Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 19, 2017 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

8:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm... the government brings forward plans to raise the retirement age to 68 — it means anyone currently aged between 39 and 47 will have to work a year longer. we had to face up to the fact that if we live longer we cannot expect the state pension age to be static, otherwise the cost just the state pension age to be static, otherwise the costjust builds and builds. i would not want to be working full time until i was 68. regardless, you know? and the thought of being forced, because some people might not be in the luxurious position of having enough cash saved. the salaries of the bbc‘s top—earning stars are revealed — just a third of those earning over £150,000 are women. what do i do? on paper, absolutely nothing justifies that huge amount of money if you compare me with lots
8:01 pm
other people. residents of a cornish village begin the clean up a day after being hit by devastating flash floods. under pressure —— west midlands police say hundreds of gay and lesbian people of south asian origin are being forced to marry somebody of the opposite sex. british—caught cod is back on the menu after stocks reach sustainable levels for more than a decade. —— for the first time in more than a decade. and a wiltshire zoo is taking part in a radical plan to save the northern white rhino from extinction. there are just three left in the world, now longleat safari park's drafting in the rhino's closest relatives to help. they have lain at the bottom of a remote scottish loch for more than 70 years, now a salvage operation is under way for the bouncing bombs of the second world war. good evening and
8:02 pm
welcome to bbc news. millions of people now in their forties will have to work a year longer before receiving their state pension. the government today announced it's decided to bring forward plans to raise the retirement age to 68. it's estimated six million people will be affected, those currently aged between 39 and a7, with the rise in the pension age being phased in by 2039 — seven years earlier than originally planned. the government argues the change will save more than £70 billion, but labour says the policy isn't fair. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg reports whether you are paid to dig the roads outside parliament or park your posterior on the green benches inside, millions of us will have to wait longer and pay more before getting the state pension back. secretary david gauke.
8:03 pm
today, i am announcing the government's intention to accept the key recommendation of the cridland review and increase the state pension age from 67 to 68 years from 2037. in other words, whether it's the cliche of taking to the bowling green, looking after grandchildren, travelling the world or frankly anything else, another six million people born in the ‘70s will have to work an extra year before the state will help support their old age. we have to face up to the fact that if we live longer, we can't expect the state pension age to be static. otherwise, the costjust builds up and builds up and become unsustainable and a government in future is forced to take some kind of panic measure and we don't want that to have to happen. what would you say, though, to younger voters who might look at this and say, "look, this is the tories again,
8:04 pm
protecting pensioners now and not caring enough about younger generations" ? if you try to ignore this, if you try to pretend there isn't an issue, it's not doing anybody a favour. what we believe in is a proper, dignified retirement, but also being fair to future generations of taxpayers. annmarie lochrie is a music teacher in glasgow. as a 39—year—old, she is one of those who will have to keep going for longer before her pension kicks in. i wouldn't want to work full—time until i was 68. the thought of being forced to. some people will not be in the luxurious position of having enough cash saved to do so, you know, to stop early and perhaps wait it out for a few years. the tories have been accused of trickery by making this announcement after the election. they know it's not exactly appealing, telling millions of us we'll have to work longer, but they believe it is a must do rather than a political win.
8:05 pm
we think it's a real mistake. we want to look at a more flexible state retirement age, we want to take into account the nature of work, so some work being much more arduous, more physically demanding, but also in terms of how people are, how long they contribute to the system. the government knows this is controversial and won't try actually to rewrite the law for months. notjust the change, but making it, will take some time. let's cross live to bristol and speak to macolm mclean, the former chief executive of the pensions advisory service and now a senior consultant at the firm barnett waddingham. thank you for being with us. the government say they do not have any choice on this? they always have choice, of course, as to what money
8:06 pm
is spent and how it is spent. there is spent and how it is spent. there isa is spent and how it is spent. there is a legal requirement that every five years or so the government is required to do a review of state pension age. state pension age was six —— fixed for 65 for men and 60 for women since 1948 and carried on that way pretty well until recently. it has been decided that since people are living much longer that the age has to go back, it is going back gradually and is due to reach 68 in 2037. the government has brought forward the age, taking account of a review conducted by a gentleman called mr criddle and, who made this recommendation and they have acted on it. it is controversial, any move in the state pension age affects people and is quite disillusioning for many young people, who see the state pension age going further and further away.
