Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 24, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. charlie gard's parents return to the high court, as a judge prepares to decide what will happen to their son. it is the latest stage of their five—month legal fight over his future. they want him to be treated by a specialist in the united states. good morning, it is monday 24july. also this morning: there are to grandmothers in their lives, and so it is important they know who she was. prince william on keeping the memory of his mother alive through his children, as the royal family prepares to mark 20 years since diana's death.
6:01 am
it is the drug that turns people into the walking dead. how spice is still causing havoc on britain's streets, more than a year after it was banned. as the government says that farm subsidies should be earned, notjust handed out, i am at one of britain's biggest agricultural shows in paris, speaking to farmers and some cows about what they make of the future of their industry. in sport: england are world champions after beating india by nine runs in the women's cricket world cup final at lord's. chris froome has won an extraordinary fourth tour de france, and jordan spieth won the open. he is just 23 years old and it is his fourth major title. what a great weekend of sport. and carol has the weather. we have an east—west split in the weather today. if you are in the east there will be a bit more cloud,
6:02 am
some spots of rain as well. if you are in the west it will be mostly sunny, dry and warm. i will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: the parents of charlie gard return to the high court today, with the judge set to consider new evidence from a us neurologist. his parents want to take their terminally ill baby to america for experimental treatment, but doctors at great ormond street hospital believe it won't work, and charlie should be allowed to die with dignity. our reporter tom burridge is outside the high court this morning. they have been there so many times. are they likely to get an answer today? rob lynott, louise. it is such a sad story. you feel for chris and connie and the doctors at great ormond street hospital who have been treating him, but it is a judge who will decide whether or not connie and chris, this parents, are allowed to ta ke and chris, this parents, are allowed to take him to new york for experimental treatments, a type of therapy. or whether, as doctors at
6:03 am
great ormond street hospital have been arguing, that therapy has such a small chance of success that it is in the best interests of young charlie gard to be allowed to die with dignity. he has a rare genetic disease called mitochondrial dna depletion syndrome, leaving him with irreversible rain damage and their five—month long legal battle, as you have been saying, took them initially to the high court, the court of appeal, the supreme court and the european court of human rights —— brain damage. they are now back at the high court, and a judge will look at what they say is new evidence, particularly linked to the opinion of an american doctor who wa nts to opinion of an american doctor who wants to treat charlie. and that evidence will be crucial in this hearing today, and possibly later in the week. the session starts at 2pm today, and we could have a decision from thejudge tomorrow. today, and we could have a decision from the judge tomorrow. thank you very much, we are having a few problems hearing your microphone but thank you very much indeed. in around half an hour we will be speaking to a former high court judge, to find out more about the process cases like charlie's have to go through, and what factors need to be
6:04 am
ta ken into account. the duke of cambridge has revealed how he tells his children stories about their grandmother, diana, princess of wales. as they approach the 20th anniversary of their mother's death, princes william and harry have been giving an insight into how they try to keep her memory alive, as greg dawson reports. a mother's photograph of her two boys. made public for the first time, it is an image that sums up the sense of fun princes william and harry describe about diana in a new documentary. nearly 20 years on from her death, prince william, now a parent himself, talks of reminding his children of the grandmother they never met. we've got more photos up round the house now, of her, and we talk about her a bit and stuff. and it's hard, because obviously catherine didn't know her, so she can't really provide that level of detail, so i do regularly, putting george or charlotte to bed,
6:05 am
talk about her and try to remind them that there are two grandmothers — there were two grandmothers — in their lives. prince harry was a boy ofjust i2 when he lost his mother. in a conversation with one of herfriends, sir eltonjohn, they reflect on her compassion, particularly her work with hiv charities. everybody in that photograph is smiling. because of her. yeah! i mean, she had an energy, she had a radiance. look at her face. in every photograph, there's a positive global, wonderful glow. also, she had this incredible ability which he kind of inherited — and i told him that, and he said "thanks very much" — to make people feel at ease and make them feel that everything will be all right. much has been said and written about diana in the years since her death. but, for this anniversary, it is her sons who are keen to remind people of her impact on their lives and the world. greg dawson, bbc news. scientists say they are examining a potential breakthrough in the case of the missing sheffield toddler ben needham. the child was last seen near a rundown farmhouse on the greek island of kos, 26 years ago. south yorkshire police say they believe ben died as a result
6:06 am
of a tragic accident, but it has now been revealed soil samples taken during excavations last year indicate potential signs of human decomposition. we gathered an awful lot of information, an awful lot of intelligence about what may have happened to ben, coming to the conclusion that we did. some of the items that we took back we submitted to furtherforensic items that we took back we submitted to further forensic work, and the result of that to date, i am led to believe, shows signs that there is still some humour dcom position around those items that we did bring back from kos. —— some human decomposition. britain's economic growth forecast has been downgraded by the international monetary fund, following a wea ker—than—expected performance at the start of the year. in april it was predicted the economy would grow by 2%, but that figure has now been revised to i.7%. the treasury says the report highlights the importance of a good brexit deal with the eu.
6:07 am
a survey of people aged over 65 in britain has found more than 40% of them think they have been contacted by scammers. the charity age uk said, of those targeted, i6% of single older people paid out money to fraudsters. here is our business correspondent joe lynam. fraud has always been with us, but technology has enabled fraudsters to use increasingly creative and believable ways to target the elderly. in a survey of more than 1,000 over—65s, age uk found that 43% had been contacted by scammers hoping to defraud them. of those targeted, i6% of people living alone paid out some money. it was only 6% for married people. two thirds of those contacted by scammer did not report the matter to police. we would encourage people to not worry about being seen to be impolite. you have to look after yourself. there are a lot of scammers who are relying on you and your politeness, to not hang up the phone or delete the e—mail. and really, if it's a call
6:08 am
or an e—mail that you're not expecting, that's offering you some sort of enticing—sounding offer, or putting you under pressure to do something, then alarm bells should be going off, and you should just be strong and delete those things. the most common types of scams were fraudulent e—mails and texts known as phishing. that was followed by vishing, in which fraudsters contact their target directly, purporting to be from their bank or broadband provider. joe lynam, bbc news. the government is promising what it calls a revolution in the way electricity is generated, used and stored. the business secretary, greg clark, is to announce more investment in battery technology and details of a competition to boost innovation in energy storage. under the plans, it is thought households could save up to £40 billion by 2050. the world's first full—scale floating wind farm has started to take shape off the north—east coast of scotland. eventually, five giant turbines will stretch for more than 175 metres and supply power to 20,000 homes. the first turbine was put into place
6:09 am
off peterhead, in aberdeenshire. the remaining four arrive from norway in the coming weeks. as you know, it is a skill i have honed over years. the silent sneeze is very impressive. people say it is not very good for you. how do you keep it in? it is years of practice. i can't wait to see this. the doctor who writer steven moffat has laid to rest one of fans‘ most fiery debates — what is the time lord's name? and it may come as a surprise that he is insisting it is doctor who, and not the doctor, as many argue. he told this year's comic—con in san diego, the largest event of its kind, dedicated to film, tv and pop culture, that there was no doubt about the name.
6:10 am
steven moffat said it was established in the 1966 episode the war machines, starring william hartnell. but he admitted the doctor doesn't often call himself doctor who because, in moffat‘s words, it is a stupid name. well, i mean... one of the big question is finally answered. the thing is everyone calls him the doctor. glad we got that settled. where do you start, where do you and then what is in the middle? we need to give you quite a bit of time. what an amazing weekend. to give you quite a bit of time. what an amazing weekendlj to give you quite a bit of time. what an amazing weekend. i think there is one thing that comes out of it for me, and that is mental resilience and also physical strength. we have seen some incredible sporting performances over the weekend. at the golf,
6:11 am
jordan spieth not falling apart, keeping together, staying cool. the women's cricketers were physically fitter than anyone else playing, and thatis fitter than anyone else playing, and that is what help them in the end. it may them mentally stronger as well. england are world champions. they beat india by nine runs to win the women cricket world cup final at lord's. it went right down to the wire, but england's anya shrubsole stole the show. she took six wickets as india collapsed and were bowled out for 219, falling short of their target of 229. chris froome says his fourth time winning the tour de france still feels as sweet as his previous victories. froome is now second on the all—time list of men to wear to yellow jersey. jordan spieth has won the open championship at royal birkdale. it is his third major title, and at 23, he became the youngest open winner since seve ballesteros. and at the women's european championship, england beat spain 2—0, withjodie taylor scoring her fourth goal in two games.
