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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 22, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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avatar and they are to talk animated avatar and they are to talk to the avatar. about a certain topic like their favourite holiday and they would have had time tracking their behaviours and seeing what they do when they stutter. they will be advising them what to do and how to improve their speech as well. gareth has previously improved a more basic headset to improve people ‘s confidence for an entire audience for them to speak in front of. and although he is only addressing the iron movement and not the speech element directly, he hopes this research might be able to improve the confidence of those who stutter andindeed the confidence of those who stutter and indeed those who don't. —— eye movement. and that is it for the short click. the full—length one is on—line right now. thank you for watching. we will see you soon. hello.
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this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. a big rise in the number of children declared homeless. it has increased by a third in three yea rs. councils in england say nearly a thousand each month are being forced into temporary accommodation. the government says it's taking action to tackle the problem. good morning. it's saturday the 22nd ofjuly. also ahead: people who fly drones will have to pass safety courses and register their devices following concerns over the danger they pose to aircraft. white house spokesman, sean spicer,
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explains why he's stepping down from the job afterjust six months. he said there were too many cooks in the kitchen. us media said he was unhappy about the new director of communications. mr spicer said he didn't want to be in the way. some of the memes you have to laugh at yourself a bit. but sometimes it goes from funny to mean. jordan spieth leads the open championship. he's two shots clear of the field, after mastering all the british summer had to throw at him, at royal birkdale. and the weather. good morning. looking like a sunshine and showers weekend for most of us. sunday looks like it will be the better of the two. i will have all the details and around 15 minutes. thank you. almost 1,000 children are being forced into temporary accommodation every month because more families are becoming homeless, according to councils in england. the local government association says the number has increased by a third in three years. it wants more powers
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to build what are described as genuinely affordable homes. 0ur social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan, reports. councils say more than 900 children, what they describe as the equivalent of a secondary school, become homeless each month. in total, they say more than 120,000 children and families are being supported by temporary accommodation. that has increased one third since 2014. councils in the south—east and major cities are dealing with the largest numbers. though cornwall and the isle of wight, for instance, also have significant problems. the councils say they need more affordable homes built. they want rules on borrowing relaxed to help with new investment in housing development. councils need the power to intervene more in the home market. we need more affordable housing built in the right place to provide decent affordable housing. we also need to be able to intervene earlier as well. rather than waiting for people to become homeless, we need to stop
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them becoming homeless in the first place. ministers say they're spending £550 million to tackle homelessness. a new bill passed earlier this year will prevent families from losing homes in the first place. michael buchanan, bbc news. later we'll be talking to a couple currently living in temporary accommodation with their children, about the effect it has had on family life. that's in about 20 minutes. drone owners will have to complete a safety awareness course under plans announced by the government. the unmanned aircraft will also have to be registered, amid growing concern about the dangers they pose to aircraft. earlier this month, five flights were diverted from gatwick airport because a drone was flown too close to the runway. our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones, reports. they've quickly become a very popular gadget, mostly used to take great aerial pictures. but as the use of drones has grown, so have concerns about the dangers they could pose. professional users already have to pass proficiency tests. now, the government wants to bring in wider regulation.
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the new rules mean any drone weighing more than 250 grams will have to be registered and the owner needs to complete a safety awareness test. and the use of geofencing, preventing drons flying near prisons and airports, will be expanded. people flying safely have nothing to worry about. research by the union found a drone weighing 400 g could damage a helicopter windscreen. although it would take a two kilograms drone to harm an airliner flying at high speeds. if there is a collision between a drone and a manned aircraft, be that a plane or a helicopter, it could be catastrophic. we have to do something now to make sure that does not happen. there are plenty of commercial uses for drones. amazon is testing them for parcel delivery. the government says it's keen to promote an exciting technology while ensuring it's
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used responsibly. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. boots the chemist has apologised for its response to a row about the cost it charges for the morning—after—pill. the chain initially rejected calls to reduce the price, saying it didn't want to encourage the misuse of emergency contraception, but after criticism from a string of labour mps, it now says it's "truly sorry." 0ur reporter, tom burridge, is outside one of their flagship stores in london. boots got a lot of criticism and now they have responded. yeah. essentially, they have almost done an about turn on the issue. where did it begin? the service that provides abortions in the uk, they we re provides abortions in the uk, they were calling on boots and other retailers in the uk to slash prices on the morning after pill, because it is so much cheaper in other parts of europe. at boots, you can get the cheapest version of it for just