8:07 pm
do you think it is the right decision, the government says we are living longer but a report the other day said that we are living longer but the rate of increase of life expectancy has, in fact, been slowing down. it is still going up but not as quickly, according to the gentleman who conducted the review, an academic. 0ther surveys have not suggested that is the case. it depends which one you look at, i'm afraid, as to where the truth is. 0r ican afraid, as to where the truth is. 0r i can say about that as there will bea i can say about that as there will be a further review in five years if, in fact, the rate has slowed down then one would hope that the government would make further adjustments to state pension age and move it the other way, but that is for the future. labour say it is picking the pockets of millions in their 40s? it shows how much the state pension costs, judging by the amount that is saved by this
8:08 pm
relatively minor adjustment to the age at which you can claim. there is age at which you can claim. there is a lot of money at stake, and the government has to get priorities right as to what it spends on, and this is one factor which they need to ta ke this is one factor which they need to take into account in all areas, particularly in relation to the state pension age, which has cost attached to it. i think it was expected that they would accept the recommendation of this review and it has not come as too much of a surprise. bearing in mind that for people aged under 39, they would have had 68 as their state pension age anyway under previous increases made, itjust age anyway under previous increases made, it just affects age anyway under previous increases made, itjust affects this particular group of people aged between 39 and a7. it is not everybody that is affected by this. that is the trend going forward. i would not rule out the possibility that going back even further in the future. thank you very much, malcolm
8:09 pm
mclean, the former chief executive of the pensions advisory service. now we can also speak to the former conservative pensions minister, baroness ros altman. thank you for being with us. what is your view? labour says it amounts to robbery, millions of a0—year—olds picking their pockets by the government is the. i really can't see it that way. clearly the government needs to be mindful of controlling the costs of the state pension. the labour ma nifesto the state pension. the labour manifesto was calling for the state pension never to rise from 66 and just keep it there. i could not possibly agree with that, the cost would be enormous. but i think maybe we should rethink how the state pension age itself works, maybe we need more allowance for people who will not have such a long life expectancy and who genuinely cannot
8:10 pm
wait until 6768 to get their state pension. maybe we could enable those people or people in particular circumstances to get their state pension a bit early, so there is a flexible band of ages rather than one age which keeps changing. the question of life expectancy is the key. the government says we are all living longer, life expectancy is extending, yet labour say there was a report the other day saying that the rate of increase of life expectancy is slowing down so maybe we are not all living longer. what is your view? one of the big problems is this idea that we are all living longer. what we are saying is that the average life expectancy is rising. but there are still lots of people who have much lower than average life expectancy,
8:11 pm
we have no account is taken of them in the state pension system at all. some will have had very hard physical labour lives, left school at 15 ori6, physical labour lives, left school at 15 or 16, worked for 50 or more yea rs, at 15 or 16, worked for 50 or more years, contributed to national insurance for years, contributed to national insurance for more years, contributed to national insurance for more than 50 years and cannot get a penny of state pension until whatever the minimum starting age is. if we can have a more flexible approach recognising these differences, and the difference in life expectancy between some places in scotland in some places in london can be 20 years or so. we live in a time where retirement is more flexible, people don't suddenly stop work at one age, people's lives are more flexible and i think we need to make a national insurance system fits better. and we could do that. these changes will not start for another 20 years or so, there is
8:12 pm
time to get this rate, there will be another state pension review in the next parliament. we need to bear in mind that the state pension itself has nothing to help people with the cost of long—term care. the welfare state was designed to think it was only a pension that you needed in retirement, 21st—century retirement, you might need a pension but you might also need some extra money when you can't live independently, and our national insurance system does not recognise that. when we are reviewing that he can review everything else. we focus on the idea of raising retirement age, is that the only tool in the policy box? is there any other way of making the sums add up? yes, there are other ways. for example, increasing the number of years over which you need to have contributed in order to get a full state pension, or having this ability to
8:13 pm
ta ke pension, or having this ability to take a reduced pension earlier, your choice, cost neutral to the state on the calculated figures, allowing people to get some money early. right now, unless you are healthy and wealthy enough to wait longer, you may get nothing. whereas if you can wait, you could get even more state pension. let's have it working flexibly on the other side, you could get a lower state pension sooner could get a lower state pension sooner if you want to, or recognise that if someone has had 50 years of national insurance they could start taking their pension, maybe at 66. baroness ros altman, the former conservative pensions minister, thank you. and we will be speaking to anotherformer thank you. and we will be speaking to another former pensions minister, the liberal democrat steve webster, at around 8:a5pm. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:a0 this evening in the papers. our guests tonight are the broadcaster lynn faulds wood,
8:14 pm
and deputy political editor of the telegraph ben riley—smith. dojoin us for that. the bbc has disclosed the salaries of its top stars after being compelled to do so by the government. chris evans is the highest paid on the list, with a salary of more than £2 million. gary lineker earns over £1.75 million, and graham norton over £850,000 — though that figure doesn't include his tv chat show. the disclosure has divided opinion, with some saying it's unfair on the corporation, others questioning the bbc‘s use of public money. there's also criticism that only a third of the names on the list are women. the bbc‘s director general defended the salaries, saying the corporation has to work in a very competitive market. 0ur media correspondent david sillito reports. the secrets are out —
8:15 pm
gary lineker of match of the day is the second highest—paid star in the bbc. behind him is graham norton. but at number one, it's chris evans on £2.2 million for presenting on radio 2 and top gear. there was a little crowd of reporters waiting as he left work today. we are the ultimate public company, i think. and therefore i think it's probably, on balance, right and proper that people know what we get paid. and here are the details. gary lineker‘s deal is heading towards £1.8 million. radio 2'sjeremy vine takes onjust under £750,000. huw edwards earns between £550,000-£599,000. and john humphrys from the today programme and mastermind gets almost £650,000, and today he was the one facing the tough questions. what do i do?
