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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 18, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11am: inflation slows unexpectedly to 2.6% injune — helped by lower fuel prices. the cabinet gathers in downing street as theresa may tells tory mps and ministers to end the "backbiting" and "carping." also — could austerity be having an impact on how long we're living? rising rates of life expectancy are grinding to a halt after more than 100 years of continuous progress. and women doing all the cleaning up, men failing at simple household tasks — the body that oversees advertising is reviewing its approach to ads that feature stereotypical gender roles. good morning, it's
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tuesday, 18th july. i'm joanna gosling — welcome to bbc newsroom live. inflation has slowed down unexpectedly. the rate — as measured by the consumer prices index dropped unexpectedly to 2.6% injune, from 2.9% in may. it's the first fall in the rate since october of last year and was largely down to lower petrol and diesel prices. while the fall was below economists‘ expectations of 2.9%, the cost of living has remained above the bank of england's target of 2%. with me is or business presenter ben bland. that has been increased wage costs,
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energy costs. we have had to pass that on to our customers. by and large, customers don't like price increases at a time of economic instability, or the uncertainty we are facing at the moment. there is also an understanding that that has to ta ke also an understanding that that has to take place if we are to continue to take place if we are to continue to produce the high—quality products that are the end consumer's the end consumer's demand. as you say, prices are still going up but not as much, what is behind that survey? the big one is in fuel, the cost of petrol, that has fallen for the fourth month in a. there has been a slight fall in the cost of recreation, games and toys and on the other hand, if we look at the change of prize for food, furniture and household goods, those have gone up, so that is what is on average
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has kept prices getting higher. what does it mean with wages as well? that is the big factor. to get a sense of the effect, you have the related to wages and the latest data we have is that average earnings increased by 2%, so if inflation is going up by 2.6 present, it means wages aren't going up with inflation rises and that is what people mean by the cost of living squeeze. that has led the trades union congress to comment today, saying... they go on to say that ministers say they are listing to struggling families, but now is the time to prove it, britain needs a pay rise across the public and private sector. we have also heard from the treasury, responding they have said, it is encouraging that inflation is low at this month but some families are concerned about the cost of living and that is
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why we have introduced a national living wage and cut taxes the millions of people. why is the inflation rate watched so closely? it is one of the big factors that affect the bank of england's decision on whether to raise interest rates or not. last month at their meeting, we saw them start to move closer to perhaps starting to raise interest rates. the fact that inflation has slowed and slowed unexpectedly means that it is less likely to go up. those interest rates affect the cost of people's mortgages and interest on loans and credit cards and so on. but the interest—rate isn't going to go up, we see the effect of that on sterling, the value of the pound has fallen against both the dollar and the euro since this inflation figure came out today. thank you very much. let's get some reaction from the cbi chief economist. prices
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are going but not as much as they were, what is your assessment? that is right, so the overall level of consumer price inflation fell back a this month to 2.6%, but i think this overall picture of rising inflation, higher inflation, and at the same time pay growth not keeping pace with that rising inflation, means that we are seeing tougher times for households at the moment and that will have an impact on household spending, on our high street and in oui’ spending, on our high street and in our shops and restaurants over the course of this year. and what would you anticipate happening with inflation? would you expect the rate to continue to fall? i think we would expect to see if inflation peak at around 3%, so i don't think this period of high inflation is behind us, so it will make it harder for households. i think the other angle to this is some of the impact on rising costs on business. i think
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there is some comfort in these latest numbers, if we look at the impact of that we get exchange rate, that has led to higher input costs, higher costs of material, if you like, for our manufacturing businesses and the rate of that inflation actually peaked back at i9% back in january. inflation actually peaked back at i9% back injanuary. the latest numbers here show that moderating it a bit to around 10% on the year this month, so i think that'll take some of the pressure is off from business but if your costs are rising at io%, thatis but if your costs are rising at io%, that is still a pretty challenging picture for our businesses and i think what is really important over the long—term is that we make it easy for our businesses to invest so that they can keep creating jobs into the future. so in policy terms, what would be the best thing?” think domestic league, what we want a real focus on think domestic league, what we want a realfocus on is improving our infrastructure, building the
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connections to improve productivity over the long term, that is about better connections between our big cities and it's also very much around education and skills, and making sure that all of our young people are leaving school with the very best results and ready for the world of work. but i think the other challenges for businesses at the moment is of course there is a lot of uncertainty out there, particularly around brexit. we did a recent survey of some of our members and the good news is that for 60% of businesses, brexit uncertainty isn't impacting on their investment, but for 40% of our businesses, we are seeing a negative impact from brexit uncertainty on their investment plans, and that is a real concern, so we plans, and that is a real concern, so we really need to make sure that business and government are working in partnership as we move through the eu negotiations and that we have a smooth transition to our new relationship with the eu. that is what will give businesses the confidence to invest now for the
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future. thank you very much. theresa may has urged conservative mps and ministers to end what she called the "backbiting" over disagreements within the party. at a reception in the commons last night, the prime minister warned that the choice was her orjeremy corbyn in downing street. let's speak to our assistant political editor norman smith in westminster. tell us more about what theresa may has said. in cabinet this morning, theresa may has reminded colleagues they must be able to have discussions in private and that ministers must not then leak contents ministers must not then leak co nte nts to ministers must not then leak contents to journalists. because ministers must not then leak contents tojournalists. because it makes the business of government pretty much impossible and that of course follows a talk to mps last night, with pretty much the same message, telling them to end the backbiting and carping. team may is
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just about through to the summer recess and the hope is that tory mps and cabinet ministers will go away over the summer, calm down and it will give breathing space in which the government can regroup, coming backin the government can regroup, coming back in october when hopefully things may have simmered down. you have to say that is probably an optimistic version of events given a profound tensions and divisions, not just over the personalities involved it over this critical issue of brexit. with really very deep gulf emerging between those determined to leave quickly after march 2019 and those who believe that the government absolutely must put in place a transitional period to ensure business has time to adapt. we are seeing pictures of the cabinet leaving after that meeting. they were told to stop the carping, as you say. what is your sense of whether the party is going to be headed for a leadership contest or
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not? there is a lot of speculation around that potentially being something in september. the only person who truly knows his theresa may, in the sense that there have been critics who have suggested that over the summer she may simply decide she has had enough, it is not working, i might as well quit. i think that is less likely, given what we have heard from mrs may in recent interviews where she has sort of stressed her sense of duty, her determination to serve and carry on. i think that outcome is probably less likely. the view of team may is the longer she stays in place, the more security becomes and every day that passes, the more her position solidifies but it is pretty much a day by day, week by week process and i think they will just day by day, week by week process and i think they willjust be released at the moment to have got through to the summer recess with the queen's speech in place, a deal with the dup and the brexit negotiations at last
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under way. thank you, norman. austerity may be starting to affect life expectancy in england, according to a leading health expert. professor sir michael marmot, from university college london, says the rate of increase has almost "ground to a halt" since 2010. his suggestion that it was "possible" that austerity was affecting how long people live has been dismissed by the government. our health correspondent, nick triggle, reports. life expectancy has been rising for the last century, but now a leading health expert is raising concerns that increases could be tailing off. sir michael marmot, who has advised both the government and world health organization, points out that the rate of increase has halved since 2010. historically, life expectancy at birth has risen by one year for every five years for women and one year every three and a half for men. sir michael says the situation needs urgently looking at.
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this is historically highly unusual because over a long period of time, for a hundred years, life expectancy has been improving, year—on—year, in britain, as it has in many, many other countries. and now it has slowed, it is almost flat, which means that we have fallen behind some of the healthier countries. that's terrible. he says it is not possible to say exactly what has caused it, but he says austerity could be a factor and funding for the nhs and social care, in particular, had been miserly. dementia is also likely to have played a role. the department of health says it is providing funding to ensure life expectancy continues to rise and the ageing population is well cared for. nick triggle, bbc news. with me is the author of the report, professor sir michael marmot. he is director of health equity.