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of europe. at boots, you can get the cheapest version of it forjust over £26. in tesco, you can get it for around £13, half the price. this row picked up speed on thursday when boots released a statement saying it would not reduce prices, saying it did not want to promote or encourage overuse of the morning after pill. that prompted an angry response from more than 30 female labour mps and some conservative mps as well, basically accusing the company of treating women like children and of taking a moral position on an issue of choice, whether or not to take the pill. last night we had a statement from boots, quite an unequivocal apology, really, saying the company was truly sorry for the poor choice of words causing misunderstanding and defence. they say they will now provide cheaper alternatives for the morning after pill in its stores. for the moment, thank you. the outgoing white house press
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secretary sean spicer has told a us television network that he resigned because he feared there would be "too many cooks in the kitchen" if he remained in hisjob. the american media reported he decided to quit because he was unhappy about president trump appointing the wall street financier, anthony scaramucci, as his new director of communications. 0ur washington correspondent, laura bicker, reports. it's all change at the white house. sean spicer is saying farewell. for six months and one day, he's been defender in chief for the often tumultuous the west wing. ijust felt it was in the best interests of the department, the press organisation, do not have too many cooks in the kitchen. sean spicer had controversy from his first briefing, just after the inauguration of donald trump. he berated reporters who said the crowd size was smaller than 0bama's. this is the largest period both in person and around the globe. he earned the nickname
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spicey when mocked on tv. he said some of it hit too hard. you have to laugh at yourself sometimes. but sometimes it used to mean. there is the difference. he left to give this man a clean slate to work with. wall street financier, anthony scaramucci, has a very different style with the press. 0utspoken and slick, he's fiercely loyal to the president. this young administration is desperate to break free from the swirl of controversy over whether russia helped donald trump win the white house. a new face may help, but the old problems will still need to be dealt with. laura bicker, bbc news, washington. britain's got talentjudges have paid tribute to the dog, pudsey, after his death was announced yesterday by his owner, ashleigh butler.
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they won the contest in 2012 with their dance routine to the mission impossible theme. ashleigh described pudsey as a "beautiful boy" who had changed her life. 0ne one of the judges tweeted "farewell toa one of the judges tweeted "farewell to a special dog the nation fell in love with." an official photograph has been unveiled to mark prince george's fourth birthday. the young prince has just returned to the uk, along with his parents the duke and duchess of cambridge and sister princess charlotte, from an official visit to poland and germany. 0ur royal correspondent, peter hunt, reports. beaming george at four, a prince poised to start school soon. a happy little boy, according to the photographer who took this official portrait. once more. george let loose on a violin. hamburg's young being encouraged
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to take up music almost something kate did in her youth. one day, william will be centre stage. not this day, which was left to his wife to take up the baton he declined. for a helicopter—mad young prince, a pre—birthday treat, being shown around one similar to the one his dad uses as an air ambulance pilot. this is the sort of moment when being on public display has its drawbacks. a sit—down protest from a princess not overly keen
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on delayed gratification. peter hunt, bbc news. sometimes i want to sit down and have a protest. what, right now? no, iamon have a protest. what, right now? no, i am on it. maybe later. mo farrah may be one of our most decorated 0lympians but now a graphic designerfrom swindon claims to have broken one of his world records. sir mo set the record for the 100—metre sack race in 2014 with a time of 39.91 seconds. but yesterday, dad of two stephen wildish took on the challenge and hopped over the line in just over 28 seconds. he's now waiting for his time to be officially verified in order to claim his new world record. good technique! you approved of it,
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his one—arm waving means of maintaining balance. we might have some thoughts on that later from mike. uk holidaymakers have been describing scenes of panic after a powerful earthquake struck the greek island of kos on thursday night. two people were killed and at least 100 people injured. 10,000 british tourists are said to be out there and many others are due to join them. so, what's the advice? joining us now from our london newsroom is emma coulthurst from the website travelsupermarket. com. good morning. thank you very much for your time. good morning. many people will be worried. not so much about whether another earthquake will happen, but what has happened to the infrastructure, the facilities over there, of many things they have booked. the epicentre was ten miles east of kos in greece. but it is kos that has had most of the damage. some of the
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buildings have been damaged. there was a bit of flooding in turkey, low—level flooding in bodram. if you are going to any of these places, and many british holidaymakers are going there this summer, the advice is to follow the commonwealth office advice, they are not advising against travel, but keep things in mind. flights are operating. there are about five or six flights from the uk, heathrow, glasgow. there is a flight from the east midlands. mostly this afternoon. and then flying out this afternoon. easyjet, they are all saying they are going and are scheduled. the flights are there, but what about accommodation? some buildings have been damaged. you are talking about flooding as well. and just general
