot of amazing musicians from all sorts of backgrounds. traditionally they were not many visible on stage in european orchestras. this was something that i know was strongly felt about, to provide a place where it was normal to be from an ethnic minority playing traditional classical music ona playing traditional classical music on a stage like this. it has been the most tremendous success of. on a stage like this. it has been the most tremendous success otm is absolutely fantastic. and the key thing is more people, the more who engage with classical music, the better, and that is a done deal in many ways, isn‘t it, that is happening at the moment?” many ways, isn‘t it, that is happening at the moment? i would like to think so, yes, and i bank my drum for this every year. i have played classical music since i was a kid. but i always say is it is part
7:54 am
of the music around us all the time, whether it is film music, likejohn williams, it is therefore stop it is just wonder. white —— it isjust there. if we can get one more from there. if we can get one more from the players as we headed back, that would be lovely. it all kicks off this evening. there are eight weeks of classical music. this evening it begins and it goes on until september. the proms has, long way in the last 123 years. —— the proms has come a long way in the last 123 years. well, wasn‘t that lovely? and how did they know that we had to come out of that moment? that was exquisite timing. time to perfection. we‘ll talk to sir david
7:55 am
attenborough about his fears for the uk‘s butterfly population and what you can do to help stop the decline. thank you for the pictures you have sentin thank you for the pictures you have sent in of butterflies in your garden — keep on doing so. we will show them at some point. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. there are claims that the number of people who could contract cancer from asbestos poisoning in london‘s hospitals is a ticking time bomb. bbc london has found 94% of hospitals in the capital contain asbestos, which is deemed safe as long as it‘s not disturbed. but the unite union, and a leading lawyer in asbestos, both claim the number of people dying from a form of lung cancer is increasing. we have to remove the danger. it kills people. it is not a joke. people will die from this. not today, 20—30 years unless we take action. an nhs improvement spokesperson says asbestos is safe unless disturbed,
7:56 am
and if building work is carried out experts are brought in to dispose of it. the bbc has learned the government is preparing a review of building regulations in england in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster. since the fire, about 200 high—rise buildings have been found to be using combustible material in cladding and insulation. it‘s thought london‘s population will reach ten million by 2030. the greater london assembly says the biggest growth will be in the east end. and we‘re an ageing population. by 2041, one in eight londoners will be at least seventy years old. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, the piccadily line is back to normal but the dlr has minor delays between canary wharf, poplar and bank due to a signal failure. there are some delays on the heathrow express and heathrow connect services following a track fault. this is how it looks on the a406 north circular — slow westbound from the a10 great cambridge interchange in edmonton towards palmers green.
7:57 am
and the m25 has clockwise delays from jucntion five for sevenoaks towards junction 6 for godstone after an accident. let‘s have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. a fairly humid feel to things as we move into the weekend, today though looking decent with lots of dry weather around and the chance of the odd isolated shower first thing. fairly cloudy as well. there will be some breaks in the cloud and we will see a gradual brightening up. temperatures today a little bit cooler than yesterday with highs of 21 degrees and a north—westerly breeze. it will still feel present in the sunshine, which means if you‘re heading to wimbledon it looks like a decent day. lots of dry weather around. we will see a gradual brightening up and temperatures edging into the 20s. again, a light north—westerly breeze. so it looks like we will see lots of play. as we go through this evening and overnight, a largely dry picture. variable amounts of cloud. there will be clear spells at times. but it will be fairly muggy with overnight lows of 14—16 degrees. we start off the day on saturday fairly cloudy.
