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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 19, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a clean—up operation is under way in cornwall after flash floods sent a four foot torrent of water through the streets. people had to be winched from their homes as torrential rain brought huge hailstones onto the village of coverack. a torrid night for others across southern england and more storms to come today. i will have the details throughout the programme. good morning, it's wednesday the 19th of july. also this morning: the bbc is to reveal how much it pays its top talent, as it admits just a third of the highest—paid stars are women. extra fees for people paying with credit or debit cards are to be scrapped, saving consumers nearly half a million every year. in sport, england's cricketers
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are through to the women's world cup final after a dramatic victory over south africa. this shot won the match with just two balls remaining. they'll play either australia or india on sunday. good morning. british businesses aren't making the most of the skills picked up by thousands of people who are leaving our armed forces according to research out today. o i'll be taking a look at how employers can make more of that military experience. now i can get myself dressed without anybody helping the! meet zion, the first person to have a double hand transplant, who is fulfilling his dreams 18 months after his operation. an amazing story. 20 more on that later in the programme. —— plenty more on that. a big clean—up operation is taking place in the village of coverack on the lizard peninsula.
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residents reported hailstones the size of 50p pieces and there was a four foot torrent of water. jon kay has the latest details. how's this for the start of the summer holidays? a coastguard helicopter winching people to safety in the cornish village of coverack. hours of massive hailstones, wind and thunder, then hours of torrential rain, brought tons of rock and debris down the steep hills. even a garden shed washed down into the harbour. hi. can we assist you at all with some lighting? last night, emergency crews were checking on chris. he rents out this seafront cottage. he couldn't believe how quickly it flooded. five foot six i'd say, i would have guessed. so it filled right up. looking on the bright side, but having to deal with the mess. you don't have to look long
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on television to see someone worse off than you. and, as i say, no—one is hurt, so it doesn't really matter. holidaymakers arriving at their summer destination couldn't believe their eyes. we never saw this before, so it's really exciting. around 50 properties have been affected, but amazingly, it seems, no casualties. coverack may not feel lucky this morning, but there is a sense here that it could have been much, much worse. just extraordinary pictures. thankfully, nobody injured. matt's here with the details. we have kept you inside today because of this. you did talk about this yesterday, quite extraordinary pictures. unbelievable scenes in cornwall. the storm has moved up from france. it has been very hot and humid there
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and in spain. notjust in cornwall, throughout the night in england and wales we saw spectacular shots like this. we have seen minorflooding in other parts of southern england overnight. there have been trees down, gusty winds, hailand overnight. there have been trees down, gusty winds, hail and those storms continue to rumble on. what happens now? the worst of the storms at the moment are easing. still some in east anglia and northern england over the next few hours, but it looks like we will see further storms throughout the day, so it isn't over. heat and humidity combined and further downpours expected. tell us about the hailstones. 50p, that's large for hailstones, isn't it? it is, but when you get heat and humidity and it is kept above. long spell of time, that's when this don't get into. —— fora time, that's when this don't get into. —— for a long spell. time, that's when this don't get into. -- for a long spell. thank you. we saw some extraordinary pictures. if you were part of that
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and want to get in touch, please do. the bbc will publish details of how much it pays its top talent later this morning in its annual report. for the first time the salaries of those who earn more than £150,000 a year will be revealed. only a third of the names on the list are women, and the director general, lord hall, says the bbc has to go further and faster on equality. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito reports. they are part of everyday life for millions, but, until today, the bbc‘s stars were allowed to keep their pay deals private. no longer. the government wants greater openness, and so today the bbc will publish the details of 96 of its highest—paid stars. the bbc is in the unique position of being funded by the licence fee payer. i think it's reasonable the license fee payer understands where that money is spent, and particularly on significant and high salaries. when someone at the corporation earns more than the prime minister, i think it is reasonable
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we understand what they do. the corporation tried to resist the move, saying staff pay has been falling over the last few years, despite increasing competition from new media rivals. we're in a very competitive market, notjust with itn and sky, but now with netflix, with amazon, with all sorts of west coast companies. and what we have managed to do is to always pay our talent at a discount to the market. we never paid top rates. people come here because they want to come and work here, and over the last year we have reduced the amount we are paying for our talent by 10%. and some think it could even drive pay up, as it gives rivals information to help poach stars. i think it's completely wrong. i think it will end in tears. i think it's inflationary, and it is an invasion of individual privacy. so, on all counts, i think this is one of the worst impositions on the bbc that i can remember. the report will also reveal wider issues about pay. the bbc has already admitted that,
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on the list of highest—paid stars, two thirds of the names are men. consumers will no longer be charged extra fees for using their credit or debit cards when paying for things. surcharges for card payments, typically imposed by airlines, food delivery apps and small businesses, will be banned from january following an eu directive. 0ur personal finance reporter brian milligan has more. passengers who book flights on airlines like ryanair passengers who book flights on airlines like rya nair currently passengers who book flights on airlines like ryanair currently play extra if they want to use a credit card. the surcharge can be 3% with a minimum payment of £5. people wanting their takeaway food delivered are also being penalised. firms like hungry house orjust eat charge 50p for orders by card, which can easily amount to 5% of the bill.
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in all consumers spent £470 million on card charges in 2010. following an eu directive, all such charges will become illegal from january. dan pane is believed the savings are likely to be considerable. it's great. these rules will put an end to surcharges. not just great. these rules will put an end to surcharges. notjust visa and mastercard, but all businesses. small shops have to pay their bank fee every time a consumer uses a credit or debit card. to cover those costs, they may simply put up their prices. flybe says it will already get rid of the minimum charge for credit cards and reduce its fees. what is likely to happen to ticket prices is another matter. hundreds of thousands of mercedes—benz diesel vehicles in the uk are to be recalled to improve their emissions systems. the german manufacturer, daimler, which makes mercedes, is currently under investigation for alleged emissions cheating,
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similar to that of volkswagen. a total of three million vehicles across europe are affected. schools need a more coherent strategy for what to do in case of a dangerous event taking place on their premises, according to the teaching union the nasuwt. it says schools currently have ad hoc drills to deal with various threats and wants a comprehensive plan for so called "lockdown procedures". the government says it constantly reviews the security guidance it issues. the defence secretary michael fallon has called for more discipline and loyalty from his colleagues, following lea ks loyalty from his colleagues, following leaks of cabinet discussions to the press. he was speaking to mps and advisers last night, following the prime minister's call for strength and unity at yesterday's cabinet meeting. this lunchtime will see the last prime minister's questions before westminster breaks for summer. it's been revealed that president trump and the russian
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leader, vladamir putin, held a second round of previously undisclosed talks during last month's g—20 summit in hamburg. the white house confirmed the two men spoke for up to an hour after dinner, shortly after their formal meeting. on twitter, donald trump dismissed accusations of a secret encounter as "sick". one of the country's leading providers of care to those with serious learning disabilities has warned that the sector is on "the brink of disaster" after a change in pay rules. mencap says demands to backdate pay for carers who sleep at their place of work will cost a total of £400 million and could ruin many smaller providers. the government says it's considering the issue extremely carefully. an american boy, who was the youngest in the world to have a double hand transplant, is now able to write, dress himself and even play baseball. zion harvey had the operation 18 months ago at the age of eight. greg dawson has more. this was zion harvey before his life
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changing operation. his hands and feet had been abdicated when he was just two after he contracted sepsis. —— amputated. in 2015 he became the world's youngest person to undergo a double hand transplant. his operation at the children's hospital of philadelphia took almost 11 hours. within days he was able to make small movements. look at that! ijust want make small movements. look at that! i just want to write make small movements. look at that! ijust want to write a letter to the parents, for giving me their son's hands, because they didn't have to do that if they didn't want to. there have been serious set tax when zion's body showed signs of rejecting his new hands, but they we re ove 1120 m e rejecting his new hands, but they were overcome with medication. 0ne year afterwards he was filmed doing some of the simple things we missed doing so much. nowl can get some of the simple things we missed doing so much. now i can get myself
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dressed without anybody helping me! now i can get a snack out of the refrigerator without anybody helping me! ican refrigerator without anybody helping me! i can heat up a sandwich and a piece of pizza all by myself. doctors say the success of this transplant is partly down to the intensive management by surgeons, but they say the key has been zion and his inspiring determination. never give up on what you're doing. you'll get there eventually. ijust think he is gorgeous. what a message. never give up. he isa message. never give up. he is a lovely little lad. lovely, and cool as well. let us know if you have any stories you want to talk about today. you can get in contact with us through the usual means. we are on facebook, twitter and e—mail. find are somewhere! never give up on something you
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really wa nt. never give up on something you really want. i think the women cricketers were listening to that. they didn't! there was a nail biting finish at bristol yesterday but, england's cricketers are through to the women's world cup final. anya shrubsole hit the winning runs with just two balls to spare against south africa. england go on to lords on sunday where they'll play either australia or india. the old rivalry continues. england and scotland are going head to head tonight in the group stage of the women's euro 2017 championship. scotland, playing in their first major tournament, are without several key players because of injury. west ham have been busy in the transfer market. they've signed stoke striker marko arnautovic for £24 million. he'll join england goalkeeper joe hart at the london stadium who has signed on a season—long loan. and britain's chris froome retained the leader's yellow jersey after stage 16 of the tour de france. the stage was won by australia's michael matthews, his second victory of the race. still on track for chris froome.
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are you ready for me? always ready! sean hasjoined always ready! sean has joined us always ready! sean hasjoined us as always ready! sean has joined us as well. pass me the papers, dan! sometimes you just have to jab me. the front page of the mail, they are talking about what will be revealed later at 11 talking about what will be revealed laterat 11 a.m.. the talking about what will be revealed later at 11 a.m.. the bbc will reveal in bands of £50,000 how much it pays its top talent. 0n the front page of the daily telegraph as well, it is the gender pay gap revealed. they have a story about... most of this week there have been pictures of some members of the royal family. have been pictures of some members of the royalfamily. this is the duke and duchess of cambridge as they were touring the former concentration camp yesterday. thousands of particularly young
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school children and others turned out to see them. clearly moved by what they saw as well. the times, a mix of stories. we have been talking about this bbc list. two thirds of its top earning stars are men. rip—off fees for credit cards. it is interesting. you go to your pace election and you don't get charged for credit cards but you get charged for credit cards but you get charged for credit cards but you get charged for —— debit cards, but you get charged for credit cards. charged for —— debit cards, but you get charged for credit cardsm happens when you book a flight. you are all right at the end and then you want to pay with your credit card. this is a german girl. she left germany and ran away to join islamic state one year ago and she has actually been found by iraqi forces in mosul. and backbenchers tell theresa may, sack the saboteurs. we were speaking to amber rudd yesterday about this. and johanna konta, he was here with
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us on and johanna konta, he was here with us on the sofa yesterday. there were some complaints to bbc radio four yesterday, after an interview with johanna konta. that is why she is on the front page of the guardian. —— guardian. a big one on the front of the business pages. inflation dipped yesterday. we talk about price rises getting faster and faster. yesterday prices were only up to .6%. a surprise? a bit of a surprise. petrol and diesel prices had fallen more than the experts thought. they clearly were more than the experts thought. they clearly we re not more than the experts thought. they clearly were not looking at the punters driving down the road. it meant there was a drop in the pound yesterday as well. quite a big one, that prices are not going up as quickly as people thought. food prices are, though, which means the night —— there might not ian interest— rate night —— there might not ian interest—rate rise as quickly as people thought. —— be an interest rate rise. and gary ballance is out of the third test against south
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africa at the oval, after fracturing and —— fracturing a finger during the defeat at kent ridge on the weekend. here is an exclusive from their writer ian herbert, who says there are members of the hillsborough families, of the support group, suggesting they would not the anti— safe standing inside football stadiums. that is quite a significant turnaround from them. no official vote has been taken, nothing official, but they say that rail seats might be a way forward. in the telegraph, another bbc story, this might come out later today. the bbc set to announce they have the rights for the us pga tournament, which is next month. a quick turnaround for them, taking that from sky. 0bviously, turnaround for them, taking that from sky. obviously, if that is confirmed later, fantastic news for the bbc, because it means lots and lots of people can watch it without paying. sky just lots of people can watch it without paying. skyjust launched their golf channel this week as well. that could be interesting. here we go, the perfect brew. i know this is a regular story. a regular favourite
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on bbc breakfast. what colour cup, do you think? white? incorrect. read. what? i can hear everybody shouting no at me. you must brew the bag for five minutes. too long! when the tea cool still spend 45 degrees we begin to appreciate the flavours properly. a red or pink mug will taste sweeter than a blue or white one. why do you want it sweet? let me finish. never drink from a styrofoa m cu p. me finish. never drink from a styrofoam cup. by waiting five minutes both taste molecules and healthy antioxidants are properly diffused into the water. does it taste different? is it psychological? you are thinking too deeply about this story. you started it. they call it the perfect brew, but everybody does it differently. who puts in the milk before the water? some friends of mine do that. i think you can make it many different ways. there are no rules about this sort of thing. do not try
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to alleviate the situation now. be a maverick. the milk in early sometimes! thank you very much. we will talk to you later on. i have not even got a cup of tea this morning it. i need to sort that out. it's 06:19 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: engineers will spend the day assessing the safety of buildings following flash flooding in the cornish village of coverack. later today the bbc will provide details of what it pays almost 100 of its top centres. —— presenters. some brutal pictures of the weather in cornwall yesterday. thankfully, as you said earlier, everybody is 0k. matthew has a clear picture of what will be happening. we have had well over 100,000
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lightning strikes across the english channel, southern england in south wales. a sleepless night for many. some flooding, too. the risk will continue through the rest of the day for some of you. stay tuned to the forecast. there will be further thunderstorms across the uk today, not just across the south. developing further north as well. there is the chance we could see large hail, gusty winds and the risk of flooding as well. let's look at what has been happening in the past few hours in southern counties of england. it is now drifting north. the worst of the storms are easing away from east anglia and parts of lincolnshire, but they will drift north. a bit hit and miss. some will avoid them altogether during the morning rush hour. as i said, do not treat positions too literally. we will continue to see further showers pushing on with heavy bursts of rain
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in northern ireland through the day, and parts of north wales. temperatures this afternoon hitting a steamy 31 celsius across parts of eastern england. that will combine to settle further storms at times. lots of cloud towards the south and west. the weather not as severe as it was yesterday. when the sunshine comes out it will feel hot. parts of mid and north wales, the midlands and into northern england, we could finish the day with those torrential downpours. rain on and off from the late morning onwards in northern ireland. 0nly late morning onwards in northern ireland. only a few showers in scotland. can't rule out a thunderstorm, though. dry and bright in the north—west highlands. they could see temperatures in the upper 20s. 0ne could see temperatures in the upper 20s. one or storms further south into the night. the storms should fade through the night. lots of cloud. scotland, england and wales will see further splashes of rain into the morning. in the west, the skies were clear later on and it will start to feel fresher again. that is the trend for tomorrow. the weather nowhere near as severe.