8:16 pm
on paper, absolutely nothing that justifies that huge amount of money. if you compare me with lots of other people who do visible... if a doctor saves a child's life, or if a nurse comforts a dying person. however, we operate in a market place. i think i provide a fairly useful service. somebody has to do the job of trying to hold power to account. what's also notable are the names that are missing. no david dimbleby. no david attenborough, no mary berry. anyone paid through an independent production company or the bbc‘s commercial arm isn't on the list, so graham norton's earnings from his production company are probably not included. but it is still a list of 96 names earning more than £150,000. we are constantly working at ensuring that we get the balance right between our public, who want to have great shows presented by stars and great presenters, and they also wanting to know that their money, and it's their money,
8:17 pm
public money, is being spent properly. that's always a balance, and over the last two or three years, yes, some key presenters and others have taken pay cuts. but is it enough? 0n the bbc tour today in salford there were some who felt it could go further. they probably should be well paid. they're doing high—pressure jobs, a lot is expected of them, but it's hard to imagine earning sums like that. so i'm going to say, no, they're not worth that. it's a national treasure. it's really important, so we should be able to pay competitive rates. i am a bit shocked at what chris evans gets paid. they are on large amounts, but i've noticed that the women are on a lot less. indeed, the highest—paid woman only just makes it into the top ten. claudia winkleman at around £a50,000. indeed, looking at the list, two thirds of the names are men. in the top 20, there arejust five women, and when it comes to black or asian or bame presenters, there's
8:18 pm
not one in the top 20. this is license fee payers' money. they need to know where the money is being spent and that they're getting that value for money, and i think by having that transparency, we have the opportunity to see where there's maybe gender pay gap, and where there's issues about bame presenters perhaps not being paid as much as others. meanwhile, at radio 2, the listeners were turning the tables onjeremy vine. are you embarrassed to pick up your paycheque? and outside, more questions. i'm just sorry, i think the bbc's really hurting today. the highest—paid bbc actor? derek thompson, charlie from casualty. of course, most actors are off the list, because they work for independents, and with amazon and netflix, talent costs are rising. it's notjust itv outbidding the bbc any more, but for those paying the license fee, today has been an eye opening glimpse into where their money has been going on. david sillito, bbc news.
8:19 pm
the headlines on bbc news: the government brings forward plans to raise the retirement age to 68 — it means anyone currently aged between 39 and a7 will have to work a year longer. the salaries of the bbc's top—earning stars are revealed — just a third of those earning over £150,000 are women. residents of a cornish village begin the clean—up, a day after being hit by devastating flash floods. sport now, and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. good advice hello. england and scotla nd good advice hello. england and scotland have been playing for around half an hour in the women's european championship group again, it is all going the way mark sampson's side so far. jodie taylor raced away and gave england the lead
8:20 pm
after just ten raced away and gave england the lead afterjust ten minutes. taylor was on hand a few minutes ago to add a second goal after some hesitancy in the scotland defence. a long day back —— way back for scotland, even longer a minute ago. ellen white made it 3—0. celtic have clinched a place in the third round of the champions league. that is if they avoid serious mishap against linfield. brendan rodgers' site lead 2-0 linfield. brendan rodgers' site lead 2—0 from the first leg, it is 3—0 as scott sinclair gave celtic the lead after just five minutes. they will play either rosenborg of norway or league of ireland champions dundalk, who drew 1—1 in their second leg tonight. rosenberg are leading 3—2 on aggregate, playing extra time at the moment. chelsea have agreed terms with real madrid for the transfer of their spanish
8:21 pm
striker, alvaro morata. the fee is belived to be in the region of £60 million, which would be a club record for the premier league champions. antonio conte missed out on the signing of romelu lukaku, who signed for manchester united for £75 million earlier this month. staying with the transfer window and the world's joint most expensive defender, kyle walker, has been speaking to the bbc about his record move from tottenham. the england right—back moved to city in a deal worth around £50 million — but he says he'll ignore the fee. coming from sheffield, moving down there when i was 19, to then come back appearfor that there when i was 19, to then come back appear for that amount of money, it is a big fee, but that is nothing to do with me. ijust had to play the game that i play, play the gamei play the game that i play, play the game i have played in the last two seasons under pochettino at totte n ha m , seasons under pochettino at tottenham, that has got me to where
8:22 pm
iam tottenham, that has got me to where i am now. i tottenham, that has got me to where iam now. i do tottenham, that has got me to where i am now. i do need to change, i just need to build on it, and build on it in the right way. scotland's maria lyle has won great britain's 21st medal in the women's t35100 metres at the world para—athletics at the london stadium. the teenager took bronze in 1a.a5 seconds. isis holt of australia took gold. chris froome's lead in the tour de france is now up to 27 seconds after today's stage 17, which was won by slovenia's primoz roglic. german sprinter marcel kittel, who was leading the greenjersey competition, was involved in a crash early on and had to abandon the race with a shoulder injury. it was a brilliant effort by roglic, who started the day 37th and is no threat to the leaders. he broke away to win the stage by over a minute. it came down to a sprint for second between froome and his rivals for second place — froome now leads colombia's rigoberto uran and frenchman romain bardet by 27 seconds. fabio aroo of italy is down to fourth overall.
