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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 15, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. demands for a crackdown to tackle acid attacks. a review will be carried out into whether laws should be tightened. after five attacks in london on thursday night, campaigners and the labour party say there needs to be change. good morning, it is saturday 15july. also ahead: a call for a more consistent approach to tower fires. tony blair says some eu leaders tell him that they are willing to consider changing rules on the free movement of people to accommodate britain. a world record for hannah cockroft, as britain takes three medals on the opening night of the world para athletics championships. while here at wimbledon,
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it is women's final day, as 37—year—old venus williams looks to become the oldest winner in the open era. and another veteran of centre court, roger federer, has made it through to the men's final. he will be looking for his eighth title here. and jay has the weather. hello there, good morning. today will be the wetter of the two days of the weekend, with most rain to the west. the further south you are, the temperature is on the rise, as is the humidity. good morning. first, our main story: laws on buying and carrying acid are to be reviewed by the government following a spate of attacks which took place in london on thursday night. five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them, including one man who is said to have suffered life—changing injuries. two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion of robbery and grievous bodily harm with intent. a warning — you may find some of the flashing images
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in andy moore's report distressing. where's it hurt, mate — your eyes? in the aftermath of the first attack, police doused the victim with water. he was protected by his helmet, and lucky to escape with only minor injuries. but even so, it was a terrifying experience. took off my helmet, and i was just screaming for help, because it was getting dry, and as much as it was getting dry, it was burning. i was screaming for water, screaming for help. knocking on the doors and windows. another rider attacked at this location was not so lucky. he has life—changing injuries to his face. the shadow home secretary called the attacks horrific and barbaric. she is calling for tighter controls. nobody in their own home needs pure
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sulphuric acid. there are different alternatives for cleaning your drains. no—one should be able to buy sulphuric acid unless they're a builder or a workman who needs it in the course of their profession, and they should have a licence. the government says it is working with the police to see what more can be done to combat the growing menace of acid attacks. there are calls for a more consistent response to major incidents from all fire brigades in the uk, following the grenfell tower disaster. a bbc news investigation found that crew levels and equipment vary significantly across the country, leading to what the fire brigade union has described as a postcode lottery. holly hamilton reports. more than a month on, there is now a clear picture of how the london fire brigade responded to the blaze. last week, it emerged it took more than 30 minutes for a high ladder to arrive after the first fire engine. until grenfell, automatically
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bringing this piece of equipment was not part of its predetermined plan. but a bbc newsnight investigation has found that is different from 70% of fire services in the uk with high—rise blocks in their region. the investigation also revealed significant variations in the number of fire engines dispatched across the country. it has prompted calls for the government to implement mandatory minimum requirements for fire services who are attending high—rise fires. we have raised concerns about this sort of issue for over a decade. we used to have national standards of fire cover. we now have local risk management plans. what they are in reality is budget management plans. we have seen the risk assessments over time, as budgets are squeezed, the response has declined over the past few years. since grenfell tower, four services, including london and manchester, have changed their attendance plans, while nine say they still would not send an aerial ladder in the first instance. the home office says
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it is the responsibility of each fire authority to manage their own resources. the former prime minister tony blair has that claimed senior figures in the eu have told him they are prepared to be flexible on freedom of movement in order to accommodate britain after brexit. mr blair made the claim in an article written for his own charitable institute. just last week the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, said the freedom of movement of people, goods, services and capital were indivisible. our political correspondent emma vardyjoins us now from our london newsroom. you have been looking through this article mr blair has risen. what is he saying, exactly? —— written. article mr blair has risen. what is he saying, exactly? -- written. the key claim that he makes is that the eu is now prepared to make concessions on freedom of movement to accommodate britain, essentially saying that while britain could gain greater control of its borders and
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bring immigration down while still remaining within a reformed eu. some might say this sounds rather like having your cake and eating it. where is the evidence that the eu is prepared to make these concessions? because, as the rules currently stand, opting out of freedom of movement means leaving the single market. but what tony blair is saying is, hang on, there could be another way it here. he is a former prime minister, he doesn't have any real political power any more. we knew that he was pro— remain. does it matter? is this a serious intervention by him? well, for some people tony blair is still a big player in politics and his argument could carry some weight. he can be persuasive, he knows how to make headlines, and he wants to be seen to be steering the country in a different way on brexit. for others, tony blair may seem a rather irreleva nt tony blair may seem a rather irrelevant voice in the brexit debate. he may want to lead the
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anti— brexit fightback and persuade the uk that it is better off in the eu but he will always face the argument that he is ignoring the referendum result and ignoring that democratic ballot. 7,000 police officers, soldiers, officials and academics have been sacked in turkey, where a national holiday is being held to mark the first anniversary of a failed attempt to remove president erdogan. the authorities have accused them of being members of terrorist organisations or of groups working against the national interest. 150,000 people have now been arrested or sacked since the thwarted coup. there are plans to extend a scheme which allows members of the public to call for harsher sentences in england and wales. the unduly lenient sentence scheme already covers serious terror offences and crimes such as murder and rape. the ministry ofjustice now wants it to apply to people who have been convicted of offences such as encouraging terrorism. james earl has more. we've been looking