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0vernight storms quickly clearing away. skies brightening across most parts. it stays cloudy and wait for the longest in the north of the country. showers the northern ireland later on. it will feel much fresher. instead of temperatures like today, we will see temperatures in the low 20s, and that is about as high as we will go. lower than that further west. 0n high as we will go. lower than that further west. on friday, we stay with the fresher thing, but after a brighter start across northern and eastern areas we will see wet and windy weather in the south and west. sunshine and showers will take us into the weekend. things do turn quieter and fresher, but for the time being there are storms around. look at those swirling pictures! that is a proper swirled. did you say there were over 100,000 lightning strikes overnight? yes. i know that is lots... i counted every single one. no, 100,000 lightning strikes recorded over south wales, southern england being the channel. lots of people said they were up since the early hours watching this thunderstorms. thank you, matt. it is arguably the country's
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favourite fish and now north sea cod is officially back on the menu again. the marine stewardship council says cod stocks have finally recovered from decades of overfishing. lorna gordon has been finding out what this means for our fishermen and the fish on our plate. in peterhead harbour, the biggest white fish port in europe, the fishermen are lending their latest catch. it has been a good few days at sea for these trawler men. among the fish being offloaded, cold, and plenty of it. —— cod. the fish being offloaded, cold, and plenty of it. -- cod. we have increased the net sizes to reduce the catches of juvenal cod. increased the net sizes to reduce the catches ofjuvenal cod. one decade ago the cod fisheries in the north sea were close to collapse, but quotas and measures taken by the fishermen themselves have helped the stock recover. scottish fishermen have also been in restricted areas for spawning cod, and high abundance in rates of god. in some years there
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was a woods of 50,000 square miles closed off to scotch fishermen. —— there was upwards of 50,000. their ha rd there was upwards of 50,000. their hard work has paid off. in peterhead fish market there is now plenty of cod for sale, and from today all of it will be certified as sustainable. extremely enthusiastic. it has taken us extremely enthusiastic. it has taken us eight or nine years to get here. a huge sacrifice. we have seen the dark days but now we have the bright days. for the wider fishing community the upturn in the cod stocks is one of several reasons they are feeling buoyed. dozens of new boats are on order for the fleet here at peterhead. there is a real sense of them is amongst the fishermen here that the work they have done to preserve the fish stocks in the north sea is helping to protect their industry for future generations. and these sustainability certification that has been awarded to north sea cod could well mean new markets opening up could well mean new markets opening upfor could well mean new markets opening up for the fishermen and their catch. a lot of supermarkets are
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looking for a sustainable, msc certified product. so now that the clyde yea rs certified product. so now that the clyde years msc certified it could be easier to cell to a number of uk supermarkets and fish and chip restau ra nt supermarkets and fish and chip restaurant as well. —— now that the cod is msc certified. so what does this mean for those of us who love cod? it is great news that it is back on the menu from a sustainable source. local and sustainable, it is good. having something that has that traceability is important. for somebody of my age, i think in two hasn't been offered or been around for many years. it is lovely to see it at on offer. there will be regular checks to see that cold stocks in our waters remain at healthy levels. —— cod stocks. there is confidence that after years of decline, north sea cod is sustainable once again. i am delighted to hear that. that is great cod news. very good cod news. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. we start this morning with more details about the grenfell tower. burning cladding on grenfell tower would have released 14 times more heat than a key government safety test allows. the energy emitted from the cladding and insulation would have been equivalent to burning 51 tonnes of pine wood, according to research by the university of leeds. it would have burnt as quick as petrol. the contractors who fitted the cladding and insulation say they both passed all regulations. a west hampstead mother, imprisoned in iran, has been at the heart of a parliamentary debate urging the government to take action on her situation and to protect british citizens with dual nationalities. the debate focused on how nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's human rights have been breached. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, says it's a matter of utmost priority for the government. it was organised by labour mp for hampstead and kilburn, tulip siddiq.
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imagine coming back from your holidays in finding out the company you parked your car with has gone bust. that has happened to hundreds of stranded passengers at gatwick airport. gatwick first parking is not an approved meet—and—greet parking company, and police have been receiving reports over the last few days of passengers unable to collect their cars. next time you see a london phone box you might want to take a closer look. a growing number of london companies are renting them to use as office space, coffee shops and mobile repair shops. there are 20 in use in london. the mobile repair company lovefone have two phone boxes up and running as workshops, including this one in knightsbridge. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tube so far this morning. a different story on the trains. stansted express services will terminate at a ship slaughtered because of overhead wire problems. sinjar ‘s can use other train providers. —— passengers. traffic lights on
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westminster bridge outside saint thomas hospital not working. so far it is looking clear. and in cat that there are temporary traffic lights on the tom burton road because of a burst water main. after the lightning and heavy rain overnight, how is the rest of the day looking? likely to be more disruptions from thunderstorms into wednesday morning. localflooding is possible, stay tuned to bbc radio for the latest updates. showers and thunderstorms will spread north through the country on wednesday morning, and further rain with thunderstorms pushing into many western areas, particular in northern ireland and north—west england. sunshine across central, southern and south—eastern areas, and feeling humid and hot, temperatures hitting 30 celsius year, but cooler further west. temperatures hitting 30 celsius year, but coolerfurtherwest. 0n wednesday night, a line of showers and thunderstorms keeps moving northwards and eastwards. again, some of them will potentially be heavy, with a risk of flash flooding. cool and fresher across the far west, and a warm and monty
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star to thursday. showers and thunderstorms across central and eastern areas continue to clear off into the north sea during the day, but something brighter and fresher for all of us as we pick up that westerly a nd for all of us as we pick up that westerly and southerly wind. temperatures on thursday ranging between 16 and 22 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it's 6:30am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: this school is in lockdown. hiding under desks and barricaded into classrooms. we'll hear about the pupils being taught how to react to an attack on their school and discuss if more official guidance is needed. this is a great question. the t rex was definitely fierce, but was it fast? we'll speak to the scientists
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who say outrunning the king of the dinosaurs might have been easier than we thought. and we'll catch up with the world record breaking sophie kamlish, one of team gb's gold medal winning stars at the world para—athletics championships. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. a big clean—up operation is taking place in cornwall, after flash floods swept through the village of coverack on the lizard peninsula. you have probably seen pictures already. residents reported hailstones the size of 50 pence pieces, and the village was divided in two by a four foot torrent of water. later today engineers will assess damage to roads and property in the area. it is quite incredible. yes. matt is here all day to tell us what is expected for the weather in the next 24 hours. the bbc will have to
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reveal how much it plays its talent in an annual report. for the first time the salaries of those who own more than £150,000 a year will be revealed. the director—general lord hall says the bbc has much to do on equality after admitting only a third of the names of the list are women. businesses will be banned from charging fees on debit and credit card transactions from january. it follows an eu directive to ban the charges typically imposed by airlines, food delivery apps and small businesses. the treasury says the fees have cost consumers £473 million since 2010. hundreds of thousands of mercedes—benz diesel vehicles in the uk are to be recalled to improve their emissions systems. the german manufacturer, daimler, which makes mercedes, is currently under investigation for alleged emissions cheating, similar to that of volkswagen. a total of 3 million vehicles across europe are affected. schools need a more coherent strategy for what to do in case of a dangerous event taking
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place on their premises, according to the teaching union the nasuwt. it says schools currently have ad hoc drills to deal with various threats and wants a comprehensive plan for so called "lockdown procedures". the government says it "constantly reviews" the security guidance it issues. the defence secretary sir michael fallon has called for more discipline and loyalty from his colleagues, following leaks of cabinet discussions to the press. alex forsyth is in westminster for us. good morning. this is a hot topic of debate yesterday. there was a cabinet minister yesterday. we spoke to the home secretary about this as well. it looks like it will continue for quite sometime? the prime minister and senior members of her tea m minister and senior members of her team were trying to put a stop to this leaks team were trying to put a stop to this lea ks and team were trying to put a stop to this leaks and meetings. theresa may said yesterday that it was vital their discussions remain private.
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she said the briefings and counter briefings showed some colleagues won't taking their responsibilities seriously and there was a need for unity. then the defence secretary michael fallon spoke at the reception last night and he said that ministers should copy military virtues of loyalty, cohesion and discipline and turned their fire on the enemy, presumably meaning labour. we've even got backbench conservative mps giving their support to the prime minister to crack the whip on cabinet ministers who leak. so there's an effort to restore some kind of control, but there are still fundamental differences over policy. brexit, yes, but also whether or not the cap on public sector pay should stay in place and now we are hearing that number 10 would respond to recommendations on police and prison officer pay until after the summer break. so with these divisions continuing the bubble under the surface, it might take more than a few stern words to stop it from spilling over. thank you. it's been revealed that president trump and the russian leader, vladamir putin, held a second round of previously undisclosed talks during last
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month's g20 summit in hamburg. the white house confirmed the two men spoke for up to an hour after dinner, shortly after their formal meeting. on twitter, donald trump dismissed accusations of a secret encounter as i. - i think he means sick in the traditional sense, rather than the more modern. asi more modern. as i read that i was thinking, is that good or bad? that, i think. that good or bad? that, ithink. —— bad. one of the country's leading providers of care to those with serious learning disabilities has warned that the sector is on "the brink of disaster" after a change in pay rules. mencap says demands to backdate pay for carers who sleep at their place of work will cost a total of £400 million and could ruin many smaller providers. the government says it's considering the issue extremely carefully. the duke and duchess of cambridge will fly to berlin today along with their children, prince george and princess charlotte, to mark the start of their trip to poland and
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germany. during the visit they are expected to meet german chancellor angela merkel and the country's president. a busy few days, but we crowds turning out to meet them in various places. 0ver turning out to meet them in various places. over to sally this morning. we are talking cricket. they did a really great thing for the cricket. kids can get in for £5. and oh my goodness they had a spectacle to watch! the female cricketers are doing really well, better than the men's team at the moment. england's cricketers are through to the women's world cup final after a thrilling last—over victory against south africa. england restricted south africa to just 218, which looked like a comfortable target. but after losing eight wickets in their reply, it came down to the final over. anya shrubsole hitting a boundary with the first ball she faced to spark jubilant scenes. england will now play australia or india at lords on sunday.
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i think it is kind of sinking in right now. once you get past the relief of getting over the line, we knew we came into this tournament with a good shot if we play some good cricket. you can't win tournaments if you aren't in the final, so we are pleased to be in the final and one more game to go. england and scotland's famous old rivalry is set for another showdown tonight, this time in the group stage of the women's euro 2017 championship. england are aiming to improve on their finish england are aiming to improve on theirfinish from the england are aiming to improve on their finish from the world cup. meanwhile, scotland are playing in their first major tournament, but have lost key players to injury. their head coach says it will be her proudest moment in football when they walk out onto the pitch. the biggest thing is to try to enjoy it. try to impress the experience and that's been a message from when we qualified. all the preparations, it has been really about you know enjoy every single second. we've put in so much preparation.
