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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 22, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the number of children declared homeless increases by a third in three years. councils in england say nearly 1,000 each month are being forced into temporary accommodation — the government says it's taking action to tackle the problem. good morning, it's saturday 22nd july. people who fly drones will have to pass safety courses, and register their devices — following concerns over the danger they pose to aircraft. white house spokesman sean spicer steps down from the job afterjuts six months — and talks about the mockery he received for some of his gaffes. some of the memes, you have to laugh at yourself but those the time when
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it comes to not do this. in sport, jordan spieth leads the open championship. he's two shots clear of the field, after mastering all the british summer had to throw at him, at royal birkdale. prince george at four — a new official portrait is released to mark his birthday. and stav has the weekend weather. it's looking like a sunshine and showers weekend for most of us. sunday is probably looking like the better of the two. all the details in about 15 minutes. good morning. first our main story. almost 1,000 children are being forced into temporary accommodation every month because more families are becoming homeless, according to councils in england. the local government association says the number has increased by a third in three years. it wants more powers to build what are described as "genuinely affordable homes". 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. councils say more than 900 children, what they describe as the equivalent of a secondary school, become homeless each month. in total, they say more than 120,000 children and their families
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are being supported in temporary accommodation. an increase of one third since 2014. councils in the south—east and major cities are dealing with the largest numbers. though cornwall and the isle of wight, for instance, also have significant problems. the councils say they need more affordable homes built. they want rules on borrowing relaxed to help with new investment in housing development. councils need the power to intervene more in the homes market. we need more affordable housing built in the right place to provide people with decent affordable housing. we also need to be able to intervene earlier as well. rather than waiting for people to become homeless, we need to stop them becoming homeless in the first place. ministers say they're spending £550 million to tackle homelessness. and that a new bill passed earlier this year will prevent families from losing homes in the first place. michael buchanan, bbc news. drone owners will have to complete a safety awareness course under plans announced by the government.
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the unmanned aircraft will also have to be registered, amid growing concern about the dangers they pose to aircraft. earlier this month, five flights were diverted from gatwick airport because a drone was flown too close to the runway. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones reports. they've quickly become a very popular gadget, mostly used to take great aerial pictures. but as the use of drones has grown, so have concerns about the dangers they could pose. professional users already have to pass proficiency tests. now, the government wants to bring in wider regulation. the new rules mean any drone weighing more than 250 grams will have to be registered and the owner needs to complete a safety awareness test. and the use of geofencing, preventing drons flying near prisons and airports, will be expanded. drone misuse is unacceptable and we are actually doing something to
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counter that. people flying safely have nothing to worry about. research by the airline pilots‘ union found a drone weighing 400 grams could damage a helicopter windscreen. although it would take a two kilograms drone to harm an airliner flying at high speeds. if there is a collision between a drone and a manned aircraft, be that an airliner or a helicopter, it could be catastrophic. we have to do something now to make sure that does not happen. there are plenty of commercial uses for drones. amazon is testing them for parcel delivery. the government says it's keen to promote an exciting technology while ensuring it's used responsibly. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. boots the chemist has apologised for its response to a row about the cost it charges for the morning—after—pill. the chain initially rejected calls to reduce the price, saying it didn't want to encourage the misuse of emergency contraception, but after criticism from a string of labour mps, it now says it's looking at lower priced alternatives. 0ur reporter tom burridge is outside one of theirflagship stores in london —
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tom this is a bit of a u—turn isn't it? they of criticism, what is the response? heavy criticism. boots has com pletely heavy criticism. boots has completely changed their position late last night. let's take you back to where this began. the british pregnancy advisory service provide abortions in the uk. they called on all retailers to cut their prices, saying in europe you can get the morning after pill for a fraction of the cost here. in their words, that was not right. they focused on boots, because their common is the cheapest options is just over £26. in tesco and superdrug, you can get it for around about £13, half the price. then you have on thursday, this statement from bsaying they we re this statement from bsaying they were not going to cut their prices and the reason for that was they did
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what want to encourage the misuse or overuse of the pale. that led to a critical letter from over 30 female labour mps who accuse bof treating women like children, and taking a moral position, an whether or not to ta ke moral position, an whether or not to take the pill. then they said in a statement that they were truly sorry for their poor choice of words that caused offence and misunderstanding. and boots says it will seek cheap alternatives in terms of the morning after pill in their stores. the outgoing white house press secretary sean spicer has told a us television network that he resigned, six months into thejob, because he feared there would be "too many cooks in the kitchen" if he remained. his time at the podium was marked by a number of clashes with reporters, the first of which, was the row over just how many people attended donald trump's inauguration. as our washington correspondent laura bicker reports. it's all change at the white house. sean spicer is saying farewell. for six months and one day,
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he's been defender in chief for the often tumultuous the west wing. i think it was in the best interest in communications department to our press organisation, do not have too many cooks in the kitchen. he courted controversy from his first briefing, just after the and organise. —— the inauguration. sean spicer courted controversy from his first briefing, just after the inauguration of donald trump. he berated reporters who said the crowd size was smaller than 0bama's. this is the largest inauguration ‘period.’ both in person and around the globe. he earned the nickname "spicey" when mocked on tv. he said some of it hit too hard. you guys should know what it is thy meaning, right or wrong! some of the
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memes are funny and you have to laugh at yourself some time. but sometimes it is too mean. there is the difference. he left to give this man a clean slate to work with. wall street financier, anthony scaramucci, has a very different style with the press. 0utspoken and slick, he's fiercely loyal to the president. this young administration is desperate to break free from the swell of controversy. 0ver whether russia helped donald trump win the white house. a new face may help, but the old problems will still need to be dealt with. laura bicker, bbc news, washington. an official photograph has been unveiled to mark prince george's fourth birthday. the young prince has just returned to the uk, along with his parents the duke and duchess of cambridge and sister princess charlotte, from an official visit to poland and germany. 0ur royal correspondent, peter hunt reports. beaming george at four, a prince poised to start school soon. a happy little boy, according to the photographer who took this official portrait. once more.