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infrastructure, the resources, the facilities. they have been affected. it will not be, for some, the typical environment they expected for a family holiday. there is a bit of damage in the kos main part of the town. it is obvious advice, but don't go into buildings, near buildings, anywhere that has been damaged, anything vulnerable to damage... what if your hotel, the on new books, has been damaged? —— the one you booked. people have to be reassured that tour operators, if there is any risk, you will be moved. we have not heard of anyone having to be moved, any problems with hotels. i think the advice is just, you know, everything is as scheduled, flights are going. the commonwealth office is saying it is fine to travel. many people are
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going to be eastern med this summer. kos has had a bad time, a turbulent one, in the last two years, because of world events. and now people are going back in big numbers. there are a thousand people in kos at the moment. lights are going. —— 8000. people should not be concerned. what if you are out there at the moment and you see the damage? i know you said it is minimal, but we are showing some significant damage in pictures. what if they think it is not the environment they want to be? iam not not the environment they want to be? i am not safe and happy. what are your rights? the advice is it safe to travel. if people are concerned then quite rightly, they can talk to the tour operators and they can talk to the travel insurance as well. you might
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be able to claim in terms of disruption that if you are thinking, oh, i don't want to travel there, speak to your tour operator. 0nly oh, i don't want to travel there, speak to your tour operator. only if the foreign office say it is unsafe to travel somewhere can you get your money back but talk to your travel provider and speak to them about it. when we see pictures of people sleeping outside their hotels in these tourist areas, they have to have travel insurance to be guaranteed to get a refund or to be re— accommodated ? guaranteed to get a refund or to be re- accommodated? not at all, no. if there is any trouble with the hotel, there is any trouble with the hotel, the tour operator will move you. in terms of insurance, if you face any delays, you may be able to claim if you have that as part of your insurance, for any delays. thank you for joining insurance, for any delays. thank you forjoining us. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you both. sunshine
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and showers are the order of play for the weekend. they could be heavy with some hail and thunder possibly mixed in through the afternoon, particularly today. these hit and myth showers, some areas may stay dry. they are falling light which is good news after yesterday's strong winds. it is starting to feel which means the width will be getting light as the weekend wears on. we start off with a mixture, rain across northern areas and sunshine through central areas and showers across the state —— south—west. largely dry for northern ireland. central, southern, northern england. rain clearing away from eastern england. then for wales and the midlands, apart from the odd fog patch,it midlands, apart from the odd fog patch, it should be dry. showers already getting into the south—west and these will be moving north and east through the day. as the temperatures rise as well, the showers will become heavier. there
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will be some sunshine mixed in across northern england, southern scotla nd across northern england, southern scotland some torrential downpours. parts of the midlands in towards wales, some decent, good spells of sunshine and it could get up to 21 celsius. there could be a shower for the golf today and into sunday, u nless the golf today and into sunday, unless a chance of showers but cloudier skies with temperatures around the high—teens. wins remaining light. the showers right along this evening and they should clear a way. —— winds. there should be the chao into overnight. —— the odd shower. a cool start to sunday. showers developing again into the afternoon. more scattered than what we saw today. a good chance many places will stay dry. 23 is the high today and spend next week, a reach of high pressure else in. at least
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it isn't strong sunshine and it will feel a little bit warmer. 900 children a month are entering temporary accommodation. no child should be homeless, but according to latest figures. the local government association, which represents councils in england, says the number of children needing accommodation has risen by a third in three years, which it describes as ‘unsustainable'. so what's causing the problem, and what is the impact on the families involved? joining us is mark coleman and gillian cooper, who are currently living in temporary accommodation with their children. and, anne baxendale from the homelessness charity, shelter. could you establish your circumstances right now? you have a number of children and the place you are living. we have five children, three currently living with us. there are circumstances with the old to moving out. they wanted to spread
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their wings and it means we became under occupied which meant we couldn't afford the rent. the rent is made up of third number of occu pa nts. is made up of third number of occupants. ——a number of occupants. he wasn't going to take a lower rent and white top up the difference. it was about £400. the result? we asked to be evicted so we could get local authority help because we couldn't find any 3—bedroom properties for the rest of us. the local authorities said ok. we got evicted and then we went to the housing department who then rejected our application. that meant you and your children went through a number of different accommodation situations. we actually didn't know what to expect when we first got made homeless. it was a big shock when we