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at this for some time. a lot of work has gone into it. we are making sure there is a system in place for the victims of terror offences, that they are properly checked. also, making sure that those who wilfully and culpably turn a blind eye to terrorist activity feel the full force of the law. a man has died after being attacked bya man a man has died after being attacked by a man on mopeds. he was pronounced dead at the scene. his family have been informed and no arrests have been made. wages are increasing at their slowest rate for five years, which is hitting young families in particular, according to new research. the resolution foundation, which analyses living standards, says average income growth halved to 0.7% in the year before the general election, as our business correspondent joe lynam reports. when theresa may became prime minister a year ago, she promised to work hardest for those
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"just about managing." but a year later, those so—called jams have seen the rate at which their incomes grow more than halved. it stood at 1.6% butjust before the general election it fell to 0.7%. before the financial crisis in 2008, incomes had grown an average rate ofjust over 2%. incomes for younger families, though, have not risen at all in 15 years. while pensioner incomes have grown by 30% in that time due to soaring property values. the big winners are those with mortgages, who have seen the interest rate on their mortgage come down significantly. and if they've stayed in theirjobs, yes, they may not get the earnings gain they wanted, but they have benefited from the interest rates. young people are still 10% lower than where they were and if they are renting, there is even more pressure on the budget. while average households have
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seen their income stagnate of late, the wealthiest 1% of the population are said to have the largest—ever share of britain's total wealth. a shortlist of five contenders has been announced in the race to be uk city of culture 2021, taking over from hull. coventry, paisley, sunderland, swansea and stoke—on—trent are all still in the running to host the yearlong celebration of art and performance, which happens every four years. the winner will be announced in december. new york is well—known for being a ruthless and competitive place, but this could be going a bit too far. it is the city's annual baby race, also known as the diaper derby. there is only one rule — no walking allowed. from the sidelines, parents use whatever it takes to encourage their little ones across the mats. jangling keys, tv remotes and bottles of milk seem to be favourites. cameras, favourite toys. rusk would
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have got me over the line. there is no stopwatch, and the time it takes these little sprinters to reach the finish line can vary wildly, to say the least. he isjust chill. we he is just chill. we assume that is a he. you never know. we will be talking to mike at wimbledon and getting the latest on the weather a little later on. the hunt for treatments to halt alzheimer's disease has so far been largely unsuccessful, with most clinical trials ending in failure. but a group of scientists say they may be close to doing for alzheimer's what statins have done for heart disease, through researching people with an unusually high genetic risk of developing the condition. we will find out a bit more injust a moment, but first, let's hearfrom one of the people taking part in the study.
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iamso i am so he, and my family has a very rare genetic form of alzheimer's which means that i can develop alzheimer's in the next couple of yea rs alzheimer's in the next couple of years —— sophie. as of this i am very much involved in alzheimer's research and passionate about finding a cure. my mum started showing signs of alzheimer's in her 405, and because her sister had had it as well and a really young age, we found out that there was a genetic link. and that meant that we had a chance, all of the children of that generation had a 50— 50 chance of getting it. i decided not to find out. i need that hope that i might not have it, and i am not ready to potentially have that taken away from me at the moment, and they know for certain what the indications are for certain what the indications are for my daughter. so for now i have chosen not to be tested. i started the drugs trial almost three years ago now. they are testing experimental drugs. i go down to
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london every four weeks. i love what iam doing. london every four weeks. i love what i am doing. i feel in a london every four weeks. i love what i am doing. ifeel in a really... what could be a very dark thing, there is this hope. and i do believe that me and that families like mine that me and that families like mine that get involved in research are going to be part of finding a cure. let's speak now to dr randy bateman, who is professor of neurology at washington university school of medicine, in st louis. thank you very much for talking to us thank you very much for talking to us this morning. sophie made it very clear that that the problem now with identifying alzheimer's and preventing alzheimer's i5 identifying alzheimer's and preventing alzheimer's is the diagno5i5 before and treatment before the disease takes hold. that's exactly right. and so these familie5 potentially hold the cure, for a wafer u5 familie5 potentially hold the cure, for a wafer us to identify those who are at certain ri5k for a wafer us to identify those who are at certain risk for getting the disease, and being able to test drugs and therapies to see if we can prevent the disease from coming on in the first place —— way for us. if
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thati5 in the first place —— way for us. if that is successful, it could lead to a prevention effort that can be used by everybody. what i suppose is discouraging about this research is that there is a very small number of people who can be identified for inheriting the disease, and still tho5e inheriting the disease, and still those who develop it without family history, the treatment is still very lacking. that's right, and so those who have these mutations are spread geographically around the world and at this year's alzheimer ‘5 meeting here in london, they are gathering over 150 family participants. so although these families are quite rare, it is important to remember that they have a genetic predisposition which causes them to have the certainty of getting the disease. and that certainty allows us disease. and that certainty allows us to treat people year5 disease. and that certainty allows us to treat people years or even decades before their symptoms began. and in so doing, we think we have the opportunity to stop the alzheimer ‘5 pathology from taking hold and damaging the brain. alzheimer ‘5 pathology from taking