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physical work, so much work off the pitch and becoming a more together team. this is probably the most prepared we've felt going into a tournament, so there's a lot of belief and determination around the squad. meanwhile, its been a busy 24 hours at west ham. they've completed the season—long loan signing of the england goalkeeperjoe hart from manchester city. also on his way to the hammers is marko arnautovic. stoke city have accepted a fee in the region of £24 million for the austrian striker. chelsea manager antonio conte has signed a new two—year deal with the premier league champions. the italian lifted the premier league title at the first attempt last season and also guided the blues to the fa cup final. britain's chris froome is still in charge of the leader's yellow jersey at the tour de france after stage 15. michael matthews won the stage, his second on the tour. froome retains his 18—second lead over fabio aru, and the three—time winner of the competition now only has
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to hang on forfive more stages. the oldest major will be held for the 10th time. the last one was back in 1988 when a freshfaced 17—year—old justin rose won the amateur prize and managed to be fourth overall. he now has a us open title and olympic gold, but he would still love to win. it is the one tournament i've dreamt about since i was a young boy. you take an open championship anywhere, you take a major challenge anywhere, but if they happen to line up at special venues they happen to line up at special venues i was fortunate to win at marion because that club has something special about it and obviously to do it here at royal birkdale would be a kind of full circle moment, based on a guess what
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idid in circle moment, based on a guess what i did in 1998. so, yeah, a special venue i did in 1998. so, yeah, a special venue and lots of good memories. he looks almost exactly the same and has barely changed. 0ne he looks almost exactly the same and has barely changed. one thing i should mention about the golf, it is due to change. on friday it will get fairly stormy. there will be at least one day of carnage. it's been on the back page of quite a few papers. he says it's been on the back page of quite a few papers. he sastustin rose is one of his three picks of an englishman who will win. justin rose, tommy fleetwood, who we heard from yesterday, and paul casey. you can see him here. there were some sort of pr thing yesterday where he was running off with the claretjug. it should be a fantastic weekend. let's hope so. thanks, sally, see you later. from weapons brought into schools to chemical fires, aggressive pupils or parents to bomb threats. these are just a few
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of the dangerous scenarios that some schools are training children to protect themselves from in special sessions. during these lockdown rehearsals, pupils are barricaded inside classrooms and hide under desks so they can't be seen. spencer stokes has been to a school in huddersfield to find out more. subtracting now a little bit hard. an ordinary maths lesson at this junior school in huddersfield, but there is nothing ordinary about what happens next. beeping the school is in lockdown. pupils take cover under desks, obstacles are placed in front of doors and the room is darkened. the aim is to restrict entry and make it ha rd to aim is to restrict entry and make it hard to see whether there is anyone in here. sue eakin staff hideaway. lockdown practice takes place twice a yearand lockdown practice takes place twice a year and the reasons for hiding are explained to pupils. you need to protect yourself in case anything is
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outside, like if someone... if there is danger outside. you are practising for someone that could be potentially harmful being in school. evenif potentially harmful being in school. even if they could get into the classroom they might not even be able to see us. west yorkshire council see themselves as trailblazers for school safety and a number of training sessions for teachers have been held. similar strategies are in place across the uk. but there is no national guidance, with the department for education saying they believe: all clear, all clear. in huddersfield, the lockdown drill is complete. children and staff emerge from under their desks. more prepared, perhaps, for potential threats to their school. it is very interesting to see that. sarah lyons from the nut joins us now. good morning. do you think this kind
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of training is necessary? yes, we do think it's a good idea. i mean, schools are very safe places and such incidents are very rare, but the first duty of a school is to ensure the safety of its pupils, so ido ensure the safety of its pupils, so i do think it's a good idea. we've just been to west yorkshire. are there many other areas doing this type of training? are not so sure about the training, but a number of local authorities to offer guidance to their schools on this issue, but there are a lot of that don't offer guidance and those schools are missing out. what do you think they should be doing? well, we think the dfe has a role in producing national guidance for schools in order to fill in the gaps. that the department for education. there is government advice by abbey national counter—terrorism security office on what to do in this kind of situation. is that not enough? that's generic advice aimed at organisations and businesses and
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schools are different because they contain children and staff need to be trained in how to take children through those procedures. so generic advice isn't really sufficient. we need school specific advice. you said yourself at the top of the interview that this is an unlikely scenario, so you think even in that case there needs to be generic advice? there needs to be specific advice. schools need to be prepared and this is reallyjust part of a school's normal emergency and security procedure, but it does need to be there. i'm watching the pictures and clearly they warned the children, they know this will happen. while you concerned about... because it is quite a scary thing even to practise in some ways, isn't it? i can understand those concerns, but teachers understand the needs of their children. they know how their children are likely to react in a particular situation, so they are best placed to take their children
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through those procedures in a sensitive manner, they don't become alarmed. and how aware our children... jingly it depends on the child, about recent events —— presumably. 0ur schools talking them about that? schools will talk to children about recent events but in an age—appropriate way and children will receive information from other sources, from parents, the media, television. just to be clear, you wa nt television. just to be clear, you want specific advice to tell schools exactly what to do. is it not dependent on the school and every school might be different?” dependent on the school and every school might be different? i think what we need is school specific advice which schools can then adapt in order to introduce their own procedures. if i could just give an example, when i knew i was coming on this programme last night i contacted the health and safety representative at one of our schools and asked if they had one of these procedures at the school and her response was, we don't have the foggiest. we would like advice from
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the dfe, so i think that says it all. thank you very much. i would like to know, are other people experiencing this? are other schools having these kinds of rehearsals about lockdown? do tell us what's going on. let us know. the main stories: a cleanup operation is under way in cornwall this morning following flash floods in the village of coverack. more on that in a moment. the bbc will provide details today on what it pays almost 100 of its presenters. we saw those pictures in cornwall. loads of storms overnight, people just tuning in, you were saying there were 100,000 lightning strikes last night? yes, in south wales, southern england and the english channel. the problems in cornwall were caused by one stubborn storm which refused to move. we had about half a month of
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rain in day few hours, filtering down on to that village. it was not just in cornwall. look at these shots from other parts of southern england overnight. 0ver100,000 lightning strikes. well over half a month of rainfall in a few spots. there has been flash flooding as well. accompanying those storms, gusty winds. trees felled in 12 spots. large hail as well. around the size of 50p pieces. a sleepless night for many people in southern areas. we are not really done with the storms yet. if we look at what is happening over the next couple of hours and into the day ahead, we are going to have sporadic storms around. not everybody will see them. we could see flooding in one or two spots as those storms rumble on and develop further into the afternoon, but certainly over the past few
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hours it is southern areas which have seen these nasty storms, especially in east anglia and lincolnshire. those storms are rumbling off into the north sea. this cluster will be running through the midlands over the next few hours, pushing into parts of northern england. there are big gaps in between. do not take the position of the rain on the charter literally. it is this zone where we could see storms late in the morning. wetter in parts of northern ireland in the afternoon, the potential for thunderstorms. some of the wettest prolonged rain will be here. a very human day, peaking in eastern england, around 31 or 32 celsius. —— humid day. we will see further storms. the showers we have seenin further storms. the showers we have seen in the south—west will not be as severe as we saw yesterday. the worst of the storms this afternoon could be north wales, the north midlands and into north—west england. that could cause issues in the evening rush—hour. we will see one or two showers and thunderstorms
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in scotland, few and far between. any will be dry. with the sunshine, the driest weather continuing across the driest weather continuing across the north—west highlands, temperatures in the high 20s. scotla nd temperatures in the high 20s. scotland will get wetter tonight. becoming less severe as the night goes on. just occasional rain across england, wales and scotland into the morning. a misty and muggy night in eastern areas. skies clearing further west, which means it will be a much fresh start to tomorrow morning. fresher air is on its way. a bright start on thursday, some showers and the old rumble of thunder to the north and east first thing. staying wet. things will brighten up later. showers into northern ireland, but across the board, a much fresherfeel. temperatures in the low 20s compare to the low 30s. mostly in the teens. 0n to the low 30s. mostly in the teens. on friday, brightest and driest to the east and the north. low pressure will push on from the west. expect the wind to strengthen. another
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batch of rain, some of which will be heavy and potentially thundery. not as bad as today, but that will spur its way eastwards throughout friday. it is going to be a wet and windy day for some of you on friday. if you are already thinking about the weekend, we continue with temperatures out if not a little below average. sunshine and showers sums it up. some blustery winds on top of that will mean a challenging tournament for those at birkdale. challenging. it is fun to watch, isn't it? it does make it interesting. it is all about controlling your ball flight in the wind. i never can. iam controlling your ball flight in the wind. i never can. i am not sure it would make much difference to me either, to be fair. thank you. as we we re either, to be fair. thank you. as we were seeing earlier, if you have got dramatic pictures from the weather last night, do send them into us and we will try to show them. it is really difficult to get a good
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teacher of a lightning strike, but people have been attempting. —— picture. but people have been trying. it is like when you see a beautiful full moon and you try to ta ke beautiful full moon and you try to take a picture, it looks appalling. you need a proper camera. a daring underwater mission to recover some world war ii "bouncing bombs" will take place on a scottish loch in a few hours. the bombs were featured in the legendary war film, dambusters, and were tested in western scotland, where catriona renton is for us this morning. the view over loch striven in argyll, a beautiful part of the country. but it also has an important place in british military history. today, divers will attempt another daring mission here. back in 1943, bouncing bombs were tested here, code—named highball. this was one of the types invented by sir barnes wallis. another, upkeep, was used in the dambuster raids in germany. highball was designed to sink enemy ships. sir barnes wallis
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had come up with an idea. a bomb that did not just had come up with an idea. a bomb that did notjust explode where it landed, but would bounce over the surface of the water like skimming stone until it hit its target. the particular focus was the german battleship, the tappets. in the end, highball bombs were never used. but they have lain on the bed of the loch for almost 70 years. so far only divers have been able to see them up close. i think it is extremely exciting. i feel that people should have the chance to cds objects —— see these objects. they are ofan objects —— see these objects. they are of an age of technological innovation that we will possibly never see again. final preparations have been made and all that remains now is that these pieces of history to be brought to the surface for the public to see for the first time. that was very beautiful. this is an
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interesting story. it's hard to explain a gap on your cv to future employers, but what if the gap was years of military service? sean's been looking into how ex—service personnel fare in the civilian jobs market. yes, you would think, the skills that you pick up, we hear about employers talking about a skills shortage or the time, there must some length. but there is a problem, it seems. this all comes from some research from what's called the veterans employment transition support programme, backed by big military charities and big businesses like barclays and jaguar land rover. they've used mod data collected from all military leavers every year to predict thejobs market for people leaving the forces over the next few years. they say around 85,000 will leave the military in the next five years. but they're warning around 1 in 5 of them are likely to face under—employment, which is when the job you have doesn't match the skills you've got. and they also found that 1 in 10 veterans will experience long—term unemployment. so clearly there is some issue here.