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this isn't george let loose on a violin. rather, hamburg's young being encouraged to take up music something kate did in her youth. one day, william will be centre stage. all not this day, which was left to his wife to take up the baton he declined. for a helicopter—mad young prince, a pre—birthday treat, being shown around one similar to the one his dad uses as an air ambulance pilot. this is the sort of moment when being on public display has its drawbacks. a sit—down protest from
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princess charlotte who, like any two—year—old, is not overly keen on delayed gratification. peter hunt, bbc news. one last story for you this morning. sir mo farrah may be one of our most decorated 0lympians but now a graphic designerfrom swindon claims to have broken one of his world records. a less well known world record. but impressive nevertheless. sir mo set the record for the 100—metre sack race in 2014 with a time of 39—point—91 seconds. it's been smashed, apparently. but yesterday, dad of two stephen wildish took on the challenge and hopped over the line in just over 28 seconds — smashing mo's attempt. he's now waiting for his time to be officially verified in order to claim his new world record. he adopts almost like a jockey technique with one arm out? a record isa technique with one arm out? a record is a record. although not official as yet. for the first time, not only do
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we have a female head of state and prime minister, but the country's most senior judge is also a woman — after baroness hale was appointed as president of the supreme court. an advocate for greater diversity within the legal profession, she's described her appointment as an honour and a challenge. she'll be officially sworn in in october. holly hamilton has been looking back at her illustrious career. predominantly white and male briton‘s traditionally now has a woman in charge for the first time. the appointment of baroness hale furthers a long career in setting milestone. the first woman appointment come to the law commission, the first woman to join the supreme court, never outspoken on issues of diversity and equality. somebody said that we had actually stripped the building of its robust masculinity. that is now as a woman, i'm really quite pleased about that. i think some femininity, even in a
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court building, is not inappropriate. she is ruled on a number of cases, now notably the government was good time to brexit last year. as a state school educated woman in the house of lords, there are few like her. how apt that she should create her own coat of arms with the motto... women are equal to everything. we're joined now by dana denis—smith, former lawyer and founder of the first 100 years female law project. lovely to have you with us. give us your reaction to the appointment of baroness hale. we are delighted to have a woman at the top of the judiciary in the uk. in my view, it is part of a line of achievements for women in law. it is part of 100 yea rs for women in law. it is part of 100 years in history for women in law, a great crowning moment, if you like.
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but there's more to her than just being a woman? we've seen her career, what will she bring to the job and why is this position is so significant? one of the first things that i would say she brings is that she brings along another woman. i think it's important she is a woman, not just because think it's important she is a woman, notjust because she makes it justice in a different way, it's the symbolic value of having a woman such an important position. it will bejoined by a such an important position. it will be joined by a second woman, that is againafirst be joined by a second woman, that is again a first for women in law. it is important that women feel if they enter the profession, they can really rise to the top of it. i think it is invaluable to all of us, asa think it is invaluable to all of us, as a society, to have this kind of role model in place. in terms of how she works, she is an incredible lawyer, and there is no difference between her ability and any man's ability. so no change there in terms of what she can bring as a lawyer, but in terms of what she brings in society is an incredible achievement. a great role model. she
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has been lined up for thisjob achievement. a great role model. she has been lined up for this job for some time, the predecessor was almost seen someone to take the job that she didn't have it? can you explain that? she has been in this vice president position for four yea rs, vice president position for four years, i believe. i'm not sure she was... she was definitely expected to be appointed as the replacement. it's an amazing... she's led the supreme court in the credible way —— he's led the supreme court. in terms of power decisions, transparency, accessibility, very often we find that lawyers are seen as a very separated professions and the rest of the society. the but they are participants in everyday decisions that affect all of society. so it is a normal progression, she has been executive of the court, it is only normal that she'd take centre stage.