6:12 am
meanwhile, scotland lost 2—1 to portugal. don't say i never give you anything. if you were busy doing other stuff over this weekend, they you have just a fantastic selection of the stories we will be talking about today. and two england cricketers on the sofa tomorrow as well. don't ask me their names, because i don't think that's confirmed yet. we were talking about the resilience. think that's confirmed yet. we were talking about the resiliencelj talking about the resilience.” heard an american on the radio talking about intestinal fortitude. who? intestinal fortitude. talking about intestinal fortitude. who? intestinalfortitude. stomach of steel. he is talking aboutjordan spieth, having been in a position a few years ago at the past masters where he was five ahead, and lost, and this morning the paper says you don't want to be the person who
6:13 am
eve ryo ne don't want to be the person who everyone thinks he has won a few majors, but he is a joker. everyone thinks he has won a few majors, but he is ajoker. how everyone thinks he has won a few majors, but he is a joker. how do you say that calm, especially in golf, where it is all about you ahead? and everyone is thinking he has lost it. thank you very much. see you later. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. carol has lots of intestinal fortitude. good morning, a bit of an east—west split going on today but the weather for the week ahead is going to be changeable. it is going to be briefly warmer, especially in the west today and tomorrow. but then we have got some rain coming oui’ then we have got some rain coming our way on wednesday. all of us are going to see it. it will move through quite smartly. what we have at the moment is this area of low pressure with its attendant front. that is what produced all the showers as we go through the course of the weekend. it will slowly drift
6:14 am
eastwards through the course of the day, but you can see a lot of cloud across central and eastern parts of england associated with this. the low cloud is producing some rain here and there, and there is a chilly breeze coming down the north sea. as we move into scotland, the north—east, some cloud around this morning, some low cloud. moving away from that we are under brighter skies. and again, in the sunshine, the temperature will pick up quite quickly. northern ireland has a fine day ahead with a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine coming your way, as indeed has wales. temperatures at around 15 celsius at 7am and the south—west england a similar story in that we have got clear skies, a fair bit of sunshine to start the day. through the day, asa to start the day. through the day, as a weather front continues to push over towards the east, the cloud will start to break a touch. we will see some brightness coming through. can't completely rule out the shower but certainly west is best in terms of sunshine. could see an odd shower across western scotland. you can see in parts of east anglia there will be some brighter breaks. but don't forget, down this east coast, with the wind coming in from the north
6:15 am
sea, from a northerly direction, it will feel cooler. much warmer out towards the west, in the sun. through the evening and overnight the showers tend to fade. there will be one or two popping up elsewhere, but it is sensibly going to be a dry night with some clear skies. there will be some fog here and there but it will be fairly isolated and by no means is it going to be cold. the temperature range of ii to 15. so tomorrow we start off dry and bright compared to today. not as windy either, so not feeling that cold. sunshine around, and the cloud brea ks sunshine around, and the cloud breaks up we will see sunny intervals develop where we start with that cloud. temperatures tomorrow between 14 and 2a but later in the day the cloud will thicken across caundle, heralding the arrival of the next set of fronts. here it is wednesday courtesy of this area of low pressure. you can see also the isobars are tightly
6:16 am
packed, so it is going to be windy. that means for wednesday that rain is going to come in from the west, and it is going to be drifting steadily eastwards. on the wind, it will blow through quite quickly but we will see some of it at some stage moving from west to east. then as we head on into thursday, it is more of a day of sunshine and showers across the board once again. 16 to around 22 will be a maximum temperature range. so changeable towards the end of the week certainly holds true. the english cricketers are on the front pages of pretty much all the papers. the front page of the times, talking about the university of oxford, their academic reputation is being exploited by overseas businessmen selling fake awards. the english cricketers on the front page
6:17 am
again in the guardian. the sun have again in the guardian. the sun have a story about cctv spying on a football ground, and love ireland comes to an end tonight, we will be speaking to one of the contestants a bit later on. once again, the england world cup women's winners are on the front page. talking about this story, a pillar ——a possible forensic break in an old case. this story, a pillar ——a possible forensic break in an old casem this story, a pillar ——a possible forensic break in an old case. it is great, the cricket on the front pages here as well. i don't know if this is something we would have seen ten years ago, women's sport on the front page of the daily telegraph. fantastic picture of them celebrating yesterday. we will surely those pictures throughout the
6:18 am
morning. you can see how much it meant to them. i know how much you are loving the golf on the weekend, you were there on saturday. we talked about jordan spieth, you were there on saturday. we talked aboutjordan spieth, we'll talked aboutjordan spieth, we'll talk about him throughout the morning. do we just mention here, the best a mature who won the silver at the royal birkdale. you might not have heard about him. his caddie is his brother, his mum and dad were watching and so was his girlfriend. his girlfriend's name is daisy meadows. isn't that amazing? and all three of the big stories, the cricket, jordan spieth and chris froome. chris froome winning the tour de france yesterday, but he has been knocked off some of the sports pages. do we not quite love him enough? when will we really, really
6:19 am
love him? i like hearing details about chris froome, we have had lots of different details, all about the bike, what he's. on the bike. he only carries one water bottle because of the extra weight, somebody is dispatched to give him the extra water. he communicates with his team with an earpiece. the extra water. he communicates with his team with an earpiecem isa team, with his team with an earpiecem is a team, we talk about that. the team got him over that line. all very important, but can any of you identify a chaffinch? that is what it looks like. according to one of the papers, four out of five people cannot identify a chaffinch. a lot of people were unable to say what an
6:20 am
irish tree looked like. and this percentage, 30% say they have not been to the countryside for more than two years —— oak tree. we need to get more in touch with nature. and, very quickly... cat news? this is potentially the world's oldest cat, 31—year—old sasha. seven years younger than the former oldest cat, who was 38. bashar is 31. she looks in great shape. she has nearly died a few times, apparently. somebody attempted to poison her a few years ago, but she is still going strong —— sasha. ago, but she is still going strong -- sasha. see you later for the sport. earlier this year, we told you about the shocking effects of the drug, spice.
