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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 15, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. calls for a crackdown to tackle acid attacks — a review will be carried out into whether laws should be tightened. after five attacks in london on thursday night campaigners and the labour party say there needs to be a change. good morning, it's saturday the 15th ofjuly. also ahead: a call for a more consistent approach to tower block fires after the grenfell tower disaster as one in five fire brigades say they will still not automatically send a high ladder to a blaze. sir david frost and his son both died from a genetic undiagnosed heart condition — we'll hear how his family hopes to prevent other people going experiencing the same loss. for your 31—year—old rubber to die
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suddenly and oblique, nothing can prepare you for that. i will never get over the pain of learning that for the first time. a world record for hannah cockroft as britain takes three medals on the opening night of the world pa ra—athletics championships. good morning here from wimbledon for women's finals day as 37—year—old venus williams aims to become the old est venus williams aims to become the oldest winner of the open era. roger federer is through as well, looking for this eighth title. and jay has the weather. todayis today is the word day of the weekend with most rain to the west. further south you are, the temperature is on the rise, as is the humidity. good morning. first, our main story. laws on buying and carrying acid are to be reviewed by the government following a spate of attacks
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which took place in london on thursday night. five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them, including one man who is said to have suffered life—changing injuries. two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion of robbery and grievous bodily harm. a warning you may find some of the images in andy moore's report distressing. where does it hurt? in your eyes? in the aftermath of the first attack, police doused the victim with water. he was protected by his helmet and lucky to escape with only minor injuries. even so, it was a terrifying experience. took my helmet off and i was screaming for help. i was crying as much as you could cry. it was burning. i was screaming for water, screaming for help. knocking on the doors and windows. another rider attacked at
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this location was not so lucky. he has a life changing injuries to his face. the shadow home secretary called the attacks horrific and barbaric and she is calling for tighter controls. there are different alternatives from sulphuric acid. no—one should be able to buy sulphuric acid unless they are a builder or a workman who neededin they are a builder or a workman who needed in the course of their profession. and they should have a licence. the government says it is working with the police to see what more can be done to combat the growing menace of acid attacks. there are calls for a more consistent response to major incidents from all fire brigades in the uk following the grenfell tower disaster. a bbc news investigation found that crew levels and equipment vary significantly across the country — leading to what the fire brigade union has described as a postcode lottery. holly hamilton reports. more than one month afterwards,
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there is now a clear picture of how there is now a clear picture of how the london fire brigade responded to the london fire brigade responded to the blaze. last week it emerged it took over half an hour for a the blaze. last week it emerged it took over half an hourfor a high ladder to arrive after the first fire engine. automatically bringing this equipment was not part of its predetermined plan but a bbc news night investigation has found that different from 70% of fire services in the uk with high—rise blocks in their region. the investigation also revealed significant variations in the number of fire engines dispatched across the country. it is procter calls for the government to implement mandatory minimum requirements forfire implement mandatory minimum requirements for fire services who are attending high—rise fires. requirements for fire services who are attending high-rise fires. we have raised concerns about the sort of issue for over a decade. we used to have national standards of fire cover. we now have local risk management plans. they are budget management plans. they are budget management plans. they are budget management plans. we have seen the
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risk assessments over time, as budgets are squeezed, the response has declined over the past few yea rs. has declined over the past few years. since grown for power, for services including london and manchester have changed their attendance plans while nine say they still would not send an aerial ladder in the first instance. they say it is the responsibility of each fire authority to manage their own resources . the former prime minister tony blair has claimed seniorfigures in the eu have told him they are prepared to be flexible on freedom of movement in order to accommodate britain after brexit. mr blair made the claim in an an article written for his own charitable institute. just last week the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier said the freedom of movement of people, goods, services and capital were indivisible. 7000 police officers, soldiers, officials and academics have been sacked in turkey were a national holiday is being held to mark the
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first anniversary of a failed attempt to remove president erdogan. your authorities have accused them of being members of terrorist at organisations or working against the national interest that it 150,000 people have now been arrested or sacked since the aborted coup. the government says it will consider increasing the sentences of people convicted of offences such as encouraging terrorism, if members of the public think the punishment is too light. the ministry ofjustice has set out plans to extend the "unduly lenient sentence" scheme in england and wales, which already covers serious terror offences and crimes such as murder and rape. james earl has more. be unduly lenient sentence scheme gives anyone the power to ask the government's most senior law officer to review a criminal sentence. if the attorney general considers it appropriate, the case can be referred to the court of appeal to reconsideration. at the moment, the scheme covers crimes such as murder,