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we nt homeless. it was a big shock when we went into the whole family sharing one i’ooiti went into the whole family sharing one room and none of us could believe it. it wasjust, we actually got there at eight pm and we just didn't know what we were looking at and how long we were going to be there. nobody gives you any information. when removed from that, we had just come home from work and they said what are you doing here? we didn't have any notice we should be gone and then we got moved to another place which was much further than the children's schools. there was about a three—hour distance to go to school. then we moved back to the burrow that we were in originally. how typical is this story? in your experience? sadly, very common. there are places are there down the country having people in this situation every day. it's people who are living it. while we
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are people who are living it. while we a re clear people who are living it. while we are clear that temporary accommodation is vital in ensuring that no family has no roof over their head, we need to find good quality accommodation as fast as possible. not all of the properties we re possible. not all of the properties were up to scratch? who is responsible for making sure these guidelines is adhered to. local authorities have limited room when there are not enough affordable homes to put people in and also housing benefits have been frozen so there is no way of topping up the rent in private sector. yes, councils have a responsibility, some better than others. really, they are operating in a situation where there is not much they can do. should the priority always be given to families with children mr mark disruption to education in itself. —— families
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with children? the disruption to education in itself. no one was to see children growing up in a situation where they are being moved from pillar to post with no uncertainty. what has the impact been? tell us the ages of your children. i have a seven-year-old, 14—year—old and a 16—year—old. their mental health has really suffered. before this all started, i would say they would just like any other child. right now, because they are so unsure, child. right now, because they are so unsure, tomorrow we could be moving. we are living in a house today. tomorrow, i could be moving. we don't know where or when. they find it hard to find friends. should we talk to the neighbours? we might not be here tomorrow. they are so scared that i think they have suddenly become much closer to us
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because we are secure and we are the only thing that is sure in their lives. when removed from one bedroom to the house, they still save with us to the house, they still save with us in one bedroom in the house for at least four or five months. why don't you know when you are moving? is it just don't you know when you are moving? is itjust a lack of communication? yes. i think it is more like a nomadic life. because the councils are trying to find accommodations, it is the newest accommodation that is more suitable to your family. that is what they are doing. can i just ask, some people will be thinking, how is it that you got into this position in the first place? needing to help someone else. you know this there is often a blame attached to people in your circumstances for some reason. now you see how easy it is to slip to the other side where you do need
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help. that's what surprised us. in this particular vermin infested hotel, there were doctors, lecturers, everyone was working. there was no unemployed people. it wasjust a there was no unemployed people. it was just a complete there was no unemployed people. it wasjust a complete shock. when i think of homeless i think of people sleeping rough in the street, i don't think of families. it just got, it was a real eye—opener, that's i can say. it has certainly made me appreciate where i live. that's i can say. it has certainly made me appreciate where i livelj think anyone is very vulnerable to this happening. it could happen to anyone. all it will take is just a lack of money. we were working and there is lots of people working and then although they are homeless, they are still working. it could happen to anyone, we are not special in any way. it wasn't until we were made homeless that i found that out. and the government says it is
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working hard to tackle the problem will stop it is not that work at the moment isn't what is needed. it needs to change now. we need urgent action. yes, there has been some good announcement in the past few months from the government. and to build more homes. and that is very welcome. we look forward to working with them on that but we need more urgency and we need to make sure the government are not distracted from this mission, given everything else going on. we said the number of children in temporary accommodation has risen by a third. do you see the trend reversing? no. it takes time to build homes and in the meantime, with rents so high, we need to lift the freeze on housing benefit because that is the only way we can make sure that people on low or ordinary incomes can pay their rent each month. thank you all very much. thank you for sharing your story with us this morning. this
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coming up in the programme. he was the much—mocked press secretary that often became the story, now sean spicer is making headlines once again as he quits as donald trump's press secretary. we'll be looking at what this latest resignation means for the president's administration. stay with us. headlines coming up. hello. this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the weather is coming up. but first, a summary of this morning's main news: nearly a thousand children are being forced into temporary accommodation every month because more families are becoming homeless, according to councils in england. the local government association says the number has increased by a third in three years. it wants more powers to build what are described as "genuinely affordable homes." the government says it is investing £550 million to help tackle the problem. drone owners will have to complete a safety awareness course under plans announced by the government. machines that weigh more than 250 grams will also have to be registered, amid growing concern about the dangers they pose to aircraft.