7:58 am
it will be a largely cloudy day. plenty of brightness in the morning, increasing through the day. temperatures at a maximum of 22 degrees. i‘ll leave you with the outlook, then. sunday looking like a decent day. a lot of cloud around and the chance of seeing the odd spot of light rain and drizzle. starting to feel increasingly humid as we move through the weekend with highs of 24 degrees on sunday. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. five people are attacked with acid in london in the space of 90 minutes. one person has suffered life—changing injuries. the government tells this programme it‘s taking action to tackle a growing problem. this was a shocking attack last night, one person has a life changing injuries, and this is something we have been concerned about in the home office for some time. good morning, it‘s
7:59 am
friday, 14th july. also this morning: new measures to tackle a rise in drug—related deaths are announced — they‘ll target so—called legal highs and provide more help for addicts. after dinner together in the eiffel tower, president trump joins president macron of france for the country‘s bastille day celebrations. actor mark rylance tells us how he thinks the spirit of dunkirk depicted in his latest film has been reflected in recent events. these recent disasters in manchester and london, the two disasters in london, have made us all so much more aware of civilian involvement and the selflessness and bravery of the civilian rescue services. the 123rd prom season begins this
8:00 am
evening, you are listening to a piece by hollyhocks. we will be speaking to the musicians taking pa rt speaking to the musicians taking part in the world‘s largest classical music festival. here at wimbledon, the dream is over forjohanna konta, but she remains defiant. she says she can win the women‘s title in years to come. she lost her semi—final yesterday to five—time champion venus williams. talking of venus, there is that song, she‘s got it, she‘s still got it. good morning, it is a chilly start at wimbledon, also quite a cloudy one but it should brighten up and stay dry. for the uk as a whole, cloudy with a few showers, sunny spells developing and further showers this afternoon in the
8:01 am
north—west later. more detail on all of that later in the programme. thank you, see you later on. first, our main story. police in east london are investigating five attacks which involved corrosive substances being thrown in people‘s faces. one of the victims has suffered what‘s been described as "life—changing injuries". the incidents all happened within 90 minutes in hackney and stoke newington last night. one teenager has been arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm and robbery. andy moore‘s report contains some distressing images. this was the scene of the most serious attack last night, the victim was apparently delivering takeaway food when a pair of men tried to steal his moped. police say a corrosive substance was thrown in his face. he was taken to hospital with what they described as life—changing injuries. in the space ofjust over an hour, police were alerted to five very similar attacks, the motive on each occasion seems to be robbery. police believe they are linked. the government says it is keen to
8:02 am
crack down on this type of crime. this was a shocking attack last night. somebody is left with life changing injuries and this is something that we‘ve been concerned about in the home office for some time. we‘ve been working very closely with our colleagues in law enforcement to get a better picture of actually what is happening, as you quite rightly say it is happening in pockets of the country. acid attacks in england have doubled since 2012. 21—year—old resham khan and her cousin jameel mukhtar were attacked shortly after they had been celebrating her 21st birthday in east london. acid was thrown through the window of their car. my face started melting, my clothes started to burn, my shorts started sticking to me, there was smoke coming out of the seats. moped crime is also on the increase, especially in london. delivery drivers in east london say they‘ve been faced by an escalating crime wave from knife—wielding gangs. andy moore, bbc news.
8:03 am
the home office has launched a new strategy to tackle illegal drug use, with tailored treatment to be given to drug addicts. it follows a rise in drug—related deaths in england and wales and targets new psychoactive substances. the home secretary amber rudd said the plan will focus on recovery. the scottish and welsh governments have threatened to block the key brexit bill which will convert all existing eu laws into uk law, over what they say is a "power grab" by westminster. the repeal bill is also facing opposition from labour and other parties in the commons. our political correspondent chris mason joins us now from our westminster studio. you can always make things clear and no—one is under any illusions, this is complicated, isn‘t it grows by pro—1 of those examples, the eu bill, there is already a row over this one? yes, there is, it is mighty complicated, this, and pretty difficult to explain but let me have a crack. what the government was