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thank you very much for coming in. why do you think it has ground to a halt, effectively? firstly, one of the components is mortality and one of the big components of that is the increase in dementia. why that has happened is less clear. i am concerned that, for example, spending on social care, adult social care, has gone down by more than 6% since 2009—10. at a time when the population over 65 has gone up when the population over 65 has gone up by when the population over 65 has gone up by one sixth. i am also concerned that health care spending is rising much lower than the historical rate and nhs expenditure increased about 3.8% from the late 1970s on bug from
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2010 on, it increased at only 1.1% and the per capita spend on health ca re and the per capita spend on health care has actually gone down this year. a decrease in social care spending, in health care spending, clearly is going to make quality of life for older people worse, particularly those with dementia. obviously, there is a tempting and easy conclusion to draw, which is that people are not receiving the right sort of treatment and therefore are dying out there. do you draw that conclusion?” therefore are dying out there. do you draw that conclusion? i have resisted the invitation to draw that conclusion because i do not know if thatis conclusion because i do not know if that is the cause. i am concerned at both things, the felling of life expectancy to continue to increase the way it has been for 100 years andi the way it has been for 100 years and i am concerned at austerity in health and social care funding and otherfunding. and health and social care funding and other funding. and i health and social care funding and otherfunding. and i am concerned at the big inequalities in health. are these three all related? i don't yet
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know. if that is not the conclusion to be drawn, what other obvious exoneration is that? there isn't one, is there? if you look at dementia, it suggests the same kinds of behaviours that would prevent heart disease, non—smoking, healthy eating, exercise and the like, are also likely to reduce the incidence of dementia. what we know is that people's ability to act on that advice is very much influenced by whether they are in the social hierarchy, people with more income, better education, living in better conditions, are more able to respond positively. those lower down, less so. i think the general social conditions in which people right across the special spectrum live in is likely to be affecting our health. and potentially life expectancy at older ages. what would
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you like to happen now? you clearly spells out what has been happening with health spending and spending on social care. does that need to be reviewed? i think we need urgently to try to understand why life expectancy has stalled, why the rise has ground to a halt, it should be a matter of utmost urgency. i also think that they know a priori that if you reduce adult social care spending at a time when the population is increasing, that will be packed. when we look across europe, the more generous the social expenditure of a country, the health, the longer the life expectancy and the narrower the health inequalities. should the government look at this and say, ok, social care has been an issue for some time and it needs extra funding? , undoubtedly. undoubtedly. it is urgent. but what i am saying
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more generally is we cannot believe it is ok to reduce spending on health and social care and potentially on education and local government and think that nothing u ntowa rd government and think that nothing untoward happens. is this a trend particular to us, in terms of life expectancy grinding to a halt effectively? the dramatic example is the united states, where life expectancy has actually gone down. we wa nt expectancy has actually gone down. we want to be more like the nordic countries, germany, france, then we wa nt to countries, germany, france, then we want to be like the us. that's not the future we want. no, thank you very much. my pleasure. let's look at some of today's other developing stories: the cabinet has met with theresa may telling ministers to end backbiting. the chief inspector of prisons has
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warned that youth custody sentences in england and wales are so unsafe that a tragedy is inevitable. in sport, england's women make breakthroughs in the cricket semifinal in south africa after losing the toss and bowling first. stumped by sarah taylor. the current squad, 48—2, after 12 overs. romelu lukaku squad, 48—2, after 12 overs. romelu lu ka ku has scored squad, 48—2, after 12 overs. romelu lukaku has scored his first goal in a menu shirt afterjoining from everton. they beat salt lake 2—1 in a friendly in utah. johanna konta has told the bbc she is working towards becoming the world number one. she is up to numberfour in the rankings after reaching the semifinals at wimbledon where she lost to venus williams. more on those after 1130. a bbc investigation has found that only a small fraction of the money donated as part
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of the grenfell tower fire appeal has so far reached survivors or relatives of the dead. around 20—million pounds has been donated by individuals and businesses to charities and appeals. but less than £800,000 has been given out so far. tom burridge reports. it is second—hand clothes heaven. some of the items we've had through have been absolutely beautiful. lovely. i mean, we've had things like this. this is the grenfell tower fire appeal in action, a red cross sorting centre in cheshire. donations in the green bags will be sold in red cross shops. black bags are for recycling. brand—new items will go straight back to survivors of the fire or relatives of those who died. it's about turning all the different donations we've had into cash which automatically will then go to the appeal. to appreciate the scale of donations, you had to fly through this london warehouse a week after the fire. it's estimated 174 tonnes
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of stuff was donated. so far they have sorted half of it, and ten tonnes has gone back to the victims. no amount of money is enough for the loved ones of those who died. research by the bbc shows that several appeals and charities have now raised nearly £20 million. some question why only a small part of that has made it through. we feel that it's betraying the public‘s generosity because they gave money to help directly those who were affected and we're not too clear that it's happening. it's like there's a filter and organisations rather than individuals are getting the financial support. charities say the complexity and the scale of what happened here means everything takes time. the thing about these things that we've learnt from the 7/7 attacks and indeed from the response to the manchester attacks, is that it takes longer than you might think for people to come forward to
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seek theirfunding. i have forgiven, you know, the bombers who did this to me... thelma stober lost her left foot in the london 7/7 bombings. she received money donated by the public. i used it to get myself daily physiotherapy support at home. my determination was to walk again as i was told the chances was highly unlikely. it took 15 months to distribute all the money raised for victims of those attacks like thelma. thelma is now a trustee of the london emergency trust. it's distributing £4.8 million of the grenfell appeal. so far, 16 people have received payments. you're in a state of total confusion. a lot of people are suffering from post—traumatic stress. you're trying to understand what has happened, the implications for your life going forward, is changed forever. even here, in rural cheshire,
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what happened in a london tower block is by no means lost. i can't watch it on tv now. you know, it makes you cry. it's emotional even now, just the thought of what's yet to be found and the people. whether donating an old top or a tenner, people have been moved to act. the challenge for charities is ensuring it all benefits those who have lost so much. an autistic boy has a rare condition which put them at risk of brain damage and the nhs says the drug is too expensive but if the challenge are too expensive but if the challenge a re successful, too expensive but if the challenge are successful, future funding decisions could be based solely upon the welfare of a child. let's talk
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to clive coleman at the royal courts ofjustice. tell us to clive coleman at the royal courts of justice. tell us more to clive coleman at the royal courts ofjustice. tell us more about this case because it is a child who has not been named, with a rare genetic condition and doctors say he should get this drug but nhs england says no? absolutely, it's a very unusual case, a very unhappy combination, this child has a condition known as pku, which means he cannot metabolise protein, so is limited to 14 metabolise protein, so is limited to 1a grams of protein, and just to give you an idea, a simple slice of bread contains four grams. because he also has the autism and he is seven he also has the autism and he is seve n yea rs he also has the autism and he is seven years old, it is very difficult for his parents to regulate his diet. he simply doesn't understand that he cannot eat some of these foods. his consultant wants to have a drug which would help metabolise protein and therefore
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could have more in his diet but nhs england has said he cannot have this because it is not cost or clinically effective and it that decision that is being challenged today on three grounds. one, that the decision was irrational, too, that fell to dig into account the welfare of the child, in other words, into account the welfare of the child, in otherwords, his into account the welfare of the child, in other words, his best interests, and thirdly, that it interferes with his human rights, his right to a private and family life. if that succeeds, particularly on the ground of the welfare of the child, it could have an effect way beyond this condition and this case and could mean in future when making these difficult decisions, where pa rents a re these difficult decisions, where parents are seeking expensive drugs, for children who have these rare and unusual conditions, the nhs would have to place centrestage the welfare, the interests of the child and that could mean many more of these drugs are given to children who want them and whose clinicians are asking for them than is
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currently the position. this case is being watched carefully. in court this morning, the challenge hasjust begun and ladyjustice andrews has said in court this morning that the welfare of the child ground may be a difficult one to argue and perhaps the rationality ground is where the argument should be focused but nonetheless, she is listening to all arguments and the hearing is due to last perhaps two days and we expect judgment within the coming weeks. thank you very much. peter clarke says there has been such a decline in standards of prisons that he has written to ministers earlier this year. launching his report, mr clarke said he had not inspected a single establishment where it was safe to hold young people. he said prisons for men had also become worse over the past 12 months, with startling
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increases in violence for them. danny, this is shocking to hear this analysis. yes, if you thought last trip report was bad, this is worse. conditions have declined, particularly in adult prisons for men but also, his real concern, youth custody centres, so young offenders institutions and secure training centres, they calljust under 800 people and he did not find in any of the inspections conducted that any of those centres was actually safe. he believes the tragedy is inevitable and the reasons are complex, it could have something to do with the fact you have some of the most difficult, dangerous and mentally unstable young people being held in those institutions but also, he talks about the vicious circle, you get someone who is violent, that then leads to more restrictive regimes, which leads to frustration, which
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then causes more violence and so it goes on. he said some of the centres just cannot break out of that vicious circle. what will happen? he was so concerned about this that you took the step of writing to the minister responsible at the ministry ofjustice in minister responsible at the ministry of justice in february. minister responsible at the ministry ofjustice in february. within a couple of weeks, the government set up couple of weeks, the government set upa new couple of weeks, the government set up a new youth custody department with greater influence on powers. there is a strategy under way. we're waiting for a response from the ministry ofjustice to these findings but another aspect that peter clarke is worried about is when he makes his recommendations right across the board, they are not acted upon. he suggests today that ministers and prison governors and managers are paying lip service to his findings. the language is interesting. it is basically making clear that this is a situation that does need to change quickly. he says there needs to be urgent action to