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but i'm not sure there is any controversy other than she is so fantastic candidate for the role. the supreme court of anyone watching 110w the supreme court of anyone watching now who is thinking about having hierarchy of the court system works, what will she be in charge of? what will she be influencing as president of supreme court? the supreme court typically doesn't fit, all 12 judges sit at the same time. there are important decisions to be taken out who here's what cases, and there are dozens who here's what cases, and there are d oze ns of who here's what cases, and there are dozens of specialisms, and justices on the supreme court. 0ne dozens of specialisms, and justices on the supreme court. one is about family law, but there are other disputes that are being heard, from contract disputes that are being heard, from co ntra ct to disputes that are being heard, from contract to speak to, located tax cases, to family law. there are some decisions to be taken around who here's what cases. and should we would be involved in that kind of decision? and cases before she has a 93v
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a gay couple, a man wanting the same rights as a wife in a heterosexual married couple. she has also had a chilly mag reviews on adoption that have proven to be controversial? she is an expert in family law, that is her area of expertise. as an academic, she has always been involved in this area but i can't think of anybody better than her to rule on such decisions, even when she had a dissenting opinion. which means that the decision went against her, ultimately. she has an incredible wealth of experience in the field, the show she is very well placed in family law, whether a gay couple rights or child ren‘s placed in family law, whether a gay couple rights or children's rights, it all falls in family law. thanks for joining it all falls in family law. thanks forjoining us. thank you for having me. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. hello. it's a weekend of sunshine
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and showers, with low—pressure nearby. some showers can be heavy this afternoon, some prices with amber. there will be disposal sunshine between and the are lighter. good news from what we heard yesterday about the gales causing damage. pictures in the english can show heavy rain, this weather front is bringing english can show heavy rain, this weatherfront is bringing rain english can show heavy rain, this weather front is bringing rain to the south—west and the west yesterday, its journey northwards, with a cluster of showers pushing towards the south—west. the weather front is bringing rain to the south—west and the west yesterday, it's journeying northwards, south—west and the west yesterday, it'sjourneying northwards, with a cluster of showers pushing towards the south—west. the website is also struggling central and southern parts of scotland. but in north scotland, it stays dry. the same for northern ireland, there is that rain, some heavy rain across scotland. it plays in eastern england as well. some sunshine behind a bar to the south, showers expected to come lacking in to the morning. they were gradually turn heavier. notice the wind arrows of
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water and light winds, breezy to the far south—west but the showers are going to be the main feature across this part of the country. so heavy, thundery downpours across england and southern scotland, and some sunshine in northern scotland, northern ireland, 20 degrees in northern scotland. the best sunshine and the south but generally high teen temperatures. at the opening royal birkdale, we could see showers during the course today, and tomorrow temperatures around 18 celsius. they rattle on this evening creating difficult driving conditions but they eased up down overnight in southern areas, if you showers across scotland and northern england. also quite chilly, with a bit of mist and fog on sunday, but drier and brighter. sunday looking the better day of the two, showers developing widely across the afternoon, the odd heavy one but some good long dry gaps of sunshine, warm as well with highs of 22
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degrees. then high pressure builds on into next week, on tuesday, and the strong late delay: july sunshine will put temperatures up to mid—20s. looking good for the start of the week. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. lbc presenter ian collins is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'll speak to ian in a minute. first let's look at the front pages. the daily telegraph says it's the end of first class travel as chris grayling attempts to ease rush hour pressure by stopping "segregation" on trains." the sun carries the story about the death of pudsey the dog. he was such a big star all those yea rs he was such a big star all those years ago on stage. he has sadly
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died. quitea years ago on stage. he has sadly died. quite a bit of coverage on that story today. the times leads on a political story dick van dyke has apologised for his atrocious cockney accent. and hard left labour activists have plotted to re m ove left labour activists have plotted to remove the deputy leader tom watson for alleged disloyalty. and finally the guardian says europe has been supplied a list of potential suicide bombers. how are you doing? i'm all right. not bad. apparently the owner has a new dog. will they change the name to pudsey? that's what they're saying. they are saying she has another dog called sully. butler.