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hold and damaging the brainm alzheimer ‘5 pathology from taking hold and damaging the brain. it is quite difficult to conceive this idea of treating something that hasn't begun yet. how do you prove the success of that treatment? hasn't begun yet. how do you prove the success of that treatment7m hasn't begun yet. how do you prove the success of that treatment? it is commonly done in medicine, where we treat diseases long before they take all and cause damage. for example, high blood pressure of cholesterol. we screened the general population, looking for people who have these as ri5k looking for people who have these as risk factors for heart attacks and strokes. and so we now have the ability to see their signatures of alzheimer's disease before they get 5ick alzheimer's disease before they get sick and before significant brain damage occur5. so if we are able to u5e damage occur5. so if we are able to use that combination of bio markers with a genetic predisposition that the5e with a genetic predisposition that these families hold, it can lead to a prevention effort where we can screen everyone with the bio markers for alzheimer's disease, treat them for alzheimer's disease, treat them for —— with the medication and
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prevent them from getting the disease. it is a very frustrating field of research, in the sense that tho5e field of research, in the sense that those with the disease now are still seeing 5ales treatments or u nsucce55ful seeing 5ales treatments or unsuccessful treatments so far. how confident are you that this could perhap5 lead confident are you that this could perha p5 lead to confident are you that this could perhap5 lead to treating tho5e confident are you that this could perhap5 lead to treating those who are currently dealing with the disease? there are multiple avenues being taken to treat the disease, both for those before they had symptoms, as well as those who already had symptoms and those individuals are included in these trials as well. what we don't know yet is when is the optimal time to intervene and with what drug and on which way? although it is frustrating that over the past ten years there have been failures in clinical trials, the trials continue to point to us that we are making progress, we can now intervene in the alzheimer's pathology in the brain itself and there are signs that this is helping people's
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cognition in thinking that in later stage trials we may be able to demonstrate significant benefits. so i would say there's a great amount of hope among researchers and familie5 of hope among researchers and families that we have a shot to change the course of this disease. thank you very much for your time and for giving us a clear explanation of going on in this area of research. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. thanks for being with us. the main stories this morning: there's to be a review of the laws on buying and carrying acid, following thursday night's attacks in london. there are demands for the uk‘s fire brigades to adopt a more consistent response to major incidents after the grenfell tower disaster. also coming up in the programme: look at this for a selfie! we've been to meet the youngest ever woman to fly with the thunderbird5 and she only had her first flying le55on a year ago. not only is she the youngest woman
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to fly with them, she takes a 5elfie when she is how high up in the air? so confident! incredible. i saw some lovely blue sky. i wonder what it will be like today. good morning. good morning. a lot of cloud in the uk this morning and we will have rain working from east to west. today look5 will have rain working from east to west. today looks like the wetter day. it is warm and muggy, which this warm aircoming day. it is warm and muggy, which this warm air coming in from the atlantic, but it is also coming in with a breeze and some cloud and outbreaks of rain. it will always be wettest acro55 outbreaks of rain. it will always be wettest across the western side of scotland. northern england will be wettest through this morning and by the afternoon things are turning a little bit drier. a little bit of rain po55ible towards the south—east of england. many 5outhern counties should be fine. it 5tays pretty dry in the central and western parts of scotland. the eastern side of
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scotla nd scotland. the eastern side of scotland has something drier developing. more rain working ever southwards through the afternoon. northern england, the wettest through this morning. some drier spell5 through the afternoon, at still spell5 through the afternoon, at 5till grey and stamp on the western side of the pennines and western wales. light rain, drizzle and low cloud into the afternoon. southern counties 5taying dry. the spot of light rain in the south—east of england, but largely wet weather in ea5t england, but largely wet weather in east the potential for rain early this afternoon, but it should be drier later at wimbledon. and a bit warmer. fairly humid into tomorrow. through this evening we have this weather front sweeping 5outh, bringing rain away from northern ireland and scotland and into parts of wales and the south—west. tony little bit more fresh further north, at12- little bit more fresh further north, at 12- 13 little bit more fresh further north, at 12— 13 degrees. the fresh air will slowly sink south through the day. that's behind this cloud and
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increasingly patchy rain, which will be there in the southern half of the uk. a lot of low cloud a5 be there in the southern half of the uk. a lot of low cloud as well in associations with that, so a pretty dull day and damper. behind that we have good spell5 of sunshine coming through. breezy in the north of scotland, but many places will be dry and fine. temperatures in the other teams and feeling fresher, but further south it is warm and humid. soa further south it is warm and humid. so a changeable weekend. the best of the sunshine in the northern half of the sunshine in the northern half of the uk through tomorrow. what do you make of these temperatures in europe, spain in particular? 47 degrees! good you cope with that? near record—breaking heat. it could be record—breaking heat. it could be record—breaking in spain. dangerous levels, at 47 celsius. extraordinary. i'm sure we won't see anything like that here. a heatwave across southern europe is fuelling fire5, exacerbating droughts and forcing the closure of tourist sites during peak holiday season.