8:23 pm
the 1a6th 0pen golf championship gets under way at royal birkdale tomorrow morning — and one man who has flown under the radar in the build—up is former world number one jason day. the australian has dropped to number six in the rankings after a slump in form — perhaps understandable after his mum was diagnosed with lung cancer at the end of last year. day admitted that golf has taken a back seat recently. i needed to take some time off, because i thought i was losing my mum. ididn't because i thought i was losing my mum. i didn't think she was going to be around any more so i needed to make sure i spent all the time the pair that i could, because leading up pair that i could, because leading up to that i would see her once every year. it was nowhere near enough time to be able to spend with your mum. so... saying that, everything seems like it's kind of coming back into balance for me and
8:24 pm
iam able coming back into balance for me and i am able to focus on just really going after and working hard. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. thank you. a big clean—up operation has been taking place in cornwall, after the flash floods that swept through the village of coverack on the lizard peninsula. three hours of torrential downpours yesterday sent a four—foot wall of water crashing through the area, with some people having to be rescued from the roofs of their homes by helicopter. 50 properties have been damaged. 0ur correspondentjon kay has spent the day in coverack assessing the extent of the damage. he's sent this report. look at the mess, all this mud everywhere. back home, but it's not the home they know and love. chris and penny's place has been trashed. the water was higher than their heads. they escaped upstairs. and here they are last night, as the water raged below, the couple airlifted to safety by the coastguard. ijust wanted to get
8:25 pm
and out and get away. they told me it was heartbreaking to look down from the helicopter at their flooded property. it was just like the titanic sinking, you know? it was really upsetting. that made me upset, and he was crying and upset. he worked so hard and made it so nice, and then we get mud in everywhere. you just give up, don't you? no, you don't give up. it all happened in minutes. torrential rain, then tonnes of water thundering down from the hills, carrying everything in its wake. mary has found her elderly mother's walking frame among the piles of debris. next to it, even her kitchen sink. it's happened, we can't put it back, we've just got to get on and carry on and do what we can. it will get back to normal, we're cornish — that's what we do. the mud and rocks can be cleared
8:26 pm
quickly, but major structural repairs will also be needed. the main road into coverack looks like it's been ripped apart by an earthquake. at this time of year, there'd normally be thousands of holiday—makers driving down this road every day, to get to the harbour, but it's going to be a while before anyone can down here. caroline davies was rescued from this car. today she realised how close she'd been to where the road collapsed. it's very, very shocking. it really is, to think one day you're just driving along in your car and then this happens. they're used to bad weather here, but they hope they won't have to deal with anything too extreme for a while. hundreds of gay and lesbian people of south asian origin are believed to be under pressure to marry someone of the opposite sex.
8:27 pm
west midlands police says dozens of people have come forward seeking help after their families have tried to force them into a heterosexual marriage because they don't agree with gay sex. 0ur midlands correspondent sima kotecha reports. cosmopolitan birmingham, a city which reflects much of the west midlands with its large ethnic minority population. but in some cases social conservatism can cause problems. decades of pressure you put on as a child that you have to conform, marry a woman. it made me wish that i could be the straits that he wanted. a gay cede man who felt he was trapped in a lie until he told his family he was homosexual. —— a gay sikh man. his father will not accepted. he's still said just get married, it is a phase, once you get
8:28 pm
married, it is a phase, once you get married everything will be fine. you get told that if you follow what your parents want you to do, you will be cured or you will be straight. he eventually married his partner but his father did not go to the wedding. it also affects the lgbt community... at a conference, police in birmingham talk about how strong anti—gay sentiment still exist in many south asian families. homophobia is right there in some communities. —— is rife in some communities. —— is rife in some communities. to be seen as gay, lesbian, bisexual, it can absolutely destroy the dynamic of that community. 0ver community. over the last week we have spoken to 22 gay and lesbian people of south asian heritage from here in the west midlands. they all told us that at some point they were pressurised to marry somebody of the opposite sex. in many of those cases they even
8:29 pm
said they considered doing so because they did not want to bring shame on their family. 1a00 people as the government for help last year about forced marriage, only 30 bollettieri said they were homosexual. police want religious figures to speak out more against what is happening. islam is categorically against forced marriage. it is important we are sensitive to the concerns of young people and we give them the care to grow and become healthy members of society. homosexuality is illegal of south asia but many argue that it is not here at people must abide by british laws and practices. now we will pause to look at the weather with ben rich.