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that's good, isn't it? people deal with loss of their pets in different ways. but if you call the dog the new dog, it's going to have a different name? she will train it. she was good training dog. yeah, but if you start monkeying around with the dogs then all hell breaks loose. how is a little child at the moment? snuggled up? she's very well. i'm told he's having a grumpy morning. he's out of nappies. where you part of the whole nappy... though the reason i ask was this story has p°pped reason i ask was this story has popped up. jacob rees—mogg, the mp, saying he has never changed a nappy. he has never changed a nappy because he has a nanny who has been with the family for 52 years, he has six kids so she's changed a lot of nappies. she is on the record book for nappy changing probably. but he's never change one. this is interesting
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because what other correlations here, i don't think it too tenuous, jacob rhys—mogg could be future leader of the tory party. and i met him this week. he is a heck of a nice man. he's got that kind of stephen friar tuck varney, dry wit. how ever, whether he's likely to enamel working—class people to vote for him, there is an out of touch sent. better than him lying about it though? there is a brutal honesty about it, look atjeremy corbyn and it's a guy from an affluent background, nearly 70—year—old man, stu d e nts background, nearly 70—year—old man, students managed to like him. good rees mogg turned that around? what i find curious about men who changed —— say they've never changed nappies. there are occasions where you're on your own at the nappy needs changing. if nanny is out,
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it's a day off, what happens then? you call the butler. you call the butler? but there are occasions... i you say i'm not doing that. in the election campaign, he has a butler. do you think the butler changes the nappies? between the butler and the nannies, they've got it covered. nappies? between the butler and the nannies, they've got it coveredlj don't have a segue to homoeopathic remedies. it's a story you picked up the nhs withdrawing funding. they've spent millions on something that is not proven to work. everyone has a story about rose petals or lavender ora story about rose petals or lavender or a compound they take or sniff and it doesn't good. but actually in terms of reviewed medicines and benefits, when it comes to homoeopathy, there really is no evidence to suggest this stuff
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actually works. the nhs perhaps doing their best to cover all bases over the years, spending £190 million on birth and it probably has to go. we've talked about the drones story this morning. is that something is that is a step forward? i can't believe you can buy a drone on their website and fly at around this guy. as in the camp believe... it's almost as big as this table, in some cases. there are implications, not least finding is parallel with a 747 on the weighty ib is. that is not good for safety. if you attach amnesty drones and fly around looking at your neighbour's gardens —— attach cameras to drones. but you have to upload your information and register as an official drone user. and second hand? there's always
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somebody flogging a drone somewhere, isn't there, i'm sure. but it is extraordinary because there are issues of safety with prisons and flying mobile phones and drugs into prisons. all sorts of things like that. but i find it strange that you can buy one and start flying stuff around this guy. we will talk to you in the next hour. thank you. banks and financial services firms are creating products that are complex and misleading to try and prevent customers shopping around effectively — that's according to a financial watchdog. in an uncompromising report, the financial services consumer panel says people are inhibited from switching their current account or insurer, which can mean they end up with a worse deal. paul lewis from radio 4's money box programme has more on this. this is one of your favourite subjects isn't it? about the extent to which people do not move around financial products to their own advantage, effectively. is it partly because they are not told what is
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possible? it's partly that. as this consumer panel says: most people doing it it is quite boring. they shouldn't have to spend their time moving every account and every product they have. as you say, it is an compromising report. let me read you it, they inhibit customer's ability to move around because of a complicated and misleading. so you can move around but they try to stop us can move around but they try to stop us by making it too difficult to work out of getting a better deal or not. so watch at the banks, these companies involved, be doing that they are not doing? the panel recommends that there should be regulations to make sure the prices are simple and clear and can powerball. take overdrafts, every one of the major banks has a different set of rules. it's impossible to see which would be better for you as an individual if you are someone who goes into overdraft. they wanted to be much simpler. ina
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overdraft. they wanted to be much simpler. in a significant move, they say people who do not switch should not be penalised. i've been on here before saying if you just little car insurance go from one to another and another year another year, it will go another year another year, it will 9° up another year another year, it will go up and up up. they said those practices should be banned by the regulators. it is a tough report. you will notice. there is a weariness about this, you can have a panel, saying something happen and they ought to and it's bad that it's not, and then what? this is the problem but i have to say the financial services consumer panel, is an official body in the sand it advises the regulator, the financial conduct authorities, that has the power to pass regulations about financial services. they will at some point reacts. their reaction to me was lukewarm, they said they welcome contributions to the panel, it's important consumers understand
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the financial products and services they are buying. so not a ringing endorsement of this. but it is important that a panel with some official status, helps all of us that they can get a better deal from financial services. if someone is watching now to go to one area to get the most game farm, in terms of changing colours, what would it be? if you've never switch your gas and electricity account, sweating that will save you money. if you have already switch, it will save you a bit. and don't let your car insurance or house insurance just go with the same firm year after year. always check it every year when it i’u ns always check it every year when it runs out. paul, thank you. there's more on money box today, at midday on radio 4. coming up in the next half hour. prince george and princess charlotte might have stolen the show in germany, but not always because they were model children. so, with george turning four tomorrow, we'll be finding out how some of the newest members