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adam bonner is with forces recruitment services. they're a small firm specialising in getting ex—armed forces into work. good morning, adam. good morning. what are the big skills that you can pick up with your experience in the military, that businesses would want? there are tangible skills, first of all. the most tangible skills would be things like engineering, trades, technical disciplines. they are things that employers tend to relate to the most because they know what value they will add to business. nvqs and our very prolific in the armed forces. the training mechanisms that are provided up parallel to those in civilian life. an employer can look ata civilian life. an employer can look at a level three mechanical engineer and know exactly what kind of value they will add to business. the things that are undervalued, and often not talked about, are the personal attributes developed while in service. things like that yet the job done attitude, things like
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employer job done attitude, things like em ployer loyalty, job done attitude, things like employer loyalty, man management, conflict resolution. and i don't mean frontline conflict resolution. imean mean frontline conflict resolution. i mean talking with fellow colleagues, defusing situations within the workplace. and pacifying potentially conflict related issues. a lot of those people skills that we hear from employers that are not necessarily coming through in the education system somehow, that people could be getting from there. why the gap? that all sounds fantastic if you are a business looking to employ people like that, if you have been —— have the qualifications and the people skills. if the military not supporting people enough? is it is such a type of workplace. supporting people enough? is it is such a type of workplacelj supporting people enough? is it is such a type of workplace. i think the mechanism is the armed forces are put into place to support levers are put into place to support levers are fantastic. they go so far. what tends to happen in service leavers come out of service, without pigeonholing the entire armed forces, is that they do not always understand how best to present themselves. what an employer is looking for. do they want to see
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military ‘s —— military experience ona cd? military ‘s —— military experience on a cd? what don't they want to see? should the cd be demilitarised and softened to say in the manager, rather than a specific military rank? —— cv. rather than a specific military rank? -- cv. using the language of business? absolutely. our view is that if you spent 20 plus years in the armed forces, perhaps entering the armed forces, perhaps entering the armed forces from school, that represents a huge proportion of your walking life and your formative yea rs. walking life and your formative years. —— working life. walking life and your formative years. -- working life. before we 90, years. -- working life. before we go, if you are leaving the armed forces and filling in your cv, you would have seen lots of these, what is the one tip you would give somebody, filling batting, to try to give them the best chance of getting thejob give them the best chance of getting the job they give them the best chance of getting thejob they are give them the best chance of getting the job they are after? —— filling that in. differentiate yourself from everybody else. your background, you releva nt everybody else. your background, you relevant skills, the experiences you have in service, you can do that. if you are in a pool of applicants, maybe cannot of people who applied for a job on the uni to set yourself apart. and your military background, if presented in the right way, can
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do that. adam, thank you very much. maybe military personnel are not making the most of their cvs, not being proud enough of what they have achieved, because we are so used to temp late cvs, aren't we? it is an art, writing a cv. get it all on the page. —— on art, writing a cv. get it all on the page. “ on one page. art, writing a cv. get it all on the page. —— on one page. have you ever seen somebody look at a cv? it is like that. make it one page. and send a tea bag. sam day teabag? billions idea. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will have the headlines at seven o'clock. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. we start this morning with more details about the grenfell tower. burning cladding on grenfell tower would have released 14 times more heat than a key government safety test allows. the energy emitted from the cladding and insulation would have burned "as quickly as petrol," according to research by the university of leeds. the contractors who fitted
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the cladding and insulation say they both passed all regulations. a west hampstead mother, imprisoned in iran, has been at the heart of a parliamentary debate urging the government to take action on her situation and to protect british citizens with dual nationalities. the debate focused on how nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's human rights have been breached. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, says it's a matter of utmost priority for the government. it was organised by labour mp for hampstead and kilburn, tulip siddiq. now imagine coming back from your holidays and finding out that the company you parked your car with has gone bust? well, that's what's happened to hundreds of stranded passengers at gatwick airport. gatwick first parking is not an approved meet—and—greet parking company, and police have been receiving reports over the last few days of passengers unable to collect their cars. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tube so far this morning. a different story on the trains. stansted express services will terminate at bishop stortford
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because of overhead wire problems. passengers can use other train providers. traffic lights on westminster bridge outside saint thomas' hospital are not working. and in catford there are temporary traffic lights on the torridon road because of a burst water main. after the lightning and heavy rain overnight, how's the rest of the day looking? here's stav de nayos. good morning. after a dramatic night last night, lots of thunderstorms, lightning flashes and a lot of rain. we start the day mostly dry and humid. isay we start the day mostly dry and humid. i say mostly dry. we still do have the risk of some thunderstorms, and the met office still has a yellow weather warning in place for heavy rain. most of those storms now towards the north of london are moving away out towards the north. we should get some sunny spells today. in turn, we may see one or
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two isolated thundery showers later this afternoon. it will feel hot and humid, temperatures ranging between 24- 26. that humid, temperatures ranging between 24— 26. that risk continues overnight of one or two showers. patchy cloud as well. another hot and humid night. the minimum temperature between 17 and 18 celsius. again, it could be uncomfortable for sleeping. tomorrow that clears the way and we will settle down for a little while. still some cloud and bright spells, but a cold front introduces fresh air. temperatures a lot call and more manageable at 21 celsius. 0n friday this area of low pressure swings fourth various systems from the atlantic, bringing us outbreaks of rain. that comes in the form of showers and to friday. rather changeable and unsettled, still with spells of sunshine through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast,
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with dan walker and louise minchin. a clean—up operation is under way in cornwall after flash floods sent a four foot torrent of water through the streets people had to be winched from their homes as torrential rain and huge hailstones bore down on the village of coverack. and it's not just and it's notjust cornwall that saw the storms. severe storms in southern england. it used for many, but there could be more later. full details throughout the programme. good morning, it's wednesday the 19th of july.
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also this morning: the bbc is to reveal how much it pays its top talent, as it admits just a third of the highest—paid stars are women. extra fees for people paying with credit or debit cards are to be scrapped, saving consumers nearly £500 million every year. in sport, england's cricketers are through to the world cup final after dramatic victory over south africa. this shot won the match with just two walls remaining. they will play either australia or india on sunday. thousands of mercedes owners in the uk will be offered a fix to their diesel vehicles' emissions system. i'll have more details on why. now i can get myself dressed without anybody helping the! —— me! and how the first child to have a double hand transplant is fulfilling his dreams, 18 months after his operation.
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let's find out about our main news story. a big clean—up operation is taking place in cornwall, after flash floods swept through the village of coverack on the lizard peninsula. residents reported hailstones the size of 50 pence pieces, and the village was divided in two by a four foot torrent of water. how's this for the start of the summer holidays? a coastguard helicopter winching people to safety in the cornish village of coverack. hours of massive hailstones, wind and thunder, then hours of torrential rain, brought tons of rock and debris down the steep hills. even a garden shed washed down into the harbour. hi. can we assist you at all with some lighting? last night, emergency crews were checking on chris.
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he rents out this seafront holiday cottage. he couldn't believe how quickly it flooded. five foot six i'd say, i would have guessed. so it filled right up. then we've got the mud and everything to clear, i guess... looking on the bright side, but having to deal with the mess. you don't have to look long on television to see someone worse off than you. and, as i say, no—one is hurt, so it doesn't really matter. holidaymakers arriving at their summer destination couldn't believe their eyes. we never saw this before, so it's really exciting. around 50 properties have been affected, but amazingly, it seems, no casualties. coverack may not feel lucky this morning, but there is a sense here that it could have been much, much worse. jon is in coverack for us this morning. jon, what are people waking up to this morning? they're waking
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they‘ re waking up they're waking up to a mess, basically. this is where the river comes down from the hills above. yesterday afternoon four feet of water thundered down, bringing everything we get from above. this solid metalframe everything we get from above. this solid metal frame has everything we get from above. this solid metalframe has been almost flattened by the force of the water and debris that came down. let me show you some of the debris. it's been piled up, before it gets into the sea. some of it was lost in the water. people have lost their garden ornaments and pots, there a mobility frame up there, even, would you believe it, the kitchen sink. all this is going to have to be cleared away and looked after as the harbour is put into some sort of semblance of order. what are you looking at here? this is very much now a response from the council and its contractors. what we need to do is
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restore coverack back to its normal self, make it accessible to the many tourists who come here and make it a good place to live again for the residents. at this time of year in the summer there will be thousands of people expecting to coming here. is it open at the moment? i think it is. if you can give the residents and the people who need to do the urgent workjust a and the people who need to do the urgent work just a little and the people who need to do the urgent workjust a little bit of space, i'm sure coverack will bounce back and we will be open for business as usual very quickly. coverack will recoverack. the beginnings of the clear up our happening. back to you. we will forgive you that pun as well. the kitchen sink as well! luckily nobody is hurt. cornwall isn't the only place affected by dramatic weather. yes, but it was spectacular. we still aren't sure exactly how much rainfall but probably one month's worth of rain.
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we call this the spanish plume, where hot air is dragged up from iberia. storms along that. fresh air off the atlantic forcing its way in, causing big storms. it wasn'tjust cornwall. 0ther causing big storms. it wasn'tjust cornwall. other parts had storms overnight. spectacular images like these. we saw over 100,000 lightning flashes since yesterday afternoon and other parts are also seeing close to half a month's or more in just around an hour. incredible. the force of the water bending that metal bar right the way down, amazing. thank you very much. if you had a quiet night you were one of the lucky ones. the bbc will publish details of how much it pays its on—air talent later this morning in its annual report. for the first time, the salaries of those who earn more than £150,000 a year will be revealed. only a third of the names on the list are women, and the director general, lord hall, says the bbc has to go further
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and faster on equality. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito reports. they are part of everyday life for millions, but, until today, the bbc‘s stars were allowed to keep their pay deals private. no longer. the government wants greater openness, and so today the bbc will publish the details of 96 of its highest—paid stars. the bbc is in the unique position of being funded by the licence fee payer. i think its reasonable the license fee payer understands where that money is spent, and particularly on significant and high salaries. when someone at the corporation earns more than the prime minister, i think it is reasonable we understand what they do. the corporation tried to resist the move, saying star pay has been falling over the last few years, despite increasing competition from new media rivals. we're in a very competitive market, notjust with itn and sky, but now with netflix, with amazon, with all sorts of west coast companies. and what we have managed to do
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is to always pay our talent at a discount to the market. we never paid top rates. people come here because they want to come and work here, and over the last year we have reduced the amount we are paying for our talent by 10%. and some think it could even drive pay up, as it gives rivals information to help poach stars. i think it's completely wrong. i think it will end in tears. i think it's inflationary, and it is an invasion of individual privacy. so, on all counts, i think this is one of the worst impositions on the bbc that i can remember. the report will also reveal wider issues about pay. the bbc has already admitted that, on the list of highest—paid stars, two thirds of the names are men. this is good news. consumers will no longer be charged extra fees for using their credit or debit cards when paying for things. it follows an eu directive to ban
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the charges typically imposed by airlines, food delivery apps and small businesses. the treasury says the fees cost consumers £473 million. that wasjust the fees cost consumers £473 million. that was just on 2010 alone. we will talk about that in a few minutes. the defence secretary sir michael fallon has called for more discipline and loyalty from his colleagues, following leaks of cabinet discussions to the press. let's get more from our political correspondent alex forsyth, who is in westminsterfor us. they've tried to stop these leaks to the press. everybody chatting to whoever they like. but how is it going? i think there's a recognition from plenty people in the conservative party that these kinds of lea ks a re conservative party that these kinds of leaks are damaging. yesterday the prime minister told a cabinet that it was vital that discussions remain private. she said briefings and counter briefings showed people were taking their responsibilities seriously. we had those comments from michael fallon, who said ministers should copy military values of loyalty, cohesion and discipline and even back then check
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this are giving their support to the prime minister to get tough on any cabinet ministers who leak even perhaps sacking them. but the problem is there are fundamental differences on policy, even at the very senior levels of government, about brexit. and also about whether or not the end that cap on public sector pay. we've heard the latest from number 10, that they would respond to recommendations about and prison officer pay until after the summer, but with all this talk of unity, divisions still remain and i think it is unlikely with her the last of this. thank you. mercedes says that thousands of people in the uk who drive one of their diesel vehicles will be offered a fix to their emissions system. sean is here with the details. we've seen this kind of thing before. what's going on? it seems like quite a big move by the company that owns mercedes—benz. they say 3 million cars across europe. they are rolling out a software update.