8:30 pm
showers and thunderstorms at what time or another over the last 2a hours for many parts of the country, but the focus for the most torrential rain has shifted to north wales in north—west england. we have seats really vicious downpours during the latter afternoon and early evening, some of them giving a lot of rain in a short space of time. showers and storms drifting eastward, much of the thunder will fade away, out west it will turn cooler and fresher by the end of the night, a side of things to come. tomorrow, eastern areas will start quite cloudy and humid with rain, road west things will brighten, spells of sunshine and cooler, fresh air returns from the atlantic. showery raided to northern ireland later in the day but temperatures lower than they have been, 70 degrees in glasgow belfast. stayed cool through friday into the weekend, with further spells of rain
8:31 pm
at times. this is bbc news. the headlines: the government brings forward plans to raise the retirement age to 68 — it means anyone currently aged between 39 and a7 will have to work a year longer. the salaries of the bbc's top—earning stars are revealed — just a third of those earning over £150,000 are women. the clean—up is under way in a cornish village to repair the damage caused by flash floods. the kremlin has branded reports of a secret meeting g20 summit as "absurd". the white house has admitted the two men had a brief discussion, with only a translator present. the leader of kensington
8:32 pm
and chelsea council has told her cabinet that it needs to change fundamentally if it is to regain the trust of the community after the grenfell fire. elizabeth campbell, who replaced the former council leader nicholas paget—brown after he resigned over his handling of the tragedy, said re—building trust would be a ‘brick—by—brick‘ decision. it was the first such meeting since the council cabinet was abandoned last month over the presence of journalists in the crowd. this time the meeting was held in public, with around 70 survivors present. the culture of this council will change. in practicalterms, we will create a future of this borough together with you, the residents. 0ur councillors and ceosenior
8:33 pm
executives will not decide this for residents, but with residents. we will rethink all our plans for regeneration in this borough. we will work with residents to create new plans, and you will vote on any results. if people vote against it, we will go back to the drawing board together and start again. secondly, how we work for and with our community will change. we need to understand and appreciate the strength that is in our neighbourhoods, the very strength that stepped into the void after the fire. that is elizabeth campbell, the new leader of kensington and chelsea council. sid—ali atmani was one of several residents of grenfell tower who spoke at the meeting. he said that the community would not simply follow what the council has planned.
8:34 pm
they prepare this as a business again. it's not going down. nothing is going to change. they changed something. you know what they changed? something. you know what they changed ? do you something. you know what they changed? do you know what is it? the names. just the names. but we are still here, with our soul, with our spirit, and the people we have dying, they didn't disappear. they stay with us. and we have a powerful god, and we have them with us. and the truth is going to come out, and you will all perish. —— you will all pgy- you will all perish. —— you will all pay. you will all pay, like it or not. we are not going to follow any of this, i tell you now. we will
8:35 pm
follow each other. that was one of several residents at g re nfell tower that was one of several residents at grenfell tower speaking at that meeting. wyre davies is in west london for us. it seemed a pretty emotionally charged meeting. yes, and occasionally angry. there is an overspill area here where those residents and supporters and demonstrators who cannot get in our watching on a screen. for the protesters, elizabeth campbell and her ruling group are part of the problem, and they want the whole group to resign and there to be new elections. but she did sound and look a lot more competent than her predecessor and came up with some concrete proposals. she said that a00 new social housing units would be built in the next four years. 68
8:36 pm
homes would be identified in the next two weeks, with another 31 homes bought by the council in the next few weeks. that shows you the council is prepared to dig deep into its many millions of pounds of reserves to buy and to identify homes for those residents who have not yet been offered new homes. she says that the rebuilding process must continue. but the problem for many of these residents is that as competent and is promising as she may look, she and her council are pa rt may look, she and her council are part of the problem. one resident said that they had no legitimacy, and as long as they remained in position, then the wounds caused by that fire that happened five weeks ago would not begin to heal. 0ne woman held up the keys to have flat tonight and dangled them in front of the assembled council chamber. the
8:37 pm
keys to her flat in which her only daughter died. a very emotionally charged meeting. many of these protesters will not be satisfied with the promises the council makes. thank you very much. more on one of our other top stories this evening. some of the bbc's highest paid presenters, actors and newsreaders have had their salaries published. chris evans was at the top of the list of top earners, making more than 2.2 million pounds in the last financial year. well, one of the presenters named in today's list is radio 2'sjeremy vine, who received upwards of £700,000 pounds last year. discussing the story on his programme this lunchtime, he was questioned by a caller from wales. harryjones in glamorgan, good afternoon. you can say what ever you want. can i say first of all that i
8:38 pm