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several spanish cities have experienced record temperatures forjuly, with montoro in cordoba reaching more than 47 degrees centigrade. at the acropolis in athens the mercury hit 39 degrees on wednesday. while in italy and sicily, temperatures have topped 40 degrees. the combination of heat and strong wind5 has fuelled large wildfires including on the slopes of mount ve5uviu5 near naples and mount etna in sicily. we're joined now on skype by miguel—ancho murado, who is in madrid. good morning and thanks forjoining u5. good morning and thanks forjoining us. i bet early in the morning is the best time, before it gets too hot? yes. in fact we have now 23 celsius and that is the coolest we can expect today. today is not going to be the hottest day at all. the maximum will be 32 degrees celsius.
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we had 40 yesterday. and this is in madrid, in the south of spain they are having over 40 celsius everyday. a5 are having over 40 celsius everyday. as you said, even 47.3! what sort of impact is that having on life? life can't go on as normal in those sorts of temperatures, can they? what can you do? ye5, of temperatures, can they? what can you do? yes, of course everything 5low5 you do? yes, of course everything slows down considerably. you can't walk in the middle hours of the day. you can't sleep, it is very difficult to sleep, and those of us not blessed with air—conditioning, we really struggled to get some sleep at night. and of course you have to carry a bottle of water with you everywhere you go because the heat retention is a real danger. here in the chilly, wet uk, we are not blessed with great summers much of the time, but we tend to think
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that spain always has hot summers come but this is unusually hot, isn't it? it is. spain has a very diverse climate. the north of spain is actually as cool in some parts as britain itself. where i come from, the north—west, has basically the same weather as england. but, yes, generally spain is hot. heatwaves are not unusual. they are a feature of our climate. they happen almost every year. but what we see is that in the last decade they are longer and this one is the most intense on record, at least since there is a consistent record of heatwaves, since 1976. i believe you to get a wet flannel and yourself off! thank you very much forjoining us for now. let's go to what must be the
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best backdrop of the day! our correspondent in athens. a lovely shot. what's the weather like in athens? earlier this month we got to 43. on wednesday it was 39. given this is the most popular landmark in the whole of greece behind me, the acropolis, that's the problem with it as well. it is effectively on the rocks, so if you are exposed in the afternoon there are problems. it closed for the whole of wednesday afternoon. for the locals in greece, they get a sense that you don't generally go to the acropolis in the afternoon, but it is for tourists. it's not just here, afternoon, but it is for tourists. it's notjust here, there are other sites as well. the big famous tracking site, again shut down. the issueis tracking site, again shut down. the issue is there are so many famous well—known sites in greece, on the island as well. in lesbos the archaeological sites had to be shut down. it is relatively infrequent.