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they've done it. of their compact ca rs they've done it. of their compact cars already, so you may be familiar with this if you have a mercedes—benz compact. hundreds of thousands of mercedes—benz cars have been sold in the uk in the last few yea rs. been sold in the uk in the last few years. it could well be that most of those are given the opportunity to get the update. not recall. they aren't saying it is safety issue, but it will improve those nitrous oxide emissions that have been especially controversial. in fact, the company that owns mercedes are being investigated in that area, but they say this update is nothing to do with that. so if you are a customer you should in theory get a letter saying to bring your car in and we will do the update, but they say if you have any issues get in touch with the person who sold you can get it fixed. simple as that. in theory... thank you. this is my favourite story of the
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day. an american boy, who was the youngest in the world to have a double hand transplant, is now able to write, dress himself and even play baseball. zion harvey had the operation 18 months ago at the age of eight. greg dawson has more. this was zion harvey before his life changing operation. his hands and feet had been amputated when he was just two after he contracted sepsis. then, in 2015, he became the world's youngest person to undergo a double hand transplant. his operation at the children's hospital of philadelphia took almost 11 hours. within days he was able to make small movements. look at that! i just want to write a letter to the parents, for giving me their son's hands, because they didn't have to do that if they didn't want to. there have been serious setbacks when zion's body showed signs of rejecting his new hands, but they were overcome with medication. more than a year after surgery, he
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was filmed doing some of the simple things in life that he missed so much. now i can get myself dressed without anybody helping me! now i can get a snack out of the refrigerator without anybody helping me! i can heat up a sandwich and a piece of pizza all by myself. doctors say the success of this transplant is partly down to the intensive management by surgeons, but they say the key has been zion and his inspiring determination. never give up on what you're doing. you'll get there eventually. i love that message as well. never give up. fantastic. he is brilliant. if you've ever used a credit card to buy a plane ticket or on a fast food app then the odds are that you had an extra charge added to your bill for the privilege. not for much longer. from january next year,
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businesses will banned from adding fees for card payments following an eu directive. the founder of consumer group fairer finance, james daley, is in our westminster studio. thanks for talking to us about this. were the charges just a way of covering costs? is that how it started ? covering costs? is that how it started? i covering costs? is that how it started ? i don't covering costs? is that how it started? i don't think it was. i think as prices are driven down when the budget airlines came in ten or 20 years ago, they started to look for other ways to get a little bit of extra cash round the back end. so they came up with this ruse, why do we start charging people to pay by card. a bit odd. you don't get a charge for having lights on in the office, why do get a charge for paying by card? have got to take your money somehow. is it cheaper for companies if we pay with cash? no, actually it's more expensive. supermarkets spend millions of pounds getting those secure vans to pick up the cash and take it to the
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bank. paying by cash is cheaper, but of course there is a cost involved and we've always thought that's just the cost of doing business. you have to ta ke the cost of doing business. you have to take your customer's money somehow and they shouldn't have to pay for the privilege of giving it to you. what about small business? will be spit spat end of the market, where they might charge you 50p to use a card or there might be a minimum spend on a card in some places? it will hit small businesses ha rd est, places? it will hit small businesses hardest, what hopefully what it will do is force them to start shopping around with their banks, because actually a lot of the small businesses are getting a really bad dealfrom their businesses are getting a really bad deal from their bank and probably haven't switched for years and if they switch now they will be able to get the charges and so it won't be so painful and of course they can still refused to take cards up to a certain limit, what i think it will get harderfor them to certain limit, what i think it will get harder for them to do that because these days people have less and less cash in their pockets. this morning i read quite a few airlines are especially annoyed about this and are digging their heels in. there have been rules in place since
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2013. have they been ignored? a bit of both. the rules were not written tightly enough. they said you can only pass on the costs of rank is charging you, and they took that to mean whatever they could come up with. —— bank. maybe the finance team, some of the canteen costs. 0rganisations like ryanair and flybe continue to charge 2% or 396. and flybe continue to charge 2% or 3%. for those kinds of companies they are probably getting charged in they are probably getting charged in the region of 0.6% by their bank at this point, so they should not be charging more than that to the customers. do you think there is an element that we as consumers can be at shoot —— be accused of being suckers in this, that when somebody says they will charge is 5% for this or that, wejust say, ok? says they will charge is 5% for this orthat, wejust say, ok? i know from personal experience, i have beenin from personal experience, i have been in that situation. u nfortu nately been in that situation. unfortunately it happens right at the end of the purchase, doesn't it? you have spent all of that time
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shopping around trying to find the best deal. you think you have it. you invest all that time and you get to that final payment screen and it says, by the way, there is more now. about 20 thing, i cannot be bothered to go back and start all over again. —— at that point you think, i cannot. that is why it is so 1000 will we see that money come off in some other way? added on, forgive me. the famous "administration fee" or whatever that might be, to cover the money they lose out from not charging you a fee for the use of a card? it will have to go somewhere. hopefully it goes into the headline price. that is the fair place for it to be. there is so much that sits within a price that we get charged, all of the cost of that company, you know, in the case of airlines, their pilots and their staff and their groundstaff, the back office, we do not get surcharges for the fact there is a pilot on the plane. why should we have a surcharge for the fa ct we should we have a surcharge for the fact we are playing by card? ——
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pain. it should all go in the headline price. it is fairer and clearer for customers. james, thank you. to give you an idea, if you came in halfway through that interview, just in 2010 those extra charges for using those credit cards cost us, as consumers in the uk, £473 million. ouch. and it is very often at the end, when you have to pay for it. either way, we ouch the going to charge you 10% for using this or whatever it might be. —— by the way. well, it will change in january. the main stories today: a cleanup operation is under way in cornwall following flash floods in the village of coverack. and the bbc will provide details today of what it pays most 100 of its presenters. we saw the impact of the weather in coverack. matthew, if you had a quiet night, you are probably unusual last night? most of the country was quiet, but
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southern england had a torrid one. lots of storms around, 100,000 flashes of lightning since yesterday afternoon across southern england, south wales and through the channel. seems like this shot captured earlier on in chelmsford in sx. there are still some more storms to come. things are quiet and in down at the moment but as temperatures rise we will expect further thunderstorms, and a bit further north and we saw yesterday. so they could be more disruption. if you are heading onto the road stage into the forecast and your bbc local radio station. to show you where the storms have been over the last few hours, they are now drifting away from east anglia and lincolnshire. some pushing up into the midlands. and there are some in the southern portion of the irish sea. we are not totally done with them, but most of you will have a dry morning. more cloud across england and wales co m pa res cloud across england and wales compares what you have seen. don't ta ke compares what you have seen. don't take the position of those blues too literally. they will be going north into parts of northern england, one of two in parts of scotland. do not
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rule out the odd rumble of thunder in northern ireland. as temperatures rise, with some fairly hot and humid conditions, particularly in eastern parts of england we could see highs around 31 or 32 in lincolnshire and east anglia in particular. that will set further storms. we do not expect to see further storms across the south—west this afternoon. nowhere near as bad as it was yesterday. 0ne of two showers yesterday. north wales, north midlands north—west england. as we go into the evening rush—hour, we could see torrential downpours. dusty winds and large hail. rain on and off through the afternoon, and a few showers in scotla nd afternoon, and a few showers in scotland in the daytime. sunshine in the north—west highlands could lift temperatures into the high 20s you. it turns wet in the evening overnight into scotland. and the occasional rain across england and wales. most of the thunderstorms will have fizzled out. there are conditions in to the west later on. temperatures will dip in the west later. for much of scotland and northern england in particular, a sticky night. temperatures not
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drawing much lower than 18 degrees. a cloudy start to thursday. some occasional rain, wettest of all in the far north—east of scotland. sky is bright for most. sunshine out before showers pushing to northern ireland later. you saw the signals there. fresh air is on its way. in there. fresh air is on its way. in the low 20s in the south—east. in the low 20s in the south—east. in the teens for many. continuing that theme on friday. low pressure pushing in across ireland. that will pick up the wind. a very windy in western and southern parts on friday. a spell of rain. heavy bursts working from west to east and some sunshine at times. probably the brightest weather in the north—east of scotland. low pressure never too far away as we go into the weekend. the heatwave, none of the massive thunderstorms we have seen so far in the past and if i was. 0ccasional showers just about anywhere. sunshine in between. temperatures lower than they should be for this time of year. when was the last time you had cod?
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probably a couple of weeks ago. i love cod. i had some last night. it is arguably the country's favourite fish and now north sea cod is officially back on the menu again. the marine stewardship council says cod stocks have finally recovered from decades of overfishing. lorna gordon has been finding out what this means for our fishermen and the fish on our plate. in peterhead harbour, the biggest whitefish port in europe, the fishermen are offloading their latest catch. it has been a good few days at sea for these trawlermen. among the fish being offloaded, cod — and plenty of it. we have increased the net sizes to reduce the catches ofjuvenile cod. 0ne decade ago the cod fisheries in the north sea were close to collapse, but quotas and measures
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taken by the fishermen themselves have helped the stock recover. scottish fishermen have also been in restricted areas for spawning cod, and high abundance in rates of cod. in some years there was upwards of 50,000 square miles closed off to scotch fishermen. their hard work has paid off. in peterhead fish market there is now plenty of cod for sale, and from today all of it will be certified as sustainable. extremely enthusiastic. it has taken us eight or nine years to get here. a huge sacrifice. we have seen the dark days but now we have the bright days. for the wider fishing community the upturn in the cod stocks is one of several reasons they're feeling buoyed. dozens of new boats are on order for the fleet here at peterhead. there is a real sense amongst the fishermen here that the work they have done to preserve the fish stocks in the north sea is helping to protect their industry
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forfuture generations. and these sustainability certifications that has been awarded for the fishermen and their catch. and these sustainability certifications that has been awarded to north sea cod could well mean new markets opening up for the fishermen and their catch. a lot of supermarkets are looking for a sustainable, msc—certified product. so now that the cod here is msc—certified it could be easier to sell to a number of uk supermarkets and fish and chip restaurants as well. so what does this mean for those of us who love cod? it's great news that it is back on the menu from a sustainable source. local and sustainable, it's good. having something that has that traceability is important. for somebody of my age, i think cod hasn't been offered or been around for many years. it's lovely to see it back on offer. there will be regular checks to see that cod stocks in our waters remain at healthy levels. there is confidence that after years of decline, north sea cod is sustainable once again.
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beautiful scenes, and great news if you like cod. i do like cod. later this morning a team of divers will attempt to recover a famous piece of second world war history from a loch in the west of scotland. catriona renton is there for us. good morning from the glenn strachan estate. it is windy here at the conditions are looking great for this morning's dive. this place was given such a level of secrecy during the second world war that smokescreens were put up around the lock so that people didn't know what was happening. that is because dancing bombs were being tested.
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this morning some divers will be attempting to raise two of them, so they will be seen for the first time in more than 70 years. they are set to go on public display. we will have more on that later. first, time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning bbc london news. we begin this morning with more details emerging about the groenefeld fire. —— grenfell tower fire. burning cladding on grenfell tower would have released 14 times more heat than a key government safety test allows. the energy emitted from the cladding and insulation would have been equivalent to burning 51 tonnes of pine wood, according to research by the university of leeds. it would have burnt as quick as petrol. the contractors who fitted the cladding and insulation say they both passed all regulations. a west hampstead mother, imprisoned in iran, has been at the heart of a parliamentary debate urging the government to take action on her situation and to protect british citizens with dual nationalities.
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the debate focused on how nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's human rights have been breached. imagine coming back from your holidays in finding out the company you parked your car with has gone bust. that has happened to hundreds of stranded passengers at gatwick airport. hundreds of passengers landing at gatwick airport have been stranded after the company they parked their cars with appears to have gone bust. gatwick first parking is not an approved meet—and—greet parking company, and police have been receiving reports over the last few days of passengers unable to collect their cars. we are working with sussex police and gatwick airport itself to try to resolve this issue and get consumers of their keys back, so they can hopefully return home safely. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tube so far this morning. a different story on the trains. stansted express services will terminate bishop stortford because of overhead wire problems. passengers can use other train providers. 0n the roads, in dartford the a2 westbound is slow because of an accident at old bexley lane.
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that seems to be clearing up now. after the lightning and heavy rain overnight, how is the rest of the day looking? let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. after a dramatic night last night with lots of thunderstorms, lightning flashes and a lot of rain we start the day mostly dry and humid. i say mostly dry. we still do have the risk of some thunderstorms and the met 0ffice still has a yellow weather warning in place for heavy rain. most of those storms towards the north of london are now moving away towards the north. we should get sunny spells today but in turn we may see one of two isolated thundershowers later this afternoon. it will feel hot and humid, temperatures ranging between 24 and 26. that risk still continues overnight of one or two showers, some patchy cloud as well. another hot and some patchy cloud as well. another hotand humid night,
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some patchy cloud as well. another hot and humid night, the temperature between 17 and 18 celsius. it could between 17 and 18 celsius. it could be very uncomfortable for sleeping. tomorrow that clears out of the way and settles down for a little while. still some cloud and bright spells, but a cold front introduces fresh row. temperatures morkel around manager at 21 celsius. 0n row. temperatures morkel around manager at 21 celsius. on friday this area of low pressure swings forward various systems from the atlantic, bringing us out rates of rain. those will come in the form of showers as we head into friday. stay in changeable and unsettled, with spells of sunshine on the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. good morning. thanks for being with us on good morning. thanks for being with us on this wednesday morning. the main news: a big clean—up operation is taking place in cornwall, after flash floods swept through the village of coverack on the lizard peninsula. residents reported hailstones the size of 50 pence pieces,
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and the village was divided in two by a four foot torrent of water. later today engineers will assess damage to roads and property in the area. jon kay is in coverack for us. you've been showing us around and the damage is quite extensive!m is. the harbour where we are now is right down the bottom, next to the sea, and there are hills all around which bring quiet streams, normally, down to the sea but last night they became four feet rivers of deep water, which brought everything with it. this is a garden shed which is upside down. hard to believe how much power that water had until you see this and you can imagine the
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power it had. some people of the local council have turned up and they are shovelling away. there's just loads of mud here. it is accessible, but local people are keen to stress that they will be open for business so you have to be careful not to slip over. there's lots of deep mud and gunk that needs to be taken away, then we've got this beautiful cottage, the beachhouse. we spoke to the owner of that last night and he said it was the suddenness of the water in a dating his property which was the most terrifying. about four or five feet of water in there within minutes. it's all gone now and he's left soggy carpets and a big cleanup job. but you can see the rocks, the pebbles, the cobbles that have been brought down and then all the other debris in the distance. we showed you some of that early. it includes things like a mobility scooter, garden furniture, fence panels, even
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a kitchen sink. it is a mess, but not as much of a mess as many people feared during the dramatic emergency incident yesterday afternoon when lives were said to be at least. two people had to be airlifted. they thought it might have been more than that. most people are still in their homes, even though about 50 properties have been affected overwrought and i think a sense that at tourism season, they will have to be ready as quickly as they can be. but it will be a tough job for the next few hours. thank you very much indeed. it is quite extensive damage. thank you. and we will have the weather forecasting about 10— 15 minutes. matt says it was a stubborn storm. and over 100,000 lightning strikes! crazy weather. lots of people have been up early, either unable to
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sleep or watching the various thunderstorms across the uk. the bbc will publish details of how much it pays its on—air talent later this morning in its annual report. for the first time the salaries of those who earn more than £150,000 a year will be revealed. the director general, lord hall, says the bbc has much to do on equality after admitting only a third of the names on the list are women. businesses will be banned from charging fees on debit and credit card transactions from january. it follows an eu directive to ban the charges typically imposed by airlines, food delivery apps and small businesses. the treasury says the fees have cost consumers £473 million since 2010. as prices got driven down when the budget airlines came in ten or 20 yea rs budget airlines came in ten or 20 years ago, they started to look for other ways to get a little bit of
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extra cash around the back end and so they came up with this ruse, why do we charge people to pay by card? it had been an odd one. you don't get a charge for having lights on in the office, so why do you get one for paying by card? they got to take your money somehow. that starts from january. thousands of owners of mercedes—benz diesel vehicles in the uk are to be offered an improvement in the system. the german manufacturer, daimler, which makes mercedes, is currently under investigation for alleged emissions cheating, similar to that of volkswagen. a total of 3 million vehicles across europe are affected. schools need a more coherent strategy for what to do in case of a dangerous event taking place on their premises, according to the teaching union the nasuwt. it says schools currently have ad hoc drills to deal with various threats and wants a comprehensive plan for so called "lockdown procedures". the government says it "constantly reviews" the security guidance it issues.