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manslaughter, rape and robbery. in 2015, the attorney general referred 136 cases to the court of appeal with 102 offenders having their sentence increased. ministers say they will now extend the scheme to cover19 they will now extend the scheme to cover 19 offences including supporting an extremist organisation, encouraging acts of terror and failing to disclose information about a terrorist attack. the government says the measure is not an overreaction to recent attacks. we have been looking at this for some time and a lot of work has gone into a. we are making sure there is a system in place for the victims of terror offences, that they are properly checked. also, making sure that those who wilfully and culpably turn a blind eye to terrorist activity feel the full force of the law. the change will occui’ on force of the law. the change will occur on august eight sentences on 01’ occur on august eight sentences on or after that they will be subject to the scheme but will not applied
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to the scheme but will not applied to previous cases. wages are increasing at their slowest rate for five years, which is hitting young families particularly hard, according to new research. the resolution foundation — which analyses living standards — says average income growth halved to 0.7% in the 12 months before last month's general election, as our business correspondent, joe lynam, reports. went theresa may became prime minister year ago she promised to work hardest for those just about managing. the one year later, that those people have seen the rate at which their incomes grow more than halved. it stood at 1.6% butjust before the general election it fell to 0.7%. before the financial crisis in 2008, incomes had grown an average rate of just in 2008, incomes had grown an average rate ofjust over 2%. incomes for younger families, however, have not risen at all in 15 yea rs. however, have not risen at all in 15 years. or pensioner incomes have grown by 30% in that time due to
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soaring property values. the big winners are those with mortgages who have seen the interest rate on their mortgage come down significantly. if they disdainjobs, mortgage come down significantly. if they disdain jobs, they may not get they disdain jobs, they may not get the earnings gain they wanted but they have benefited from the interest rates. young people are still 10% lower than where they were and if they are renting, they say even more pressure on the budget. while average households have seen the ring can stagnate of late the wealthiest 1% of the population are said to have the largest ever share of written is total wealth. —— britain's total wealth. a shortlist of five contenders has been announced in the race to be uk city of culture 2021, taking over from hull. coventry, paisley, sunderland, swansea and stoke—on—trent are all still in the running to host the year—long celebration of art and performance, which happens every four years. the winner will be announced in december. new york is well—known
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for being a ruthless and competitive place — but this could be going a bit too far. it is the city's annual baby race — also known as the diaper derby. there is only one rule — no walking allowed. from the sidelines parents use whatever it takes to encourage their little ones across the mats. jangling keys, tv remotes and bottles of milk seem to be favourites. there is no stopwatch, and the time it takes these little sprinters to reach the finish line can vary wildly, to say the least. no tears, however? there were plenty of tears. it is just the parents. no tears, however? there were plenty of tears. it isjust the parentsm is just of tears. it isjust the parentsm isjust an of tears. it isjust the parentsm is just an excuse for cute children on screen, isn't it? let's have a
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look at the front pages. this is the story we lead with as well, knife crime laws to halt acid attacks ministers are reacting after we heard that in london five people we re heard that in london five people were attacked on thursday night in the space of 90 minutes. one person suffered life changing injuries and 110w suffered life changing injuries and now new laws to restrict the sale and possession of corrosive su bsta nces and possession of corrosive substances will be proposed. that is what times they picture there is the king of spain saying farewell to the queen after his visit, the first bias that spanish moniker since 1956. the daily mail is marking the beginning of the summer holidays, an investigation into what it calls the summer investigation into what it calls the summer hire car rip—off. it says that british tourist travelling in the eu are facing increases in the access they have to pay if they have an accident. up to two and a half thousand pounds. did you watch the
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game with roger federer? it was fabulous. such a good game. two brilliant sportsman just battling it out. he has now proceeded to the final. he would be the first, he is one victory away from being the first man to win wimbledon eight times the massive amount of respect to this man. you remember pictures of them as a young boy winning the singles. and he is still there. a well liked competitor. tough laws, again, called to stop acid attacks. we will have some highlights from wimbledon a little bit later and we are looking forward to the ladies final this afternoon. talking out to j. final this afternoon. talking out to j, let's find out what happens with the weather because it will not be amazing to be. good morning, how are you? yes, amazing to be. good morning, how are you ? yes, you amazing to be. good morning, how are you? yes, you are right, there is a mixed bag this morning. some rain this weekend, mostly in the north
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and west of the uk, not too much in the south and east that will be quite warm and muddy. this is the big picture, weatherfronts coming in from the atlantic and this wedge of warm airwill in from the atlantic and this wedge of warm air will be heading across the uk and fairly humid as well without. rain on fairly wet in the west of scotland, rain through time working its way across much of northern england. most of the other counties stayed essentially dry is a bit cloudy and breezy. mid—afternoon, still wet across western scotland. and drier developing further is but another band of rain working south across northern ireland. northern england dries up to some extent into the afternoon but still a little dull and damp in the west of the pennines. low cloud here. a lot of cloud to the afternoon across the south—west of england but not a lot of rain, if any at all, and very little rain makes its way towards the south—east of england. there will be some in east anglia.