6:21 am
it's a former legal high, which leaves users in a zombie—like state. bbc breakfast has been told that, despite being banned more than a year ago, even more more virulent versions of the drug are on our streets. and it's becoming a particular problem amongst the homeless community. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has spent time with the emergency services and those on the front line in newcastle as they try to tackle the issue. it's 6am in newcastle. volunteers are checking on rough sleepers. are you all right? traditional drugs, they know how to deal with, but is they know how to deal with, but is the constantly changing nature of new, psychoactive substances which cause concern. spice isjust one. new, psychoactive substances which cause concern. spice isjust onem is constantly evolving. we find the effects of it can be really extreme. peter tells us he is hooked. how
6:22 am
long have you been doing it? for the past few years. the images of so—called macro one zombies court headlines, for a while. but while the headlines have faded, the problem hasn't. these outreach workers are among 250 people who have been given special emergency training. when darren and his colleague found a rough sleeper, unresponsive, they knew exactly what to do. he was on the phone to emergency services, i to do. he was on the phone to emergency services, i was to do. he was on the phone to emergency services, i was busy giving chest compression is until the ambulance service arrived. how was the guy? he is doing well, doing fine. that was why my saved, but latest official figures show that while nps deaths are rare, they are increasing by just over a
6:23 am
while nps deaths are rare, they are increasing byjust over a quarter in one year, to 114 deaths. medics who helped train people like darren kellas casualties rates are rising. we are starting to see a spike again. what is that down to? an increase of different and new drugs now on the market. there is a drug called super spice. they tell me the ban has led to a change, but only in the kind of user being admitted, not the kind of user being admitted, not the number. i am not convinced that the number. i am not convinced that the pressures have changed much. we would expect to see a number of people everyday. some may be unresponsive, some aggressive. it depends what is in the drug. this sample, we have instructed... they are trying to find that out in this lab at manchester metropolitan university. they have a unique way of working with police, samples were analysed within 24 hours instead of
6:24 am
four weeks. toxicity results are immediately fed back to users in the emergency services dealing with the fallout. this sample was linked to a significant rise in hospitalisation a few months ago about 53 people hospitalised. because of one batch? yes. how old were you when you first started ? yes. how old were you when you first started? probably about 14. if the ban had been in place for the start, this man might never have started taking drugs. he lost ten years of his life. today, he's kicked the habit, but he says young people are finding new ways of lying on the street and online. is there any evidence that the problem is going away? no, if anything it is getting away? no, if anything it is getting a lot worse. through the streets of newcastle, is kids are starting to get on with it. the problem is being ignored. it is not being bored by the government. nps is mentioned in
6:25 am
its drug strategy for the first time. but with no additional funds to tackle it, some say this is a problem which won't easily be fixed. a home office spokesperson told breakfast that the government's new drug strategy is supporting people through treatment, while also tackling the supply of illegal drugs. with uncertainty over post—brexit subsidies, there are fears the welsh farming industry could suffer after britain leaves the eu. we've sent sean to the royal welsh show to chew the cud. we have about 7000 livestock here across the ages this morning. it has been going for decades and decades. a lot of the talk today will be about subsidies. there are a lot of subsidies that farmers get from the eu. we heard from michael gove on
6:26 am
friday. £2 billion is how much subsidies are at the minute. in wales, £200 million for welsh farmers comes from that. it is one of the biggest regions in the country. the government have said subsidies will stay in place until 2022, but people are still getting ready for all the awards and prizes going on today. these are beef cattle, and they? what are you getting up to? —— aren't. cattle, and they? what are you getting up to? -- aren't. he is basically trying to make them look pretty. you want the black to shine through, you want to emphasise the angles of the animal. it's a chance to show off to the farming community and to buyers exactly what he is doing. the cattle are great. we will talk a lot more about that over the
6:27 am
morning. we will get into that today, subsidies, who is going to win and other exciting things. before that, time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. detectives investigating the death of a young woman in south—west london have charged a 33—year—old man with murder, rape and kidnap. the 19—year—old's body was found at a house in kingston on wednesday. the man is also accused of raping another woman. a second man has been charged with kidnap. a mother from woking is calling for doctors and midwives to have more guidance on how to talk about the possibility of having a baby with down syndrome. sarah roberts says a paediatrician called her baby a risk during her pregnancy. the royal college of midwives says it's working on new training around the language used by staff. when they delivered the news, it
6:28 am
was, iam when they delivered the news, it was, i am so sorry to tell you this, we suspect oscar has down syndrome. i kind of feel like, if she had opened it with, congratulations, you've got a beautiful baby boy, i'm about to tell you something that isn't the news you were expecting, but please don't panic... i don't think i would have felt so sad for quite so long. travel now. firstly, we have lots of problems on the tube this monring — none of the weekend engineering works have finished on time. so there's no circle line between edgware road to aldgate via embankment, no district line between parsons green to edgware road, and south kensington and west kensington to south kensington. the hammersmith and city line has minor delays and the victoria line has severe delays. this is how it looks in islington where essex road is closed for works — there's a lane closed on upper street, too. in battersea, falcon road is closed southbound from york road for repairs to a burst water main. and in forest hill, there are restrictions in place
6:29 am
on the south circular near brockely rise because of a gas leak. time for the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. what a damp start to the week. a healthy mix of wet and dry weather over the next few days. houthi cloudy today from the start, outbreaks of rain pushing southwards and eastwards. we will see that much of the day, some dry spells in between. the cloud is not really going anywhere. the best chance of greatness this afternoon, a north—westerly breeze as well, temperatures getting up to about 90 degrees. in some spots barely getting above the midteens. rain clearing away overnight, the second half of the night is looking largely dry. temperatures 13— 14 degrees. clear spells tonight, but tomorrow, very different. largely dry and fine with sunny spells. one or two very isolated showers, you would be pretty unlucky if you catch those. temperatures getting up to about 24 celsius. back to wet weather on
6:30 am
wednesday, whether pushing eastwards. does that, weather is trying to break through but not very successful. a day of sunny spells and fairly light showers, a similar picture for friday. the temperatures are flip—flopping all over the place, high teens today, mid 20s tomorrow. that's all for now, i'll be back in around half an hour with the latest from the bbc london newsroom. there's plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: we will be joined by the mother of missing airman corrie mckeague, as she calls on police not to give up the search for her son. it started sneaking back a little
6:31 am
bitjust it started sneaking back a little bit just before it started sneaking back a little bitjust before the world cup in 2015. i was under huge pressure to reach certain fitness levels. as one of the world's top rugby referees, he is used to facing challenges on the pitch. but, after 8:00am, nigel owens will be here to talk about his decades—long battle with bulimia. nice to see you. there is the most terrible smell in here. and, after 8:30am, we are heading to norfolk to find out how the owners of wiveton hall are making a 17th—century manor house fit for the modern day. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news: the parents of charlie gard return to the high court today, with the judge set to consider new evidence from a us neurologist. his parents want to take their terminally ill baby to america for experimental treatment, but doctors at great ormond street hospital believe it won't work and the 11—month—old should be allowed to die with dignity. our reporter tom burridge is outside
6:32 am
the high court this morning. good morning to you. when are we likely to get clarity on what the decision will be? good morning. well, we think a decision could come from thejudge well, we think a decision could come from the judge any time from tomorrow. so the court is sitting this afternoon and will consider what charlie's parents consider to be new evidence, particularly from this american doctor who claims that his treatment, an experimental treatment, has a 10% chance of improving charlie's health, now great ormond street hospital say the evidence is not new but they do welcome the fact that this evidence is being considered by the court. it is being considered by the court. it is such a sad case. you feel for connie and chris, charlie's parents, you also feel for the doctors who have been treating the boy at great ormond street hospital. over the weekend great ormond street hospital released a statement saying that doctors and nurses have suffered a torrent of abuse. thousands of
6:33 am
messages, verbal abuse in the street and hate messages online, including death threats. we got a longer statement yesterday from connie and chris, charlie's parents, saying that they have also been the subject ofa that they have also been the subject of a lot of abuse, and a backlash, since that statement was released on saturday i great ormond street hospital. we will speak to you again later on. and we will be speaking to a judge shortly who has been involved in cases like this, to discuss a little bit about how you make those decisions. the duke of cambridge has revealed how he tells his children stories about their grandmother, diana, princess of wales. as they approach the 20th anniversary of their mother's death, princes william and harry have been giving an insight into how they try to keep her memory alive. it is part of a new documentary that airs tonight. at least 24 people have been killed and more than 40 injured in a suicide bomb attack in the afghan capital, kabul. it is understood the attacker detonated the car bomb close
6:34 am
to a bus carrying government employees in the west of the city. it is not yet clear who was behind the attack. scientists say they are examining a potential breakthrough in the case of the missing sheffield toddler ben needham. the child was last seen near a rundown farmhouse on the greek island of kos, 26 years ago. south yorkshire police say they believe ben died as a result of a tragic accident, but it has now been revealed soil samples taken during excavations last year indicate potential signs of human decomposition. the government is promising what it calls a revolution in the way electricity is generated, used and stored. the business secretary, greg clark, is to announce more investment in battery technology and details of a competition to boost innovation in energy storage. under the plans, it is thought households could save up to £40 billion pounds by 2050. two thirds of pregnant women are unsure how much they should consume
6:35 am
and many feel under pressure to eat larger meals in front of other people according to a survey of higher national charity partnership which says the idea of eating for two is a myth which can be harmful to both mother to be and baby. official guidelines suggest women do not need to eat anything extra during the first six months of pregnancy, and only require an additional 200 calories a day in the final months. which actually isn't that much, is it? hardly anything. we shall be discussing a little bit later on. i thought that was more to our news bulletin, but we have reached the end! we have a pregnant mum coming on who is 8.5 months pregnant. so have we got any towels? i could do that. you have actually... i have been there in an emergency. you are our bbc breakfast... emergency midwife. i was going to say both person, but i
6:36 am
think midwife is the more recognised term. —— birth person. sometimes you get it where there is a weekend with a lot of things to talk about at this weekend people are going to work, and there is so much to discuss which happened over the weekend, on whichever field you are looking at. you could have spent the entire weekend watching lots and lots of sport. england's cricketers are waking up this morning as world champions, after beating india by nine runs in the women's cricket world cup final at lord's. natalie sciver top—scored for england, as they set a target of 229 runs for victory. india looked comfortable chasing that target, with poonam raut hitting 86. but after she was dismissed, india collapsed, losing their last seven wickets for just 28 runs. england's anya shrubsole, who took the winning wicket, was named player of the match. in front of a sell—out crowd, england lifted the trophy for the fourth time. pure elation, i think.