8:04 am
doing and is doing with the blueprint for brexit is setting out how it goes about untying the uk from 40 odd years of association with the eu, in terms cutting and pasting all of the laws that brussels has made on our behalf and turning them into british law on day one after brexit so there are no black holes in terms of laws and regulations. but exactly how that works is causing 360 degrees of scrutiny, labour asking awkward questions, some conservatives asking awkward questions, and crucially awkward questions, and crucially awkward questions, and crucially awkward questions from scotland and wales, the devolved administrations. powers that will come back from brussels that could eventually end up brussels that could eventually end up in belfast, edinburgh and cardiff are coming via westminster and that is causing real anxiety. listen to the concern of the first minister of wales, for instance. it is not one rule for london and then different rules for everybody else, the uk is
8:05 am
a partnership of four nations, or what is it? it is hugely important we work together to deliver a brexit that works for everybody and that means showing proper respect to scotland, wales and northern ireland. the first ministers outside of london can‘t stop brexit happening altogether but they can cause no end of grief to the process and downing street is well aware of that and well aware of where else the criticism could come from as well. this is going to be a rocky couple of years the theresa may, if she lasts that long. chris, thank you. crowds are expected to line the streets for the funeral of bradley lowery later today. the six—year—old sunderland fan won a legion of supporters across the country, including footballerjermain defoe, who has left training in spain to be at the funeral. bradley died last friday after suffering from a rare cancer. two police forces have become the first in the uk to set up a dedicated drones unit. a helicopter can cost
8:06 am
hundreds of pounds per hour but the remote—controlled miniature alternative provides an eye—in—the—sky for a fraction of the price to help with searches for missing people, responding to road crashes and tackling other major incidents. president donald trump is in paris to discuss us relations with french leader emanuel macron. he has been the guest of honour at many of the city‘s famous landmarks — including the eiffel tower, where they had dinner last night. you looked that up, £170 per head is what you would pay? normally, it is probably more expensive on this occasion! maybe they got a special deal. they‘ll meet again at the bastille day celebrations in paris. our reporter hugh schofield is there. we can see people lining the streets, very much very keen to welcome president trump? they are, and in an hour orso
8:07 am
welcome president trump? they are, and in an hour or so the parade will start down the champs—elysees where i am standing and the final preparations are underway, watching soldiers, beautifully turned out, putting on the final changes and joking in their bright red cravat and helping each other to looks big and span and in an hourthe each other to looks big and span and in an hour the first troop. marching down. americans, by the way, this year, because this year marks 100 yea rs year, because this year marks 100 years since the united states joined the first world war and that is why donald trump is here, the invitation was to come and represent america for this very important anniversary, coincidentally, but of course it comes also with diplomatic baggage around it, emmanuel macron and donald trump seem to have forged a friendship or at least a relationship that is functioning and which, from the french point of view, will serve the purpose of keeping donald trump and america
8:08 am
within the camp, stopping the isolation of trump, which the french beard is what was happening. it is interesting as you talk about that relationship being built upon and how, i don‘t know, how people in the press are perceiving trump with other leaders, there are still comments being picked up on about what donald trump did or did not say to emmanuel macron‘s wife and in relation to the general political sense of unease at the moment? yes, there were remarks that donald trump made yesterday, basically complimenting emmanuel macron‘s wife, a much older woman of course, which had been reported and spun and indicating that his crudeness has not gone away, shall we say, but thatis not gone away, shall we say, but that is not being made much of here in france. one aspect of this which i heard you referred to in the
8:09 am