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i love this young boy. an american boy who was the youngest in the world to have a double hand transplant is now able to write, dress himself and even played —— play baseball! he had the operation two years ago after his hands and feet were amputated when he had sepsis. there were setbacks when his body showed signs of rejecting the hands but that was overcome with medication. doctors say the key was zion and his inspiring determination to succeed. he isa to succeed. he is a wonderful little boy. more on that later. coming up, all of the weather details, wherever you are. good morning, sally! what's the weather like over there? i attempted to do a little bit of a
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weather forecast for the opener earlier and they got it wrong. not terribly wrong. i said it might be stormy towards the end of the week and matt pointed out that there would be rain and strong winds, but even of that happening it is and what you would necessarily call a storm. shall we talk about the cricket? good morning. england's cricketers are through to the women's world cup final after a thrilling last—over victory against south africa. england restricted south africa to just 218, which looked like a comfortable target. but after losing eight wickets in their reply, it came down to the final over. anya shrubsole hitting a boundary with the first ball she faced to spark jubilant scenes. england will now play australia or india at lords on sunday. i think it's kind of sinking in right now. once you get past the relief of getting over the line... we knew we came into this tournament with a good shot if we play some good cricket. you can't win tournaments if you aren't in the final, so we're pleased to be in the final and one more game to go.
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england and scotland's famous old rivalry is set for another showdown tonight, this time in the group stage of the women's euro 2017 championship. england are the favourite after narrowly missing out two years ago in the world cup. it is the first major tournament scotland have qualified for. there are certain things you expect from the netherlands. but while football is also full of wild assumptions, this tournament feels different. scotland are here for a start, while england are here for a start, while england are among the favourites. for the first time in years england expects. we wa nt first time in years england expects. we want to use it as a positive. see it as an opportunity to exploit and get amongst it. we did struggle before. we made a championship with an english football team on the back of what's been a great summer for all of ourjunior of what's been a great summer for all of our junior teams. for the women's game, we want to take this to the next level. england's history at the euros is a chequered one. in
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2009 there were runners up to germany, but fell apart at the tournament four years ago in sweden and finished bottom of the group. that failure led to a change in coach and a change in fortune. they then finished third under a new coach and arrived here fit than they've ever been before. scotland have made history just they've ever been before. scotland have made historyjust by being here. this is theirfirst major tournament. 0br without a number of key players, including their world —class key players, including their world—class arsenal player. key players, including their world-class arsenal player. we put so much into the team to get us to this point. we would just love to experience this, but they aren't here and that brings us close together as a team. we will face it head—on. while scotland's players are preparing for the biggest game of their careers, england's have been brushing up on more thanjust tactics. everybody knows that rivalry and that battle. yesterday we had a meeting, kind of a history lesson about the rivalry, because we all know there is a rivalry but
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actually what's behind it. so we had actually what's behind it. so we had a sitdown. if my history lessons we re a sitdown. if my history lessons were like that in school i would have listened more! history favours germany, which has won the past european championships. but this is a country with its own foot walling folklore. england and scotland will also hope it is where they make their mark. commentary of that match is on radio 5 live from 745 p.m.. it has been a summer of transfer frustration but antonio conte has been given a pay rise! conte — who has two years left on his deal — has signed a new improved contract with the premier league champions. he lifted the premier league title at the first attempt last season and also guided them to the fa cup final. the golf gets under way tomorrow morning. the 10th time the open has been held there. one of the most memorable was in 1988 whenjustin
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rose chipped it at the 18th to win the amateur prize of fourth overall, setting him on his way to a great career. he now has a us open title at olympic gold. but he would still love to win at birkdale. it's the one tournament i've dreamt about since i was a young boy. especially at royal birkdale, you take an open championship anywhere, you take a major challenge anywhere, but if they happen to line up at special venues — i was fortunate to win at marion because that club has something special about it and obviously to do it here at royal birkdale would be a kind of full circle moment, based on i guess what i did in 1998. so, yeah, a special venue and lots of good memories. justin rose better watch out! we better be smart because he is playing with thomas. this is what justin thomas is planning to wear. it looks very much like what you are wearing, dan. is that a suitjacket?
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i think it might be like a cardigan. because he couldn't play in a suit jacket. a bit restrictive at the top of the backswing. potentially. but also a tie. a bit restrictive? i do like dressing up for golf. do you? oh, yeah. iwould never wear white trousers in life generally, but i think they are kay on a golf course. what about red trousers? i've got the lot! patterned trousers? i was playing last week and everyone has to wear tartan. i had a little green number. after i hit two shots someone said my golf was worse in that round. thanks. we've already been talking this morning about the bbc‘s annual report which will be published later today. it contains details of how much the corporation pays its talent.
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the salaries of those who earn more than £150,000 a year will be revealed for the first time and the bbc has already admitted that only a third of the names on the list are women. we can talk now to our media editor amol rajan who's outside broadcasting house. the figure is over £150,000. how will it rate down? good morning. it will it rate down? good morning. it will be 96 people. the annual report last year had 109 people paid a big number. now it will be 96 and it will break down in salary bands of £50,000. all the way up to a number that's probably going to end up in over seven figures. it is worth saying this is something to be busy strongly resisted. they said they didn't want these numbers to come out. they did publish how much they we re out. they did publish how much they were paying on air talent in the past but they didn't want the numbers to be attached to specific individuals because they say those individuals because they say those individuals will now ask for massive pay rises. why would they ask for pay rises. why would they ask for pay rises. why would they ask for pay rises and how toxic is all of
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this? i think it is potentially very toxic. some people will look at these numbers and say, hang on a second, this person is paid a huge amount more than me for doing something that's quite finance simple. there's also the issue you mentioned a moment ago about gender equality. of the 96 people, two thirds are men and only one third women. but i think the question is, why they resisted it, they would say that if you are one of those 96 people and you are paid pretty well, someone who does a similarjob to you is paid more, you will ask for a pay rise. the bbc say they are trying to bring the costs of all of this on their talent down to try to ta ke this on their talent down to try to take money out of the bbc budget overall and by publishing the salaries what they are effectively doing, this is the bbc‘s argument, is staying to this on a talent that you are paid less than someone who does a similarjob and therefore you've got reason to be slightly jealous of them and ask for a pay rise. that might not make sense
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demands of the public, that it might be how some broadcasters think. tell us be how some broadcasters think. tell us about this inequality. the director—general has already addressed this, but only one third of the people are women on that list. yes, the director-general tony hall said to me last night that the bbc will do a hell of a lot more when it comes to gender equality and diversity. i think the bbc feel they are on safer to rein in general. they got a lot more to do and only a third think it is unacceptable. but i think they've got a good story to tell about the changes they've made. since tony hall has been director—general, over 60% of the people that have entered this salary band, getting paid more than one of the £50,000, are women and there have been some high—profile appointments lately —— £150,000. so i think the bbc feel they have a difficult story to tell and things
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are changing. is the bbc prepared for public reaction on this?” are changing. is the bbc prepared for public reaction on this? i think so. the mood is one of people being braced... gary lineker said so. the mood is one of people being braced... gary linekersaid it so. the mood is one of people being braced... gary lineker said it was tin hat day. there are people who are nervous, but there is also deep recognition. there is a report on the bbc, rather than someone who works on behalf of the bbc, but this is public money and the public has a right to see how this money is spent. the transparency is incredibly important and can flush out problems like gender equality and ultimately this is for the public to decide. this is for the licence fee payer to decide as to whether or not these 96 people represent value for money or not. thank you. and that will all be published at 11 o'clock this morning. it's 07:45 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. matthew has the weather. it has been dramatic. it has. you saw the scenes in
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cornwall, but other parts of the country were affected by the storms as well. 100,000 lightning strikes and is yesterday afternoon. sleepless nights at a southernmost counties. we aren't done yet. things have quietened down, but we could still see more severe storms in the afternoon. if you haven't seen anything yet, there is no guarantee you'll get away with it. stay tuned to your local bbc radio station of storm start rumble through your area. in the last few hours, it has area. in the last few hours, it has a mainly across east anglia and literature. they are clearing away. they are pushing up through the midlands. big gaps around. many starting the day drive. those showers will push into northern england and wales in the coming hours. there will be some places that avoid them altogether, that is the nature of these storms. 12 working into southern scotland are the afternoon. —— one or two. rain on and off through the second half
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of the day. england and wales should be dry through the morning. temperatures will rise in eastern areas to about 32 celsius. cooler on the southern and western coast thanks to the presence of cloud. showers will be nowhere as severe as whistle yesterday in cornwall. north wales, the midlands and north—west england are more likely to see torrential storms. the gusty winds and large hail coming with them. the odd rumble of thunder in northern ireland. not everybody will see these storms. some places will stay dry. 0nly these storms. some places will stay dry. only a few showers in scotland. parts of north—west scotland will have lovely temperatures into the high 20s. scotland will get wet overnight. a few rumbles of thunder. 0nly overnight. a few rumbles of thunder. only one or two storms for england and wales. the rain turning right into the night. into the west the skies are clear and it will be much cooler than last night. through scotla nd cooler than last night. through scotland and much of england, another muggy night in store. temperatures no higher than the high teens. into thursday, there could
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still be some thunderstorms around, but any still be some thunderstorms around, butany rain still be some thunderstorms around, but any rain clears away by morning. showers in northern ireland later. in between, even if you start with cloud and occasional rantings will turn dry and bright, but also a good deal fresher. low 20s at the very best tomorrow. we continue that fresher story on friday. that will push a weather front, particularly across england and wales, with heavy bursts of rain around. driest in northern scotland. it will feel much cooler still. temperatures for most of you around the mid—to high teens. temperatures lower than you would expect at this time of year after starting on a hot note. we continue blustery on the weekend. if you have any plans this weekend, it will be cooler times, especially when the is around, but sunshine in between. —— when the rain is around. it is 7:48am. good morning.
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don't mix your words up like me. you mean when you said only one third of the women are women? you know what i meant. a daring underwater mission to recover some world war ii "bouncing bombs" will take place on a scottish loch in a few hours. the bombs were featured in the legendary war film, dambusters, and were tested in western scotland — where catriona renton is at loch striven for us this morning. good morning. what are they planning to do? and good morning. it is a bit windy this morning but the conditions are shaping up well for this morning's dive. such was the secrecy around this place during the second world war that smoke was generated so that the public couldn't see what was going on here. midget submarines and bouncing bombs we re midget submarines and bouncing bombs were being tested. as you said, the dambuster raid is caught the public imagination and much was learned about the types of bouncing bomb used there. but the ones tested
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here, the naval equivalent, much less is known about them. that is, until now. the view over loch striven in argyll, a beautiful part of the country. but it also has an important place in british military history. today divers will attempt another daring rescue mission here. in 1943, bouncing bombs were tested here. they were called highballs, invented by sir barnes wallis. another was used in the dambusters in germany. highball was designed to sink enemy ships. sir barnes wallace came up with an idea, a bomb that didn't just explode where it landed but would bounce over the surface of the water, like a skimming stone, until it hit its target. the particular focus was the german battleship, the tirpitz. in the end, though, highball bombs were never used, but they have lain on the bed of the loch for almost 70 years. so far, only divers have been able
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to see them up close. i think it's extremely exciting. i feel that people should have the chance to see these objects. they are of an age, of a technological innovation that will possibly never be seen again. final preparations have been made, and all that remains now is for these pieces of history to be brought to the surface for the public to see for the first time. iamjoined i am joined now by mark paisey from the british sub—aqua club. tell us about what is going to happen here logistically this morning? good morning. 0ur divers are getting ready to go and mark the fireballs that will be lifted today. you can see the royal navy support ship there, the bombs will be lifted and winched aboard that around lunchtime. tell us why you are involved. i so many people involved.