6:37 am
i always think it's better winning when you are all out there in the field, because you've got your team—mates around you. and this world cup really has been a team effort. people have chipped in along the way. we have fought our way through some games, haven't necessarily won the prettiest at times. but tournament cricket is all about winning. it's not necessarily about how you win, it's just getting over the line. so shrubsole has won the world cup at lord's, and before the match, her dad tweeted this. this is anya back in 2001, visiting lords, and his tweet says, "what a place! i'd like to play here, for england, in a world cup final." well, 16 years later, anya did just that. that fabulous? talk about realising yourdream. that fabulous? talk about realising your dream. i wonder if when he took it he thought i will save that one just in case. and there is a certain look in her eyes, are confident that
6:38 am
i should be out there. —— a confidence. chris froome has sealed his fourth tour de france title, to put him second on the all—time list. he came through the largely processional final stage through paris unscathed, and managed to enjoy a glass of champagne on the way, too. it is his third triumph in a row, and he did it without winning a single stage of the tour. incredible feeling, to ride onto the champs—elysees. even after having done it three times previously, it doesn't diminish it at all. it's still — all the same emotions are here. it's just incredible, absolutely incredible. american jordan spieth is the new open champion, but he did it the hard way, after a really topsy—turvy final round. he was already struggling by the time he reached the 13th, when his tee shot ended up on a steep bank. after slipping out of the lead with a bogey on that hole, he then produced an amazing putting masterclass to pick up five shots over the next four, including this monster eagle putt. he is only the second man, afterjack nicklaus, to have won three major
6:39 am
titles before turning 24, and says it is a dream come true. iam going i am going to thoroughly enjoy this. i look back on 2015, and thought yes, i enjoyed it, but! i look back on 2015, and thought yes, i enjoyed it, but i never realised the significance until you kind of hidden low, hit a pitfall, to appreciate the highs so much. —— hit a low. and this is as much of the high as i have ever experienced in my golfing life, and i am going to enjoy it more than i have enjoyed anything i have accomplished in the past. he is the definition of a cool customer. how do you stay calm when everything is going wrong? that is the success of it all. and matt kuchar scored two birdies in his
6:40 am
last few holes, and finished second. shall ijust carry on? england look set to progress to the knockout stages of the women's european championship, after a 2—0 win over spain, in breda, and they had a helping hand from one of the officials. fran kirby had put england 1—0 up, but then ellen white appeared to handle the ball in the box. the referee awarded spain a penalty, then changed her mind. confusion all around. england escaped, and jodie taylor made sure they took advantage, doubling the lead soon after. after the game, defender lucy bronze admitted she reminded the referee of the rules and changed her mind. i actually saw it right in front of me and said that is not a penalty. and she said you're right, that is my mistake. so fair play to her for going back on it. i don't think a lot of referees would be brave enough to do that on such a big game and such a big decision. england look set to progress to the knockout stages scotland look as though they will be
6:41 am
heading out at the group stage in their first major tournament. they did score against portugal in rotterdam, erin cuthbert making it1—1. but portugal scored to make it 2—1 and register their first win. scotland sit bottom of the group without a point. great britain have ended the world para athletics championships with 39 medals. they won four on the final morning at the london stadium, including another gold for sammi kinghorn, who added the t53 title to her 200 metres gold. gb have won eight more medals at these championships than they managed in doha two years ago. adam peaty goes in his first final of the world aquatics championships in budapest later today. he qualified for the 100 metre breaststroke final, setting a new world championship record time of just under 58 seconds. britain's ross murdoch will also be in that final. he qualified seventh—fastest. seven other brits also race in finals today. there is just so
6:42 am
there isjust so much there is just so much to talk about. thank you very much, we will talk at more length throughout the programme. about keeping calm, cool and collected and how all those people who won this weekend managed to do that. it is the culmination of a five—month legal battle that has drawn international attention, and interventions from figures including the pope and donald trump. today, the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard will return to the high court, as they continue their fight to be allowed to take their son to the us for experimental therapy. treatment doctors here argue won't help him. it is clearly a highly emotional and complex case. let's get the thoughts of former high courtjudge, sir mark headley. good morning to you. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. we have talked to charlie gard's mother, connie, here on the programme. obviously incredibly difficult for them. tell us about the impact of having to make these decisions on people like you. well, thank you and good morning. i have had to do a few of these before i retired, and they do have, obviously, a tremendous impact on notjust the judge but everybody involved in the case. the
6:43 am
judge has his or her own particular pressures , judge has his or her own particular pressures, because at the end of the day they have the final say. but you are sharing, merely, in the anguish and the emotional pressures that apply to everybody who is involved in the case. absolutely, tell us about how a judge decides what is right in what is clearly a difficult and emotional case for everyone, as you say. well, a judge and emotional case for everyone, as you say. well, ajudge has and emotional case for everyone, as you say. well, a judge has to justify their decision on the basis that the decision is in the best interests of the child. as a society, of course, i think we find it quite difficult to spell out how it quite difficult to spell out how it is in the child's best interest that they should die, but i think instinctively everybody knows that they must come a stage when that is indeed the case. so the judge is trying to work out from all the evidence, including the evidence of the parents and everybody else, just
6:44 am
what is in the best interest of that particular child at that particular time. and does it weigh on your mind, these kinds of decisions? obviously they wear on your mind in the sense that once you start a case like that it is very difficult to think about very much else. and of course, when you have finished a case like that, particularly if you have made a decision that treatment should be withdrawn, then, you know, you will get the telephone call telling you that the baby has died, and that is the kind of thing you don't readily forget. at the end of the day, the judge weighing all the evidence. is it the judge that has the final say, or is it the medical opinion? thejudge has the final say. that's the whole purpose of having judges, so that disputes between the states, as the
6:45 am
national health is, and parents, can have a final resolution. and the pa rents have a final resolution. and the parents have spoken to us about the difficulty for them fighting this case. we also know that there have been threats against great ormond street and such, what would you say about the care that the doctors have been giving charlie gard? the quality of life in the medical care thatis quality of life in the medical care that is being given, i don't think that is being given, i don't think that would be questioned, or the fa ct that would be questioned, or the fact that the parents are anxious to do what is right for their child. you would find that in every similar case that we deal with in this. this happens to have gotten an awful lot of publicity, but it's not a unique case. thank you very much for your time. good morning, if you havejust turned on your television.