enjoy your programme and i enjoy you personally, but i'd like to ask you a direct question. are you embarrassed to pick up your pay cheque? do you know, ijust feel very lucky every day, is the answer. ido very lucky every day, is the answer. i do think you are overpaid.|j very lucky every day, is the answer. i do think you are overpaid. i don't wa nt to a nswer i do think you are overpaid. i don't want to answer that really, because i don't think it's the moment for me... jeremic, you spend your life time asking people questions. this isa direct time asking people questions. this is a direct question. do you think that you, the rest of the bbc staff, claudia winkleman and chris evans, do you think that they are overpaid? i work do you think that they are overpaid? iwork in do you think that they are overpaid? i work in the coal industry, a coal miner, iwork i work in the coal industry, a coal miner, i work in construction, and i have seen men buckle up from doing ha rd have seen men buckle up from doing hard graft all their life, and nothing to show for it. how can you people justify the amount of money you are earning? jeremy vine,
8:39 pm
answering the questions for once. but what do licence fee payers make of it? this is what a few people in salford had to say earlier i'm quite shocked that chris evans is at the top. i wasn't aware he is that relevant any more. gary lineker. .. it's that relevant any more. gary lineker... it's a lot of money. i'm not sure the public really needs to know this kind of information. it's just going to wind people up. they are on large amounts, but i've noticed that the women are on a lot less. a lot of them dojust as good a job as the men, so they should be on the same money. the bbc should be allowed to be competitive and pay competitive rates, because we want people to watch the bbc. it's a national treasure. it's really important, so we want to pay competitive rates. but i am shocked at what chris evans gets paid. butjames purnell, the bbc's director of radio and education explained why some star's received seemingly high salaries. if you got all of chris' listeners
8:40 pm
together and ask them to pay for him for a week, it would be less than 1p per person. 0urjob is to put on world —class per person. 0urjob is to put on world—class programmes, and to do that, we have to pay world—class talent. we typically pay less than the market, but we have to pay to be able to do ourjob. what has emerged has been this gender gap between men and women. chris evans earning something like five times more than the top earning woman at the bbc. is that right? people do very different jobs. you can go mad comparing x with y. per listener, it is less than one peer week, and we know he
8:41 pm
has had offers significantly above this in the past. we take this very seriously, but we have to have the balance between getting the right stars and paying the right amount. about gender inequality there, when you said that people do different jobs, are you suggesting that there isn't gender inequality? the facts show we have a 10% gender pay gap, which is compared to 18% in the economy overall. the bbc has a more equal balance than other companies. men... we want to have 50% men and 50% women by 2020, and get rid of the gender pay back. we have made a lot of changes over the past three yea rs. lot of changes over the past three years. 20% of the people on the list are from ethnic minority backgrounds. we have been transforming the bbc. we should be
8:42 pm
the best, because we are publicly funded, and we are determined to do that. the director-general said that on that, the bbc is doing better than other broadcasters. do you have evidence that? yes you can look at the annual reports of the other broadcasters. we and channel a are neck and neck, but we are better than everybody else in the industry, so compared to itv, for example, we have twice as many senior managers who are women. if you are saying there is gender inequality, will you be offering pay rises to your female stars ? be offering pay rises to your female stars? we go through everybody's contract every few years, and we will take those factors into account. the most important thing is to have the right next generation coming through. you have seen that with reporters like laura kuenssberg. we need to have the investment to get the right next generation of talent to achieve that
8:43 pm
aim. the former eastenders star paul nicholls is recovering in hospital in thailand after being seriously injured when he fell from the top of a waterfall on the popular island of koh samui. he broke both his legs and smashed one of his kneecaps. he was trapped for three days before being rescued, after his abandoned motorcycle was spotted nearby. from january, businesses will be banned from charging fees on transactions, made with a debit or credit card. it follows a directive from the european union, with the fees often applied by airlines, food delivery companies, and small businesses. the treasury says the cost to consumers, is around £a73 million a year. it is arguably the country's favourite fish and now north sea cod is officially back on the menu again. the marine stewardship council says cod stocks have finally recovered from decades of overfishing.
8:44 pm
lorna gordon has been finding out what this means for our fishermen and the fish on our plate. in peterhead harbour, the biggest whitefish port in europe, the fishermen are off—loading their latest catch. it has been a good few days at sea for these trawlermen. among the fish being off—loaded, cod — and plenty of it. we have increased the net sizes to reduce the catches ofjuvenile cod. 0ne decade ago the cod fisheries in the north sea were close to collapse, but quotas and measures taken by the fishermen themselves have helped the stock recover. scottish fishermen have also been in restricted areas for spawning cod, and high abundance areas of cod. in some years there was upwards of 50,000 square miles closed off to scottish fishermen. their hard work has paid off. at peterhead fish market, there is now plenty of cod for sale, and from today all of it will be
8:45 pm
certified as sustainable. extremely pleased.. it has taken us eight or nine years to get here. a huge sacrifice. we have seen the dark days, but now we have the bright days. what you see is the pinnacle of that. for the wider fishing community the upturn in the cod stocks is one of several reasons they're feeling buoyed. dozens of new boats are on order for the fleet here at peterhead. there is a real sense of optimism amongst the fishermen here that the work they have done to preserve the fish stocks in the north sea is helping to protect their industry forfuture generations. and the sustainability certifications that has been awarded to north sea cod could well mean new markets opening up for the fishermen and their catch. a lot of supermarkets are looking for a sustainable, msc—certified product. so now that the cod here is msc—certified it could be easier to sell to a number of uk supermarkets and fish and chip restaurants as well.