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yes, we have three big scottish companies and 12 divers from the british sub—aqua club, but basically it is to secure the history and uncover what is a lesson in story about the eye ball weapon. uncover what is a lesson in story about the eyeball weapon. why are you so interested personally on it? lama you so interested personally on it? i am a former raf pilot and a diver, andl i am a former raf pilot and a diver, and i love the fact that we can combine both in a project. it is exciting. this is captured tipple's imagination. so many people want to get involved and see these things. and it is going to happen. get involved and see these things. and it is going to happenm get involved and see these things. and it is going to happen. it is, they will be sent to museums for restoration and everybody will be able to see and take part in it. it is really good. thank you to speaking to us. as mark says, hopefully we will get a glimpse of these bombs at lunchtime. what an amazing thing to try to do. catriona renton, thank you. i know she said it was windy, but it looks gorgeous there this morning. the way product recalls are organised in the uk is not fit for purpose according to the campaign group
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which this morning. sean is looking at this. yes, safety and people's homes has come to the forefront of people's minds after the grenfell tower fire. it is being scrutinised heavily. product safety is at the top of a lot of people's minds at the moment. today the consumer group which has some pretty strong words for the product recall system, where companies tell customers to return their items for safety reasons. which say the system's not fit for purpose and potentially putting people's lives at risk. now, the chartered trading standards institute plays a major role in testing products and getting businesses to take them off shelves in our shops where necessary. we'rejoined by adam scorer, who's the director of policy there. good morning, adam. good morning. do you think the system is putting people's lives at risk?” you think the system is putting people's lives at risk? i think the syste m people's lives at risk? i think the system is broken and when you have unsafe products on shelves and in people's homes, there is a to well—being. people's homes, there is a to well-being. it is yourjob, isn't
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it, at the trading standards institute, to test those products and make sure that people have confidence in them. no, it is the job of trading standards officers employed by local authorities to test products, to do what we call market surveillance, to make sure that companies comply with regulations, including requiring them to do recalls. and then to get them to do recalls. and then to get them off the shelves. it is a local authority function, it is organised and resource locally, and with all the stresses on local authority budgets it should be no surprise that when we have had over 50% cut and resources to trading standards that they look at local issues. product safety is primarily a national issue. that is why we agree with which, injust national issue. that is why we agree with which, in just about everybody else who pays this issue any attention at all, that we need a national centralised expert technical body to make sure we have the level of testing and market surveillance that we know will keep people safe. you guys are experts in the area of safety. do you think that there are electrical goods out there that you have not tested, which may be at risk to people? what
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i would say is that trading standards officers, again, organised locally, can do less and less product testing. the emphasis from local authority paymasters who employ them are that you look at local issues, local trading complaints, issues that affect bell local community. there is less and less testing going on. there is more and more reliance on companies to self compliance to make sure that self compliance to make sure that self certifying is going on against the standards. there is no question, the standards. there is no question, the degradation that has happened in our product safety system is due to a lack of resources over a number of years and organising its locally rather than centrally, and also, to be honest, a lack of focus from central government, which is the only body that will be able to organise this properly. on that point, the government says that they are already considering the framework for a national body to support consumers on product safety. have they prioritise this enough?m is an unpalatable truth that action follows tragedy. i have got no doubt at all but the government is
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absolutely focused on getting this right now. i do not think that has been the case over the past couple of years but now there are immediate things that they can do. there is a website that everybody, consumers, retailers, manufacturers, can look at. there is a national technical body to intervene and do testing. unfortunately you can have all the regulations and testing in the world but they need to be enforced. government needs to look at the way in which we organise trading standards. some issues need to be done regionally and strategically, not locally. and we need to have some resources to enable expert, skilled, trained product safety office rs skilled, trained product safety officers to be able to intervene directly with companies to make sure that these things do not get on the shelves, let alone dealing with something after a problem arises. adam, thank you. clearly there is a bit of urgency around this now, with which st leonards be some action taken. -- stating there needs to be. there is a big cleanup operation
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going on in cornwall. while we look at that, time to find out what is happening wherever you are watching brea kfast happening wherever you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. we start this morning with more details about the grenfell tower. burning cladding on grenfell tower would have released 14 times more heat than a key government safety test allows. the energy emitted from the cladding and insulation would have "burned as quickly as petrol," according to research by the university of leeds. the contractors who fitted the cladding and insulation say they both passed all regulations. a west hampstead mother, imprisoned in iran, has been at the heart of a parliamentary debate urging the government to take action on her situation and to protect british citizens with dual nationalities. the debate focused on how nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's human rights have been breached. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, says it's a matter of utmost priority for the government. it was organised by labour mp for hampstead and kilburn, tulip siddiq.
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imagine coming back from your holidays in finding out the company you parked your car with has gone bust. that has happened to hundreds of stranded passengers at gatwick airport. hundreds of passengers landing at gatwick airport have been stranded after the company they parked their cars with appears to have gone bust. gatwick first parking is not an approved meet—and—greet parking company, and police have been receiving reports over the last few days of passengers unable to collect their cars. we are working with sussex police and gatwick airport itself, hopefully to try to resolve this issue, get consumers their keys back, and hopefully they can return home safely. there is a good service on the tube so far this morning. a different story on the trains. stansted express services will terminate at bishop stortford because of overhead wire problems. make sure you check before you travel. 0n the roads in battersea, there is queueing traffic on
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battersea bridge, northbound towards chelsea embankment. after the lightning and heavy rain overnight, how is the rest of the day looking? let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. after quite a dramatic night last night, lots of thunderstorms, lightning and a lot of rain, we start the day mostly dry and humid. i say mostly dry. we do still have the risk of some thunderstorms and the risk of some thunderstorms and the met office still has a yellow weather warning in place for heavy rain. most of those storms now towards the north of london are moving away towards the north. we should get some sunny spells today but in turn we may see one or two isolated thundershowers later this afternoon. it will feel hot and humid, temperatures ranging between 24 and 26. that risk still continues overnight of one or two showers, some patchy cloud as well. another hot and some patchy cloud as well. another hotand humid night, some patchy cloud as well. another hot and humid night, the some patchy cloud as well. another hotand humid night, the minimum temperature between 17 and 18, so again it could be very uncomfortable for sleeping. tomorrow that clears out of the way and settles down for
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a little while. some cloud and bright cells, but a cold front introduces fresh air. —— bright spells. 0n introduces fresh air. —— bright spells. on friday this area of low pressure swings forth various systems from the atlantic. that brings us some outbreaks of rain in the form of showers. as we head through friday it stays rather changeable and unsettled. still with spells of sunshine through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a clean—up operation is underway in cornwall after flash floods sent a four—foot torrent of water through the streets. people had to be winched from their homes as torrential rain and huge hailstones bore down on the village of coverack. they're hard at work here this morning clearing the roads of the rubbish and the rubble and there is a garden shed that's been brought down here from above by the
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floodwater. the weather in cornwall may not be as dramatic today, there could be more severe storms later. i will have an update in 15 minutes. good morning. it's wednesday, 19thjuly. also this morning: the bbc is to reveal how much it pays many of its presenters as it admits just a third of the highest—paid stars are women. extra fees for people paying with credit or debit cards are to be scrapped saving consumers nearly £0.5 billion every year. in sport, england's cricketers are through to the women's world cup final after a dramatic victory over south africa. this shot won the match with just two balls remaining. they'll play either australia or india on sunday. good morning.
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i'm going to be talking to the founder of not on the high street about how she started a multi—million pound business from her kitchen table. now i can get myself dressed without anybody helping me. and how the first child to have a double hand transplant is fulfilling his dreams two years after his operation. he isa he is a love as well. more on that later. a big clean—up operation is taking place in cornwall, after flash floods swept through the village of coverack on the lizard peninsula. residents reported hailstones the size of 50 pence pieces and the village was divided in two by a four—foot torrent of water. jon kay reports. how's this for the start of the summer holidays? a coastguard helicopter winching people to safety in the cornish village of coverack. hours of massive hailstones, wind and thunder, then hours of torrential rain,
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brought tonnes of rock and debris down the steep hills. even a garden shed washed down into the harbour. hi. can we assist you at all with some lighting? last night emergency crews were checking on chris. he rents out this seafront holiday cottage. he couldn't believe how quickly it flooded. 56" i'd say with a guess. so it filled right up. looking on the bright side, but having to deal with the mess. you don't have to look long on television to see someone worse off than you. and, as i say, no one is hurt, so it doesn't really matter. holiday—makers arriving at their summer destination couldn't believe their eyes. we never saw this before, so it's really exciting. around 50 properties have been affected, but amazingly, it seems, no casualties. coverack may not feel lucky this morning, but there's a sense
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here that it could have been much, much worse. jon is in coverack for us. showing us so much damage done there. morning. hi louise. it is ha rd to there. morning. hi louise. it is hard to take in and hard to take in how quickly it happened as well. this stream, normally a stream, yu yesterday afternoon it turned into a river, a tower of water coming down from the hills bringing boulders and rubbish with it. this barrier, solid metal, normally there to stop people falling into the stream, flattened by the force of the water. the water was carrying all sorts of rubbish that's been brought over here. we showed you an hour ago just some of the stuff, garden panels, garden furniture, we've got a mobility scooter over there. and even look
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here, even a kitchen sink! when we showed you that on breakfast an hour ago, we said we didn't know where it came from, well mary was watching and she knows where it has come from because some of the stuff is yours. it came from my garden shed. the shedis it came from my garden shed. the shed is down on the beach. the mobility scooter belongs to my 87—year—old mother—in—law. yeah, it's fine. how are you doing this morning? this must have been a really frightening time? it was extremely frightening. i have never known anything like it and it happened so quick. 0ne known anything like it and it happened so quick. one minute we we re happened so quick. one minute we were 0k and the next minute we had three—foot of water. but you have got to cope with it. some of your neighbours had to be airlifted off by the coastguard. talk me through the mayhem of that time yesterday?” didn't see it happening we were inside because of the helicopter, but i understand from my son that they were flooded out, the front windows blew out with the force of the water and they were upstairs shouting for help. so, that's when
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the helicopter came out. what strikes me this morning is there is a real sense here of right, let's clea n a real sense here of right, let's clean up, let's open up, it's summer time, we need visitors and let's get back to normal as soon as we can. let's get back to normal. things can be replaced. nobody was hurt. nobody was be replaced. nobody was hurt. nobody was injured and nobody was killed. that's the main thing. we are all fine. what are you going to help yourself to first? i don't know really. none of it. do you want the sink? ican really. none of it. do you want the sink? i can give you a hand? no, it's all right. the shed is on the beach. the shed is on the beach and the summer house. i'm sorry you had to find out through breakfast. that's mary coming down to assess her own damage and it's the damage to one of the roads the main road that comes in on the other side of the village which is causing most concern. a lot has been washed away, damaged by the rubble and some of the services under the pipes, that kind of thing, damaged too. that's going to take a while to be sorted out, but people here say they will be re—open within hours. within days at the most and coverack will recover.