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earlier this month, five flights were diverted from gatwick airport because a drone was flown too close to the runway. boots the chemist has apologised for its response to a row about the cost it charges for the morning—after—pill. the chain initially rejected calls to reduce the price, saying it didn't want to encourage the misuse of emergency contraception, but after criticism from a string of labour mps. it now says it's looking at lower priced alternatives. an official photograph has been unveiled to mark prince george's fourth birthday. it was taken at kensington palace by royal photographer chris jackson, who described the young prince as a "happy little boy." the prince has just returned to the uk from an official visit to poland and germany with the duke and duchess of cambridge and his sister, princess charlotte. he was mary poppins's friendly chimney sweep with a rather dodgy cockney twang. now dick van dyke has apologised for his accent, calling it "atrocious." the 91—year—old american actor made
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the comments after he was chosen by bafta to receive the britannia award for excellence in television. the star has long been derided for his attempt at an east end accent, but this is the first time he has publicly apologised for his efforts. charming to apologise. it is the "i" in that song that is wrong. charming to apologise. it is the "i" in that song that is wronglj charming to apologise. it is the "i" in that song that is wrong. i grew up in that song that is wrong. i grew up as in that song that is wrong. i grew upasa in that song that is wrong. i grew up as a child thinking he was from the east end. did you believe mary poppins was real as well? of course, she is! apparently they are going to remake it, but how could you do it without the original cast? anyway,
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can anyone stop jordan without the original cast? anyway, can anyone stopjordan spieth? not according to statistics. it is suggested he can tame all of the conditions and go on to win it. and so it's the american, jordan spieth, who heads the field at the halfway stage of the open championship. he negotiated some foul conditions at royal birkdale yesterday afternoon. the two—time major winner, lies on six under par, two shots ahead of his nearest rival, despite playing in the worst of the conditions. ian poulter is the best placed brit. he's three shots off the lead, after a consistent round yesterday. and after rory mcilroy feared he might miss the cut in the first round, he's bounced back, into a tie for seventh place on one under par. anything around even par, conditions will bring a good score. i got off to the best possible start. i made some birdies early on. i needed some big up and downs. it will be great to tee off late and have a lie—down in the morning,
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look at the pin locations, see how other players are playing certain holes. how the course should be played. ijust want a nice weekend without too much rain. the american leads after two rounds from his compatriot matt kuchar who's two back. ian poulter is the best—placed british player on three under par, with rory mcilroy‘s 68 putting him back in contention. 77 players remain. 79, their time is over. defending champion, henrik stenson, lies at two over par. his preparations for the second round were less than ideal, after the house that he's staying
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in, was burgled on thursday. clothes, personal effects and jewellery were stolen but stenson refused to blame that, for a poor round yesterday. not too much on, you know, the effect of today's round, i would say, but being with the police rather than staying where you want to do, it was a difficult evening, if i could put it that way. kadeena cox won britain's 14th gold at the world para athletics championships last night, winning the t38 400m. cox, who holds the world record in the event, beat the rest of the field by six seconds for her second medal of the championships. she'll run again today in the t38100m. cox won gold, silver and bronze on the track in rio last year and another gold in cycling. look at the distance! she'll run again today in the t38100m. cox won gold, silver and bronze on the track in rio last year and another gold in cycling. i was confident for 300 metres.
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it is massive. it was good. i did not know if i had the strength. i have not been on the bike. ijust needed to give myself a gap to have a bit of a buffer. usain bolt was victorious in his final race before his swansong at the world athletics championships in london next month. competing in the monaco diamond league, bolt produced a season's best, running under ten seconds for the first time this year. britain's cj ujah finished fourth. iam i am always excited for the championship. right now i am really excited going into the championship. i knew it was going to be energetic. i knew it was going to be energetic. i knew there would be many jamaicans. for me, i am excited to come into this. i willjust do my best as always, and that is it. and there was a great run from laura muir in the women's 3,000 metres. smashing her personal best by eight
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seconds as she finished third, a place ahead of her fellow scot eilish mccolgan who also set a new pb. 12 seconds faster than her previous best. chris froome is just two stages away from a fourth tour de france title. he finished in the bunch on stage 19 yesterday as norway's edvan bosen—hagen took the win. froome has a 23—second lead to protect going into today's time trial in marseille this afternoon. if he emerges unscathed, he'll be crowned champion on the champs elysses tomorrow. tom daley is through to the men's ten metre platform final at the world aquatics championships in hungary daley, who won bronze in this event in london, qualified in second place for this afternoon's showpiece. compatriot, matty lee, is also through. i think this year it has been all about enjoying it. last year was such a serious year with it in the olympic year. ijust wanted the best shot i could have. i wanted to have fun with it.
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wigan completed their regular super league season with a crushing 34—0 victory over leeds wigan had already qualified for the super eights, but ran in seven tries against an injury hit rhinos. there were wins elsewhere for leigh and hull fc, who move up to third. after a half century, in his first game back for surrey, kevin pietersen was brought back down to earth last night. struggling with a calf injury, he madejust nine, in their latest t20, blast game against middlesex. in his nine ball innings, he also found time to run out one of his teammates. surrey did manage to win though by 15 runs. but, yes, a bit embarrassing. last weekend, we had the british grand prix at silverstone. this weekend, it is the british speedway grand prix in cardiff. tai woffinden is in
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fifth place going into it. it should be fantastic. his press briefings gave birth to the phrase "alternative facts" and led to much mocking on social media, but sean spicer‘s brief but turbulent time as the face of president trump's administration is over. mr spicer quit his role as the white house press secretary, reportedly in response to an organisational shake—up. so where does that leave the trump administration? we'll look at the implications in a moment, but first let's remind ourselves of some of his most memorable moments. this was the largest audience to ever witnessed an inauguration period! both in person and around the globe. these attempts to lessen it are shameful and wrong. the default narrative is always negative
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and is demoralising. someone as this i and is demoralising. someone as this , this despicable, like hitler, they did not even sink to chemical weapons. bashar... did not even sink to chemical weapons. bashar. .. al... did not even sink to chemical weapons. bashar... al... al assad. you have mispronounced his name. bashar al—assad. so, you have mispronounced his name. basharal—assad. so, donald trump puts russian salad dressing on his salad and suddenly he is connected to russia. put your hand up like a big boys. are you 0k? to russia. put your hand up like a big boys. are you ok? i can sense the love—in the room. big boys. are you ok? i can sense the love-in the room. sean! sean!