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these temperatures have been on the upper 405. today, like in spain, these temperatures have been on the upper405. today, like in spain, i can wear a jacket, it is cooler, and it is expected to be like that for the week ahead. what we are heading into august. these are slightly unprecedented for the past couple of yea rs. unprecedented for the past couple of years. a bit of relief today. what sort of advice for people heading on holidays to places like greece? ab the islands, rather than the cities. what are we being told to do, apart from just 80 more bottles of water? i think both here and in italy as well. in italy we have similar temperatures as spain, where they have above 40. there were fires and 700 tourists were evacuated from a beach resort. the mountain close to naples, the fire at the foot of the mountains... italian authorities say it may have been set alight purposefully. i think the basic
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advice you would think everyone would do, people don't. people get dehydrated, they forget to drink water. a lot of people come here to this famous sites, 2 million people come to see the acropolis every year, bring water, keeping the shade. if you walk in exposed areas, don't wear a jacket. be loose and cool don't wear a jacket. be loose and cool. we don't have such concerns over here! at thank you for the advice. it's not that hard this week. but not that good either. which would you choose? i would much prefer here. it is dangerous for a lot of people. this is a rather delightful story. the us air force thunderbirds team is mostly made up of experienced fighter pilots. now 20—year—old beth moran has become the youngest ever woman to fly alongside them and she only had her first flying lesson a year ago! she took up flying last year because she wanted to do something positive following the shoreham air
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disaster, as ben moore reports. coping with a force nearly ten times that of gravity is not bad for a novice pilot. beth moran is the youngest ever woman to fly with the thunderbirds, despite having had her first flying lesson just over a year ago. now she is in an f—16 belonging to the top american aerial display team. all right. up over the top. .. beth wanted to do something to lift spirits after the shorham air disaster, she learned to fly. she had disaster, she learned to fly. she ha d co nta ct disaster, she learned to fly. she had contact with the thunderbirds on social media, asking if they would ta ke social media, asking if they would take up. she was unsurprisingly
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impressed. it still feels surreal that i went up in an air —— an f—16 and pulled 9.2 g. it is an experience i will never forget. for being part of such a select team, she got her name on the plane. around of applause and a friend photo. but this just has to be the best selfie ever! thumbs up. she spentjust a year learning. she got her name on a plane, the certificate and she got to fly with the thunderbirds. williams! well done. now, could mike top that? he has done some pretty amazing things. i don't think it could topic today. he is looking ahead to the action today on for the ladies‘ final.
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i have done everything, but never again. my stomach was left behind in the skies above london. hats off to them. it is an incredible skill to cope with all of those g—force is. it is the final day for the ladies and the penultimate day for our challenge. look at that! despite the pressure, see how david haye got on when he took on the challenge. we are mainly focusing on the women‘s final. ken venus williams at the age of 37 we come the oldest winner of the title? in fact the oldest winner since 1908, when a woman won at the age of 37. are we different times of course. talking of veterans on centre court, roger federer will be there tomorrow trying to win the title for the eighth time against marriage village and later on brea kfast marriage village and later on breakfast i will tell you we are guaranteed a winner! see what i have to put up with? we are guaranteed a british winner in the mixed doubles
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tomorrow. that‘s all to come tomorrow. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. coming up before 8:00am: jay will have the weather. but first, at 7:30am, a summary of this morning‘s main news: laws on buying and carrying acid are to be reviewed by the government, following attacks which took place in london on thursday night. five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them, including one man who is said to have suffered life—changing injuries. two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion of robbery and grievous
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bodily harm with intent. 20% of fire brigades across the uk still won‘t automatically send a tall ladder to a fire in a high—rise block of flats, despite the grenfell tower disaster. under its policy at the time, the london brigade didn‘t send an aerial ladder immediately to the blaze. it is thought the equipment might have helped crews restrict the spread of the fire. it has now led to concerns about discrepancies between local responses across the uk. the former prime minister tony blair has that claimed senior figures in the eu have told him they are prepared to be flexible on freedom of movement in order to accommodate britain after brexit. mr blair made the claim in an article written for his own charitable institute. just last week the eu‘s chief negotiator, michel barnier, said the freedom of movement of people, goods, services and capital were indivisible. there are plans to extend a scheme which allows members of the public to call for harsher sentences in england and wales. the unduly lenient sentence scheme already covers serious terror offences and crimes such as murder and rape. the ministry ofjustice now wants it
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to apply to people who have been convicted of offences such as encouraging terrorism. wages are increasing at their slowest rate for five years, which is hitting young families in particular, according to new research. the resolution foundation, which analyses living standards, says average income growth halved to 0.7% in the 12 months before last month‘s general election. a shortlist of five contenders has been announced in the race to be uk city of culture 2021, taking over from hull. coventry, paisley, sunderland, swansea and stoke—on—trent are all still in the running to host the yearlong celebration of art and performance, which happens every four years. the winner will be announced in december. those are the main stories, so we
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have to talk to mike at wimbledon. he is having a bit of fun at wimbledon. i cannot lend him. where are you, mike? you are joining me live in the undergrowth, the beautiful reeds, the bushes, the magnificent flowers, i have gone all sir david attenborough. he was here yesterday on centre court and we are looking for something so rat, which hasn‘t been seen since 1908, a 37—year—old winner of the ladies‘ title. that is what venus williams is trying to do today. also, talking of vetera ns is trying to do today. also, talking of veterans on centre court, we must also focus on roger federer. he is into the men‘s final tomorrow. he beat tomas berdych in straight
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sets to book his 11th wimbledon final, as he looks for a record 19th grand slam title. i feel privileged to be in another final. i know how much it means to so many players to be able to go out on centre court at wimbledon at any time in their career and i have had the pleasure to do it so many times. this time in another final, it is so good. i can not believe it is true again. looking to spoil federer‘s party on centre court tomorrow is marin cilic. the seventh seed came through a tough four—set semi—final with sam querrey. cilic is into his second majorfinal after winning the 2014 us open. jamie murray and martina hingis are through to the mixed doubles final, after beating marcelo demoliner and maria jose martinez sanchez in straights sets on centre court. and waiting for them are heather watson and henri kontinen.