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wimbledon this afternoon, the ladies final, a lot of cloud around, maybe a spot of rain but i suspect it will stay dry. warm for the men's final and quitea stay dry. warm for the men's final and quite a lot of cloud around. as we head on into the evening there will be wetter weather sinking slowly south, moving away from scotla nd slowly south, moving away from scotland and northern ireland, heading down to the western side of england and wales. dry further is to go. quite warm night, 16, 17 degrees pertaining fresher further north. of fresh air will work as we ever southwards during the day on sunday. behind this band of cloud, increasingly light and patchy rain. bit of a north south splits in the second half of the weekend, bride of the further north you go with a few showers but further south, a lot of cloud, not a lot of rain that there will be some and still warm and humid with the low cloud across the southern half of the uk. fairly high humidity and further north, a little fresher at 17 — 19 degrees.
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identifying inherited heart conditions can save lives, but many of us don't know that we're carrying the gene that causes a disease known as hcm. sir david frost had the condition and while it didn't cause his death he did pass it on to one of his sons miles. his family have now set up a fund in his name which is paying for genetic testing at centres across the uk. our correspondent chris buckler has been to one of the centres in belfast. miles, come here. in every child you can find something of their parents and often inherited alongside looks and often inherited alongside looks and characteristics are things that can't be seen. miles frost shared with his father david gene responsible for a heart condition that led to his sudden death. for your 31—year—old brother to die
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suddenly and unexpectedly, nothing can prepare you for it and i'll never get over the pain of learning that for the first time. he loved sport and he seemed extremely healthy, but he died after going out. his brothers have now set up a fund which, along with the british heart foundation, is paying for people to be tested for an inherited heart condition. he would have had to adapt his life and stop playing sport, but at least he would be with us. sport, but at least he would be with us. that didn't happen and we can look back and we can complain about that or we can look forward and make sure it doesn't happen again for the people. sports clubs are starting to get to grips with how to deal with the problem. it's impossible to simply spot who might have an inherited condition on the pitch, but being aware of the disability could save someone's life. we have a
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couple of southern deaths within our clu b couple of southern deaths within our club and it has been shocking and we will go back to looking atjust giving advice to people. that doesn't necessarily mean not taking pa rt doesn't necessarily mean not taking part in sport, it is just changing what they do on the field. most of the risk with sport is associated with high intensity sprinting back bell based activities, so we would normally steer people away from those activities. —— sprinting based. just do things within parameters. this is one of six centres across the country to be given funding. notjust centres across the country to be given funding. not just for families who have this gene, which is known as hcm, but also to offer some support to them. when you see it in the book... this woman has been identified with the condition and she has passed it onto her 14—year—old son. that means real adjustments for a football and rugby mad teenager. rugby is a no-no, but
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he can play in nets, provided there's the lower level of physical exertion. golf, he loves it, but it will be a huge impact on him. the bottomline is it is better that he knows and that we can make those adjustments in his life and to live with the condition that he has. it's thought tens of thousands of people are carrying the gene in the uk and targeted screening is at the heart of atte m pts targeted screening is at the heart of attempts to make sure they live long and active lives. we will talk a bit more about that condition later and about the screening methods that can take place. we'll be back with the headlines at 6:30am. now on breakfast it's time to join jane hill and mark kermode for this week's film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news.
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to take us through this week's cinema releases, as ever, mark kermode. hello again mark. hello. so have you been watching this week? we have the beguiled, which is sofia coppola's remake of the don siegel film from 1971. we have cars 3, the animated sequel — more cars. and the war for the planet of the apes, the ongoing saga continues. so, sofia coppola. yes. as i already learnt i have to pronounce. yes, "cope—ola", "cop—pola" let's call the whole thing off! the point is, this is based on a novel by thomas cullinan that was filmed before by don siegel in 1971, a famous adaptation, a cult movie. during the civil war a wounded union soldier is found in the woods by a young girl from miss farnsworth‘s seminary for young ladies. he is brought back to the seminary, he is mortally wounded, he is very badly wounded. and his presence immediately starts to cause a kerfuffle,
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not only because he is an enemy soldier — and how do they feel about brining an enemy soldier into the school — but also because he is a man. here's a clip. miss martha! marie, come with me. help, miss martha. miss martha! amy! help! what happened? are you all right? how did he get here? he was all alone in the woods. i couldn't leave him there to die. you know you're not supposed to go that far. is he dead? no, not yet. quick, we need to move him to the porch. so what happens is, due to what miss martha calls christian charity, they bring him into the house. they start to look after him and he starts to get better
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and immediately he starts to get his way into everyone's confidences and he's flirty and he sees what each character wants or needs. the film appears to be one kind of film, but the question is, of course — who is the beguiled? sofia coppola said when she saw the don siegel version, she wanted to tell this interesting story but from the point of view of the women's characters. although you could say the novel and the film, which have multiple narrators voices, aren't necessarilyjust from the male characters point of view. what she's really good at, is the relationships between these women. they've lived in kind of cloistered existence and in comes this alien presence. and it changes the way in which the dynamic between their relationships work. it's beautifully photographed. you saw from that sequencejust then, it's almost like a fairy tale. yes, it did. it's a really ethereal, almost gauzy look to it. it is a beautiful looking film. that fairytale quality is partly deliberate but also what it does, it dehistorises it. this is set in the civil war but it might as well not be, the civil war is very distant. in the don siegel version we have