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sean! sean! donald trump says it is all fine. with us now is james boys. are you surprised he has gone so soon?m has been on the cards for a long time, to be honest. he was the face of the donald trump administration coming in injanuary. in the last few weeks he has been replaced by his deputy. his replacement had been touted for a while. those briefings have gone off camera for a while. it was acknowledged donald trump was not happy with how the presentation had gone. that clip showed he was mocked by everyone on saturday night live. that did not go down well at the white house. for the last couple of weeks and months, many people have been going in to be interviewed. some from fox news. his
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demise had been forecast for a while. to what extent was that adversarial and sometimes comic approach to those press briefings, to what extent in the early days was that what donald trump wanted? presumably, it was the first day that they were arguing over the numbers at the inauguration. that set the benchmark for what. .. presumably, the white house thought that was the right approach, or he would have been gone a long time ago. possibly. this guy has a great relationship with the white house chief of staff, reince priebus. that kind of performance, you are right, as you refer to it, it is carried on last night with his new boss. he came in, the new white house communications director. donald trump want someone who with an entertainer at the podium. in the media that is fine. by the press needs someone who with an honest broker, someone who can convey the
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word of the white house. —— but. increasingly, there was a gulf between reality and what the press man was having to say. what about his replacement? a wall street financier, a business background, anthony scaramucci, who has already been up on the podium. is he confident? certainly he is confident. there is no doubt about it. he will do what donald trump wa nts. it. he will do what donald trump wants. the problem is you have a massive rift in the administration. donald trump wanted him, sean spicer did not come to that idea. steve bannon and priebus didn't. it is debatable how long he stays. what about the relationship with the press ? about the relationship with the press? to say that is fractious is an understatement. no doubt. is it
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hisjob to smooth an understatement. no doubt. is it his job to smooth that relationship out? anthony? the challenge fundamentally is donald trump wants someone fundamentally is donald trump wants someone who can fundamentally is donald trump wants someone who can go fundamentally is donald trump wants someone who can go out there and be quiet, you know, old and engaging with the media. i think donald trump in the white house has a different take about what it is the relationship should be with the media, the fake media, as he co nsta ntly refers media, the fake media, as he constantly refers to it to be increasingly, media outlets, including conservative ones, fox, the wall streetjournal, they understand what is going on. some have said they are lying. is donald trump is losing the rupert murdoch press, it is questionable where it goes from there. umm. .. press, it is questionable where it goes from there. umm... shall we press, it is questionable where it goes from there. umm. .. shall we see that again? it is an interesting reminder of... sorry, iwill ask that again? it is an interesting reminder of... sorry, i will ask you one more question, james. you mentioned the administration. just
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seeing this tweet, he will go on to bigger and better things, i just wonder if the staffing levels are collapsing around him. are they collapsing? is he just collapsing around him. are they collapsing? is hejust saying, right, a clean slate, i am starting again. his departure is the most visible departure from the white house. we have lost a federal bureau of investigation director. a white house press man. so many others. donald trump has to set the reset button. he has been in office six months. usually the administration would be touting great success. so far they have put someone on the supreme court, not unsubstantial, but they have not repealed 0bamacare and have not done anything else. keep us entertained. the weather.
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this weekend will have sunshine and showers. today, the most frequent showers. today, the most frequent showers. sunday will be better. there will be some sunshine between them and they will be light winds, which is good news after the atrocious windy weather in the west of the uk. brightening up thanks to this. this weather front goes north and clear its way east. sunshine to begin the day in central areas and also across northern scotland. northern scotland doing well today. staying dry with sunshine. turning warm. central and southern areas have a weather front bringing outbreaks of rain. northern ireland, the rain trying to get into eastern areas at times during the morning. drying up in the afternoon. sunshine in central areas. mist and fog. showers in the south—west. showers will continue to go north and east.