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address this situation, the injection of new staff, 2500 extra prison officers are being recruited by the government, he says that will help but it is notjust about staff, there are some prisons which have staff shortages but do better than others, so it's much more fundamental than that. thank you. there should be stronger regulation of advertisements which show men failing at simple household tasks and women left to clean up — according to the body that oversees advertising in the uk. the advertising standards authority has been reviewing its approach to ads that feature stereotypical gender roles. it concluded that such ads had "costs for individuals, the economy and society". as a result, it says it will draw up new rules. let's get the weather forecast. we have some high temperatures across parts of england and wales, it will peak at around 30 celsius
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across southern areas. but not warm and sunny for all of us, we have more cloud moving into the south—west and with that, heavy showers working northwards. cornwall, devon and into southern areas, thundery showers pushing him. for most of us, hot. a little fresher on the north sea coast. temperatures around 21. this evening, thunderstorms will move north. they will be hit and miss. if you catch one, as we go through wednesday, as they move northwards, there could be hail, frequent lightning and gusty winds. still warm and sunny in the south—east. further north and west, turning fresh. that fresher weather will push to all parts through thursday and friday, with heavy rain at the end of the week. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines:
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inflation has unexpectedly fallen unexpectedly to 2.6% injune. inflation has unexpectedly fallen to 2.6% injune. it's the first fall since october 2016. lower prices for fuel have have contributed. the cabinet has met — with theresa may telling conservative mps and ministers to end the "backbiting" and "carping." the bbc finds that only a fraction youth custody centres in england and wales are so unsafe that a "tragedy" is "inevitable" warns the chief inspector of prisons. the bbc finds that only a fraction of the money, donated as part of the grenfell tower fire appeal, has so far reached survivors or relatives. let's catch up with the sport with hugh. good morning. england's women attempting to reach the second cricket world cup final in three tournaments, playing south africa in
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a semifinal at bristol. they have taken a semifinal at bristol. they have ta ke n two a semifinal at bristol. they have ta ken two early wickets a semifinal at bristol. they have taken two early wickets the toss. they met at the group stage of the competition, a match that england won and they would love to do it again. ican won and they would love to do it again. i can tell you it is now 58—2 in the 17th over. you can follow it all on 5 live sports extra for radio commentary. joanna konta has told the bbc she is working to becoming the world number one in women's tennis. she got the last four of wimbledon before to venus williams, the first british woman to reach the last four at the all england club in 39 years. i have always believed my own ability, our boys believed that can be at the top of the game, i've a lwa ys be at the top of the game, i've always wanted to be at the top of the game so every experience i've had every step of the way, i've just tried to use that to my advantage and use that in a way that is only
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making the better. and i'm really enjoying my journey. i making the better. and i'm really enjoying myjourney. ifeel making the better. and i'm really enjoying myjourney. i feel that making the better. and i'm really enjoying myjourney. ifeel that i'm trying to maximise every day and i think i'm doing that 95% of the time. romelu lu ka ku romelu lukaku has scored his first goal ina romelu lukaku has scored his first goal in a manchester united shirt in a friendly against rail salt lake. it was his first start for the new clu b it was his first start for the new club and he helped united to come from behind and win in utah. antonia valencia was sent off and juan mata was forced off with an ankle injury. the women's european championships carries on today. england scotland begin their tournament tomorrow. casey stoner wasn't expected to start the match but has now been ruled out for definite. the lionesses are tipped for a strong tournament and want to improve on their impressive third place at the world cup back in 2015. a few of the
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girls about bronze and silver so we arejust girls about bronze and silver so we are just after that gold now, but as isaid, it are just after that gold now, but as i said, it is not going to be an easy task, it is going to be difficult and there will be lumps and bumps along the way but as a team, it is about pulling together and getting through them hurdles and at the end, hopefully it'll be worth the reward. the head of spain's soccer federation, angel maria villar was arrested on tuesday after a raid on several offices in madrid linked to the group as part of an anti—corruption investigation, police said. media reports this are suggesting his son has also been detained. former chelsea captain marcel dasaolu believes thatjohn terry can play football thriller that two seasons at leas. he was skipper at sta mford seasons at leas. he was skipper at stamford bridge for some 13 years before leaving on a free transfer to join aston villa, where he has taken the armband. desailly was asked how john terry's future looks now he is no longer a chelsea player. very
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good, nobody should blame him because he has gone to another club. i think he still wanted to play football, he is still fit, you can see on his social media and he is going to be the captain that we know and this team will need him and he will show that he can play another two seasons. for him to retire peacefully, he has done his duty and maybe come back as a coach because i can see that he is very, very motivated to continue in this business. we will have more in the next hour but that is the sport of an hour. thank you very much. let's just go live to the house of commons, because we are expecting to hear from the chancellor of the exchequer philip hammond, answering questions from mps. liz truss is actually just answering questions questions from mps. liz truss is actuallyjust answering questions at the moment, i think on productivity. she is talking about the pay cap, so let's listen in, that 1% pay cut the public sector. of £1400 rise in
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take—home pay the lowest earners. the thing that is very important to be getting a wage from employer is to make sure you got a job, and the chief secretary welcome the record fall in unemployment to a 42 year low, particularly the young people, giving them a much better opportunity in britain than most other countries in the european union? well, my might honourable friend is right, we now have the lowest levels of u nem ployment friend is right, we now have the lowest levels of unemployment since 1975, and that is thanks to the economic policies pursued by this government, improving the skills, improving infrastructure and taking sensible decisions on public sector pat’- sensible decisions on public sector pay. as clearly demonstrated, the government celebrates falling levels of unemployment without any critical analysis of the nature of that employment created. many residents in north west durham are in work
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which exacerbates those financial difficulties because pay is low, terms and conditions are poor and they do not have regular hours. can they do not have regular hours. can the minister update the house on the numbers of people currently working on zero hours contracts and will you also accept that looking at employment figures in a vacuum does nothing to help us understand if people are any more secure better off? well, it's fewer than 396 of people on zero hours contracts and as recognised by matthew taylor, many people want that flexibility in the work they do to combine it with other things that they do in their lives. what we need to do is make sure that people have the skills to get betterjobs in the future, and thatis get betterjobs in the future, and that is exactly what this government is investing in. with the chief secretary to the treasuryjoin me in welcoming the fact that since 2010, 70 5% of the two point out million jobs created are full—time and zero
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hours contracts... this is treasury questions in the commons. liz truss, chief secretary to the treasury answering questions. we are expecting philip hammond to answer some questions as well, so we will come away and keep listening in and go back as and when. president from's attempt to replace obama car has been dealt another major blow. two republican senators have refused to back the bill, making it impossible to pass on his current form. republicans have been divided on the issue, with moderates concerned about the effects on the country's most vulnerable. our north america correspondent, nick bryant reports. for seven years, republicans have been vowing to repeal obamacare, a central pledge of donald trump's election campaign was to do it immediately. but getting rid of that landmark reform and coming up with a replacement is proving politically impossible. two republican senators announced they weren't prepared to vote, even to allow the bill to be debated. they didn't think it went far enough in dismantling obamacare. but other moderate republicans have been opposed because millions of americans could lose their health coverage.
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the numbers simply aren't there, even though the republicans have a majority in the senate. it's a huge blow to donald trump — the second time since he became president that the republican— controlled congress has failed to deliver his slogan "repeal and replace". he's tweeted that republicans should simply repeal obamacare, and then begin work on a new health care plan. but that could strip 18 million americans of their health coverage — a potentially politically disastrous power. disastrous path. let's get more on a bbc investigation which has than just a small fraction of the money donated as part of the grenfell tower fire appeal has so far reached survivors or relatives of the dead. with me now is simon lewis, head of crisis response at
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british red cross. tell me what is happening in terms of the donations, financial and clothing and anything else that has been donated. in terms of donations, i'm sure you have heard coverage of the terms of quantity, the size of football pitches, the amount of stuff being sorted and 170 tonnes is available for people in crisis at the assistance centre near the towers, there is always a supply of clothing and baby goods and toiletries that people can access, so while, i guess, there is understandable concern about the number of items that are left outside of that, there isa that are left outside of that, there is a constant supply of it available, including if someone wa nts a available, including if someone wants a specific item, we can get it for them or at least that they or the following day. why is it taking so long? obviously, it is a huge
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amount of stuff you are sorting through, why is it taking so long?” will just through, why is it taking so long?” willjust go back to that fact through, why is it taking so long?” will just go back to that fact that there are always items available, but now it is the sheer quantity. we'll sorting it into anything new or most suitable, so that is carrying out assessments on the ground, making sure it is going to the assistance centre as soon as possible. but other items are either, again, given to our stores and in the stores, those items are coded, so that every penny that is made from the sale of those items that have been donated will go back to people affected by the incident. how much are people taking up what is on offer? because it is tough, isn't it, obviously, when you have been self—sufficient, you have had all of your things and then you have lost everything, to actually go and sort of seek out the sort of stuff you are offering. the amount of goods that are at the assistance
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centre are cleared out nearly every day and replenished, but then there are some community members, which links into the funding issue, there are some affected people that went necessarily want to come to the assistance centre and there have been talks about maybe because there are police officers outside, etc, so we have been working really hard with community groups like the grenfell muslim community response unit to encourage people to either come to the centre all we will do door—to—door with the health service to people in their homes to provide those things. on the funding, £800,000 has been given out, of i think more than £20 million raised. why is it that small amount? you said there is an element of people not wanting to claim? yes. but that isa not wanting to claim? yes. but that is a huge amount of money not given out. what would you expect to happen with that money? the 20 million