6:46 am
here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. today, an east—west split. west, we will see some sunshine, east, a bit more cloud and some rain. through the course of the week, the weather is going to be changeable. warmer inner west, but through the middle part of the week, an area of low pressure coming our. it seems to bring rain across the whole of uk. the weather dominating the weekend is still with us, producing a fair bit of cloud. also some showery outbreaks of rain. you can see all this cloud extending through the midlands, over towards east anglia and kent. heading north, we also have it. reducing some rain, particularly across yorkshire and lincolnshire this morning. you can see we've got some splashes elsewhere as well. cloud pushing up to the borders, the same across south—east scotland. further west,
6:47 am
under blue skies. northern ireland, a clearer start today for you. temperatures picking up quickly in the morning sunshine. the same for wales. by the time we get to eight o'clock, temperatures roughly around 18 degrees. some doubt whether cloud, but again, a dry and sunny start to the day. through today, that weather front drifts back to the north sea, taking remnants of rain with it. on the east coast, and onshore flow. a brisk wind coming from the north. feeling cooler, looking at16— from the north. feeling cooler, looking at 16— 17 down the east coast. in the sunshine and towards the west, likely to get up to about 24. we could see the odd shower across western scotland later in the day. in the evening and overnight, many showers tending to fade. wind tending to drop a touch, some clearer skies. we could see some isolated pockets of fog, nothing too
6:48 am
drastic. in scotland, temperatures could dip down into lows single figures. for the rest of us, good shape, staying in double figures. tomorrow, starting on a much dry your note down the east coast. the wind will be lighter, not feeling as cold as it is going to do today. they are breaking up, some sunshine developing. one or two showers, but for most, dry. however, later ran in the day, cloud thickening across cornwall, you can see the rain coming in across the aisle of silly. moving west to east across wednesday, accompanied by gusty winds. starting off on a dry note in the east, not lasting very long. the rain comes in, scooted from the west to east. brightening up behind it, still quite windy with it. thank you
6:49 am
very much, carol. with uncertainty over post—brexit subsidies, there are fears the welsh farming industry could suffer after britain leaves the eu. the impact of brexit on the future of farming in wales is likely to dominate discussion at this year's royal welsh show, which begins today. it's the biggest event in the british agricultural calendar — and sean is there for us this morning. iam i am expecting you to be somewhat of an expert on the livestock. pei, it is incredible. now, hazel here is a real beauty. there are about 7000 of these out this morning, all up for a variety of prizes. a lot of polishing and shining is going on now, we can go and have a lookjust outside here. a bit closer to what
6:50 am
is going on. what's the name of this lovely ball you've got here? she is actually a house. her name is... inaudible. she is the maiden heifer. best of luck today. what are you doing now, polishing? yes, a bit of black shine on her feet. doing now, polishing? yes, a bit of black shine on herfeet. i am going to cover myself. —— shine. a day like this, it is pretty important to show off what you guys do? absolutely, this is a shop window of what wales produces for the world. this is probably the best beef in the world, pasture fed, absolutely fantastic. a lot of the talk today,
6:51 am
ura she from. we heard from michael gove on friday about views for subsidies further down the road. are you worried about that? about 6096 of our income comes from those subsidies, so it is a bit scary. but it might be a fantastic opportunity. i think we could build it and manage it on our bellies. i think welsh and uk governments need to be procuring from britain, not looking for cheaper imports. practice what they preach, start to support the uk. let's build this nation together. watch out there, she's just getting a bit grumpy. what is more of an issue forfarmers, a bit grumpy. what is more of an issue for farmers, subsidies that michael gove was talking about, or is it that access to other markets? what we want is a fair price for
6:52 am
what we produce. we only get that through competition and access to trade. customers want low prices? they do, but they want value. price isn't everything. this beef is not treated with hormones, not genetically modified. if someone wants the cheapest, that is a very different product. we are talking about the highest welfare standards in the world, the highest grade in the world. we understand it needs to be the right price, but we have to recognise that. is that one thing that could change? the standards in the uk? yes, cheap food comes at a cost to the environment and to the animals. these are animals living on the most luscious grassland, my family has produced beef or 350 years ina family has produced beef or 350 years in a sustainable way. i think we've got to watch out for the smaller family farms. that's what's important. the countryside in wales,
6:53 am
for us to get that balance right, it isa for us to get that balance right, it is a massive operation. we have to work really hard. he is still working very hard right now! looking great. we will be talking more over the morning about the effects of those subsidies. we have someone from the welsh government coming on later in the programme. i have already learned the difference between a heifer and a bull, it's been a good morning.” between a heifer and a bull, it's been a good morning. i think we are all being educated today. that cow was absolutely massive. polishing going on, and some have —— some hairspray. it may not be the most obvious contender for the uk's fastest growing leisure activity — but it appears we're being bowled over by ten—pin bowling.
6:54 am
do you bowl straight?” do you bowl straight? i do. i wish i could swazz it. it may have experienced it's heyday in the 1950s, but the sport is once again booming in britain. to find out why, breakfast‘s holly hamilton is at a bowling alley in manchester for us this morning. good morning. i have to say, it is a bit loud in here, all of these strikes going on behind me. the premise of bowling is quite straightforward. something we probably learned at a fourth birthday party many years ago. recently there has been something of a grid to the nation. last year, one third of us went bowling, spending £285 million on this. next year it is predicted to rise to around £3 million. why are we getting excited about bowling again? let's speak to the owner of this bowling alley. you are doing very well. why are people
6:55 am
getting so excited about bowling ain? getting so excited about bowling again? i think if people are going out drinking for nights out, they like to have some entertainment along the way. crazy golf, ping—pong, they have made a real surgeons as well. —— resurgence. it is notjust for recreational purposes, some people are taking it up professionally as well. time to speak to helena from professional tenpin bowling. why are people doing it again? it doesn't matter who you are, what age, everyone can do it. you make friends, you can do it as a team. we
6:56 am
have got bowlers from all levels here today. we've got an eight—year—old who is a great olah, right up to much older competitors —— bowler. right up to much older competitors -- bowler. i want right up to much older competitors -- bowler. iwant to right up to much older competitors -- bowler. i want to see you in action quickly? i want to see you get a strike, live on air! let's put the pressure on. eight years old. a strike live on bbc breakfast. is he going to do it? are, so close! i am thinking we need a breakfast bowling team, just come up with a name for me. we are in for that. i think stef would be interested in it as well. we will have all the headlines at
6:57 am
seven o'clock. —— steph. time to have a look at the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. detectives investigating the death of a young woman in south—west london have charged a 33—year—old man with murder, rape and kidnap. the 19—year—old's body was found at a house in kingston on wednesday. the man is also accused of raping another woman. a second man has been charged with kidnap. travel now — and there is major disruption for thousands of commuters heading into waterloo station this morning following a signal failure. it's affecting all south west trains — a few services are running
6:58 am
into waterloo, but passengers are being strongly advised not to travel till after nine o'clock this morning. we will keep you updated on this of course throughout the morning. we also have lots of problems on the tube this morning — none of the weekend engineering works have finished on time. so there's no circle line between edgware road to aldgate via embankment, no district line between parsons green to edgware road and south kensington, and west kensington to south kensington. and the hammersmith and city line has minor delays. this is how it looks in islington where essex road is closed for works — there's a lane closed on upper street, too. a mother from woking is calling for doctors and midwives to have more guidance on how to talk about the possibility of having a baby with down syndrome. sarah roberts says a paediatrician called her baby a risk during her pregnancy. the royal college of midwives says it's working on new training around the language used by staff. when they delivered the news, it was, i am so sorry to tell you this, we suspect
6:59 am
oscar has down syndrome. i kind of feel like, if she had opened it with, congratulations, you've got a beautiful baby boy, i'm about to tell you something that isn't the news you were expecting, but please don't panic... i don't think i would have felt so sad for quite so long. time for the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. what a damp start to the week. a healthy mix of wet and dry weather over the next few days. pretty cloudy today from the start, outbreaks of rain pushing southwards and eastwards. we will see that much of the day, some dry spells in between. the cloud is not really going anywhere. the best chance of brightness this afternoon, a north—westerly breeze as well, temperatures getting up to about 19 degrees. in some spots barely getting above the midteens. rain clearing away overnight, the second half of the night is looking largely dry. temperatures 13—14 degrees. clear spells tonight, but tomorrow, very different. largely dry and fine with sunny spells. one or two very isolated showers, you would be pretty unlucky if you catch those. temperatures getting up to about 24 celsius. back to wet weather on wednesday, a band of rain pushing
7:00 am
eastwards. thursday, weather is trying to break through but not very successful. a day of sunny spells and fairly light showers, a similar picture for friday. the temperatures are flip—flopping all over the place, high teens today, mid 20s tomorrow. rain and lots of travel problems, sorry about that. that's all for now, i'll be back in around half an hour with the latest from the bbc london newsroom. there's plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. charlie gard's parents return to the high court as a judge prepares to decide what will happen to their son. it's the latest stage of their five—month legal fight over his future — they want him to be treated by a specialist in the united states. good morning, it's monday the 24th ofjuly.