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of the royal family are coping with the pressure of very public trips. stay with us — headlines coming—up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. coming up before 9am, stav will have the weather, but first a summary of this morning's main news. nearly 1,000 children are being forced into temporary accommodation every month because more families are becoming homeless, according to councils in england. the local government association says the number has increased by a third in three years. it wants more powers to build what are described as "genuinely affordable homes". the government says it is investing £550 million to help tackle the problem. drone owners will have to complete a safety awareness course under plans announced by the government. machines that weigh more than 250—grams will also have to be registered, amid growing concern about the dangers they pose to aircraft. earlier this month five flights were diverted from gatwick airport because a drone was flown too close to the runway. boots the chemist has apologised for its response to a row
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about what it charges for the morning—after—pill. the chain initially rejected calls to reduce the price, saying it didn't want to encourage the misuse of emergency contraception, but after criticism from a string of labour mps, it now says it's looking at lower priced alternatives. the outgoing white house press secretary, sean spicer, has told an american television network that he resigned six months into thejob because he feared there would be "too many cooks in the kitchen" if he remained in hisjob. his time at the podium was marked by a number of clashes with reporters, the first of which, was the row over just how many people attended donald trump's inauguration. an official photograph has been unveiled to mark prince george's fourth birthday. it was taken at kensington palace by royal photographer chris jackson, who described the young prince as a "happy little boy". the prince has just returned to the uk from an official visit to poland and germany with the duke and duchess of cambridge and his sister princess charlotte. paintings by michaeljackson's
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former pet chimpanzee are going on sale tonight. the king of pop's pet primate has been picking up a paintbrush during his retirement. the work by bubbles can be seen at a gallery in miami. the organisers say the proceeds will help fund an sanctuary in florida. hopefully he will be sending the art world ape! what was that noise, matt?|j what was that noise, matt? i was doing this to wake up from the dream i was doing this to wake up from the dream iwas in. it doing this to wake up from the dream i was in. it sounded like you were slapping yourself. i was. i was in. it sounded like you were slapping yourself. iwas. ifi could see the painting, i quite liked it.
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he looked relaxed and he was happy. don't put paint brushes in your mouth. that's never a good idea. he looks really content, doesn't he?” quite like it. i'm not going to buy one. if you have got £1500 spare charlie. i reckon i could do something for you. what have you got for us, mike? back in the real world. a moment ago you were warming up world. a moment ago you were warming up on the side of the sofa, you were doing a little bit of warm up, you we re doing a little bit of warm up, you were really bracing yourself for this one. yes, like the golfers are for the open! and so it's the americanjordan spieth, who heads the field at the halfway stage of the open championship. 79 players have gone. # 7 remain.
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77 remain. he negotiated some foul conditions at royal birkdale yesterday afternoon. the two—time major winner, lies on six under par — two shots ahead of his nearest rival, despite playing in the worst of the conditions. ian poulter is the best placed brit. he's three shots off the lead after a consistent round yesterday. after rory mcilroy feared he might miss the cut in the first round, he's bounced back into a tie for seventh place on one under par. anything around even par will be a really good score today. i got off to the best possible start. i continued where i left off last night. i made some birdies early on and that gave me a cushion to play with. like i needed to make some big up with. like i needed to make some big up and downs around the middle of the round, but yeah, i did exactly what i wanted to do. it will be great to tee off late
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and have a lie—in in the morning, look at the pin locations, see how other players are playing certain holes. how the course should be played. ijust want a nice weekend without too much rain. the american leads after two rounds from his compatriot matt kuchar who is two back. ian poulter is the best placed british player on three under par with rory mcilroy‘s 68 putting him back in contention. defending champion henrik stenson lies at two over par. but his preparations for the second round were less than ideal, after the house that he's staying in, was burgled on thursday. clothes, personal effects and jewellery were stolen but stenson refused to blame that for a poor round yesterday. not too much on, you know,
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the effect of today's round, i wouldn't say, but being with the police rather than staying where you wanted to do, it was a difficult evening, if i could put it that way. kadeena cox won britain's 14th gold at the world para athletics championships last night, winning the t38 400m. cox, who holds the world record in the event, beat the rest of the field by six seconds for her second medal of the championships. she'll run again today in the t38100m. cox won gold, silver and bronze on the track in rio last year and another gold in cycling. i was confident for 300 metres. it's massive. it was good. but i did not know if i had the strength. i have not been on the bike. i have not put in the work. the last