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st strikes me jon recover. st strikes mejon you better go and help mary. thank you very much. what a wonderful attitude from mary. he's off! he's off with that kitchen sink. it is notjust cornwall that's been hit by this sort of weather. matt is here with talking about what we saw injon's report there. matt is here with talking about what we saw injon's report therem matt is here with talking about what we saw in jon's report there. it is not just cornwall. in we saw in jon's report there. it is notjust cornwall. in italy they had a particularly immense storm. it is a particularly immense storm. it is a back building storm. it looks like it is moving away, but the back end keeps reforming and the ground is so dry at the moment and you're seeing close to a month's worth of rainfall. we have not got official totals, but it is understandable you saw flooding. across southern parts of england and south wales and the english channel we saw 100,000 flashes of lightening. some spectacular shots coming in to bbc weather watchers. we saw large hail and gusty winds. there have been reports of minor flooding across other parts of southern england and treeses felled. conditions have
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eased a little bit, but we're not done with the storyjust yet. there could be further storms later. what a dramatic picture over london. they are extraordinary pictures. rather beautiful of the lightening. very difficult to capture so they have done a good job, there were plenty of light i think strikes around through the night thank you very much. see you in a few minutes with the weather. matt will have the weather at 8.15am. the bbc will publish details of how much it pays its on—air talent later this morning in its annual report. for the first time, the salaries of those who earn more than £150,000 a year will be revealed. only a third of the names on the list are women, and the director—general, lord hall, says the bbc has to go further and faster on equality. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito reports. they're part of everyday life for millions, but, untiltoday, the bbc‘s stars were allowed to keep their pay deals private. no longer. the government wants greater openness and so today the bbc will publish the details of 96
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of its highest—paid stars. the bbc is in the unique position of being funded by the licence fee payer. i think its reasonable the license fee payer understands where that money is spent and particularly on significant and high salaries. when someone at the corporation earns more than the prime minister, i think its reasonable we understand what they do. the corporation tried to resist the move, saying staff pay has been falling over the last few years, despite increasing competition from new media rivals. we're in a very competitive market, notjust with itn and sky, but now with netflix, with amazon, with all sorts of west coast companies and what we've managed to do is to always pay our talent at a discount to the market. we never paid top whack. people come here because they want to come and work here and over the last year we've reduced the amount we are paying for our talent by 10%. and some think it could even drive pay up as it gives rivals information to help poach stars. i think it's completely wrong. i think it will end in tears. i think it's inflationary and it's
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an invasion of individual privacy. so, on all counts, i think this is one of the worst impositions on the bbc that i can remember. the report will also reveal wider issues about pay. the bbc has already admitted that on the list of highest—paid stars two—thirds of the names are men. businesses will be banned from charging fees on debit and credit card transactions from january next year. it follows an eu directive to ban the charges typically imposed by airlines, food delivery apps and small businesses. the treasury says the fees cost consumers £473 million in 2010 alone. as prices got driven down when the budget airlines came in 10 or 20 yea rs budget airlines came in 10 or 20
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years ago they started to look for other way to say get a little bit of extra cash around the back end and they came up with this ruse why don't we start getting people to pay by card. you don't get charged for having the lights on in the office, why do you have to pay by card? christine and joe saying when they renew car tax they have to pay for using their debit card or credit card. thank you for pointing that out and keep the comments coming in and the other stories around this morning. an american boy, who was the youngest in the world to have a double hand transplant, is now able to write, dress himself and even play baseball. zion harvey had the operation two years ago when he was just eight—years—old. there was setbacks his body rejected the new hands, but they overcame
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that with medication and the doctors say the key for zioh has been his determination and attitude to succeed. we have tweeted a little film about him as well. he's brilliant. he is a real star, isn't he? the weather is coming your way in a few minutes from matt. from weapons brought into schools to chemical fires, aggressive pupils or parents to bomb threats. these are just a few of the dangerous scenarios that some schools in england are training children to protect themselves from in special lessons. during these "lockdown" rehearsals pupils are barricaded inside classrooms and hide under desks so they can't be seen. spencer stokes has been to a school in huddersfield to find out more. subtracting now, a little bit harder. an ordinary maths lesson at reinwood junior school in huddersfield, but there is nothing ordinary about what happens next. tannoy: this school is in lockdown.
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pupils take cover under desks. obstacles are placed in front of doors and the room is darkened. the aim is to restrict entry and make it hard to see whether there is anyone in here. so even staff hide away. the lockdown practise takes place twice a year and the reasons for hiding are explained to pupils. you need to protect yourself in case like anything is outside like if danger is outside. you're practising for someone that could be potentially harmful being in school. and even if they could get into the classroom they mightn't even be able to see us. west yorkshire council see themselves as trailblazers for school safety and a number of training sessions for teachers have been held. similar strategies are in place across the uk. but there is no national guidance. with the department for education saying they believe individual schools together with local emergency forces are best placed to determine their safety arrangements. tannoy: all clear. all clear. in huddersfield, the lockdown
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drill is complete. children and staff emerge from under their desks. more prepared perhaps for potential threats to their school. we're joined by teacher ian darlington who we just saw there, and hannah archer whose daughter was involved in a real lockdown last year. hannah let's talk to you first. you got a text, didn't you, what was it saying and how did you react? just that the school was on lockdown and no one would be coming in or out of the gates. there was nothing on the news. were you worried? i was really worried. i had not seen the news. so ididn't worried. i had not seen the news. so i didn't know what was going on. i didn't know what a lockdown meant until i had phoned her dad to see if he got the same text and he said i will look at the news. this mp, something happened to her and there isa man something happened to her and there is a man and they have not caught
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him yet. that was it. and that was the murder ofjo cox, wasn't it? yeah. how did your daughter feel about it? well, she was only five. she didn't say anything to me when she came home and she said they weren't allowed to play out at the play time. but she has had not mentioned anything. there was no drills of lockdown or anything. so... it is interesting ian watching the reaction of the children. you're doing this as rehearsals, aren't you? yes. are they scared by it? what's their reaction? they treat it like a fire drill. we have two practices a year. to start with, they were fantastic, because we have had lessons to explain to the children what we are going to do and explain why we need to do it. gone down the line of keeping them safe because at the end of the day, school is supposed to be a safe
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place. when we did the practices, they were fantastic. we can see one of the practices you were involved in on the screens. lots of people getting in touch. someone says, if there is a risk, it is negligent not to practice. someone else says, this is over the top. sean says, my school has been doing this for a number of years and it is sad to say it isa number of years and it is sad to say it is a sign of the times. mixed reaction as you would expect. what sort of government support you get? from the government, our school have used government lockdown procedures. if one goes into lockdown, the other ina same if one goes into lockdown, the other in a same area has two as well. from my point of view, i find it is a good thing because for me, i want to
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keep those children as safe as i can and it has given me extra confidence to know what to do if anything should happen. i suppose you might not panic as much, if you know what to do. it is helpful? yes. would it have helped you if you had known what lockdown was? yes. my daughter has moved school now but they are not doing any training or any of this. i think it would help. when i got the text message, if i had known, if they had done a practice i would have known she would have been safe but i didn't. do you communicate everything back to pa rents ? communicate everything back to parents? yes, before we did our first practice, we sent a letter explaining what we were doing. we said what we would be explaining to
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the children before we did it. if ever there was a real lockdown practice, we would keep the parents updated by text. we also post on our school website, updates, so the parents are kept involved. do children know it will be a rehearsal day? they do, we tell them in the morning. just so they don't panic and they know what to do. they do it without any fuss. any reason why you started doing it? we thought it would be a sensible idea. it might not be an external intruder, it might be a dangerous dog on the grounds we have to keep the children safe from. it'sjust grounds we have to keep the children safe from. it's just sensible as much as anything. keep your comments coming in on that. we have had plenty already on that discussion about lockdowns in school. some of those pictures that you took the lightning strikes, a feat in itself. a torrid night after the storms.
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flooding through the night and we saw close to half a month's worth of rainfall in some spots. things have turned generally quieter now, do not drop your guard because they could be further thunderstorms later. the past few hours, it has been mainly towards the south of the country. the storms have been easing away. we do have some drifting up through the irish sea and in the northern ireland. things could turn wetter over the next few hours. could be a rumble of thunder. isolated showers, northern england, north wales. don't treat the blue colour in the charts to literally because they are sporadic. some heavy bursts of rain on and off for
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the rest of the day and things will get hot and humid as sunshine breaks through the cloud. eastern parts of england could get close to 31, 30 two celsius. a little bit cooler to the south and west. this afternoon, parts of north wales, the midlands, we could see those torrential downpours, gusty winds as well. risks of minorflooding. it downpours, gusty winds as well. risks of minor flooding. it would be some further heavy bursts of rain in northern ireland. 0nly some further heavy bursts of rain in northern ireland. only a few showers in scotland, lovely, sunny day in the highlands. scotland does turn wetter tonight. rumbles of thunder can't be ruled out. turns quieter for england and wales, some patchy rain and drizzle around, lots of cloud and a humid night. cast your eyes to the west, clear skies and fresh air is on its way. things
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turning fresh tomorrow. morning cloud clearing away. fresher but brighter a taking hold. cloudy in scotla nd brighter a taking hold. cloudy in scotland with outbreaks of rain. a cool datacom here. temperatures across the board down over the past couple of days. some wet and windy weather will sweep across the country from friday. sunshine and showers. blustery conditions may prove challenging for some of the golfers. weighing in at... the tyrannosaurus rex has acquired a reputation as a fearsome predator thanks to films likejurassic park. clearly, in the film, a very fast
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predator, very terrifying. but scientists think that the dinosaur was not in fact a sprinter. 0nly capable of running 12 mph. we can talk now to professor william sellers from the university of manchester about their new research. loving the jumper. you loving thejumper. you have loving the jumper. you have a triceratops on the front and a t—rex on the back. we all assumed t—rex were fast. on the back. we all assumed t-rex were fast. we
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digitised every single bone in the t—rex body and we put it into a computer and then you can put the muscles on the bone is based on what you have done by dissecting crocodiles and birds and things. you give the whole thing to a robots simulating system and it uses artificial intelligence machine learning to make the animal go as fast as it can. the thing is, if you do that, you can get quite a fast t—rex running along about 80 miles an hour. but then we spotted that if you do that, the force on the hind limbs isjust you do that, the force on the hind limbs is just too you do that, the force on the hind limbs isjust too big. the legs would have broken at that speed. so we had to slow the assimilation down toa we had to slow the assimilation down to a walk and that's the only way you can make it plausible. still scary. it walks about 12 mph because it has huge legs and it still has big tease. still scary but not fast. how does this change thoughts that
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have been around for a while. palaeontologists love have been around for a while. palaeontolog ists love to have been around for a while. palaeontologists love to disagree with each other. one thought t—rex of the superfast 45 miles an hour predator. another school of thought didn't think it was as fast. and what it did was go fairly slowly and scavenge or perhaps it was an ambush hunter. what our work has shown is that there was no way it was ever catching up with thejurassic park animal. are you disappointed? a little bit! i went into this thinking i would be able to show that it was quite a fast animal. it is what you want, it is the super predator, the alien of thejurassic, cretaceous period. but if you think about it, as animals get really large, they do slow down and of
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course, it is nice when science is all matches up and you get the a nswer all matches up and you get the answer you should expect. would it still... can we still call it the king of the dinosaurs? but rather than chasing its prey, it would have ambushed its prey rather than chasing around the forest? absolutely, it will still the biggest of the predatory dinosaurs so still scary. it laid eggs about the size of a football, so you have football sized dinosaurs growing up in the space of about 20 years into a t—rex. imagine an angry adolescent t—rex that is still fast moving, i think there is still plenty to be scared of. i think you are quite right. there was some talk about feathers. do we know whether they had feathers? animals with feathers also had scales. these things are
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not exclusive. it almost certainly had both. we have got evidence, not of t—rex, but other tyrannosaurs, closely related dinosaurs, with feathers on them. but they may have just had crests or parts of the body. the mohican dinosaur could well be real thing. have body. the mohican dinosaur could well be realthing. have you had other experts shouting at you for this? saying, you have ruined what we thought about the t—rex! this? saying, you have ruined what we thought about the t-rex! not yet, iam waiting we thought about the t-rex! not yet, i am waiting for it! possibly, it ta kes i am waiting for it! possibly, it takes some time. the next conference igotoi takes some time. the next conference i go to i suspect there will be experts standing up and saying, i disagree. you need to wear that jumper to your next conference. my mum makes them for me! have you got a lot of dinosaurjumpers? i've only got three dinosaurs but a range of other ones. thank you for coming in. can we get a shot of you?
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. it was a pretty spectacular night last night. we had over 100,000 flashes of lightening across south wales and southern england. this is just across south wales and southern england. this isjust one example across south wales and southern england. this is just one example of the weather watcher photos we have been sent. we have had loads of these. really spectacular lightening. more storms expected today. if you get hit by one of the storms there is the potential for flash flooding and hail and strong and gusty winds and potential disruption. this morning, we have
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got storms affecting northern areas. those will drift their way further northward and into the afternoon the main focus of the storms will be across northern ireland and into wales and the midlands. this area here, that's where you're most likely to get a thunderstorm. elsewhere, there will be drier weather and sunshine towards the south and the east of england and that's where temperatures could shoot up to 32 celsius. elsewhere, temperatures 23 celsius, 25 celsius, but fresher in evening scotland and north—east england. through this evening and tonight, we will continue to see storms moving further northward into scotland. 0ne or two moving east ward across england and wales as well. that will ta ke england and wales as well. that will take us into thursday morning. temperatures no lower than 13 or 15 celsius, 17 celsius in the south east. it could be a fairly uncomfortable night for sleeping. 0n thursday, isolated storms across eastern parts drifting away and then we're looking at drier weather. there will be sunshine as well developing into the afternoon. a few showers into northern ireland, but
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they won't be as heavy as we're expecting today. top temperatures, fresher for all of expecting today. top temperatures, fresherfor all of us. 17 expecting today. top temperatures, fresher for all of us. 17 celsius to 18 celsius, perhaps 22 celsius, a good ten celsius lower in the south east than for today. heavy rain expected in northern and western areas and will be followed by sunshine and showers as we go into the start of the weekend. temperatures 16 to 20 celsius where they should be for the time of year. bye— bye. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and rachel horne. chinese and us officials meet
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for high—level economic talks. but with president trump considering tariffs on steel imports, can a trade war be averted? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 19thjuly. president trump hopes the talks can tackle what he sees as an unfair trading relationship as he seeks to boost the number of products made in the usa. also in the programme: cutting diesel emissions, car—maker daimler says it will recall three million mercedes—benz cars to install a software fix.

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