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includes all of the funding streams, it is not just includes all of the funding streams, it is notjust the includes all of the funding streams, it is not just the four includes all of the funding streams, it is notjust the four by includes all of the funding streams, it is not just the four by 7 includes all of the funding streams, it is notjust the four by 7 million the red cross has managed to raise. —— four points £7 million. we have been doing it from day one, making sure that people who need things, and that might be money, get it, so we have had the support of people from day one. so you have that 4.7 million pounds pot, how quickly would that be distributed? we have the support line that helps people to fill in the applications and access it. what sort of procedure is it? people are putting in the applications and it is taking time to process? just before i'anson, the five and a half thousand pounds that people had access to in day one, in cash almost, it is not as if people are waiting, and i'm not trying to reduce their need, but they have had
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a release of funding right at the beginning. did everybody get that £5,500? everybody that asked for it that was affected, so everybody in a tower got 5,500 fans and the next tranche, if you like, sadly is for either bereaved families or people who have been hospitalised. then there will be another transfer of there will be another transfer of the woods where we look to provide more support. so it is quite a complicated process. simon lewis, from the british red cross, thank you. four men, including two serving police officers are on trial today after being accused of misusing the camera on a police helicopter to come people who were naked or having sex. the group, which includes a retired police officer and a pilot, we re retired police officer and a pilot, were arrested as part of a south yorkshire police investigation. danny savage is outside sheffield crown court. what have you heard in court? well, this trial hasjust got under way within the last hour and i
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suspect for many others, the side of a police helicopter in the skies above is in britain's towns and cities is a familiar one, a useful tool in the battle against crime, thejury were tool in the battle against crime, the jury were told this morning. what they were also towed is —— told us what they were also towed is —— told us that for a number of incidents over a number of years, in south yorkshire, that helicopter based in the city was used for other things and it was basically used to film people sunbathing naked in their gardens and people having sex, and in the last hour, the jury he has been shown three videos of three different incidents. the first one was a woman sunbathing naked in her garden in rotherham, in south yorkshire, completely unaware that their helicopter was above her filming. the second video showed people at a naturist camp near doncaster sitting outside their caravan. thejury doncaster sitting outside their caravan. the jury was told that naturist is expect to be seen naked by other naturist but not to be
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filmed by the police helicopter flying overhead. the third couple showed a couple on the decking outside their house in south yorkshire having sex for a number of minutes, and they were willingly filmed, because they were friends of one of the defendants and they knew his helicopter would be flying over and were happy to be filmed having sex. the people on trial are two police officers and two pilots, they are accused of misconduct in a public office. what did they do in order to misuse the helicopter? the jury order to misuse the helicopter? the jury were told they used the unique viewing position afforded to them, together with the powerful video camera with which the helicopter is a quote, to video members of the public engaged in private activities ina gross public engaged in private activities in a gross violation of their privacy. on three separate occasions, they filmed a total of five people sunbathing naked and on another occasion, filmed a couple having sex. they recorded what they saw using the recording facilities that the helicopter was equipped with. the number of men on trial,
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four of them, they all deny the charges. matthew lucas was a serving police officer at the time. matthew loosemore was a pilot, as was malcolm reeves. lee walls was a police officer. a fifth defendant, adrian portmore, has pleaded guilty to the charges he faced, so he's not on trial. the others are an deny a charges and the trial is expected to last 3—4 weeks. charges and the trial is expected to last 3-4 weeks. in a moment, the summary of the business news but first, the headlines. inflation has slowed unexpectedly to 2.6% injune, helped by lower fuel prices. slowed unexpectedly to 2.6% injune, helped by lowerfuel prices. the cabinet has met with theresa may, telling conservative ministers to end the backbiting and carping. and the chief inspector of prisons has warned that youth custody centres in england and wales also save a tragedy is inevitable. —— are so u nsafe tragedy is inevitable. —— are so unsafe tragedy is inevitable. as we've been hearing falling petrol prices was the main driver behind the unexpected fall
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in inflation today. it is the first fall in the rate since october of last year. however, inflation is still running ahead of average wage inflation, which currently stands at 2%. the uk inflation rate has risen sharply since the referendum on membership of the european union lastjune, partly due to an increase in the cost of imported goods following the fall in the value of the pound. more in a moment. advertisements that show men failing at simple household tasks and women left to clean up are set to be banned by the uk advertising watchdog. the advertising standards authority will crack down on ads that feature stereotypical gender roles. it says ads that mock people for not conforming to gender types or reinforce gender roles had "costs for individuals, the economy and society". it's planning to draw up new rules next year. motorists have been hit with the fastest year—on—year rise in insurance premiums since records began five years ago — according to the insurance industry. average premiums have gone up by 11% and the typical bill for an annual policy is now £484. the news will put further
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pressure on the government to change its decision to reduce the so—called discount rate in march this year. the effect of that was to increase pay—outs to accident victims, but also to raise premiums. more on that surprise fall in inflation. it's fallen to 2.6% — the first time it's fallen since last october. the consumer prices index is basically a big basket of goods and services that you and i typically spend our money on. this inflation figure of 2.6% refers to how much those prices went up compared to what they were a year ago. so they are rising but not as fast as they did in may. partly because petrol and diesel prices fell, but food prices continue to rise and, importantly, inflation is running at a higher rate than earnings. so let's delve into the figures in a
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little more detail. victoria clarke, an economist at investec. we have been saying this figure of 2.6% came as a surprise. why? we have been saying this figure of 2.696 came as a surprise. why? partly because the decline in fuel prices we saw was larger than many of the economists looking at it had expected, but also because there we re expected, but also because there were a number of price falls across the category that is called recreation, so things like computer games and toys. all of thatjust added up to a bigger fall overall. the most had been anticipating. when we put it into the context of average wage increases, the latest data shows average wages went up by 296 data shows average wages went up by 2% and in the public sector, they are capped at 1%, so this will be welcome, this lower rate of inflation will be welcome because it means there is not quite such a squeeze on living standards but prices are still outpacing earnings. that's right, as you say, it is
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welcome but it is one month of a lowerfigure and welcome but it is one month of a lower figure and our suspicion welcome but it is one month of a lowerfigure and our suspicion is it isn't the trend that it will go down, but that it will push up further towards 3% as we get towards the end of the year and inflation is still running ahead of wage growth, so there is still a cash squeeze which has holes are facing and they are still worse off month—to—month as we move through the year. —— households are facing. and since the figures came out a couple of hours ago, we have seen the handball against the value of the euro —— we have seen the apparent fall in value against the euro and the dollar. why is that? in anticipation of these figures and the year ahead, the bank of england had been thinking about what to do with monetary policy and whether higher interest rates were appropriate and there is a big meeting at the start of august, and there had been a lot of speculation about whether the bank of england we re about whether the bank of england were gearing up to raise interest rates at that meeting or a subsequent one. the consequence of
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the day's viggers is it probably gives them a bit more breathing space to sit tight and wait and see how inflation trends over the next humans and decide what to do on interest rates later in the year, perhaps not at all this year —— how inflation trends over the next few months. victoria clark, thank you. let's ta ke months. victoria clark, thank you. let's take a look at some of the other business stories we are following. netflix shares surged on monday after the video streaming firm said it had about 104 million subscribers. the us company said the better—than—expected number was a sign that investment in new shows and movies was paying off. netflix shares rose more than 10% in after—hours trading in new york after announcing its second—quarter results. the firm said it added about 5.2 million members during the quarter, mostly from overseas. international members now account for about half of its subscriber total. the full design of the new plastic £10 note will be revealed by bank of england governor mark carney
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at winchester cathedral on tuesday. here he is with an earlier version. the note, which follows the polymer £5 note into circulation, is likely to be available for use in september. it will feature a portrait ofjane austen and is being launched on the 200th anniversary of her death. train passengers will soon be able to judge the punctuality of theirjourneys with much greater accuracy. from tuesday, the industry trade body, the rail delivery group, is publishing average national punctuality statistics to the minute, notjust to within five or ten minutes of planned arrival times. currently trains are judged to be on time officially if they arrive within five or even ten minutes of their scheduled arrival time. the london ftse100 index of leading shares has edged up — shares had edged up — after data showed that inflation eased in june. it means the bank of england is less
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likely to raise interest rates — so that has led the pound to fall in value. major companies on the ftse100 benefit from a weaker pound the ftse100 also benefiting from positive earnings updates from british land and royal mail. that is where we wanted the business now. r&b singer r kelly has denied allegations that he is holding several young women in an "abusive cult". a buzzfeed report accuses the singer of brainwashing women, who got closer to him in an effort to boost their musical careers. the 50—year—old has faced previous accusations of sexual misconduct, but was never found guilty. his lawyer says on these latest allegations, he'll work "diligently and forcibly to pursue his accusers and clear his name". as adults, these woman are free to consent to any form of relationship — indeed police welfare checks in illinois and georgia did not lead to any action being taken. the family of one of the women
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claim their daugher is being held by r kelly at a home in atlanta. release these girls... and put them back where they belong. my daughter was off in college at the time and i haven't seen her since. i have pictures of where the house was, inside this house where he resided, with rooms set up like a hotel for girls to stay in. and he also had a black room which he would do different sexual acts in and then he had three separate rooms out of 24 rooms in his house and they all have the same identical setup. my daughter is severely brainwashed. she is brainwashed to the point where she says anything that he asks her to say. she's not the same jocelyn that we knew. so we just want him to release her and let her go on with her life, because he has affected too many
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young girls over the years and ijust want her home and to try to get her rehabilitated to the jocelyn we know and miss. headlines coming up on the bbc news channel. at the moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two but first, the weather. for many of us, hot and sunny today through into the afternoon, temperatures up to around 30. many of us enjoying scenes like this, but the towards the south—west, the clouds are gathering. you can see the cloud is becoming quite lumpy, this is in cornwall and the lumpy cloud as a precursor to showers which are already developing. this is the recent radar picture, some heavy showers developing in the channel and they will move northwards over the next few hours. we will see though showers cropping