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shots of the battlefield and flashbacks but none of that here, it is just in the distance. in the novel and the siegel version there is a slave character who has been written out of this. sofia coppola said because she did not want to trivialise that subject and also because in her mind, that is not what the story is about. i have to confess i have a real fondness of the don siegel version, it is an exploitation movie. it's very ripe. it has some very raw scenes in it, but i do like it. this version takes it in a different direction, a very different tone. it is a valid interpretation. that is the question, is it worth remaking something that has been done so well in the past? it is worth it because it is such a different film. i actually prefer the don siegel version but i'm happy... the two versions can coexist because they are such different films, and personally, i grew up loving ‘70s exploitation cinema and i will always have a fondness for the original, but the performances are very good. nicole kidman is very nuanced in her response
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and colin farrell is terrific. he has the sly look in his eye, you think he's in control but maybe he isn't. i would encourage people to see this but also the don siegel version which is still a very fine film. it strikes me that your next choice could not be more different. the problem with it is, it is very samey, it is cars 3, and you know cars 1 and cars 2, well, it is that. there are some cars in it. i'm an animation fan. i remember seeing the first one, i loved the designs, i loved the way the landscapes actually looked like cars. i loved the tail fins within the landscapes, but the problem here, the narrative, we have been around this track before, it feels very threadbare. or treadbare!
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the central character lightning mcqueen has got to go back to school to learn about new ways of winning a race, in the process his trainer has to learn there is more to being a trainer. there are individual set pieces which are good and the animation is terrific. it comes with a short film at the beginning, and the little short film is really sweet and smart, about bullying and how bullying comes from being hurt yourself and it is really short and compact and everything that is smart about that little short film is what is wrong with cars. individual scenes are fine but overall it feels heavy baggage. is it about selling merchandise? if we start going down that road, we can wipe out most mainstream cinema, to be honest! it is not fair to say that about cars, as every mainstream franchise has got that. i wouldn't mind that if the film felt more original, but it felt like i had seen that before. right, now war for the planet of the apes. i'm in the dark here. you are not an apes fan. you can't pick your favourite. sorry, mark, i know i am an eternal disappointment to you.
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the original series of the planet of the apes i loved, television series not so great, forget about the tim burton remake, but now we have got this with performance capture. this comes on from rise and dawn. mankind is on the decline, apekind is on the rise. caesar is leading the apes, played by andy serkis. here's a clip. look at your eyes. almost human. how did you know i was here? i was told you were coming. that more soldiers from the north would be joining you here. joining me? to finish us off. for good. who told you that? 0k. let's go. what i like about this,
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the performance capture work is so great. andy serkis is starting to specialise in this, he is remarkable. his relationship with performance capture goes back to gollum in lord of the rings and working with peterjackson on king kong and now this. what is extraordinary is this evolution has happened in a fairly short period of time. i remember watching the tim burton planet of the apes and thinking, oh, they had developed a prosthetic to allow one of their lips to move, but now they have computer generated images that are mapped on to a performance. i think the story is good, very dark, and there is a lot of apocalypse now in there, which there also was in kong skull island, but i think the way of the performance capture, you think, this is astonishing. i think i'm actually watching these characters, and i'm not any longer concentrating on how well rendered they are. i do think serkis's work is brilliant, and there has been talk about whether he will get an oscar—nomination and i think it is long overdue.
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what i like about this, as someone who is a die—hard planet of the apes fan, i have always said everything i know about politics i learned from planet of the apes and i'm not joking. now i do have to watch it. i think this has taken the series on, it is dramatic. the synthesis of performance and technology is really, really well captured in this film. clever. alright, really interesting. what is best out this week? it comes at night, i still think is terrific, some people that go thinking this is a slam bang horror movie, as the trailer suggests, have been disappointed, but it's not that. and i asked you to go and see this, but you didn't? i've had a busy week. you didn't do your homework! you need to go and see this, it is a creepy film, it's not a shriek film, a really creepy horror film, family holed up in this house in the woods and there is something out there. i really like it and i think
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you will admire it. but you know i am a bit chicken about that kind of thing, but i am really desperate to see what you want to talk about for your dvd. this is a great film, the levelling, one of the best debut films i've seen in a long time, set in the somerset levels after the flood. ellie kendrick and david troughton are estranged father and daughter, on the farm that he owns, that is failing, they are trying to find their relationship again. the best way to describe this film is, it is a very tactile film. you can feel the earth, the mud and the history, and all of that stuff bubbling up from the ground. i thought it was terrific, great soundtrack, beautiful use of incidental music. her debut feature film? she was named as a rising star many years ago, all these newspapers saying this, and it took a long time to get the levelling made, but boy was it worth it. if you can make a film that good, take as long as you want. excellent. mark, as ever, thanks forjoining us. a quick reminder before we go that
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you'll find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/markkermode. and you can find all our previous programmes on the iplayer. that is it for this week. enjoy your cinema going. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. coming up before sevenjay will have the weekend's weather forecast for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. laws on buying and carrying acid are to be reviewed by the government following a spate of attacks which took place in london on thursday night. five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them, including one man who is said to have suffered life—changing injuries. two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion of robbery and grievous bodily harm with intent. 20% of fire brigades across the uk still won't automatically send a tall ladder to a fire in a high rise block of flats — despite the grenfell tower disaster. under its policy at the time, the london brigade didn't send an aerial ladder immediately to the blaze.