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100 meters will be horrible. i needed to give myself the gap to have a buffer if they did come back. usain bolt, was victorious in his final race, before his swansong, at the world athletics championships, in london next month. competing in the monaco diamond league, bolt produced a season's best, running under ten seconds, for the first time this year. britain's, c.j ujah, finished fourth. i'm always excited for a championship. i think after that i will be sad, but i'm really excited going into these championships. i know it's going to be energetic. i know it's going to be energetic. i know there will be a lot of jamaicans andi know there will be a lot of jamaicans and i know it will be big. for me, i'm really excited going into this. i'm just going to do my best as always and aim to win. that's it. and there was a great run from laura muir, in the women's 3,000 metres, smashing her personal best, by eight seconds, as she finished third, so a place ahead of her fellow scot, eilish mccolgan, who also set a new pb 12 seconds faster than her previous best. chris froome is just two stages away from a fourth tour de france
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title. he finished in the bunch on stage 19 yesterday as norway's edvan bosen—hagen took the win. froome has a 23—second lead to protect, going into the time trial in marseille this afternoon. if he emerges unscathed. he'll be crowned champion on the champs elysees tomorrow. tom daley is through to the men's ten metre platform final, at the world aquatics championships in hungary. daley — who won bronze in this event in london — qualified in second place for this afternoon's showpiece. compatriot matty lee is also through. i think this year it has been all about enjoying it. last year was such a serious year with it in the olympic year. ijust wanted the best shot i could have. i wanted to have fun with it. wigan completed their regular super league season, with a crushing 34—0 victory over leeds. wigan had already qualified for the super eights,
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but ran in seven tries against an injury hit rhinos. there were wins elsewhere for leigh and hull fc who move up to third. after a half century, in his first game back for surrey, kevin pietersen was brought back down to earth last night. going into their t—20 blast game against middlesex he was struggling with a calf injury and that may have been on his mind when he set off for a run but changed his mind, leaving his australian team—mate aaron finch stranded halfway down the pitch and unable to get back before being run out. pietersen then only made four. surrey did manage to win though by 15 runs. now in football and on a weekend when england and scotland's women play their second matches at euro 2017, i've been to stoke to join some young women who are playing a new form of the game which is played in the dark. well, we're all dressed up with our
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face paints on. some more than others admittedly. it seems like an ordinary six aside indoor game. all that changes with the flick of a switch! it all started with badminton glow squash two years ago. glow football started up in stoke. it spread across other parts of the country too. it is just across other parts of the country too. it isjust the combination of the three factors, playing football with a friend, the lights are off and they have got the headbands and music is on. it is a real party scene. when they are playing they are not worried about the image. everybody is the same or out there and going for it. it is great for teenage girls really. there is now weekly uv league here at
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staffordshi re weekly uv league here at staffordshire university an initiative funded by the premier league and backed by the fa. it's like ping—pong at times. sometimes you can't see which team—mates you're passing to as long as they are in an orange shirt. it is part ofa are in an orange shirt. it is part of a wider push by glow active uk which helped start leagues at dozens of clu bs which helped start leagues at dozens of clubs to reach girls like bonnie who says she would never have got into football had it not been for this. it's in the dark, you can't really see you in that. so if you're embarrassed or anything, no point because it's like no one can really see you. is that what helped you get into it? yeah. the girls can show their personal with the way they put their personal with the way they put their face paint on. it is a save. it stays level. the game is finely poised. the opposition are making a substitution. and what a substitution. and what a substitution it was. 0h, tackled. we
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lost. the super sub made all the difference as the lights go on and ourface paints difference as the lights go on and our face paints have difference as the lights go on and ourface paints have run. 94 caps for england, sue smith, herfirst experience of glow football. how was it? i loved t it was so much fun. it's great for maybe the young girls and boys that don't have confidence. soiif and boys that don't have confidence. so i if you make a mistake, you don't know who has done that mistake. it probably would have good for me. and me, i hope, when i managed to score an own goal, but it could have been anyone as you hide behind their uv paint which certainly makes for some interesting tea m certainly makes for some interesting team photos! i think bubbles the chimp would have done better there with the paint! a great game because you are anonymous. we could do it with golf
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and then you wouldn't show us up as much. you wouldn't know where the ball had gone. i think they do glow in the dark golf. squash, badminton. squash could be dangerous. i get hit enough with the squash ball in the light. get inspired website has more information on where you can play, glow in the dark football or uv football. cycling is due to lose funding. seniorfigures have cycling is due to lose funding. senior figures have expressed concerns that the reforms have been rushed through and will be rejected. let's discuss this now with former president of british cycling tony doyle who joins us now. this is confusing, can you give us
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the mug's guide to why this day, this vote is important? well, the mug's guide is always betterfor yourself, charlie! fair point! the government has come forward and said that we are putting hundreds of millions of pounds into sport through the national lottery funding and there needs to be more diversity, more inclusion, we need to stamp out sexism and racism and bullying and we want all national governing bodies to ahere to our new code of governance. so on the face of it, they're saying you get the money if you do those good things. so how can that be a problem? they are saying we need to have a major influence sitting on the board. so that we're involved with the grass—roots, the basic decisions and so we're going to have people outside of the sport who have had no experience, no involvement with the sport whatsoever and they are deciding on basic issues. so the fa ct deciding on basic issues. so the fact that it has been rushed through