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through the afternoon becoming more widespread. it is this south—west quadrant, south wales, seeing the heaviest and most thundery showers. elsewhere, some good spells of sunshine, especially in northern ireland and the north of scotland. possibly 21 to the south. under those showers, it will feel more fresh. 17 degrees. there could be a show at royal birkdale. 19 degrees. nice in the sunshine. variable cloud and showers. sunshine and showers. they should tend to die away in england and wales in the evening and overnight as sky is clear. turning chilly. there will be some mist and fog to start sunday morning. a good deal of dry weather and sunshine. through the afternoon, showers developing once again. turning scattered. some areas turning dry. in the sunshine with light winds, fairly pleasant. 23 degrees. that
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fine weather continues on into monday and tuesday. that she dry things out. good sunny spells. feeling warm. temperatures widely in the low 20s. back to you. thank you. now it's time for newswatch with samira ahmed. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira amehd. coming up: news presenters featured prominently in the bbc‘s list of its best paid on—air stuff this week, but are they really worth the money? and how will the bbc deal with the gap in pay revealed between men and women? wednesday was a difficult day for the bbc. as ordered by the government, against its wishes, the corporation published the names and salary bands of all of its oniair employees paid more than £150,000 a year. this led to some uncomfortable interviews,
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with those unused to being on the receiving end of questions. what do i do? on paper, absolutely nothing that justifies that huge amount of money, if you compare me with lots of other people who do visible good, a doctor saves a child's live or a nurse who comforts a dying person. would you do the job for less money? yeah, of course i would. i've never for a second doubted how lucky i am to work in there and i'm just sorry, i think the bbc is really hurting today. john humphrys and jeremy vine there, who were the two leading news presenters on the list, earning over £600,000 and £700,000 respectively. they were followed by the likes of huw edwards on more than £550,000. andrew marr earning over £400,000. fiona bruce with more than £350,000 and laura kuenssberg on over £200,000, who was in same range as andrew neil, as wasjon sopel. many bbc outlets indulged in what some viewers felt was washing their dirty linen in public. including breakfast, with this surreal self—referential
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paper review, presented awkwardly by on—the—list naga munchetty and not—on—the—list charlie stayt. not every day the bbc breakfast sofa makes the front page of the sun, but there we go. the figures are out there. many of the papers, as naga's said, looking at some of the detail and some of the discrepancies highlighted. the daily mail saying "mutiny". bitter recriminations at the politically correct bbc as this gulf between men's and women's pay is revealed. so that's us on newswatch, broadcast during breakfast, showing a clip of breakfast, featuring a newspaper frontpage about breakfast. apologies for adding to the self absorption which on wednesday prompted this from rowena kay... and another twitter user called jerome thought... others felt the difference between men's and women's earnings
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revealed by the list was being poured over to excess, with helen blamires asking... well, amol rajan has been reporting on this story all week, as the bbc‘s media editor and hejoins me now. has it been awkward? not particularly, not particularly. i mean, maybe i have a certain advantage to many, that i have not in here that long so i haven't become best friends with various of the people that i was reporting on. you are talking about people like huw edwards, that you have to end up working with, but you just try very, very hard. you come across a lots awkward situations injournalism, you just try very, very hard to think, how would i cover this as an organization if it wasn't the bbc, if i was somewhere else, and you try and do it straight down the line. you have, of course, come from newspapers, the independent in
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particular, has it affected how you view the row over bbc pay? i don't think it has affected how i view the row. basically i approach this as a hack, i do not appraoch this as a company man. it is a juicy story, it's fantastically gossipy and exciting details. at it's core, this is a story which is a list of names, a list of numbers and ifind it completely fascinating so as an old—fashioned hack, i think this is a really... i wouldn't say sexy story but a juicy one. a lot of viewers say there was too much self—flagellating coverage, and the media talking about itself at the expense of other news. how would you answer that? i don't think it was self—flagellating. if you're the bbc you have to cover yourself in a way that tries to be fair and objective. you have to be tough. i was very conscious. i had two interview with tony hall on the news at ten, two nights in a row — there's no way i was going to let the director general get on to the news at ten — which is a prestige bulletin — and not give him a hard time. so, yeah, when i was editing the packages, i made sure that we were seem to be giving them a hard
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time but i don't think were seen to be giving them a hard time but i don't think that's self—flagellation. there is a hugely important public interest story, which is, how is public money spent? there is a question, did we do too much? that is complicated one, because it has to do with what else was on the news agenda. but i think we got it roughly right — i would say that, wouldn't i — but broadly speaking i'm pretty satisfied we got it about right. there is also an accusation from some viewers that news coverage actually focused too much on the gender gap to distract from the sheer size of the salaries? were you under any pressure to report the story in any way? i was under absolute no pressure whatsoever. i can tell you, hand on heart, no one tried to... maybe to go back to your first question, maybe you're conscious of a kind of environmental pressure but i came under no editorial pressure whatsoever to make sure i spun a particular line. having been a kind of media adviser and having thought about the cons in the previousjob and having gone through some pretty difficult things in myjournalistic career,