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it's thought the equipment might have helped firefighters restrict the spread of the blaze. it's now led to concerns over discrepencies between local fire responses across the uk. the former prime minister tony blair has claimed seniorfigures in the eu have told him they are prepared to be flexible on freedom of movement in order to accomodate britain after brexit. mr blair made the claim in an article written for his own charitable institute. just last week the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier said the freedom of movement of people, goods, services and capital were indivisible. there are plans to extend a scheme which allows members of the public to call for harsher sentences in england and wales. the unduly lenient sentence scheme already covers serious terror offences and crimes such as murder and rape. the ministry ofjustice now wants it to apply to people who have been convicted of offences such
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as encouraging terrorism. wages are increasing at their slowest rate for five years, which is hitting young families particularly hard, according to new research. the resolution foundation — which analyses living standards — says average income growth halved to 0.7% in the 12 months before last month's general election. a shortlist of five contenders has been announced in the race to be uk city of culture 2021, taking over from hull. coventry, paisley, sunderland, swansea and stoke—on—trent are all still in the running to host the year—long celebration of art and performance, which happens every four years. the winner will be announced in december. a 20—year old pilot from west sussex has become the youngest ever woman to fly alongside the us air force thunderbirds display team. beth moran only took up flying last year because she wanted to do something positive following the shoreham air disaster. she took to the skies over raf fairford in gloucestershire in an f—16 combatjet that is in the uk as part of 70th
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anniversary celebrations. iam dizzy i am dizzy just looking i am dizzyjust looking at that. you can fill your stomach flipping while you watch it. well done to her, however. those are our main stories this morning. we promised you we would head to wimbledon and we are going there now. good morning, mike. good morning. can you see what we are doing here? i have a mug of tea behind me. iwould are doing here? i have a mug of tea behind me. i would find are doing here? i have a mug of tea behind me. iwould find it are doing here? i have a mug of tea behind me. i would find it difficult to pick it up and drink it. it is oui’ to pick it up and drink it. it is our mug for our challenge. later we will see how the former world heavyweight champion of the world, david hay, got an. heavyweight champion of the world, david hay, gotan. here heavyweight champion of the world, david hay, got an. here we are, heavyweight champion of the world, david hay, gotan. here we are, on women's final day. a history making
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weekend this could be. if venus williams at the age of 37 can do defeat babinda muguruza this afternoon she will be the oldest winner in the open era, the oldest since 1908, some achievement. we have waited a long time 337—year—old to wina have waited a long time 337—year—old to win a ran slam like this. in the men's final tomorrow, another vetera n men's final tomorrow, another veteran of centre court, roger federer is through looking to make history as well. he defeated his opponent in straight sets as he looks freeze record 19th grand slam title. i feel privileged to be in another final. i know how much a means to so many players to be able to go out on centre court at wimbledon at any time in their career and i have had the pleasure to do it so many times. this time in another final, it is so good. ican this time in another final, it is so good. i can not believe it is true again. looking to spoil federer‘s party on centre court tomorrow is marin
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cilic. the seventh seed came through a tough four set semi—final with sam querrey. cilic is into his second majorfinal after winning the 2014 us open. jamie murray and martina hingis are through to the mixed doubles final after beating marcelo demoliner and maria jose martinez—sanchez in straights sets on centre court. and waiting for them are heather watson and henri kontinen. they beat bruno soares and elena vesnina two sets to one. so that means britain is guaranteed success one way or another in the final. gordon reid and alfie hewett are back in the hunt for another wimbledon title after britain's star wheelchair tennis double act reached the final. after early defeats in the singles for the british pair, they rebounded as a team with victory over argentinian gustavo fernandez and japan's shingo kunieda. away from the tennis, hannah cockcroft set a new world record at the world para—athletics
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championships in london last night. cockroft won the 100 metre t34 gold in 17.18 seconds. and it was a british one—two as as sixteen—year—old kare adenegan came in second, winning silver. immense. amazing. iwas immense. amazing. i was getting a little emotional. the noise is so loud, we have not had that since the london 2012. to be able to go in and put in such a good performance, it means so put in such a good performance, it means so much and hopefully that's a sign of a good championships to come. and gemma prescott won gb‘s third medal of the tournament with bronze in the f32 club final for seated athletes with cerebral palsy. prescott‘s best throw was 19.97 metres. south africa are 309 for six after day one of the second test at trent bridge. hashim amla top scored for the tourists with 78, but england picked up four wickets, including his, in the last session