7:01 am
also this morning: there are two grandmothers in their lives, and so it's important they know who she was and that she existed. prince william on keeping the memory of his mother alive through his children as the royal family prepares to mark 20 years since diana's death. it is the drug that turns people into the walking dead. how spice is still causing havoc on british streets over a year after it was banned. and later we will hearfrom the mother of a missing airmen as she calls for police to continue searching for her son. as the government says that subsidies should be earned and not merely handed out, i am at one of the biggest agricultural shows in britain with thousands of lauer have
7:02 am
stopped talking to farmers about what they think about the future of their sector. what a weekend of sport it has been. england are world champions after defeating india by nine runs in the women's world cup cricket final. chris froome won an extraordinary fourth tour de france and jordan speith has won the british open and 23 becomes the youngest open winner for years. carol is with us today. we have an east—west split in the weather across central and eastern areas this morning. it is cloudy. splashes of rain as well. in the west, we look at some sunshine. here will feel warm but quite cool across the north sea coastline. first, our main story. the parents of charlie gard return to the high court today, with the judge set to consider new evidence from a us neurologist. his parents want to take their terminally ill baby to america for experimental treatment, but doctors at great ormond street
7:03 am
hospital believe it won't work, and the 11—month—old should be allowed to die with dignity. our reporter tom burridge is outside the high court this morning: the parents have been there so many times before. can you tell us, a judge will need to make this decision. when will they know the result? we expect a decision any time from tomorrow. the judge will consider evidence this afternoon, particularly from the doctor in america who claims his experimental treatment, a type of therapy, would have a 10% chance of improving charlie's health. great ormond street hospital say the evidence being considered is new they welcome the fact that this evidence is being considered. is a side case and you feel sorry for the parents of charlie as well as the doctors and nurses who have been treating him. both of those,, as we have learned, have been suffering verbal abuse and
7:04 am
online abuse, an extensive amount and charlie ‘s parents coming out with a long statement yesterday paying tribute to great ormond street hospital and the staff and saying that they have been suffering a backlash since great ormond street released their statement on saturday. the evidence will be heard this afternoon and then we expect a decision any time from tomorrow. thank you very much. we will continue, of course, to look at this cake, case. —— case. the duke of cambridge has revealed how he tells his children stories about their grandmother, diana princess of wales. as they approach the 20th anniversary of their mother's death, princes william and harry have been giving an insight into how they try to keep her memory alive. greg dawson reports. a mother's photograph of her two boys. made public for the first time, it is an image that sums up the sense of fun princes william and harry describe about diana in a new documentary. nearly 20 years on from her death, prince william, now a parent himself, talks of reminding his
7:05 am
children of the grandmother they never met. we've got more photos up round the house now, of her, and we talk about her a bit and stuff. and it's hard, because obviously catherine didn't know her, so she can't really provide that level of detail. so i do regularly, putting george or charlotte to bed, talk about her and try to remind them that there are two grandmothers — there were two grandmothers — in their lives. prince harry was a boy ofjust 12 when he lost his mother. in a conversation with one of herfriends, sir eltonjohn, they reflect on her compassion, particularly her work with hiv charities. everybody in that photograph is smiling. because of her. yeah! i mean, she had an energy, she had a radiance. look at her face. in every photograph, there's a positive global, wonderful glow. also, she had this incredible ability which he kind of inherited — and i told him that, and he said "thanks very much" — to make people feel at ease and make them feel that everything will be all right. much has been said and written about diana in the years since her death.
7:06 am
but, for this anniversary, it is her sons who are keen to remind people of her impact on their lives and the world. greg dawson, bbc news. scientists say they're examining a potential breakthrough in the case of the missing sheffield toddler, ben needham. the child was last seen near a rundown farm house on the greek island of kos 26 years ago. south yorkshire police say they believe ben died as a result of a tragic accident. but it's now been revealed soil samples taken during excavations last year, indicate potential signs of human decomposition. we gathered an awful lot of information, an awful lot of intelligence about what may have happened to ben, coming to the conclusion that we did. some of the items that we took back we submitted to further forensic work. and the result of that to date, i am led to believe, shows signs that there is still some human decomposition around those items that we did bring back from kos. commuters face travel chaos this
7:07 am
morning of the south west trains was forced to cancel services running into the busiest station, london waterloo. and signalling problem on the line means that services across the line means that services across the network are unable to run. the company said passengers are strongly advised not to travel with delays and cancellations expected throughout the morning. if you are affected, please let us know and get in touch. it is quite a mess for thousands of people this morning. britain's economic growth forecast has been downgraded by the international monetary fund — following a weaker than expected performance at the start of the year. in april, it was predicted the economy would grow by two% but figure has now been revised down to 1.7% the treasury says the report highlights the importance of a good brexit deal with the eu. a survey of people aged over 65 in britain has found more than 40% of them think they've been targeted by scammers. the charity, age uk, also found that those living on their own were two and a half times more likely to be picked on. here's our business
7:08 am
correspondent, joe lynam. fraud has always been with us, but technology has enabled fraudsters to use increasingly creative and believable ways to target the elderly. in a survey of more than 1,000 over—65s, age uk found that 43% had been contacted by scammers hoping to defraud them. of those targeted, 16% of people living alone paid out some money. it was only 6% for married people. two thirds of those contacted by scammers did not report the matter to police. we would encourage people to not worry about being seen to be impolite. you have to look after yourself. there are a lot of scammers who are relying on you and your politeness, to not hang up the phone or delete the e—mail. and really, if it's a call or an e—mail that you're not expecting, that's offering you some sort of enticing—sounding offer, or putting you under pressure to do something,
7:09 am
then alarm bells should be going off, and you should just be strong and delete those things. the most common types of scams were fraudulent e—mails and texts known as phishing. that was followed by vishing, in which fraudsters contact their target directly, purporting to be from their bank or broadband provider. joe lynam, bbc news. the government is promising what it calls a revolution in the way electricity is generated, used and stored. the business secretary, greg clark, is to announce more investment in battery technology and details of a competition to boost innovation in energy storage. under the plans, it's thought households could save up to £40 billion by 2050. the world's first full—scale floating wind farm has started to take shape off the north—east coast of scotland. eventually, five giant turbines will stretch for more than 175 metres and supply power to 20,000 homes. the first turbine was put into place off peterhead in aberdeenshire. the remaining four arrive from norway in the coming weeks.
7:10 am
i cannot read that story without thinking of your silent sneeze the last time i read it. people were amazed by the fact you can sneeze violently. it is just amazed by the fact you can sneeze violently. it isjust years of being here on the sofa. i am amazed because my father has an uncontrollably loud sneeze. i remember in supermarkets... he does about six or seven in a row and it is like some sort of explosion going off. i don't know what it is but it is probably not good for me. the doctor who writer, steven moffat, has laid to rest one of fans‘ most fiery debates — what is the time lord's name? and it may come as a surprise that he's insisting it's ‘doctor who' and not ‘the doctor‘ as many argue. he told this year's comic—con in san diego —
7:11 am
the largest event of its kind dedicated to film, tv and pop culture — that there was no doubt about the name. steven moffat said it was established in the 1966 episode the war machines, starring william hartnell. but he admitted the doctor doesn't often call himself doctor who because — in moffat‘s words — it's a "stupid name". i have a feeling that that is not settled. it will rumble on. as fans of the show and no. carol will have the moment for you in a few minutes time. the mother of the missing airman, corrie mckeague, has urged suffolk police to continue efforts to find her son. on friday, officers called off their 20—week search of a landfill site near cambridge — after failing to find evidence relating to his disappearance. corrie's mother, nicola urquhart, is due to meet with police later today. we can speak to her now. thank you so much for coming along this morning. to little bit about this morning. to little bit about this meeting with police. what sort of things will you be talking about?