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like shutting a newspaper, i was obviously thinking to myself, what is the line that the bbc would like to put out. and i'm conscious that they feel they have a decent story to tell on gender — tony hall in particular because he has made particular strides. so i tried to make sure i did not focus too much just on gender and was kind of thinking about what the audience, what the public would care about and at base, if you're finding out that chris evans is paid £2.2 million you think, wow, that is a big number. that was at the forefront of my mind. and also notjust gender but there's other issues revealed by this list, like diversity, like class and i made sure i got those into my live for the airfor the ten o'clock news. thank you. pleasure. well, many of those who contacted newswatch expressed their dismay and disgust about the levels of salary revealed, and there was also concern about the gender disparity in pay — with the top seven on the list all men,
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and on the issue of race — the top 24 are all white. john maguire thought... mick warren had a similar view... one might assume that people are paid partly according to their experience, to the amount of work done, and the types of shows presented. for instance, john humphrys and jeremy vine both present tv quiz shows which contribute to their wage bills. trickier factors are how replaceable each person is and how much they would earn elsewhere. bbc says that, though it often pays below the market rate, it cannot ignore those rates. but that cuts no ice with david goodchild who told us... well, the bbc direct general, lord hall, responded to all these points in an interview he gave on wednesday. he said the gender pay gap was lower on the bbc than it was nationally, and pledged equal pay on the air between men and women by 2020. he pointed to the increased competition to the bbc
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for presenters, not just domestically, but from companies, such as apple and amazon, and he said he'd continue efforts to reduce the on—air wage bill. we are constantly working at ensuring that we get the balance right between our public, who want to have great shows presented by stars and great presenters, and them also wanting to know that their money — and it's their money, public money — is being spent properly and that is always a balance. mark damazer has worked at the bbc for many years, including as deputy director of bbc news, and he was later a bbc trustee. he is now master at saint peters college oxford. welcome to newswatch. you used to be management and make these kind of pay decisions. were you surprise by the numbers revealed ? i was surprised by the gender gap. i thought there might be a gender gap but it was considerably more embarrassing and bigger than i had anticipated. some of the individualfigures, of course, caused some surprise. not necessarily in news, sometimes outside. not all of them were surprising.
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i can see entirely from the point of view of an average licence payer that they would have looked on average high. but in terms of negotiating these one by one, no, i wasn't enormously surprise. several viewers have described some of these salaries as obscene, and they are eye—watering, aren't they? well, it is a truth and it is not necessarily a happy truth that the way that people get paid across the economy is not a reflection of moral virtue or moral value. it would be hard to say that a nurse or a policewoman, or a fire officer is not worth more by way of moral value than they stand in the economic hierarchy and you have to take that to one side and look at it as a market—based calculation. once you get to that, and strip out the notion that these people are intrinsically more virtuous, then the figures make some more sense. but people still think, you know, the bbc is a public organization and in the end there is no justification for a news reader to be paid half a million pounds
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a year, is there? well, the problem with that is that, if other people are paying a great deal more — and i'm afraid the bbc has to operate by trying to get the best talent that they can for a price that is always likely to be discounted to what everybody else is paying — but it has to be reasonable enough to get people into those job and keep them, and recruit new people and it is not always happy, and this is difficult and embarrassing but i think the bbc‘s right to have a policy that says we need talent and we are going to have to pay. a lot of viewers and a lot of bbc staff, women, people from minority backgrounds, have been quite pleased to see these numbers out in the open. transparency is quite revelaing, isn't it? i was on the bbc trust for a couple of years and i was not an enthusiast for this. i was perfectly happy about bands in which you could locate the numbers of people, but not necessarily their name, and i was absolutely happy and am happy that the gender gap is being disclosed. now, that's not the same as individual salaries being disclosed in this way.
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so although i think that some good, because of the pressure that will now be on the bbc management has come out this because the gender gap will have to be sorted. how? it will be extremely difficult. in some cases it is likely to lead to inflation. i don't think that tony hall can admit to that, but is go to be very hard to do this if you do not inflate some people's salaries, those people being women, and that may not be good for the bbc‘s total pay bill, and it may not be good for people worrying about overpayment in general, if they think everybody‘s been paid too much, but i think womean are going to have to be paid more on average. one of the things that's likely to happen over a period of time is that some of the better paid men — not that i wish ill on any of them — may leave. and it may be that they will be replaced by other, dare i say it — cheaper men or women, at that will, in some way, compress the gap between the males and the females but i think the bbc cannot go on like this even if it is true that — and i think it almost certainly is — the bbc‘s record is more defensible than most if not all
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of that broadcasters and many other big corporations in other fields of the economy. thank you very much. it's a pleasure. thank you for all your comments this week. we are off the air for a few weeks now over the summer, but do please still share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs by calling us or e—mailing us. you can find us on twitter and have a look at our website. that's all from us, we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc coverage again in september. goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the number of children declared homeless increases by a third in three years. councils in england say nearly 1,000 each month are being forced into temporary accommodation — the government says it's taking action to tackle the problem. good morning, it's saturday 22nd july. people who fly drones will have to pass safety courses, and register their devices —
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following concerns over the danger they pose to aircraft. white house spokesman sean spicer steps down from the job
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