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up we will see though showers cropping up in the south—west of england, but elsewhere, looking at some sunny spells during this afternoon. the best of the blue skies will be across scotland and temperatures in the west are getting 223—25dc. further eased on the north sea coast, a little fresher, more like 21 celsius but plenty of sunshine across northern ireland and northern areas of england well. the cloud a bit more patchy towards central and southern areas and you can see through this afternoon, heavy and thundery showers across the south—west of england and though showers will continue to move their way northward through this evening and tonight but important to stress the showers are hit and miss. if you catch one, you will see a lot of rainfall ina catch one, you will see a lot of rainfall in a short space of time, frequent lightning, some strong gusty winds and some hail as well but if you missed them completely, you will wonder what the fuss is about. they move northwards overnight tonight, temperatures no lower than 14—18, so fairly warm into wednesday morning. the theme of
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the showers continues on wednesday, they will continue to track northwards. in the meantime, another band of rain moves in from the west into northern ireland and north—western parts of scotland. still some sunshine across the south and east, it should stay largely dry here, temperatures reaching 31, perhaps 32 degrees but further north and west, it will turn noticeably fresher. that pressure weather is courtesy of that cold front. it will move its way eastwards and introduce pressure conditions for many of us as we go into thursday. for many of us on thursday, it should be a dry day after any rain clears away towards the east. further west, a bit more rain spreading in. top temperatures 16—23. if you don't like the heat, something fresher coming infor like the heat, something fresher coming in for thursday and friday, temperatures where they should be for the time of the year but there will be heavy rain around as well, particularly in northern and western areas of the uk. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at midday:
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inflation slows unexpectedly to 2.6% injune — helped by lower fuel prices. the cabinet gathers in downing street as theresa may tells tory mps and ministers to end the "backbiting" and "carping." the chief inspector of prisons warns that youth custody centres in england and wales are so unsafe that a "tragedy" is "inevitable". a leading health expert says he's ‘deeply concerned' that rising rates are grinding to a halt after more than 100 years of progress. and women doing all the cleaning up, men failing at simple household tasks — the body that oversees advertising is reviewing its approach to ads that feature stereotypical gender roles. pay £500 reward is being offered after two blocks of award—winning cheese were stolen from an agricultural show. good afternoon, it's
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tuesday, 18th july. i'm joanna gosling — welcome to bbc newsroom live. inflation has slowed down unexpectedly. the rate — as measured by the consumer prices index dropped unexpectedly to 2.6% injune, from 2.9% in may. it's the first fall in the rate since october of last year and was largely down to lower petrol and diesel prices. while the fall was below economists' expectations of 2.9%, the cost of living has remained above the bank of england's target of 2%. with me is our business presenter ben bland. remind us what is being measured. the consumer price index is basically a basket of goods and services that we typically spend money on them and they compare prices in june this
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money on them and they compare prices injune this year to last year, 2.6% shows the average price went up by that amount. from one year to the next. it is a slight slowdown, that means prices are still going up but not as fast as they did in may. in may, they were 2.996, they did in may. in may, they were 2.9%, a four—year high. we have seen inflation running at a high level over the past year, ever since britain voted to leave the european union, partly because the pound fell in value, that means it costs more to buy things abroad and import them, so when companies face higher costs they pass those on in higher prices to you and me. we can hear from one business about the real impact on prices. our prices have had to go up — we've increased prices by around 2% this year — and that's been a national consequence of the increased wage costs, yarn costs and energy costs, as well as the costs of auto—enrolment. we have had to pass that on to our customers. by and large customers don't
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like price increases in a time of economic instability, i suppose, or uncertainty, that we're facing at the moment. but there's also an understanding that that has to take place for us to be able to continue to produce the high—quality products which the end consumer is demanding. the increase is slowing, what is behind that? in large part it is down to falling petrol and diesel prices which fell for the fourth month in ebro, to a lesser extent, the costs of recreation, games and toys, fell slightly. on the other food prices household and furniture went the other way, they went up. that is why on average, prices are still rising. how does this relate to wages? this is the big question, this is what puts it in context. the latest we have shows that average
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earnings went up by 2%. in the public sector, wage rises are capped at 1%, of course. if prices are going up by two by 6% and wages aren't going up as high, it means prices are outstripping people's wages, so that's what people mean when they talk about the cost—of—living crisis. that has eased somewhat due to deflation but prices are still outstripping wages and that has prompted the tuc to react today and say the government must stop this cost of living squeeze. many working people are caught ina squeeze. many working people are caught in a vice as rising prices crashed their pay. they have said that britain needs a pay rise across the public and private sector. meanwhile, the treasury has said... "while it is encouraging that inflation was lower this month, we appreciate that some families are concerned about the cost of living. that's why we have introduced the national living wage and cut taxes for millions of people." the bank of england does have a
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target of 2%. what is their policy likely to be? last month, we saw a split in the vote and it looked like the committee that sets interest rates for the bank of england was starting to move towards perhaps raising interest rates. in light of this slowdown in inflation, a lot of economists say banks will be relu cta nt to economists say banks will be reluctant to raise interest rates because they fear is thatjust put a bigger squeeze on people's cost of living and stops them spending because of interest rates go up, mortgage costs go up and so on, the bank will be very cautious about doing that. as a result, because it looks less likely that we will see an interest rate rise in august, sterling has fallen in value since we got that inflation figure this morning, down quite steeply against the euro but to a lesser extent against the dollar. not keeping pace with rising
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inflation means we are seeing tougher times for households and that will impact on household spending, in the high street and in our shops and restaurants. what dant is happening with inflation? would you expect the rate to continue to fall? we think we would expect to see inflation... we think this is some of the impact of rising costs on business. there is overall
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comfort in these numbers, if you look at the impact of the weaker exchange rate, it has led to higher import costs and materials for lots of manufacturers. the rate of inflation peaked at 19% injanuary. the latest numbers here show moderating a bit to around 10% on the year this month. i think that will take off some of the pressure on businesses. if costs are rising, and 10%, that's still a challenging picture for businesses. what's really important over the long—term as we make it easy for businesses to invest, so they can keep creating jobs into the future. in policy what would you, what would be the best thing? domestically, we want to focus on improving infrastructure, building connections to improve productivity over the long—term,
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that's about better connections between our big cities and also very much about education and skills in making sure all our young people are leaving school with the very best results and ready for the world of work but i think the other challenges for businesses at the moment is there is a lot of uncertainty and around brexiter particularly, we did a survey of our members and the good news is that for 60% of businesses, brings uncertainty is not impacting on investment but for 40% of businesses, we are seeing a negative impact from brexit uncertainty on investment plans and that's a real concern, so we need to make sure business and government works in partnership as we move through the eu negotiations are now we have a smooth transition to our new relationship with the eu. that's what would give business the confidence to invest now for the future. theresa may has urged conservative mps and ministers to end what she called the "backbiting"
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over disagreements within the party. at a reception in the commons last night, the prime minister warned that the choice was her orjeremy corbyn in downing street. let's speak to our assistant political editor norman smith in westminster. tell us more about what she said, this appeal. theresa may has remained at cabinet ministers that cabinet meetings have to be private, that if ministers go out and leaked details, that undermines how government operates because difficult decisions and conversations, you cannot afford those to be leaked out yet that is what has happened, certainly at the weekend, we saw is damaging briefings against philip hammond, with suggestions he described public sector workers as overpaid, interesting just watching mr hammond in the commons now, he did not look like a in the commons now, he did not look likea man in the commons now, he did not look like a man on the back foot, i have to say. he said at one point, i am
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not enfeebled and went out of his way to make the case against for tackling the deficit and if these briefings were meant to damage him, it certainly didn't look like they had succeeded. nevertheless, from mrs may's point of view, if you have a cabinet leaking information, inevitably, it appears there's a lack of control and that damages her own authority, so she has appealed to ministers this morning to the briefing and that follows a talk he gave to conservative mps last night on the commons terrace saying, stop the backbiting and sniping. i think we hope in mrs may's camp is that if they can just get through to the summer recess, a couple of days away, then maybe, maybe over the summer, things will come down a bit. what do you think is lower to happen? i think it is pretty optimistic hope the briefing and lily king will end and that the manoeuvring over brexit will simply fade away. because, frankly, the
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issues are too profound, the divisions within the party is so immense, from brexit, between those are basically want to get out after march 2019 and those were much more cautious, like the chancellor, who feels the need to build in a transitional period to ensure the economy does not suffer a huge shock that business is ready to adapt. also, you sense, it has become personal. a lot of the briefing against philip hammond was designed to damage him personally, so that is a degree of ejected needle to it. for that reason, i suspect, despite mrs may's plea for an end to all this sniping, it's probably going to continue. thank you. the chief inspector of prisons has warned that youth custody centres in england and wales are so unsafe that a "tragedy" is "inevitable." peter clarke said there'd been such a "staggering" decline in standards that he'd written to ministers about it earlier this year. launching his annual report, mr clarke said he hadn't inspected a single establishment where it was safe to hold young people.
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he said prisons for men had also become worse over the past 12 months with "startling" increases in violence. earlier i spoke to our home affairs correspondent danny shaw. if you thought last year's report was bad, this is worse. conditions have declined, particularly in adult prisons for men but also, his real concern, youth custody centres, so young offenders institutions and secure training centres, they calljust under 800 people and he did not find in any of the inspections conducted that any of those centres was actually safe. he believes a tragedy is inevitable and the reasons are complex, it could have something to do with the fact you have some of the most difficult, dangerous and mentally unstable young people being held in those institutions but also, he talks about the vicious circle, you get someone who is violent, that then leads to more restrictive regimes, which leads to frustration, which then causes more violence and so it goes on.