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and it has all been convened so there is as least resistance as possible. we have a british rider who is leading the tour de—france at the moment. hundreds of thousands of brits are over there. so a lot of people who should be in attendance at the meeting aren't there because they are away supporting britain's cycling stars. how long have you been aware that there is an issue with diversity in cycling or pressure for the board or the way the sport is run to change? has this come out of the blue? no, it hasn't come out of the blue? no, it hasn't come out of the blue? no, it hasn't come out of the blue. for sometime we've realised that there is not enough inclusion and that the governing body and our government itself have been concentrating far too much on the top of pyramid. cycling has been very successful over the past 10 or 20 years, but there is a huge number of people coming new into the sport and we need to be looking after them. so
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it's the kids that are coming through, the people who are riding for leisure and recognise reration. we don'tjust concentrate on the medal factory at the top of the pyramid. chris hoy is saying he understands the reforms should be voted through. that it's important they should be. you are taking a different view. no, i'm not taking a com pletely different view. no, i'm not taking a completely different view. the majority of the proposals make sense and it's time for haining. we need and it's time for haining. we need an overall reform and we don't have to make that decision this afternoon. we've got until the end of october, before we have to give a final decision. so there is three months grace where we can talk about it and sit around the table and discuss things properly rather than being told what we have to do. sorry, i'm not clear what you are being asked to do. is it a code of conduct or a set of brand—new rules? it's a code of conduct. but...” don't understand why that needs so much discussion if you agree with
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the principles that diversity needs to be increased and that the sport should be open to one and all. you have got people like chris hoy supporting it. i don't understand why it is a problem to have a code of conduct? the money that comes into the sport is for the elite programmes, so for the world—class performance programme so it doesn't trickle down to the grass—roots and to the kids that are coming through. we're not against it, but the federation... this sounds like an argument against the way that the sport is funded, not the code of conduct? it's against both. so, the british cycling federation is a members organisation so the membership is the controlling sovereign body of our governing body and the members have not been consulted. meeting have been taking place secretly without the membership being told. you don't agree you won't get the funding, as simple as that, isn't it? we are ready to agree, but we need
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compromise. we need room for discussion rather than the rules and the new code of conduct being imposed on us. tony doyle, thank you for talking to us and explaining it all to us. it's 8.47am and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories: almost 1,000 children in england are being forced into temporary accommodation every month, according to local councils. drone owners will have to complete a safety course and register their aircraft amid growing concern about the danger they pose to aircraft. also coming up in the programme, former beautiful south members jacqui abbott and paul heaton hope they will be "deserving" of success with their latest album. it has been praised by fans and critics alike. they'll be here just before 10am. a mixed picture for a lot of us
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across the country. stav, we have seen stormy, windy conditions, haven't we? we had heavy rain and strong winds and trees down. this weekend, we have low pressure nearby which will be producing sunshine and showers. some will be heavy, but the winds will be falling light too. glorious skies across the south—west of england at the moment like this picture shous in bath, but the showers are never far away. heavy showers across northern areas. but to the north of scotland, here it should stay dry with sunny spells throughout the day and it will turn warm ina throughout the day and it will turn warm in a few places. the same too for northern ireland, but grim skies further south, southern scotland and into northern england, but the rain should clear away from eastern england. further south, here
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should clear away from eastern england. furthersouth, here the showers pushing in towards the south—west, south wales, they will be making their way inroads as well and they will turn heavier as the afternoon wears on because of the sunshine heating the ground. heavy thundery ones, but in between, some good sunny spells like in northern ireland and northern scotland seeing the best of the dry and the bright weather. top temperatures 20 or 21 celsius. for the golf, there could be showers both today and tomorrow. temperatures around 18 to 20 celsius, but the winds will be light. the showers rattle on for a while this evening into the first pa rt while this evening into the first part of the night and then they tend to fade away for central and southern areas. but under the clear skies, light winds, it will turn fresh, i think, skies, light winds, it will turn fresh, ithink, in rural skies, light winds, it will turn fresh, i think, in rural places. we could see some mist and fog developing too. into sunday then, a cool start, but dry with sunshine for many. actually quite a pleasant day. a better looking day than what we will have today with the showers
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developing in the afternoon. again they could be heavy, but they will be well scattered. some areas staying dry. if you catch the sunshine it will stay warm. it stays good into next week thanks to a ridge of high pressure and light winds. we should be looking at the mid to low 20s particularly central and southern areas. studio: stav, are those typical temperatures? around the low to mid—20s, high teens further north. but the northerly winds, so it will feel fresh if you are awe out of the sun, but because the sun is strong, it will make it lovely and warm. stav, we will speak later. andy steggles nearly drowned when he was three—years—old only to be rescued from a river by two strangers who resuscitated him. more than four decades later, and after years of trying, he finally tracked down the pair who saved his life. 0ur reporter laura may mcmullan was there for the reunion. hello you. you've grown a little bit