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of the day . the last time that we played here and older we bowled rather well. i think was important that whatever we did, we kept at it and we did that. they applied themselves well, credit to them. as i say, they were in front. there's eight stages to go at the tour de france and chris froome will start this morning in white, rather than yellow, for a second day — he's still six seconds behind fabio aru. but he says he's enjoying racing to try and take the yellowjersey back. it was actually quite a great feeling to have to go out there and try to race for a win today, as opposed to racing defensively and having the pressure of defending the jersey. it was nice to have the shoe
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on the other foot. it's been a difficult few weeks for rory mcilroy, he's been struggling for form and he's now missed the cut at the scottish open too. it means he misses the weekend's play, for the third time in the last four tournaments. celtic have beaten northern irish side linfield two nil in a champions league qualifier in belfast. scott sinclair and tom rogic scoring the goals for brendan rodgers' side. floyd mayweather and conor mcgregor were in london last night, promoting their much anticipated boxing match at the end of august. like the three events before it, it was a highly charged affair but challenger conor mcgregor say‘s he can't wait to prove all of the doubters wrong. you are all going to air your words andi you are all going to air your words and i will be so happy. it is all being documented. everyone stared into a camera and gave the prediction that i would not touch on, and that there was no chance. i
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am sitting here laughing. they doubt me but it is a different world, a whole new wave. i look forward to watching all the post match footage. he may be the former heavyweight world champion, but can david haye put andy murray on the ropes to go top of the leaderboard in our game, set, mug challenge? let's see how he got on. we are in a privileged place this morning. we are inside the gym owned by the one and only mr david hay, former world heavyweight champion. he will have a go against the market. i am feeling that you are ready for this. i am. i have been waiting a long time for this. 0k. ready for this. i am. i have been waiting a long time for this. ok. 30 seconds to get as many balls into that mug. andy murray has 1a. here's
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a wimbledon champion, though... yes. i think double figures is good. ok. iam going i think double figures is good. ok. i am going for the double figures. good technique. overarm, yes, kept going. oh, my goodness. this is going. oh, my goodness. this is going to be a good one. here we go. interesting. of power in these risks is translating into a good result here. you are halfway there, 15 seconds left. i feel like here. you are halfway there, 15 seconds left. ifeel like i here. you are halfway there, 15 seconds left. i feel like i am here. you are halfway there, 15 seconds left. ifeel like i am in your corner. this is brilliant. should i offer you some coaching? i am better at punching people. and now stocked. had you think you did? not that great. i think i got around three orfour, hopefully. follow me. let's have a look. let's have a look. ready look inside the mug? i am. oh, that is brilliant! nine!
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nine! idid am. oh, that is brilliant! nine! nine! i did not trust your counting. iam happy nine! i did not trust your counting. i am happy with that. david hay, nine. who have second place? i think you may have been beaten by kim clijsters, i'm not sure. but for a boxer, that is very good, better than me. thank you. i will come back andi than me. thank you. i will come back and i will beat andy. i will get you, andy. well done. david hayes certainly did well there. let's see where it leaves him now on the leaderboard. this is our leaderboard on the ultimate day of wimbledon. david hay, joins grigor dimitrov on
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ninejust behind david hay, joins grigor dimitrov on nine just behind james ward and clinton cries that and andy murray, still there on 1a. looking as though he may take the title. so on ladies final day, do not forget the coverage starts on bbc two at 11 o'clock and then it is across the bbc on radio 5 live on the sport website at two o'clock this afternoon. the fund should be shining. i don't will see this on centre court this afternoon. misses from yesterday, i think you'll enjoy this moment. kim clijsters is asking the crowd how she should serve? one serve as a madman said do a body so. well, kim wanted to know if he could do the walk as well is talk the talk she also went and got him one of her
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skirts and shirts and tries to squeeze the fan into its. so that he can indeed face one of her first. and he does. actually, he manages to return it. well done, sir. imagine trying to do that with all the pressure of the crowd looking at you, having squeezed into the type of stock skirts. there were. one brave man, isn't he? he had some real walls to do that and he did quite well. how do you think you would have done that?” quite well. how do you think you would have done that? i don't think i would have returned as well as he did. maybe you would have looked better in this go. i might have squeezed in bath... it does make it ha rd to squeezed in bath... it does make it hard to move. i have never won a skirt, i don't know. trident. it is not hard. a whole new you. will try later. not today. only on sundays.
