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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 17, 2017 6:50pm-7:01pm BST

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toa success will be a kick—start to a sustained period of domination in the sport for him. for me now, a case of looking forward to try to put what happened in the olympics as much as possible at my mind. i'm here to make a statement, to win everything possibly i can to september. it is going to be relentless. tom daley and daniel goodfellow have just missed out on a medal at the ten metre synchro platform final at the world diving champion ships. did not score as well as they hope to move their fifth not score as well as they hope to move theirfifth die. not score as well as they hope to move their fifth die. they could not finish off in the top three. —— dive. olivia breen has won a ninth gold medal at the para athletic championships in london. nor medal prospects to come this evening. there'll be more sport here on bbc news throughout the evening. from neither team, goodbye. from neitherteam, goodbye. —— from
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me and the team. you're watching bbc news. let's talk more about one of the main story this evening, schools in england getting £i.3 this evening, schools in england getting £1.3 billion over two years. the money will have to come from savings elsewhere in the education budget. the announcement by the education secretaryjustin budget. the announcement by the education secretary justin ca reening follows protests by headteachers and mps that schools had been facing unsustainable cuts. labour criticised the move as a sticking plaster. let's talk to our education correspondent, julianne hargreaves. where will this be spent? we have some detailfrom the where will this be spent? we have some detail from the department for education. i want to alter something we have just education. i want to alter something we havejust said. 1.3 billion from next year, 2017 — 18. another 1.3 billion for the following year. in
quote
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total 2.6 billion. year on year, a big injection of extra cash raided from civil servants in whitehall, the free schools programme, diverted back to the chalkface in classrooms. not new money from the treasury, it is from within the existing education budget. labour has said this is not new money. conservative ma nifesto this is not new money. conservative manifesto commitment in the general election they would put more money into schools. we knew it was coming, it has been made today, it will have a real impact. teachers are saying from the south—east of england to the north—west of england they are seeing big cuts to their school budgets. that means rising class numbers, teachers may well not be replaced when they leave. particularly teaching assistants losing theirjobs. whether this will be quite enough is the $61; question. the national audit office reckons
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that by 2020 schools will face £3 billion worth of cuts. this is 2.6 billion worth of cuts. this is 2.6 billion over two years. somewhere along the line they will face efficiency savings. schools in the land of plenty for 30 years are really finding they will have to balance the books. do we know how evenly the money will be spread across schools? if you see it as a cake, we have seen a bit more added to the cake. that cake is being carved up in a different way. the nationalfunding carved up in a different way. the national funding formula. traditionally inner cities have already spent per pupil than more prosperous rural county shires. lots of conservative mps in the rural cou nty of conservative mps in the rural county shires who say this is not fair. the government promised six or seven fair. the government promised six or seve n years fair. the government promised six or seven years ago they would look of school funding. but we do know every
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pupil secondary school would have a minimum of £4800 spent on education. briefly we talked about labour's reaction, reaction from the teaching unions? they are saying what the labour party are saying, they are just taking money from the education budget. no doubt the government has been rattled by parents, opposition to school cuts. they knew it was an issue on the doorsteps in the general election, it may have lost them some seats. no doubt they are rattled. this is why they have gone away and found more cash. for this year hull is celebrating the uk's city of culture, nine places in the city of culture, nine places in the city getting listed heritage status. the humber bridge designated grade one status 36 years to the it was officially opened by the queen. let's talk to our correspondentjill archibald. she is by the humber bridge. what a magnificent sight it
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is. what has the reaction been? historic england describe the structure behind the as a formidable piece of engineering. they also like the way it was designed. despite being made mostly of concrete, they like the way it fits into the landscape. it is sympathetic in this area of the humber very flat. 36 yea rs area of the humber very flat. 36 years ago today it was officially opened by her majesty the queen, and at that time it was the longest single span bridge in the world. 1400 metres. that was a record we held on the humberfor 16 1400 metres. that was a record we held on the humber for 16 years. later taken by japan. a held on the humber for 16 years. later taken byjapan. a view statistics about the bridge, quite fascinating, it has enough cable holding it in place to wrap around the world almost twice. in total the structure weighs half a million tonnes. the tabloids are actually
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built further apart at the top stand the bottom. that is because of the curvature of the earth. this is an icon of the humber, held in high affection by people who live in the area, and walk across it, or use it for their morning commute. i spoke to one apprentice scaffolder, he had been on the project when they were starting to build it 36 years ago, he said he quickly found out he did not have a head for heights, did not continue with his work creating this magnificent piece of architecture behind me. not only the bridge getting this special status. other places including philip larkin's home. one of my favourite poets. certainly standing in sharp contrast to this structure. to what has been described by historic england as a modest terraced house. in a park in
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hull. you could walk past it, not even realise its significance. we we re even realise its significance. we were there with members of the philip larkin society. they are absolutely thrilled to see it is listed. it is a pilgrimage that fans of the poet may come along, like yourself, to see the place where he created some of his most famous works. they specifically mention the very windows that are still there in hull. you could only imagine the view he may have had out onto the park. there are other tenants in our live in the flat today. great stuff, thank you for being with us. let's check out the weather prospects, coming from ben rich. sunshine and warmth was the story on monday. make the most of it if you like the weather. some changes to come later in the week. that was the scene from the moray first. icloud developing
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across the south of england and wales. cooler and fresher devon north. a good deal of sunshine, sunshine turning increasingly hazy as higha sunshine turning increasingly hazy as high a loud is across england and wales. today, signs of a change, quite scattered thunderstorms, pushing towards the channel islands and the west. very cool across east coast thunderstorm developing widely on wednesday. as a clear, pressured by thursday. —— it is fresher by thursday. this is bbc news. the headlines at 7pm: a boost for schools — the education secretary announces an extra £1.3 billion, over the next two years.
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the additional investment in schools we are confirming today will be the biggest improvement in school funding for well over a decade. the routes for the second phase of the hs2 rail project are announced — new homes on a housing estate near sheffield will be demolished. why build houses and knock it down when we are short of houses, where do we move to? we are in limbo. round two. fresh talks today in brussels on the uk's departure from the european union — the brexit secretary says it's time to get down to business. a terminally ill man takes his case to the high court — trying to overturn the ban on assisted dying.
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