8:46 pm
so what does this mean for those of us who love cod? it's great news that it is back on the menu from a sustainable source. local and sustainable, it's good. having something that has that traceability is important. for somebody of my age, i think cod hasn't been offered or been around for many years. it's lovely to see it back on offer. there will be regular checks to ensure that cod stocks in our waters off our shores remain at healthy levels. but there is confidence that, after years of decline, north sea cod is sustainable once again. the headlines on bbc news: the government brings forward plans to raise the retirement age to 68 — it means anyone currently aged between 39 and a7 will have to work a year longer. the salaries of the bbc's top—earning stars are revealed — just a third of those earning over £150,000 are women.
8:47 pm
the clean—up is under way in a cornish village to repair the damage caused by flash floods. ina in a moment, they've lain at the bottom of a remote scottish loch for more than 70 years. now an operation is under way to raise the bouncing bombs secretly tested during the second world war. let's return to our top story, the raising of the state pension age to 68 from 2037. it means millions of people now in theirforties will have to work a year longer, before receiving their state pension. let's speak to the former liberal democrat pensions steve webb, now director of policy at royal london.
8:48 pm
hejoins us from his home just outside bristol. is this the right move for the government? the labour party say it is picking the pocket of millions of people in theirforties. is picking the pocket of millions of people in their forties.|j is picking the pocket of millions of people in their forties. i think it had to be done. asking people to work for longer is never going to be popular, but if we are living longer, someone has to pay. if we keep pension age is static, it's people like me, aged 52, saying to my children, you pay. when i'm older, you can pay for my health care, social care and state pensions. there is a balance to be struck, and i think they have struck it well. this is predicated on the idea that people are living longer. a report the other day said, actually, that's not necessarily true. life expectancy is growing, but at a lower rate. that is right, and that's why they have to review
8:49 pm
this every five years. it's been said today that they are not going to pass a law based on what they've said today. they will review again in five years' time, when they have a lot more evidence. it could be that pensions don't go up as much as planned. if you look at decades and decades of trends, we have been living dramatically longer. certainly for men, 100 years ago, the pensions age was 65, and it's still the same today. the labour party are saying this is all part of the government's austerity agenda, pushing people to work longer and longer to pay for theirfailed policies. but it doesn't affect anybody for at least 20 years, so not until the late 20 30s. this is nothing to do with balancing the books today. it won't make a difference to the government ‘s finances for 20 years. it is being
8:50 pm
realistic. when the idea of this legislation went through, the labour party didn't object to it in principle. of course it is populist to oppose increases in pension ages, but not increasing pension ages has a cost as well, a cost to tomorrow's workers, my children's generation, giving them bigger tax bills because i'm not prepared to work longer. raising it to 68, this could go on and on. the retirement age could be 70 or71. it and on. the retirement age could be 70 or 71. it could well be that for people in their 20s, but only if the experts think they will be living well into their 90s. if we have evidence that people are living well into their 90s, how can we begin paying pensions in the mid—60s. this will never be popular, but pension ages, with plenty of notice, do need to increase. thank you. the first of the bouncing bombs
8:51 pm
which have lain at the bottom of a remote scottish loch for more than 70 years has been raised. codenamed "highball" these were tested during the second world war in secret on the loch. the weapons were the naval equivalent of the bouncing bombs used in the dambusters raid. as catriona renton reports from the glenstriven estate, it's hoped more bombs will soon be raised. this loch has guarded secrets for more than 70 years. yesterday afternoon, one of them was revealed, the first of the bouncing bombs tested here during the second world war was raised. the arm, code—named "highball", was invented for use against enemy ships. it was in remarkable condition is after more than seven decades. it's absolutely fantastic. we've got examples of what everyone of barnes wallis's
8:52 pm
bombs in museums, apart from "highball". so to have this one in almost factory condition, it really is great. the lock was shrouded in secrecy during the tests. smoke was generated along its banks are so people couldn't see what was happening. the high ball was designed for use against enemy ships. the lock was chosen for its similarity to wear the station was. the idea behind the bouncing bomb was that it did notjust explode where it landed, but would bounce over the surface of the water like a skimming stone until it hit its target. in the end, "highball" was never used. the project to raise the bombs has been a long time in the making. this has been a great opportunity for us to develop our
8:53 pm