7:12 am
i will be trying to find out in plain language exactly what they have searched but, more importantly, what is still left to be searched. i think, with my comprehension and the public‘s as well, the police are saying that corrie is still in the landfill but they are no longer searching. i don't know if it is because the form of words they are using um it has certainly confused me. is to and get some clarity as to exactly what still needs to be searched. then, is there some kind of compromise that we can find, or whether it is funding, getting military assistance... is there any way we can continue just search left of that sell. not the entire landfill, just the part that was open. were you surprised on friday when you were told that this landfill site search was going to end. were you surprised to be told
7:13 am
that? i was not surprised. i had known for two weeks that the search was going to end. i have always known that. eventually they would come to a stage where they had finished searching. what surprised me was they did not say we have concluded the search, we have not found my son so now we will move on to try and find him somewhere else. it was that they said we have concluded the search but we think he is still in their. i did not expect that result at all. so, i know you will go and have a talk with police today. how forcefully do you think you will be able to make your point? i know there is a petition signed by quite a few thousand people is wilfully surged to continue.” quite a few thousand people is wilfully surged to continue. i think there is 21,000 people have signed it in the last two dess. this is the community further afield as well but the community of suffolk and north
7:14 am
and they do not understand this decision either. when you say will i be forceful, no. i am decision either. when you say will i be forceful, no. iam his decision either. when you say will i be forceful, no. i am his mother, decision either. when you say will i be forceful, no. iam his mother, i will do everything i can to try and understand why they are not doing it. i do understand that they have to stop the search at some point. but it does not seem to make sense to say he is still in there but we are no longer searching. so it is just trying to find a compromise. there must be one. i know from a mother ‘s perspective you are no doubt of the opinion that you would search for your son for ever. you would do it yourself and you would never stop. i wonder what sort of effect this has had on you and the rest of the family. we are doing ok. the past two days have been incredibly difficult. it was unfortunate... although we knew that the press announcement was coming, because he was a work, he did not have the opportunity to discuss it before it went out live. say things
7:15 am
like that do make it difficult for us. we will get through it. just as anyfamily us. we will get through it. just as any family would. we are nothing special, no different from anyone else, we will find a way through it. but knowing that we can do that on the back of everything has been exhausted. if you know where our son is, let us find him. did notjust give up and walk away. you are a police officer yourself and you would surely have an idea of how they come to this decision, when the cost has already been in over £1 million? it has been an extremely cost and i am devastated that so much money has been used on my son, because i know how difficult it is for all forces just now with money. the circumstances surrounding him are exceptional in that they know
7:16 am
that they have several positive lines of enquiry. they have done a phenomenal amount of work in searching, i will never be able to thank every individual officer enough, but let's make their search worth something. i know they are desperate to find him, let them finish. ask for help from the military, i know they have to be officially asked. they could say no, but they could ask. that would not cost the police anything. ijust don't understand. i need to be able to talk to the police about this and find out why they have made this decision. and how is his girlfriend, april? she is pregnant with his child? she has had the baby, it was a little girl. she is absolutely adorable. both mum and baby are
7:17 am
doing fantastic. i spent the day with them yesterday. she is gorgeous. an absolute lessing. thank you so much for talking to us this morning. i hope that meeting with the police officers today goes as well as you hope it will. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. if you are in the west today, it is going to be a pretty nice day. in the east and central, there is some rain. the forecast for the week ahead is changeable. today and tomorrow, it is going to be warmer. as we head into wednesday, an area of low pressure is coming our way. bringing wet and windy weather. the latter pa rt bringing wet and windy weather. the latter part of the week reverts back to sunshine and showers. this weather front is drifting, bringing some rain. high—pressure following
7:18 am
that, by giving is much more settled. cloud associated with that weather from this morning, settled. cloud associated with that weatherfrom this morning, some splashes of rain and drizzle. not everywhere, but as we push into lincolnshire and yorkshire, there is all this cloud across the midlands and towards the borders. we also have low cloud across north—east scotland. pushing away from that, clearer skies and some sunshine. the east and northern ireland, cloud tending to break up. seeing some sunshine developing. across wales, a fine start to the day. some sunshine. some sunshine across south—west england, in the sunshine, temperatures climbing readily. through the day, where there is cloud through central england, that will start to break up. we will see to brighten up with a few sunny spells. a key northerly wind coming down this coastline. feeling cold, particularly under the cloud and rain. east anglia, would see some sunshine develop in the afternoon.
7:19 am
that will help temperatures rise. in the west, highest temperatures, 24— 25 degrees. in western scotland, we could pick up the odd afternoon shower. overnight, losing that keen wind. tending not to be strong, still some cloud with showers tending to fade. some clear skies. we could see some isolated pockets of all, nothing too drastic. temperatures could move to low single figures. starting with some sunshine, especially where we have had clear skies. might try down the coast compared to today. windfall in later. a lot of sunshine and sunny spells tomorrow, temperatures responding accordingly. later in the day, cloud thickening across cornwall, heralding the arrival of this low pressure. really quite swiftly from west to east. you can
7:20 am
see it is also going to be a blustery day. that will help blow this wind across from the west to east. we will see some of it, but not for a terribly long amount of time. then, getting brighter with some showers behind it. changeable sums up the weather for this week pretty nicely. earlier this year, we told you about the shocking effects of the drug, spice. it's a former legal high, which leaves users in a zombie—like state. bbc breakfast has been told that, despite being banned more than a year ago, even more virulent versions of the drug are now on our streets. and it's becoming a particular problem amongst the homeless community. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has spent time with the emergency services and those on the front line in newcastle as they try to tackle the issue. it's 6am in newcastle. volunteers are checking on rough sleepers. are you all right?
7:21 am
traditional drugs they know how to deal with, but is the constantly changing nature of new, psychoactive su bsta nces which cause concern. spice isjust one. it is constantly evolving. we find the effects of it can be really extreme. peter tells us he is hooked. i'm actually trying hard to come off it. how long have you been doing that? for the past few years. the images of so—called spice zombies caught the headlines, for a while. but while the headlines have faded, the problem hasn't. these outreach workers are among 250 people who have been given special emergency training. when darren and his colleague
7:22 am
found a rough sleeper, unresponsive, lips blue, they knew exactly what to do. he was on the phone to emergency services, i was busy giving chest compressions until the ambulance service arrived. how was the guy? he is doing well, doing fine. that was one life saved, but latest official figures show that while nps deaths are rare, they are increasing byjust over a quarter in one year to 114 deaths. paramedics who help train people like darren tell us casualties rates are rising. we are starting to see a spike again. what is that down to? an increase of different and new drugs now on the market. there is a new drug called super spice. at newcastle a&e, they tell me the ban has led to a change,
7:23 am
but only in the kind of user being admitted, not the number. i am not convinced that the pressures have changed much. we would expect to see a number of people everyday. some may be unresponsive, some aggressive. it depends on what is in the drug. this sample, we have extracted... they are trying to find that out in this lab at manchester metropolitan university. they have a unique way of working with police, samples were analysed within 24 hours instead of four weeks. toxicity results are immediately fed back to users and the emergency services dealing with the fallout. this sample was linked to a significant rise in hospitalisations a few months ago, about 53 people hospitalised. because of one batch? yes. how old were you when you first started? probably about 14. if the ban had been in place from the start, rhys might never have started taking drugs. he lost ten years of his life.
7:24 am
today, he's kicked the habit, but he says young people are finding new ways of buying on the street and online. is there any evidence that the problem is going away? no, if anything it is getting a lot worse. through the streets of newcastle, kids are starting to get on with it. the problem is getting ignored. it is not being bored by the government. nps is mentioned in its drug strategy for the first time. but with no additional funds to tackle it, some say this is a problem which won't easily be fixed. the home office told breakfast that the government's strategy is supporting people through treatment, while also tackling the supply of illegal drugs. the front page of the telegraph, on pretty much all of the papers, actually, the english women's cricket team. they won the world cup
7:25 am
yesterday, absolutely fantastic. we hope to speak to them tomorrow.” was going to show you a really old cat again. chris froome winning again, as well. one story each. what have you good? -- got? it is really about swimming lessons and the fact that, lots of people are on some holidays. 300 people drowned last year on summer holidays. the worst period for tired death. they talk about data which shows that lots of children are not going to swimming lessons, they have got real concerns about it. we might address that on bbc breakfast. would you like to see possibly the world's oldest cat? apsley, what's are named? ——
7:26 am
absolutely, what's her name? her name is sasha. she has reached the grand old age of 31, the oldest cat ever to live was 38. that is extraordinary. may be one of your cats... you could have a cat that is older than that! our cats died at age 11. i am very sorry. we will see you in a minute. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. starting with the travel. there is major disruption for thousands of commuters heading
7:27 am
into waterloo station this morning following a signal failure. it's affecting all south west trains — a few services are running into waterloo, but passengers are being strongly advised not to travel till after nine o'clock this morning. we will keep you updated on this of course throughout the morning. we also have lots of problems on the tube this morning — none of the weekend engineering works have finished on time. so there's no circle line between edgware road to aldgate via embankment, no district line between parsons green to edgware road and south kensington, and west kensington to south kensington. and the hammersmith and city line has severe delays. the metropolitan line is also experiencing delays. and on the roads, and on th chelsea embankment is closed
7:28 am
westbound from chelsea to battersea bridge for works. detectives investigating the death of a young woman in south—west london have charged a 33—year—old man with murder, rape and kidnap. the 19—year—old's body was found at a house in kingston on wednesday. the man is also accused of raping another woman. a second man has been charged with kidnap. a mother from woking is calling for doctors and midwives to have more guidance on how to talk about the possibility of having a baby with down syndrome. sarah roberts says a paediatrician called her baby a risk during her pregnancy. the royal college of midwives says it's working on new training around the language used by staff. when they delivered the news, it was, i am so sorry to tell you this, we suspect oscar has down syndrome. i kind of feel like, if she had opened it with, congratulations, you've got a beautiful baby boy, i'm about to tell you something that isn't the news you were expecting, but please don't panic... i don't think i would have felt so sad for quite so long. time for the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. what a damp start to the week. a healthy mix of wet and dry weather
7:29 am
over the next few days. pretty cloudy today from the start, outbreaks of rain pushing southwards and eastwards. we will see that much of the day, some dry spells in between. the cloud is not really going anywhere. the best chance of brightness this afternoon, a north—westerly breeze as well, temperatures getting up to about 19 degrees. in some spots barely getting above the midteens. rain clearing away overnight, the second half of the night is looking largely dry. temperatures 13—14 degrees. clear spells tonight, but tomorrow, very different. largely dry and fine with sunny spells. one or two very isolated showers, you would be pretty unlucky if you catch those. temperatures getting up to about 24 celsius. back to wet weather on wednesday, a band of rain pushing eastwards. thursday, weather is trying to break through but not very successful. a day of sunny spells and fairly light showers, a similar picture for friday. the temperatures are flip—flopping all over the place, high teens today, mid 20s tomorrow. rain and lots of travel problems, sorry about that. that's all for now, i'll be back in around half an hour with the latest from the bbc london newsroom. now it's back to dan and louise.