earlier discussion is why are there no protest here? the french are not big fans of donald trump at all but they are not protesting, largely because it is holiday time here, summer is coming, the french really switch off politics now and will give him a good welcome. always good to talk to you, thank you very much. apologies for a bit ofa you very much. apologies for a bit of a break—up, the technical gremlins tackling us again, but we got the gist of what he was saying, president trump expected to arrive for the parade in about an hour. sunshine in paris, but further south the temperatures are getting warm across southern europe. it has forced some of the region‘s most famous tourist sites to close during peak holiday season. more than 20 fires have started near naples and sicily, where the temperatures have climbed above 40 degrees celsius this week. the greek government has ordered that popular archaeological sites close. in southern spain,
8:10 am
the drought has devastated crops. several spanish cities have experienced record temperatures forjuly. it will reach a record 47 degrees in cordoba today. we will get a full weather update for over year with carol in every moment. fewer people are taking illegal drugs than in recent years but according to the home office there has been a dramatic increase in deaths from drugs in england and wales. the first new strategy for seven years aims to target what are described as "new threats" such as former legal highs and performance—enhancing drugs. there will be more monitoring of those who use drugs to better target the help available. with us now is eve christian, a former drugs user who now helps support others with addiction problems, and in our westminster
8:11 am
studio is ed morrow, from the royal society of public health. ed, let me begin with you. your reaction to this programme, there is no new money, no decriminalisation when it comes to the use of drugs or for drug users, those are some criticisms levied at it. what are some positives? this is a small step in the right direction, there is an increased emphasis on recovery, on harm reduction, on getting people into treatment, but really without the new money to facilitate that we are still facing a problem where huge numbers of people are suffering harm from drug use because they are not accessing the services that they need, the majority of deaths we have seen recently, those people have never been in contact with treatment, so if we don‘t remove the barrier of criminalisation and put
8:12 am
more money into treatment services, we are not going to get those people into co nta ct we are not going to get those people into contact with treatment services. eve, we will talk about what you think works in a moment but it is worth establishing, for people who don‘t know your story, how bad things were bored you, and i‘m looking at a quote here, you said yourself, a drugs worker you first came into contact with said, i really don‘t know how you are not dead? you were five stone, a combination of drink and drugs? dead? you were five stone, a combination of drink and drugs7m was, yes. i started out a heavy drinker, turned to drugs, the last two years of my addiction were the worst, i would climb into a cupboard because i couldn‘t stand the sound of my own breath because i had turned to crack cocaine as well and ididn‘t turned to crack cocaine as well and i didn‘t know where to go to help. i had been to my doctor several times, there was no literature anywhere, no one pointing me in the right direction, and it was actually social services that gave me the number to my local community drugs... and they were in touch, you had young children at the time? yes,
8:13 am
two of my children had been removed at that time, there was no social service involvement, i became homeless so they had to go and stay with their dad and luckily enough he was such a fantastic father social services never had to get involved, but when i got clean they never came back to me, they stayed with their dad. they are now adults and we have a healthy, strong relationship, but i had had another child later on and she remained with me, she was two when i decided to get help. we spoke earlier to a government minister about this new idea, no new money, as we have heard. from your experience, what are the things that really work that can help people and genuinely make a
8:14 am
difference? i work for a charity called action on addiction and we have lots of services available and their people helped me, i went into their people helped me, i went into the 12—step treatment programme with them, which is now slightly adapted, we offer two routes to recovery, centred around an interpersonal approach, your relationships, and thatis approach, your relationships, and that is what worked for me. i currently get people ready to move into abstinence for recovery. the problem is how many of those programmes are available and how people find out about it? that is theissue, people find out about it? that is the issue, yes, we try to get out there as much as we can and i‘m sure people have heard of the brink, a bar in liverpool, and my services are based in there, we have drugs and alcohol counsellor, and a family programme because it is notjust addiction, the addict, it is a family illness and the family must recover from it as well. i family illness and the family must recoverfrom it as well. i brought great shame on my own family and it took time to rebuild those relationships and i think that is what has worked best for me. when i went for help i was met with understanding and compassion, and grace. ed, you are listening to leave and