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they beat bruno soares and elena vesnina 2—1. so that means britain is guaranteed success, one way or another, in the final. gordon reid and alfie hewett are back in the hunt for another wimbledon title, after britain‘s star wheelchair tennis double act reached the final. after early defeats in the singles for the british pair, they rebounded as a team with victory over argentinian gustavo fernandez and japan‘s shingo kunieda. away from the tennis, hannah cockcroft set a new world record at the world para athletics championships in london last night. cockroft won the 100 metre t34 gold in 17.18 seconds. and it was a british one—two, as 16—year—old kare adenegan came in second, winning silver. immense. amazing. i was getting a little emotional. the noise is so loud, we have not had that since the london 2012.
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to be able to go in and put in such a good performance, it means so much and hopefully that‘s a sign of a good championships to come. and gemma prescott won gb‘s third medal of the tournament, with bronze in the f32 club final for seated athletes with cerebral palsy. prescott‘s best throw was 19.97 metres. south africa are 309—6 after day one of the second test at trent bridge. hashim amla top—scored for the tourists, with 78. but england picked up four wickets, including his, in the last session of the day. the last time that we played here and older we bowled rather well. so i think was important that whatever we did, we kept at it and we did that. they applied themselves well, credit to them. 170 odd for two, as i say, they were
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excellent. there are eight stages to go at the tour de france, and chris froome will start this morning in white, rather than yellow, for a second day. he is still six seconds behind fabio aru, but he says he is enjoying racing to try and take the yellowjersey back. it was actually quite a great feeling to have to go out there and try to race for a win today, as opposed to racing defensively and having the pressure of defending the jersey. it was nice to have the shoe on the other foot. it has been a difficult few weeks for rory mcilroy. he has been struggling for form, and he has now missed the cut at the scottish 0pen, too. it means he misses the weekend‘s play for the third time in the last four tournaments. england‘s callum shinkwin is in a three—way tie for the lead, on nine—under—par, with ian poulter a shot back. celtic have beaten northern irish side linfield 2—0 in a champions league qualifier in belfast, scott sinclair and tom rogic scoring the goals for brendan rodgers‘s side. floyd mayweather and conor mcgregor were in london last night
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promoting their much—anticipated boxing match at the end of august. like the three events before it, it was a highly charged affair, but challenger conor mcgregor says he can‘t wait to prove doubters wrong. he could have rode off into the sunset 45— zero. instead, this is my first time in the ring and in six weeks i will run boxing. and, of course, it is the ladies‘ final here at wimbledon. there is coverage across the bbc, starting at 11:00am on bbc two, from 2:00pm on bbc radio 5 live and on the bbc sport website. asi as i was saying earlier, i don‘t think this will happen on centre court today. kim clijsters was
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asking the crowd how she should serve. so the crowd said do serve. she gets a skirt out of her bag, and a t—shirt, and it takes a little time but he managesjust about a t—shirt, and it takes a little time but he manages just about to squeeze into this outfits, which a p pa re ntly squeeze into this outfits, which apparently i have been told is a skort. he still manages to return the kim clijsters body serve, so he goes really well. i did not know that that was a skort, i had never heard of that before. do you know why it is colder skort? women wear them for golf, and maybe some men wear them. it is because you have shorts inside the skirt, because they are often quite short, the skirt, so you have shorts inside to protect your dignity, but they are
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also very comfortable. very practical, by the sound of it. i like the sound of a skort.|j practical, by the sound of it. i like the sound of a skort. i will have a bit of a shop around. lovely seeing you in amongst the foliage, you did a very good impression. he was here yesterday, he was really enjoying the tennis. it always takes your breath away, the perfection that they achieved with everything that they achieved with everything that they achieved with everything that they do here at wimbledon, including the flowers. almost symmetry, isn‘t it? the way they match and blend together, it is beautiful. and the wimbledon colours. goes nicely with his tie. identifying inherited heart conditions can save lives, but many of us don‘t know that we are carrying the gene that causes a disease known as hcm. sir david frost had the condition, and while it didn‘t cause his death he did pass it on to one of his sons miles who died at the age ofjust 31.