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he said some of the centres just cannot break out of that vicious circle. danny shaw was talking to me earlier and with me now is peter clarke. thank you for coming in. it is extraordinary to hear you say you have not inspected a single establishment where it is safe to hold young people. when you say it is unsafe, or tell us more about what you mean by that. is a common perceptions on boys and girls being held in trust to, perceptions of staff on the reality of violence, ta ke staff on the reality of violence, take that into account the movement judgments. we got to be point in february where we were unable to say that any of the institutions we inspect it, we could not consider
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any of them as safe to hold children and young people. that is what prompted me to write to ministers in february. is it a breach of some's human rights, if they are being held ina human rights, if they are being held in a place where their safety cannot be guaranteed ? in a place where their safety cannot be guaranteed? whether that is a breach of human rights or not, i wouldn't want to get into a legal debate about that... that if you hear the chief inspector of prisons saying it is not safe for you to be somewhere, you may be thinking it is a breach of your human rights.” would wonder why the state, in attempting to ensure my safety are placing me in conditions where they cannot do it. you wrote to ministers and their this year. i'll be taking it seriously? no but i very much hope they are. i made it clear that
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in my view, some sort of tragedy would be inevitable. unless there was firm action taken to make these places safer, indeed, within four weeks of my letter, there was very nearly such a tragedy from the secure training centre, where a young member of staff was attacked. i've had a reply setting out the aspirations of the future, plans the government has to improve things. i just hope these aspirations plans are turned into reality. when you say a very young member of staff was attacked, i said say a very young member of staff was attacked, isaid before, about say a very young member of staff was attacked, i said before, about the human rights of the people being locked up in these places, but the same applies to people working on them, doesn't it? might they be thinking, actually, i don't think i should be going into the system should be going into the system should every day? it is very easy to minimise, and we should not do, the fa ct minimise, and we should not do, the fact there are a lot of very dedicated and caring staff working in difficult and challenging situations. yes, i know we have seen
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challenges the other way round, staff not behaving appropriately in these institutions. but we mustn't lose sight of the fact that it can bea lose sight of the fact that it can be a difficult and dangerous place to work. that's why there needs to bea to work. that's why there needs to be a serious approach to making these places say. he said when he wrote to ministers earlier this year, you hoped they would take it seriously, you had a response within four weeks. has there been any action to indicate they are taking it seriously? as an inspector, we ta ke it seriously? as an inspector, we take a snapshot unannounced, we report on what we find. over the coming weeks and months, whether they're taking it seriously or not will be shown through the results of our inspections. what did they tell you? what are they say they would make immediate changes to? they said they are looking to train staff better, to employ more staff, to
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look carefully at arrangements for safety a nd look carefully at arrangements for safety and there has been some restructuring in terms of new youth custody service that's been created within her majesty ‘s prison and probation service. we have to see what the impact of all of this is. i think the most important thing is to make sure it doesn't remain as an exercise in shifting deckchairs around. we have to make sure this fundamental change, the basic unaddressed and these places are made safe. i have interviewed you so many times about inspection reports and, as we hearing today, the picture seems to be getting worse. i'm really sensing exasperation from you, actually, now, about an apparent of anything change.” you, actually, now, about an apparent of anything change. i don't think it's right to say i'm exasperated, i am very concerned for the safety of children and people from the state has expected to accept a responsibility for, it has accept a responsibility for, it has a responsibility to hold those people safely. thank you for coming
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in. we have had a statement from the ministry ofjustice on the report. it says the safety and welfare of every young person in custody is our absolute priority and we are clear that more needs to be done to achieve this. we also want custody to improve the life chances of children in our care and to deliver improvements to education and health service within youth custody. the headlines on bbc newsroom live — inflation slows unexpectedly to 2.6% injune — helped by lower fuel prices. the cabinet gathers in downing street as theresa may tells tory mps and ministers to end the "backbiting" and "carping." the chief inspector of prisons warns that youth custody centres in england and wales are so unsafe
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that a "tragedy" is "inevitable". we mentioned theresa may hannant been telling cabinet to stop the fighting and carping. we are hearing a spokesman for the prime minister that she told the cabinet there is a need to show strength in unity in the country and that stands in cabinet. she did also speak to tory mps last night. the spokesman also said the prime minister told ministers that government can make better decisions if there is open
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debate. that remains private. there pictures from earlier of ministers leaving number ten after that cabinet meeting. she is making an appealfor unity in cabinet. there is some speculation potentially of a leadership challenge in the autumn. keep watching let's catch up with the sport. england's women have made two early breakthroughs in their cricket world cup semifinal against south africa. after losing the toss and bowling first, anya shrubsole took the wicket of lizelle lee forjust seven. trisha chetty has also since departed. they have just lost their third
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wicket. heather knight has just rolled her out. you can hear the action on bbc radio five. and johanna konta has told the bbc she's working towards becoming the world number one. she's up to fourth in the rankings after reaching the semi—finals at wimbledon. i've always believed in my own ability, that i can be on top the game. every experience i have happened, every step of the way, i have tried to use that to my own advantage and to use that anyway thatis advantage and to use that anyway that is only making the better and really enjoying myjourney. ifeel i'm trying to maximise it everyday andi i'm trying to maximise it everyday and i feel i am doing i'm trying to maximise it everyday and ifeel i am doing that i'm trying to maximise it everyday and i feel i am doing that 95% the time. romelu lukaku has scored his first goal in manchester united shirt since joining from everton
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for 75 million pounds. united beat real salt lake 2—1 in a friendly in utah. not all good news, antonio valencia was sent off and juan mata was forced off with an ankle injury. the head of the spanish football federation has been arrested as part ofa federation has been arrested as part of a corruption investigation. it has been reported he was arrested on suspicion of embezzling funds. his son has also been detained. he is both a fever and uefa vice president. written's jack parnell has suffered more marathon swimming heartbreak, finishing fourth in the ten kilometre world championship in hungary. that's all the sport.
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president trump's attempt to replace obamacare have been dealt another major blow. two more republican senators have refused to back their party's latest plans. making it impossible for the bill to pass in its current form. republicans have been divided on the issue, with moderates concerned about the effects on the country's most vulnerable. our washington correspondent gary o'donoghuejoins me now. this leads one of the central signature promises of the trumpet campaign in tatters at the moment. he promised to do this on day one, to repeal and replace so—called obamacare and now the republican party in congress and indeed in the white house, in the shape of donald
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trump, have acknowledged they cannot get their plans through. he called ita get their plans through. he called it a fantastic plan, said everyone would like it, well, the problem is, a number of people in his own party did not like it and last night a further two republican senators effectively defected and that means they simply do not have the numbers to get it through. what they propose now is a bill to replace obamacare, rather to repeal it, in two years' time and that is what they believe will give them a window to force democrats to come on board to work with them for a solution between now and then. neither party will want to get to the end of the two—year period. with nothing in place because that could result in tens of millions of americans losing insurance. that is one political truth which is pretty universal, one should give people something, taking
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it away is very difficult. where does this leave donald trump's authority with his own party? his approval ratings are at rock bottom, 36%, historically low, a decade low figure and i think that's part of the reason he couldn't get this done, republicans control both houses. if he had more political capital to play with, he could have lent on republicans much harder by the city does not have the clout or the city does not have the clout or the muscle because of those poll numbers. i think that's a problem for him. he's being frustrated in the courts by things like the travel
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bans and now by some of the states who are starting to go their own way or go even further their own way on issues like climate change, despite him pulling out of the paris climate change agreement. what i think you will see now is an attempt to repeal obamacare over this will see now is an attempt to repeal obamaca re over this two—year will see now is an attempt to repeal obamacare over this two—year period but they will want to then move onto other like reforming the tax code, infrastructure, and they will get some democratic support for that, so they have something to show for the first year in office, come november, december. thank you, gary. the family of an autistic seven—year—old boy is beginning a high court challenge against an nhs decision to deny him a life—changing drug. the child has a rare condition, which puts him at risk of severe brain damage. nhs england says the drug is too expensive — and there's no evidence it will work. but if the challenge is successful, future funding decisions could be based solely upon the welfare of the child.
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with me now is clive coleman who's at the royal courts ofjustice. a lot riding on this case, obviously for the family in particular. but wider repercussions potentially too? sure, let me tell you a bit about this little boy, we're calling him david. he has a rare condition called pku, which means he cannot metabolise protein so he is limited to just 12 metabolise protein so he is limited tojust 12 grams metabolise protein so he is limited to just 12 grams of protein per day. let me put that into context, it slice of bread contains four grams. the figures above the limit, he risks serious and permanent brain damage. he also has autism, so here seven damage. he also has autism, so here seve n yea rs damage. he also has autism, so here seven years old and it is very difficult, despite herculean efforts, for his parents regulate his diet. i spoke to david's father and asked about some of the difficulties. he will sometimes run into a room if
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we're eating and literally take food of our plates. he doesn't realise he cannot have certain things. when he gets upset, he really gets upset, it's physical with us, with his siblings. he will break things in the house, you know, it's a meltdown, really. now, the point is that they want him to have a drug which would help him metabolise protein and have more in his diet. the nhs has refused his application, this individual funding application, this individual funding application that has been made, on the basis that the cost effectiveness and clinical effectiveness and clinical effectiveness is not established. although, in court today it was agreed that the short—term clinical effectiveness is beyond question. the challenge is being bought on three grounds. one, the decision is
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irrational, secondly, it does not ta ke irrational, secondly, it does not take into account david's welfare and thirdly, that it reaches its human rights. it is the welfare ground that may have broader consequences because of the case is won on that basis, it means the nhs will have to put the welfare of the child at the centre of these decisions on whether or not to give these expensive drugs for rare conditions that could have a significant funding application for the nhs. but it could also mean that pa rents of the nhs. but it could also mean that parents of children who desperately wa nt parents of children who desperately want these drugs may get them. thank you. let's catch up with the weather. it's going to be another warm and sunny day for the vast majority of us today. temperatures at their highest across southern and western parts of the country. sunny for most but storms moving across the english channel in two parts of devon, cornwall, probably dorset is well over the next couple of hours.