capability. but to tie that in with a piece of history, to bring this naval piece of ordinance to the surface, which will now be open to the public, it's fantastic. divers working on the list have had to deal with the weather and some unusual challenges. it's got worse as the week has gone through, the visibility has reduced and we've had a massive jellyfish visibility has reduced and we've had a massivejellyfish infestation. it's pretty much like diving in a black bin bag down there, but it's well within our capabilities of what well within our capabilities of what we can do. we are one of the first members of the public are allowed up close to "highball", and i am allowed to touch it. it has been keptin allowed to touch it. it has been kept in water to stop it deteriorating further before it is restored properly. the high balls are set to go on display in museums in england in time for the 75th anniversary of the dambusters raid. a zoo in wiltshire is taking
8:54 pm
part in a radical plan to save the northern white rhino from extinction. there are just three left in the world, but at longleat safari park, the rhino's closest relatives are being drafted in to help. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle has this exclusive report. meet ebun — a seven—year—old southern white rhino who could save a species from extinction. the 1.5—tonne animal is sedated. a little agitated at first, but soon she is sound asleep. she is ready to take part in an experimental fertility treatment. scientists are harvesting her eggs to be fertilised in a lab. this is rhino ivf. this procedure is farfrom easy. the team here are keeping an incredibly close eye on this rhino. it is essential she stays under heavy sedation. over the last week or so she's been given hormone treatment,
8:55 pm
but what's been done today requires millimetre precision. egg collection is really only a technique that has been perfected over the last year. this is conservation science at its most extreme. here's the animal ebun could save, her closest living relative, the northern white rhino. 0nce widespread across central africa, today there are just three left on the planet. but they are unable to breed. back at longleat in a makeshift laboratory, the researchers check for eggs. they find one. they will take this southern white rhino egg and mix it with sperm from one of the last northern white rhinos, creating a hybrid. scientists say it is better than losing the species altogether. the last three can die at any time, they are not as old but anything can happen to them and then all their genetics would be lost. if we have at least 50% of this
8:56 pm
species preserved in a hybrid embryo, we would preserve at least half of this for future generations. with herjob done, ebun is soon back on herfeet. the safari park is proud of the role she will play. with the northern white rhino being sojeopardised in numbers, practising these techniques with southern whites is a huge advance in science and conservation, i suppose. it's a real honour to be able to help. the eggs are now being rushed back to a laboratory in italy. there is a 20—hour window to prepare them for fertilisation. they could be implanted back into ebun, but with her northern cousins so close to extinction, it's a race against time. time for a weather forecast now. we
8:57 pm
saw those flash floods in cornwall last night and tropical downpours. is there more of that on the way? things are beginning to calm down a bit from here on in. the weather has been changing over the last day or so from sunny and very warm to what will be cooler and much fresher. as the change has taken place, things have been turbulent. we saw some thunderstorms last night. but today, it has been slightly further north and west where we've seen the heaviest downpours, northern wales and parts of northern england now. this was the scene in parts of northern wales earlier on. some of these showers will work their way across scotland and northern england throughout the night. the skies clearing across northern ireland, and hear things will be turning cooler and fresher by the end of the night. still quite warm and mikey
8:58 pm
for the east. the eastern half of the country starts tomorrow quite cloudy and a little humid, but those areas of wet weather will clear away to the east. by the afternoon, most areas will be fairly bright, but temperatures down on where they have been. cooler, fresher air in place to ta ke been. cooler, fresher air in place to take us into the latter part of the afternoon. a bit more clouds starting to develop across the south west and west wales. the midlands should be dry. some heavy rain continuing across the far north of scotla nd continuing across the far north of scotland and showers further south, and further showery rain pushing its way back into northern ireland. that's what's to come on friday. this area of low pressure winding itself up and moving in slowly across the western half of the british isles. that low will continue to move very slowly during
8:59 pm
friday. south—west wales, parts of the west midlands and northern ireland could see wet weather for a good part of the day. ahead of that, largely dry. some warmth in the south—east, but generally speaking around 18 degrees. low pressure will drive the weather throughout the weekend. some spells of sunshine, but some showers as well. some showers heavy and possibly thundery, but nothing quite as dramatic as we've seen over the last few days. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source.
9:00 pm
i thought we were done with the g20 — but two weeks since hamburg it turns out donald trump and vladimir putin spent more time together than we realised. there they are at the meeting we knew about. we'll get into what happened a little later in the day. the white house says it was normal — not everyone agrees. it makes the president, frankly and disturbingly, not a credible in the white house response. the salaries of the bbc's top—earning stars have been revealed — and about two—thirds of those earning more than £150,000 are men. saudi arabia and its allies have dropped their demands of qatar and issued six broad principles instead. that's a climb down in most people's eyes. we'll look at why it's happened.

34 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on