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now, his family are trying to help other people find out if they could be affected. 0ur correspondent chris buckler reports. there‘s miles, come here. in every child, you can find something of their parents, and often inherited alongside looks and characteristics are things that can‘t be seen. miles frost shared with his father david a gene responsible for a heart condition that led to his sudden death. for your 31—year—old brother to die, suddenly and unexpectedly, nothing can prepare you for it. and i‘ll never get over the pain of learning that for the first time. miles loved sport, and he seemed extremely healthy, but he died after going out for a run. his brothers have now set up a fund which,
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along with the british heart foundation, is paying for people to be tested for an inherited heart condition. miles would have had to adapt his life and stop playing sport, but at least he would be with us. now, that didn‘t happen, and we can look back and we can complain about that, or we can look forward and make sure it doesn‘t happen again for the people. three, two, one — go! sports clubs are starting to get to grips with how to deal with the problem. it is impossible to simply spot who might have an inherited condition on the pitch, but the gaelic athletic association says being aware of the disability could save someone‘s life. we‘ve a couple of sudden deaths within our own club, and it has been shocking, and we will go back to looking atjust giving advice to people. that doesn‘t necessarily mean not taking part in sport. it is just changing what they do on the field. most of the risk is thought to be associated with high—intensity
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sprinting—based activities. so we would normally steer people away from those activities. just do things within parameters. this is one of six centres across the country to be given funding. they will employ staff not just for families who have this gene, which is known as hcm, but also to offer some support to them. when you see it in the book... moira has been identified with the condition, and she has passed it onto her 14—year—old son. that means real adjustments for a football and rugby—mad teenager. rugby is a no—no, but he can play in nets, provided there‘s the lower level of physical exertion. golf he can‘t continue with, which he also loves. but it will be a huge impact on him. the bottomline is it is better that he knows and that we can make
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those adjustments in his life, and to live with the condition that he has. it is thought tens of thousands of people are carrying the gene in the uk, and targeted screening is at the heart of attempts to make sure they live long and active lives. in one hourwe in one hour we will talk to adopt about that condition and about diagnosing and detecting it. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: there‘s to be a review of the laws on buying and carrying acid, following thursday night‘s attacks in london. there are demands for the uk‘s fire brigades to adopt a more consistent response to major incidents after the grenfell tower disaster. here‘s jay with a look at this morning‘s weather. that‘s a lovely picture. what does that signify? it is a bit of a mixed bag this weekend. expect some rain.
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most of it will be today. it will be warm and fairly muddy. we have this wedge of warm air coming in from the athletic, but that comes in with some weather fronts and a bit of a breeze. it will always be a dull and damp day in scotland. in northern england as the rain will be most noticeable through the morning. patchy rain in the midlands, but most will clear in the afternoon. it stays windy and wet across the western side of scotland well into the afternoon. the eastern side of scotla nd the afternoon. the eastern side of scotland should have some brighter spells developing into the afternoon. staying cloudy in northern ireland. rain working south. in northern england it tends to dry up, but we will also have low cloud on the western side of the pennines. the western side of wales as drizzle into the afternoon. largely dry. cos, maybe the odd spot of rain in the london and the early
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afternoon, but a lot of dry weather in and around the wimbledon area. dry but what rather cloudy and warmer tomorrow, still humid. through this evening and overnight the rain eventually clears from scotla nd the rain eventually clears from scotland and northern ireland, moving south. low cloud in the western parts of england and wales, with light rain and drizzle. the warm night in the south of the uk. temperatures dropping away. something fresher in the north of scotland. it is that fresher air in the north of the uk which will eventually win out. it is coming in behind this band of cloud and increasingly patchy rain. behind it, much brighter skies. still breezy in northern scotland. the odd spot of rain along this weather front, which continues south. it remains humid in the south of the uk into tomorrow. it is fresh, 17— 19 the further
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north you happen to be. thanks very much. the headlines in a few minutes‘ time. now it‘s time for samira ahmed to round up your comments on bbc news in newswatch. welcome to newswatch. wimbledon fans have been glued to television screens this past fortnight but should tennis take priority over the news? and would a male politician have been asked if he had shed a tear on election night? we are coming to the end of the wimbledon fortnight, the annual treat for tennis fans, but the source of frustration for others. never mind the many hours of live action on bbc one and bbc two, the tournament has featured strongly over the past two weeks on breakfast, the news channel and news bulletins. there have been features on the famously long queue for spectators to get into wimbledon, the condition
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of andy murray‘s dodgy hip and discussion of the baby his wife has on the way. a number of injuries sustained by other players in matches, the state of the grass on court and of course the progress of our great british singles hopes, all lapped up by the aficionados. on tuesday night it wasn‘t a question of tennis featuring in the news, as instead of the news, specifically some local news bulletins, as it came up to six o‘clock the british number one woman johanna konta was battling it out on centre court in her quarterfinal. and it was decided to keep showing that match on bbc one instead of the scheduled news at six. and on bbc two they had