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let's bring you up today now with the news from bbc. laws to be reviewed on buying and carrying acid and corrosive materials after the attacks in london on thursday night. and there are demands for the fire brigades to adopt a more consistent response to major incidents after the grand full power disaster. —— g re nfell tower. i enjoyed this so much. ifeel very grateful to do the things that i like so much. he stars alongside tom hardy and mark rylance in one of the summer's biggest blockbusters, dunkirk. here's jay with a look at this morning's weather. a dramatic sky behind you! yes, we can expect at least some rain this weekend. most of that will be in
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northern parts of the uk, but for most of us it's a warm day and fairly humid as well. this warm air is coming in from the south and west, bringing the weather fronts with them. it is bring the rain into the north and west. there are highs bars on the chart, so it be breezy. lots of cloud first thing. the rain is moving from west to east. further south it's a largely dry day, if rather cloudy and breezy. wettest all the while in the western side of scotland. further east, some drier and brighter interludes, but there will be another band of rain working south through the afternoon. in northern england most of the rain will be through the morning. still some left over in the west in particular, quite grey as well. again, the rain works through here through the morning. there will be some drier and brighter conditions in the southern counties. temperatures about 21— 22 degrees in
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the south and east. not a great deal of sunshine through the afternoon. largely dry for the ladies‘ final today. tomorrow a lot of cloud around again. in evening the weather front around again. in evening the weather fro nt m oves around again. in evening the weather front moves away from scotland and northern ireland and pushes into the north of england, maybe some wet weather to the south and west of the uk as well with lots of low cloud. but quite a warm night, 16— 17 degrees. fresherfurther north. that fresh air will eventually win out and push in behind this weakening band of cloud and a little bit of rain as well through the day on sunday. as you see this is working south. fresh air coming in behind it and brighter conditions as well. maybe the odd shower in scotland. dry and bright weather across the northern half of the uk. maybe some rain, but nothing too significant and still pretty warm and humid. further north it is fresh, 17— 19. a
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changeable weekend. back to you. thanks very much. we‘ll be back with the headlines at 7am. now on breakfast, it‘s time for click. this is adam jensen, star of the video game deus ex: human revolution. set in 2027, the poor chap has to undergo extensive cybernetic modifications after being severely injured. well, just ten years before those events might occur, that plot line doesn‘t seem that far off. for years now people have been body hacking,
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giving themselves extra abilities and, as our understanding of robotics has advanced, so has our creativity. meet rob spence. like the cyborg in the video game, he too has a bionic eye. it doesn‘t have terminator vision like this, yet, but it does record video. inside a prosthetic eye, which is an odd shape, they‘re not a sphere, a prosthetic eye, they‘re actually like a very thick contact lens. inside that is a battery, a video camera and a video transmitter all attached to a circuit board so they can talk to one another. the camera is turned on and off with a magnet. it doesn‘t look at all comfortable, is it in anyway comfortable? yeah, it‘s fine. i know it looks uncomfortable. the first configuration that looks the most uncomfortable,
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it looks like a ‘90s imac, you can see all the goods inside. like the battery and the wires, but that‘s covered by smooth plastic that, you know... ..so it‘s not like that. i don‘t have open wires and batteries, you know. 0h! that kind of made my stomach drop a little bit when i saw that. rob damaged his eye when he was nine and in 2009 began exploring the idea of a bionic eye. as a film—maker himself, he was fascinated with the idea that his eye could become a camera. it‘s like an absurd toy for a one—eyed film—maker. i used to watch the bionic man when i was a kid, the $6 million man. i had the action figure, you looked through the back of his head, through his bionic eye. i was looking at my nokia flip phone at the time i was like — this is pretty small. that‘s in fact who i called, i called nokia. they said — well, we‘ll call the camera module people in china.
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this is how you begin these things. it‘s very small, it‘s very challenging. we in fact used analogue technology. it does visual dropouts, which is the visual language of all video from the future, including princess leia asking for obi—wan‘s help. exactly — the future is analogue! yeah! since the initial prototype, rob and his engineers have gone through several upgrades. he now has one eye that glows red when it films and another camera eye that looks a bit more normal. i get calls from and emails from moms whose kid hasjust lost an eye, because it‘s some sort of fun thing to show a kid this maniac running around on videos and glowing red eye cameras and stuff. it‘s fun for them to look at that. they‘re now looking working on ways
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to transfer the technology to other people‘s prosthetic eyes. we‘re doing 3d scans of those now and then that creates a space that you can take into software to map on the technology that we‘re increasingly able to reproduce. some people golf, i like to make fake eye cameras and, you know, film things with it. activate eyeborg — now! 0h! welcome to the weekend tech. it was the week a group of disgruntled twitter users began suing president donald trump for blocking them on twitter! facebook announced it is trialling embedded advertising in its messenger app. yay, that will go down well with users. step aside, psy, here is wiz khalifa, taking the coveted crown of most watched youtube clip. it has been viewed a staggering
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2.9 billion times. billionaire elon musk launched the new all—electric tesla model three. at a pricetag of $35,000, it‘s supposed to be more affordable than tesla‘s previous efforts which cost 100 grand. rival automobile company faraday future has scrapped its plans to build a billion—dollar factory in the us state of nevada. this leaves a big question mark over the launch next year of their new model. no, this is not a digital version of the ministry of silly walks but this is google‘s deep mind attempting to learn how to walk. so far the research is being conducted in virtual environments, but it could one day help robots learn how to navigate complex spaces. and, finally, a former nasa scientist has built a super sized super soaker.