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expect thunder and lightning here. a little fresher for eastern scotland and eastern parts of england. storms push northwards overnight across england and wales. some of the biggest storms could bring half a month's worth of rain in just a couple of hours. localised flooding problems are likely. we could have interruptions to power supplies and transport could be affected. temperatures peaking at around 32 across england. it will feel oppressive and humid. we will keep you up—to—date as we go through the day. cloud this is bbc newsroom live.
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the headlines: inflation has unexpectedly fallen to 2.6% injune. it's the first fall since october 2016. lower prices for fuel have have contributed. the bbc finds that only a fraction of the money, donated as part of the grenfell tower fire appeal, has so far reached survivors or relatives. the cabinet has met — with theresa may telling conservative mps and ministers to end the "backbiting" and "carping." youth custody centres in england and wales are so unsafe that a "tragedy" is "inevitable" warns the chief inspector of prisons. and the advertising regulator is looking at introducing new rules to put an end ads which portray stereotypical gender roles. a bbc investigation has found that only a small fraction of the money donated as part of the grenfell tower fire appeal has so far reached
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survivors or relatives of the victims. almost £20 million has been raised and 40,000 boxes of goods have been donated. less tha n less than £800,000 has been given out. tom burridge reports. it is second—hand clothes heaven. some of the items we've had through have been absolutely beautiful. lovely. i mean, we've had things like this. this is the grenfell tower fire appeal in action, a red cross sorting centre in cheshire. donations in the green bags will be sold in red cross shops. black bags are for recycling. brand—new items will go straight back to survivors of the fire or relatives of those who died. it's about turning all the different donations we've had into cash which automatically will then go to the appeal. to appreciate the scale of donations, you had to fly through this london warehouse a week after the fire. it's estimated 174 tonnes of stuff was donated.
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so far they have sorted half of it, and ten tonnes has gone back to the victims. no amount of money is enough for the loved ones of those who died. research by the bbc shows that several appeals and charities have now raised nearly £20 million. some question why only a small part of that has made it through. we feel that it's betraying the public‘s generosity because they gave money to help directly those who were affected and we're not too clear that it's happening. it's like there's a filter and organisations rather than individuals are getting the financial support. charities say the complexity and the scale of what happened here means everything takes time. the thing about these things that we've learnt from the 7/7 attacks and indeed from the response to the manchester attacks, is that it takes longer than you might think for people
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to come forward to seek theirfunding. i have forgiven, you know, the bombers who did this to me... thelma stober lost her left foot in the london 7/7 bombings. she received money donated by the public. i used it to get myself daily physiotherapy support at home. my determination was to walk again as i was told the chances were highly unlikely. it took 15 months to distribute all the money raised for victims of those attacks like thelma. thelma is now a trustee of the london emergency trust. it's distributing £4.8 million of the grenfell appeal. so far, 16 people have received payments. you're in a state of total confusion. a lot of people are suffering from post—traumatic stress. you're trying to understand what has happened, the implications for your life going forward, is changed forever. even here, in rural cheshire, what happened in a london tower are
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block is by no means lost. i can't watch it on tv now. you know, it makes you cry. it's emotional even now, just the thought of what's yet to be found and the people. whether donating an old top or a tenner, people have been moved to act. the challenge for charities is ensuring it all benefits those who have lost so much. in our report, we saw sami. she is with the there in the studio. tell us more about your concerns about what is going on here. we are concerned, the perception we have on the ground is that the support is not reaching the ones who needed. we think you indications could be improved and people feel that
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decisions are being made without them being consulted and i think on them being consulted and i think on the part of the local authority, they have read the situation and didn't take into account the fact that there is public mistrust in north kensington and chelsea because we re north kensington and chelsea because were talking about a culture of not listening to the concerns of residents, so we were happy and glad and thankful that the public has been so generous but, again, it seems like there is a lack of transparency and we don't know what happened to the money and the donations. so when you say that there is a perception on the ground that the support isn't reaching those who needed, can you give me some examples of what have been hearing from people, what help they need and what they have actually got? because there was initially £5,500, payet that were supposed to go to everyone. has that been received by everyone? not everyone has received it, we are not too
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clear as to why the people cannot access the money. i have spoken to survivors who didn't have access to clothes, or it was a bit too bureaucratic, they had to go from one centre to another, they had to find their letter to show they were eligible, so i think this is the basis for us thinking something is not happening the way it should.” spoke to the head of crisis response at the british red cross earlier and he mentioned that £5,500 payment and he mentioned that £5,500 payment and he said with the clothes, they are busy taking a long time to sort through but he said there are clothes in response centres and anybody that wants them can get them, and also there is that huge amount of money that's been raised, 4.56 amount of money that's been raised, 4.5g and plans specifically by the red cross but a £20 million in all -- 4.56 red cross but a £20 million in all —— 4.5g million pounds. people can putting claims that money. from what you are describing, people have
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potentially had nothing. yes, last night somebody told me they never received that £5,000 grant. so where is the disconnect? what has happened? it is the lack of coordinators asian and organisation. i think every family have been allocated nikki walker —— the lack of coordination and organisation. i think every family has been allocated a key worker. the money seems to have reached organisations, even national organisations, who are ina even national organisations, who are in a position to advertise forjob vacancies, so we don't understand why we are not getting access. so if you have met people who haven't had that money, haven't got clothes, how are they living? i understand there was an initial £,500 amount given to people to live in a bed—and—brea kfast, and i people to live in a bed—and—breakfast, and i think they we re bed—and—breakfast, and i think they were given a voucher to buy food and
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they are expected to travel every day back and forth to different centres to access support. and people are too traumatised and it is very ha rd people are too traumatised and it is very hard in the community for people to physically go into centres, so again, i think it is misreading the situation. they need to do misreading the situation. they need todoa misreading the situation. they need to do a bit more outreach work to make sure people access that help. thank you very much coming samia. if posterity may be able to earth —— starting to affect life expectancy in england. the rate of increase has almost ground to hold since 2010. hit his suggestion that it was possible posterity was how long people can live was dismissed by the government. life expectancy has been rising for the last century, but now a leading health expert is raising concerns that increases could be tailing off. sir michael marmot, who has advised both the government and world health organization, points out that the rate of increase has halved since 2010.
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historically, life expectancy at birth has risen by one year for every five years for women and one year every three and a half for men. since 2010, however, that has slowed to one year for every ten for women and one for every six for men. sir michael says the situation needs urgently looking at. this is historically highly unusual because over a long period of time, for a hundred years, life expectancy has been improving, year—on—year, in britain, as it has in many, many other countries. and now it has slowed, it is almost flat, which means that we have fallen behind some of the healthier countries. that's terrible. he says it is not possible to say exactly what has caused it, but he says austerity could be a factor and funding for the nhs and social care, in particular, had been miserly. dementia is also likely to have played a role. the department of health says it is providing funding to ensure
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life expectancy continues to rise and the ageing population is well cared for. for men, including two serving police officers rm trial accused of misusing the camera on a police helicopter to film people naked or having sex. the group, which includes a retired police officer and a pilot, were arrested as part of a south yorkshire police investigation. danny savage is outside sheffield crown court, bring us up—to—date with what you been hearing. joanna, the opening words from richard wright qc, prosecuting this case, is that "some of you, the south yorkshire police helicopter might bea south yorkshire police helicopter might be a familiar sight in the skies of this city or across the cou nty skies of this city or across the county a south yorkshire, but this case concerns the use of a south yorkshire police helicopter on four occasions between 2007 and 2012. or
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to put it more accurately, perhaps it involves the misuse of that helicopter by the four defendants and a fifth man called adrian pogmore." adrian pogmore was an observer in the helicopter and has already pleaded guilty to his charges, misconduct in a public office, but the others denied. what did they do? they flew over people's property and filmed them without them knowing and those videos, four different incidents were shown to the court. the first one showed a woman sunbathing naked in her garden in rotherham, completely unaware that their helicopter was hovering nearby and filming her and zooming in and taking close—ups. the second one showed some naturists outside a ca rava n one showed some naturists outside a caravan at a site in doncaster as the helicopter went by. the third showed a couple having sex on the decking outside their detached home in south yorkshire. they knew they we re in south yorkshire. they knew they were being filmed and were basically putting on a show because they were friends of adrian pogmore, the observer in the helicopter, a police
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officer, who was described as "sex obsessed swinger" in court today. thejury were obsessed swinger" in court today. the jury were told this was a deliberate invasion of people's privacy pork at the very least the amusement of the crew and at the worst, the sexual gratification and represents not only an abuse of that trust placed in them as the crew of a police helicopter but also a gross waste of the valuable resource, the police helicopter. it was also said there may be attempts to trivialise what happened during this court case, to dismiss it as loutish conduct. however, you will hear from some of those whose privacy was invaded who found nothing amusing about what happened. there are four defendants on trial, the trial is due to last three weeks. matthew leuchars, police officer, lee walls, also a police officer and two pilots, matthew loosemore and malcolm reeves, and they deny all of the charges they are facing. adverts showing women cleaning up — or men failing at household chores should be regulated more strongly.
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the advertising standards authority says commercials that endorse gender stereotypes can be socially irresponsible. but are those stereotypes having a damaging effect? here are a few examples. # she'sa # she's a lady # she's a lady # 0h, she's a lady # 0h, she's a lady # talking about... at least someone knows how to treat you right. french of the griddle from kfc. —— fresh off the griddle. it doesn't just it doesn'tjust happen by magic. behind every great christmas, there is mum. let's speak now to the writer and broadcaster, lynette burrows.