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abandoned their planned wimbledon coverage for unscheduled repeats, as rain meant no other matches were being played. confused? john wilson did not understand the logic. another viewer pat brown was also annoyed by this and recorded this video to explain why. hello. we have been subscribers of the radio times for many years but when it comes to wimbledon the scheduling might as well go out of the window. a prime example of this was on tuesday, when at six o‘clock the news was turned over onto bbc two — can‘t wimbledon fans flick the channel? perhaps not. and no london news at all that night. why was that? not very good, bbc. the london news was in fact shown
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that evening later than scheduled but in other parts of the uk such as scotland and northern ireland the early evening regional bulletin was dropped altogether. we hoped to discuss the reasoning behind this with someone from bbc television but no one was available. instead, they gave us this statement. it has been a month since the fire at grenfell tower in london in which at least 80 people died. and on wednesday morning our
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reporter reported on the impact the disaster has had on the local community, especially children. all the children who have witnessed unimaginable horror, we asked for a show of hands of those who knew someone who had died. this isjust the beginning of the healing process. but we know that the healing is going to take years, a very long time. having watched that, jan had this to say. justin contacted us with more general thoughts on coverage of the grenfell tower, one month on. justin contacted us with more general thoughts on coverage
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of the grenfell tower, one month on. and graham satchell‘s report on the aftermath of the tragedy came on the news at ten — it began like this. a black nail, hammered into london‘s conscience. grenfell tower demands your attention. in its shadow the faces of the missing are everywhere. 0n trees and walls and bus shelters, unblinking, it is hard to hold their accusatory gaze. several wrote in about this. adrian made the same point on camera.
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come on, bbc, this is a serious news item, why did we have to have dramatic build—up music, more akin to a drama like silent witness or a hollywood movie? this is the bbc and not fox news. this was unnecessary, trivialising a serious news item. on wednesday mp5 debated the abuse and intimidation of parliamentary candidates after a cross—party report said misogyny, racism and bigotry was on the rise. politicians like diane abbott and stella creasy had described the repeated online abuse they have been subjected to and theresa may has now ordered an inquiry into the subject. william mcnulty gave us his thoughts after considering the interviews with theresa may and andrea leadsom. if you look at the way the prime minister is addressed
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orjeremy corbyn is addressed, certainly by members of newsnight and the media in general, think the aggressive tones that are used against politicians... and this unfortunately translates to members of the public. and i think the media, certainly the bbc, and they are not alone in it — they have contributed to the levels of abuse that politicians have to put up with today. 0n wednesday‘s daily politics the labour mpjack dromey came to discuss the scale of personal abuse directed at politicians. it has been getting worse for some years. i personally don‘t get that much bleep, if you will excuse the language.
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it comes overwhelmingly from the right, but that doesn‘t matter where it comes from, it is not acceptable and anyone who practices that is completely wrong. when we‘re talking about abuse it would be best if we did not use abusive language on daytime television. i feel very strongly about it. the daily politics team were not able to bleep out the term as we have done and that led to this response. i don‘t want to sit and hear people coming out with disgusting language like that, i‘m amazed you allow people like that to come on the television and speak like that. when there are little children around. another political interview caused more controversy this week, one conducted on thursday by emma barnett for radio five. she asked the prime minister how she reacted on election night
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when she saw the exit poll. did you have a cry, how did you feel? i felt devastated, really. enough to shed a tear? yes, a little tear. at that moment? at that moment, yes. that admission was headlined on television news bulletins throughout the day. it is worth bearing in mind that interviews like this are arranged between the prime minister‘s office and a programme, and maybe the line of questioning is anticipated. but some viewers felt the prominence given to it and the line of questioning played into gender stereotypes. finally back to tennis, and the defeats of britain‘s great hopes andy murray and johanna konta. these are the headlines from the news at six on wednesday and thursday. and andy murray crashes out of the quarterfinals at wimbledon and finally admits he was injured. and the end of a dream
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for britain‘s johanna konta as she crashes out of the wimbledon semifinals. sarah said: thank you for your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc mews and current affairs and even appear on the programme, you can call us or e—mail newswatch. you can find us on twitter and have a look at our website. that is all from us. we will be back to hear your
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thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. demands for a crackdown to tackle acid attacks. a review will be carried out into whether laws should be tightened. after five attacks in london on thursday night, campaigners and the labour party say there needs to be change. good morning, it‘s saturday the 15th ofjuly. also ahead this morning... a call for a more consistent approach to tower—block fires after the grenfell disaster, as one in five fire brigades say they still won‘t automatically send a high ladder to a blaze. tony blair says some eu leaders are willing to consider changing rules on the free movement of people to accommodate britain after brexit. a world record for hannah cockroft, as britain takes three medals on the opening night of the world para—athletics
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championships.
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