8:15 am
the focus on... what did you call it, the step towards abstinence or preparation for abstinence? is that when you think the resources should be focused? there are different forms of treatment. there is the issue of abstinence —based treatment which works for some people but perhaps not so well for others. we need to be flexible in the treatment we are delivering. one of the things we are delivering. one of the things we think is good with this new strategy is the appointment of a new champion, which has more of a focus on looking at the fundamental deterrents to people/ use. —— determinants to people/ use. things like unemployment, homelessness, mental health problems. we need to address those issues when people have come out of recovery. to be fair, that is what the minister said, those are the resources being tied together. they say that is how
8:16 am
you tackle something like this. tied together. they say that is how you tackle something like thism is hugely important, another positive movement is moving the measure of success about successful treatment completion from six to 12 months after completion so we are not putting people out as a successful completion and seeing them falling back into dependency and coming back to the system. but it remains to be seen whether the recovery champion is a gimmick or if resources will improve those factors and support people back into a normal life which gives them a platform to avoid dependency in the future. tomorrow, and even, thank you both very much. we met your 11—year—old daughter this morning, possibly the best evidence of your story and recovery. she certainly is. she is very confident. she is. thank you. shall we find out what is happening in the weather? we had some really
8:17 am
scorching and pleasant temperatures across the european mainland, luckily we will not experience any thing so horrible —— scorching and unpleasant. yesterday in southern spain the temperature hit 46.6 celsius. we would round that up to 47, a whopping and very uncomfortable 116.6 fahrenheit. that heat is coming our way, but not to that extent. into next week, parts of southern england could hit 28, 29 or even 30. but when we see those kinds of levels, it all breaks down in a thundery maths. that is likely to happen next week. if you are out and about this morning, it is a chilly start. it is bright with quite a lot of cloud here at wimbledon this morning, some showers as a result. the forecast the wimbledon, when
8:18 am
play gets under way, is try. variable shallots, sunny spells, highs of 20 or 21 and light breezes. when the cloud cover comes over it feels chilly. when we lose this cloud, for many we are looking at sunny spells and showers. we have showers in the forecast this morning. at 9am across southern england we have guys like this with cloud, some breaks in it, so some blue sky, but also some showers continuing to east anglia. northern england, scotland and northern england, scotland and northern ireland, a similar story, bright and sunny spells and the cloud thick enough for the odd shower. across the irish sea into wales, a similar story. the same for the midlands. some bright spells but quite a bit of cloud around. that is producing the odd shower. even the south—west of england is not immune through the morning but it will brighten up very nicely for you. as
8:19 am
we drift from gloucestershire into dorset, hampshire, the home counties, a similar story. some clouds, some breaks, some sunshine and the odd shower. many of the showers will fade through the morning, the cloud will break out by late morning/ early afternoon, lots of us will be dry with sunny spells. through the afternoon we could see some scattered showers develop. by no means will we all see them. by the end of the afternoon, the weather front will produce rain across western scotland and northern ireland. this evening and overnight, that will move south and east, taking the cloud and rain with it. across scotland, northern england and northern ireland, a milder nights. and a clear skies, further south, for the rest of england and wales, a night than the one just gone —— under more clearfurther south.
8:20 am
some patchy light rain and showers on saturday, behind that it brightens up nicely with sunshine, but later a new weather front will come into the north—west, introducing more rain. for southern areas, for the rest of england away from the north and wales, we are looking at variable cloud with some sunny spells, with a temperature continuing to climb. in this sunday, the weather front across scotland and northern ireland sinks southwards. for scotland, northern england and northern ireland on sunday we will see some sunshine and one or two showers. after a bright and sunny start in the south of england and south wales, the weather front comes south, introducing more cloud, we will also see the odd shower from cloud, we will also see the odd showerfrom bad. it will feel more humid, highs of 27. thank you, carol the weather is closely related to the next story, featuring british butterflies.