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shejoins us from cambridge. is it a goodidea shejoins us from cambridge. is it a good idea for the advertising standards authority to start a clamp—down on that gender stereotyping? no, i don't think so. i know they don't like it because they are politically correct, but if people don't like an advert, they can complain about it to one another and it will lose its effect, so no company would want to lose its audience. most of the adverts would they call gender stereotyping just reflect people's experience and that is what they want to do. but doesn't it therefore compound images and perceptions of the roles that people should carry out, for instance, that women should do it all and therefore put themselves under pressure to keep doing it all? no. the idea, it
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is so patronising that women are little tender flowers incapable of making up their own mind about anything and doing what they want to do and protesting about what they don't want to do. that is far more debilitating than showing a woman managing christmas, which most women do for theirfamilies. managing christmas, which most women do for their families. it's just reality. i very much object to this idea of putting women wearing hard hats, helping to resurface a motorway. it's nonsense and it doesn't influence anybody, itjust irritates a large number. when you say it is just the reality, of women basically running christmas, well it might be in a lot of households, but is it right to reinforce that through advertising? why not? i mean, advertising is there to do something to encourage you to buy something to encourage you to buy something usually, that is what it is for. they know very well how to do that and when they are giving a
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negative impression, they will back off doing it. we don't need to be protected. what about when it comes to ads that reinforce gender stereotypes from an early age? there isa stereotypes from an early age? there is a baby milk advert which i think we might see in a minute which is basically sort of showing little girls aspiring to be ballerinas and boys aspiring to be, i can't remember, something like a soldier, pretty stereotypical stuff. what you think about that? perfectly all right. that does reflect reality and all these people in the media who haven't got any children have noticed how you spend a lifetime with young children trying to reinforce an impression that they should wash their hands before they go to bed and eat up their greens and all sorts of things. if it's true and it reflects the reality of the child, it will work, but it's all propaganda and you can't make little girls want to greece motorways or tinker with engines.
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you talk about parents, any parent would know that the kids don't obviously always conform to the sort of stereotypes that you are saying, so shouldn't that be reflected? of stereotypes that you are saying, so shouldn't that be reflected ?m should be reflected, the fact that they are absolutely free to make up their minds and nothing has got in their minds and nothing has got in the way of that. it's just that it is propaganda, you are telling them what they ought to do and who are you to tell the public? thank you very much, lynette burrows. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: inflation slows unexpectedly — to 2.6% injune — helped by lower fuel prices. the cabinet has met — with theresa may telling conservative mps and ministers to end the "backbiting" and "carping." the chief inspector of prisons warns that youth custody centres in england and wales are so unsafe that a "tragedy" is "inevitable". an award winning cheese maker is offering a reward of £500 to track down the thieves who stole two blocks of cheddar cheese
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from a country show. we can now speak to richard clothier, a third generation cheddar maker and managing director of wyke farms in somerset. it is your cheese that was taken. thank you forjoining us. is this cheese worth £,500? there are two big blocks about the same size as this and they are quite heavy, each one weighs about the same as a large bag of cement, so these cheeses are probably worth about £,500 to this size, but these cheeses are very rare because they won the champion's show at one of the most prestigious cheddar shows in the world, yeovil show, which is about 15 miles from the village of cheddar itself. so you just demonstrated how difficult it is to lift that. it wouldn't have been easy for anyone to make off with two blocks like that. it's not the sort of thing you can slip into your handbag or tucked up your
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jumper. two big blocks like this, i have been carrying these cheeses for about 40 years and i still find them heavy. how proud of you are you of your cheese and how devastated are your cheese and how devastated are you by this loss? i'm really proud of the cheese, because wyke farmers in myfamily of the cheese, because wyke farmers in my family have been making cheese for hundreds of years and we still make this vintage cheddar to my 100—year—old family recipe and my grandmother was the first one to ride the recipe down and start making wyke cheese in a really high quality way, so she would have been really proud of us winning awards like this. so it is a fantastic accolade for the whole team at wyke to wina accolade for the whole team at wyke to win a prize like this, so for it to win a prize like this, so for it to be snatched away from us on saturday night in the middle of the night is a really tough pill to swallow. so what would your speculation be about who would have taken it? would it be someone hoping to resell it or a massive cheese fan? i hope whoever has stolen it
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would enjoy it as much as we do, but i think there are some conspiracy theories. we are selling cheese to 160 countries around the world and cheddar is getting really popular, so there is a conspiracy theory about because they are prize—winning cheeses, winning fantastic prizes at a local show, that maybe they were stolen in some sort of cheese collector for an export market or some bitter competitor. but people in the cheese world are really friendly with each other, so i doubt it would be a competitor, it's more likely some prankster on the way back from the club in yeovil on saturday night who decided to steal something that was probably a lot more valuable than they realised and hopefully they might return it. so you are saying if they return it, they will get £,500. not the people who stole it! there is a reward for the safe return and information leading to the prosecution of the people who may have taken it, but at the end of the day, we just want to
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see the cheese back and certificates, so that i can share the certificates with the team here, incredibly proud of wyke farms to have won these fantastic prizes. congratulations on winning the prizes, i am sorry we are talking about it because the cheese has been stolen. thank you very much for your time. if you are interested in the search for alien life, south africa should be the first country on your radar. the first stage of a giant new radio telescope is almost complete. it's so powerful that its creators say it will be able to see in the emptiest corner of south africa, some of the most sensitive technology on the planet. the meerkat array radio telescope. near completion now, and already probing the far reaches of the universe. the head scientist takes us closer, but to film here we have to take precautions.
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these receivers are so delicate, any electronic interference could destroy them. the dishes could pick up a mobile phone signal on jupiter. with this, south african astronomy is suddenly becoming a world beater. because some people had the vision, the know—how, the guts and the support of the whole country, fundamentally, to do this. here we are. yes, it's in africa, it's going to be world—class science no matter where it is. it happens to be in south africa, which is very exciting, of course. soon there will be 64 international receivers. they will then join up with an international array that will be 10,000 times better than today's models, better at exploring space and black holes and the origins of our own galaxy. so what you have here, basically, are incredibly sophisticated buckets. they are designed to catch radio waves that have been travelling for so many billions of years across the universe that they contain within them secrets about what was going on not
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long after the big bang, and the more buckets you have and the more widely spread they are, the clearer the picture. at the headquarters in cape town, the biggest challenge right now is to work out how to cope with an impending tsunami of intergalactic data. we believe we will be able to probe the deepest recesses of the universe. who knows what we might find? perhaps another planet with life. there were colleagues in other parts of the world who would say, focus on your poverty problems. what are you doing with this? we said, this is part of our answer to poverty. you cannot neglect science and believe you will address your deepest problems. the amplified blips of distant radio waves reaching the african continent. who knows what secrets they might hold? first in the queue to use these telescopes are astronomers searching
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for alien life, convinced this network might be their best chance yet. ina moment, in a moment, the news at one with jane hill first, the weather with chris. hello, more warm and sunny weather coming up most of us this afternoon. yesterday, the highest temperatures were across eastern and southern parts of the british isles. high pressure in charge and that same area of high pressure still with us today but it moved further eastwards, said the winds of change direction. today, we've got these south—easterly winds, so the highest temperatures, instead of being in the east, are in the west and the south, temperatures 29 degrees to the west of london, somewhere like hampshire the hotspot. it is a quiet day weather—wise the most of us but the weather watch picture shows a cloud that is the side of a brewing
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storm, and those thunderstorms are already on the way, moving across the english channel. first port of call, devon, cornwall, probably dorset is well with some afternoon storms working in. elsewhere, it is a dry afternoon with some high cloud in the sky but some warm and sunny weather. overnight, the storms get more widespread, first arriving in across southern counties of england before spreading into wales, the midlands and east anglia. the amount of rain we get from these storms will vary from place to place. some areas could pick up over half a month's rain in the space of a couple of hours or so. localised flooding is a risk and because there isa flooding is a risk and because there is a lot of lightning from this thunderstorms, but could be disruption to power supplies and maybe transport affected as well. on into wednesday, further storms around as well. they might ease after a time that they will reform as we go through the afternoon. could have some particularly fierce once across parts of wales and northern counties of england but
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some elsewhere possible too. a warm, humid, hotand muggy some elsewhere possible too. a warm, humid, hot and muggy kind of day, temperatures up to 31, 32 across eastern parts. the peak of the heatwave because by thursday, temperatures coming down. still quite warm across east anglia and south—east england but on thursday, we see the weather turning rather more unsettled with an atlantic filter things. temperatures a little bit below par across western areas, just 16 degrees in belfast in glasgow and some heavy showers around as well which sets the scene for later in the week, through friday and on into the weekend. we've got a mixture of sunny and showers. that is your latest weather. an unexpected fall in inflation, but prices are still rising faster than wages. it's fallen to 2.6% — the first time it's fallen since last october, but its still higher than the government's target of 2%. we'll ask what it means for living standards. also this lunchtime: the chief inspector of prisons says youth custody centres in england
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and wales are so unsafe that a tragedy is inevitable. improvements in life expectancy almost grind to a halt in england — a leading health academic says austerity may be having an impact. another blow to president trump's promise to overturn obamacare as some of his own senators refuse to back his latest healthcare proposals. thanks, beautiful. you're welcome. how can such a pretty wife make such bad coffee?
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