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it‘s so big, at least you will see him coming. almost everyone in the world who works pays tax on the money they earn. but at this restaurant in san francisco there are no waiting staff and robots plate the food. that work is currently not taxable and politicianjane kim is now looking into how this is changing the city‘s economy. so what we‘re seeing is after automation that you can hire less people in order to deliver products maybe quicker and more affordably. but it‘s one of the questions that we have, it‘s true this is really convenient, but at what cost? it‘s notjust restaurants, this picture is now seen across the city, from hotels and hospitals to the latest addition to the autonomous family, self—driving cars. policy makers have noticed, every time a robot takes a human job, potential tax revenue is being lost. the research is showing us thatjobs
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are going to get lost over the next ten years and if before the great depression we could have predicted what would come afterwards, if government could have prepared for the job loss that occurred, wouldn‘t we do that? that is the level at which we are looking at potentially over the next ten years, in terms ofjob loss for this country. estimations of how manyjobs will be wiped out vary widely from study to study, but a recent report especially has stuck in jane‘s mind. it‘s estimated that robots will replace 37% ofjobs in the united states by the early 20305. so the biggest concern is mass job displacement, lack of true, meaningful, high wage work. we are already seeing a decrease of that in san francisco where we have the fastest growing income gap in the country and a wealth gap that is akin to the country of rwanda, accord to our own human services agency data and so we have a shrinking middle—class and we have this growing imminent threat that
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many of our meaningful, working—class and even middle—class jobs may go away to robots and automation. at cafe x, again a human worker has been replaced by a robot. an americano with milk, served by a robot. now, the human has a different role, advising on coffee beans and showing customers how to use the tablet to operate the robot. the owner is not sure about the idea of a tax on the replacement. i guess i find it a little odd because what robots are supposed to do is to increase productivity. that means it allows a shift in labourfrom doing highly repetitive, low productivity tasks to more useful things. it‘s not about eliminating people. actually, we have quite a big team. so in order to have this machine operate, there has to be a lot of engineers on software, hardware and manufacturing to build something like this. jobs like this require training and that‘s what supervisor kim wants
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a tax to help bring about. if you‘re a childcare worker or you‘re an in home support services worker, working with a senior or individual with disability, you often work three or four hours a day and you make minimum wage. so one of the ideas was, why not tax robots and invest in these povertyjobs and make them truly living wage careers for people. this would mean a robot tax potentially subsidising low paying, but essential jobs, so that the human employees would earn a living wage. currently, many people are working but not earning enough to live, leading several politicians around the world to float the idea of a universal basic income. this would be expensive for governments and supervisor kim is suggesting an automation tax could be a solution. if there‘s one thing that san francisco is known for, it‘s leading the conversation on technology and innovation, but as harder and harder questions are asked about automation and what this really means for people‘s jobs it seems appropriate that this city,
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which has added so much to the problem, is also grappling with what could be the solution. but the rise of robotic workers is playing out on a global scale and san francisco is not the only place trying to lead the conversation. in the eu, a proposal to tax robots was voted down earlier in the year and one of the commissioners who did so says robots will create more jobs, not reduce them. they are worried because they say robots they will take theirjobs, but i believe in progress. progress always created more jobs than progress used to destroy. the train is moving and speed is high and now it‘s up to us to be on that train or to stay and to wave to the leaving train. concerns about automation replacing humanjobs has been felt since the industrial revolution and more recently workers in the manufacturing industry have seen jobs disappear as automation takes hold.
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as the issue of a robot tax begins to spread further, a fundamental question still needs to be answered — what even is automation? in the context of robots of course automation is much broader and we have to find this definition. they gave this definition more than 100 years ago. politicians can no longer ignore the robots creeping into the workplace and while many of the big questions are still being thrashed out, it‘s clear that the issue of robot workers is becoming more and more of a political one. and this‘s it for this week. you can watch the full version on iplayer. and you can follow us on twitter @bbc click throughout the week and like us on facebook, too. thanks for watching and we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. demands for a crackdown to tackle acid attacks.
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a review will be carried out into whether laws should be tightened. after five attacks in london on thursday night, campaigners and the labour party say there needs to be change. good morning, it is saturday 15july. also ahead: a call for a more consistent approach to tower fires. tony blair says some eu leaders tell him that they are willing to consider changing rules on the free movement of people to accommodate britain. a world record for hannah cockroft, as britain takes three medals
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