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since the last time i saw you. they spent their lives as strangers, but ones who share a unique bond. andy steggles was just three years old when he nearly drowned in a brook in birmingham. there you was a little bundle on the floor. oh my god. i just dropped everything and ran. to say i owe you a debt of gratitude is the under statement of the century. ann morgan had learnt herfirst aid skills in the girl guides and andy had to be resuscitated three times. he waited 44 years to finally meet her and say thank you. ann has had probably more of an impact on my life than she could possibly imagine. it means so much when i
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look at my kids and i look at you know my children, three—year—old 0liver, it always comes back to ann pulling me out of the river and saving my life. what's it like seeing him after all these years? i'm so pleased that he's doing so well. 0ver i'm so pleased that he's doing so well. over the years i've thought about him and wondered how he's getting on and what sort of life he's leading. it's lovely to have him back in my life. you were here actually. he pulled you out from there and you were down here. it's the first time in over 40 yea rs here. it's the first time in over 40 years they have been back to the brook in marsden green. andy now lives in america and was keen to show his family. from the first time i met show his family. from the first time imet him, show his family. from the first time i met him, you know, when you exchange stories and when you're first dating, this is one of the first dating, this is one of the first things he told me and the impact she made for my life and so many others, you know, bringing him into my world and our children, it's
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just i'm so grateful and thankful. it's like an adopted son now all of a sudden. it's nice. it's nice. being able to finally meet ann and just thank her. it's a big deal. being able to finally meet ann and just thank her. it's a big deal! happy ending and now a friendship that will last a lifetime. directing an orchestra, trying out a new helicopter and even sorting out a tantrum on the runway — it was a busy and eventful day for the duke and duchess of cambridge as they brought their royal tour of poland and germany to a close. the official visit was laid on to remind people of the strength of ties between britain and europe, but it was arguably the young prince george and his sister princess charlotte who stole the show. here's a quick look at what they got up to. classical music
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joining us now from our plymouth studio is the royal historian, professor kate williams. good morning to you. interesting look at those images isn't it, because there was an enormous amount of attention because it was a family occasion, wasn't it? yes, it's very interesting because it really works in terms of the royal family the biggest crowd puller is the queen, but she is no longer doing overseas visits and the next ones down are william and kate, but the level of attention they draw is always doubled if they take the little people with them, if they take their children with them. yes, they got huge attention in paris, in india. the media attention is doubled. there are all the pictures and there really often is the case that the little people, george and charlotte do steal the show. yes, and what you
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have here, of course, we are seeing a number of images, of the youngsters, prince george in the helicopter, but as always with the royal tours, there is a mixture of events and were sombre during this particular tour, particularly those in poland? yes, there were some very sombre events. we saw some fun events and the rowing match, but we saw much more serious events, visiting the concentration camp, talking with former survivors and also talking about the occupation of poland, visiting the museum that celebrated and commemorated the uprising of 1944, so what you see here are william and kate engaging in much more serious engagements with european history with the past thatis with european history with the past that is very recent past for many people that they met, europe is joined together in unity now, but that was not the case during the second world war. so they were there
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commemorating the sadness and the struggles and the difficult times and really when we see the duke and duchess of cambridge engaging in this serious political engagement it really does show that they one day there will be the future king and queen. yes, of course, on this occasion, it is a major visit in two european countries, the backdrop to this is the brexit situation which is rumbling around even as they are speaking to dignitaries and doing theirjob. how do you think they sort of managed that diplomacy element of the trip? well, it's very interesting because initially when they were off, there was lots of talk about how they were the brexit ambassadors, is this a brexit mission? the brexit mission is being conducted by david davis and the other ministers in the negotiations, but the idea is that this is going to be the soft power, the soft reminder to europe that at hoe the negotiations are going on and they are rather sticky, they are becoming
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rather mired up over questions of the divorce bill, but the visit of the divorce bill, but the visit of the duke and duchess of cambridge and their children will remind people that britain still wants to be their kate, sorry, i'm friends. short for time. but on a lighter note, princess charlotte, the moment outside the plane when clearly, people get tired when they're young. they are being dragged around. there was a moment a lot of people will sympathise with? yes, it is tough on the little people. it's, most small children sadly they want to be in a soft play and not shaking hands and meeting royal dignitaries and they are exhausted. although the majority of places william and kate didn't ta ke of places william and kate didn't take them to the serious parts, they we re take them to the serious parts, they were there for the fun parts. although it is hard tonne a little person, it is fantastic to see them and they enjoy themselves and people are thrilled to see them and it is a great treat to see the small royals even though they find it a little
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bit exhausting. kate, thank you very much. the headlines are coming up. we will be back with you at 9am. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the number of children declared homeless increases by a third in three years. councils in england say nearly 1,000 each month are being forced into temporary accommodation — the government says it's taking action to tackle the problem. good morning.
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also ahead... people who fly drones will have to pass safety courses, and register their devices — following concerns over the danger they pose to aircraft. white house spokesman sean spicer steps down from the job
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