8:21 am
it‘s a critical summer for the uk‘s butterflies, with even the most common of species experiencing a significant decline in recent years. but it‘s hoped that this year‘s warm weather could see populations bounce back and the big butterfly count launches today to see what the true picture is. sir david attenborough is president of the butterfly conservation charity and joins us now from the london wetland centre. iam very i am very pleased to say he can join us. good morning. thank you very much for talking to us. good morning. how can people help? how do you count and record butterflies and how will that help? initially the big butterfly count is to discover what is happening. last year was the fourth worst year on record in terms of butterflies. what we want to know is what is happening this year. it looks pretty promising at the moment, but what people can do is go into a garden or an open place, some sunny place, and start looking around for 15 minutes and tell us
8:22 am
how many butterflies they saw and what kinds they were. even if they don‘t see any at all, that is an important piece of information. having done that for 15 minutes, how many they are, you can get a chart from the internet to tell you what they were, then tell us on the internet. that will give us lots of valuable statistics. i should apologise for calling you sir richard, said david, a slip of the tongue. what are the most common —— why are the most common butterfly species like the common white declining? that is exactly what we wa nt to declining? that is exactly what we want to know. can you hear me now?” can hear you. the most common ones as opposed to the more rare ones? yes. in the past, the thing about butterflies, all those are fairly common. what were once common, the
8:23 am
populations are going up and going down. last year was very bad. this year is beginning to look good, partly because we have the good weather. butterflies can bounce back. female butterflies lay so many eggs that if only a tiny proportion of them survive they are doing quite well, but if conditions are good then you will get a lot of butterflies of different kinds. and we hope you will. that is what we wa nt to we hope you will. that is what we want to discover. which species do you miss seeing the most at the moment? there are four common ones, the peacock is very beautiful, one of the most. happily it is one of the more common ones. bread and rolls are very exciting but not doing quite as well as peacocks —— red admirals are very exciting. there is the ringlets, the meadow brown, the clouded white. you will
8:24 am
find a chart of 18 of the most common plus two of the day flying moths on the internet which will help you to identify them. it is interesting talking about the smaller creatures in life, we have often spoken about how the humble bee is threatened and how important the bumblebee is to conservation, and the butterfly. how should we link this all and that this ecosystem together? how do we put them all together? we don‘t have too. but the more you know about these things the more you can put them together and get around eight —— geta them together and get around eight —— get a rounded picture. once you start looking at butterflies, as you say, you suddenly see bumblebees. and there might be more bumblebees than we thought. there are societies you canjoin than we thought. there are societies you can join that will specialise in bumblebees. but what we are talking about butterflies. have you seen any this morning? have i seen any? no,
8:25 am
it isa this morning? have i seen any? no, it is a bit early, not warm enough yet. butterflies like the warm weather. and when they come up they are very important because they fertilise plants. they pollinate them. sir david attenborough, it is a m them. sir david attenborough, it is a joy talking to you. thank you very much. it looks so tranquil, then you hear the noise of the aeroplanes! we‘re behind the scenes of the proms ahead of the start of the world‘s greatest classical music festival. tim muffett is at the royal albert hall for us. good morning, there is a fair bit of cloud to start the day and it becomes mainly dry with plenty in the way of sunshine developing as well. high pressure is still influencing our weather, you can see a weather system approaching that will bring rain through the day but for most of us it is fine and dry. the cloud continues to dinner and drake and the strong ofjuly sunshine will work its magic to allow the sunshine three. by four
8:26 am
o‘clock, the rain fringing into northern ireland and parts of western scotland as well but for most of us dry conditions with temperatures climb into the high teens all low 20s. for wales, decent spousal sunshine, more breezy than of late, and the south—west of england will see plenty in the way of sunny spells developing. in the south—east, temperatures could climb to 20 or21, south—east, temperatures could climb to 20 or 21, if you are heading to wimbledon we are looking at largely dry conditions, a fair bit of cloud to start but that will continue to dinnerand start but that will continue to dinner and break, more start but that will continue to dinnerand break, more in start but that will continue to dinner and break, more in the way of sunshine by the evening and at the very isolated risk of a shower.
8:27 am
during the evening the rain across the northwest will travel further south—east, bringing with it the cloud, missed and mike over the hills, staying prior to the longest over the south—east and temperatures generally holding onto double figures overnight. it means the start of the weekend is rather cloudy and quite damp, some persistent rain for western scotland, northern ireland and north—western england as well but try to the south—east and the cloud finning and breaking to allow brightness and temperatures reaching the mid—20th year. by sunday after some rain overnight, on saturday night conditions will tend to improve. at the moment it looks brighter and becoming quite humid, temperatures in the south—east up to the high 20s. this is business live from bbc news with susannah streeter and rachel horne. banking on better times — wall street‘s giants have been getting a bump from trump, but what will their latest results show? live from london, that‘s our top story on friday 14thjuly. will profits soar for three of america‘s banking big guns?
8:28 am
and what will they tell us about the state of the world‘s biggest economy? also in the programme, the company behind many of amazon and alibaba‘s warehouses in asia and the us is set for an $11 billion takeover. and we‘ll have the latest from the financial markets — this is the picture in europe as stocks around the world are
8:29 am
8:30 am

198 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on