7:30 am
hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. thank you for being with us on this monday morning. let's bring you up today with the headlines. the parents of charlie gard return to the high court today, with the judge set to consider new evidence from a us neurologist. his parents want to take their terminally ill baby to america for experimental treatment, but doctors at great ormond street hospital believe it won't work, and say the 11—month—old should be allowed to die with dignity. the mother of a missing air man has urged suffolk police to continue effo rts urged suffolk police to continue efforts to find her son. a search was called off after no evidence was found to his disappearance. they have done a phenomenal amount of work in searching the landfill. all the individual officers, i can never
7:31 am
thank them enough. but let us make the last 20 weeks they have searched worth something. i know they are desperate to find my son, let them finish. ask for help, they have never been asked, the military. i know they need ministerial approval andi know they need ministerial approval and i know they could say no. will ask police anything. the duke of cambridge has revealed how he tells his children stories about their grandmother, diana princess of wales. as they approach the 20th anniversary of their mother's death, princes william and harry have been giving an insight into how they try to keep her memory alive. it's part of a new documentary that airs tonight. we have more photos around the house now. we talk about her. it is difficult because catherine did not know her so she could not provide the level of detail. i regularly talk about her when i put the children to bed. remind them that there are two grandmothers. at least 24 people have been killed
7:32 am
and more than 40 injured in a suicide bomb attack in the afghan capital, kabul. it's understood the attacker detonated the car bomb close to a bus carrying government employees in the west of the city. it's not yet clear who was behind the attack. scientists say they're examining a potential breakthrough in the case of the missing sheffield toddler, ben needham. the young boy was last seen near a rundown farm house on the greek island of kos 26 years ago. south yorkshire police say they believe ben died as a result of a tragic accident. but it's now been revealed soil samples taken during excavations last year, indicate potential signs of human decomposition. we gathered an awful lot of information, an awful lot of intelligence about what may have happened to ben, coming to the conclusion that we did. some of the items that we took back we submitted to further forensic work. and the result of that to date, i am led to believe, shows signs that there is still some human decomposition around those items that we did
7:33 am
bring back from kos. commuters face travel chaos this morning after south west trains was forced to cancel services running into the uk's busiest station, london waterloo. a signalling problem on the woking line means services across the network are unable to run. the company said passengers are "strongly advised" not to travel with delays and cancellations expected throughout the morning. i'm sorry if you are involved in that. it must be pretty miserable. the doctor who writer has laid to rest one of fans‘ most fiery debates — what is the time lord's name? it comes as a first glimpse of peter capaldi's final outing in this year's christmas special has been released. writer steven moffat insists the real name is "doctor who" — and not "the doctor" — as many argue.
7:34 am
he said it was established in the 1966 episode ‘the war machines', starring william hartnell. but he admitted the doctor doesn't often call himself "doctor who" because — in moffat‘s words — it's a "stupid name". and people go doctor who? itjust does not work as a ee name. it is like bad joke about who is the most famous doctor on television? coming up on the programme, carol will have an update of this morning's weather in 15 minutes. let's handover to sally now for the weekend sport. how can you start after that weekend of spore? there is an interesting theme to this weekend sport. holding your nerve, the women's cricketers held their nerve to become world cup champions as did jordan speith, chris froome
7:35 am
did. that tour was not a tour that suited him this time but he still won. an incredible weekend of sport. england's women are cricket world champions — beating india by nine runs in the final at lord's natalie sciver top scored for england as they set a target of 229 runs for victory. the great thing about this yesterday is that the group stages were watched by around 50 million people around the world. that can only be a good thing for cricket in general, for women's cricket in particular. someone tweeted yesterday saying that at last their daughters wanted to play cricket. pure elation, i think. i always think it's better winning when you're all out there in the field, because you've got your team—mates around you. and this world cup really has been a team effort. people have chipped in along the way. we have fought our way through some games, haven't necessarily won the prettiest at times.
7:36 am
but tournament cricket is all about winning. it's not necessarily about how you win, its just getting over the line. before the match anya shrubsole's dad tweeted this. this is anya back in 2001, visiting lords and his tweet says "what a place! i'd like to play here ....for england in a world cup final." well, 16 years later, anya did just that!! that is an amazing picture. and, like you said, it is great that he managed to keep it and not lose it anywhere in the back of the cupboard quite a anywhere in the back of the cupboard quiteafar anywhere in the back of the cupboard quite a far proud father. —— quite a proud father. chris froome has sealed his fourth tour de france title to put him second on the all—time list. he came through the largely processional final stage through paris unscathed, and managed to enjoy a glass of champagne on the way too. you can only imagine that after all of those miles on the bike, that
7:37 am
champagne probably went straight to his head. many players dropped out due to injury but here we have the winner, chris froome. incredible feeling, to ride onto the champs—elysees. even after having done it three times previously, it doesn't diminish it at all. it's still — all the same emotions are here. it's just incredible, absolutely incredible. jordan speith did not make it easy at the weekend. mentioning earlier about the americans calling at intestinal fortitude. about the americans calling at intestinalfortitude. when about the americans calling at intestinal fortitude. when you are in deep to do, you begin the final round, you are ahead and everybody says you played well. and then here's four over after 12 holes. he hooks one miles to the ride on the 13th and gets into all sorts of bother. he loses the lead and then
7:38 am
somehow he is five under for the next four holes. it only went about 20 minutes. he hits his tee shot on the 13th, 120 yards right into the deep grass. it is an playable. most golfers at this point would just get on with it and he takes his time. he ta kes on with it and he takes his time. he takes 20 minutes. he declares this liar as takes 20 minutes. he declares this liaras an takes 20 minutes. he declares this liar as an playable. he could return to the tee but he takes a drop into the practice ground and then he says to his caddie we need to make it five. does need a bogey. he get a bogey, he moves on and then it is berdych, eagle, berdych, berdych, pa rt berdych, eagle, berdych, berdych, part and he wins the tournament. and here he is. i'm going to thoroughly enjoy this. i look back on ‘15, and thought yeah, i enjoyed it. but i never realised the significance until you kind of hit a low, hit a pitfall, to appreciate the highs so much. and this is as much of a high as i have ever experienced in my golfing life, and i am
7:39 am
going to enjoy it more than i have enjoyed anything i've accomplished in the past. cani can ijust can i just remind can ijust remind everybody that he is only 23. only 23. talk about composure. later in the programme we will bring you the latest from the para athletics, swimming and the women's football as well. and we will be talking to the person chosen as team captain for the british team for world athletics championships. can't say who it is yet. and tomorrow, we don't know who do we will have two cricketers with us. after they have recovered. 739. with uncertainty over post—brexit subsidies, there are fears the welsh farming industry in particular could suffer after the uk leaves the eu. we've sent sean to the royal welsh show which is the biggest event in the british agricultural calendar. if you were watching earlier, there
7:40 am
are if you were watching earlier, there a re cowl if you were watching earlier, there are cowl hoovers, polished hooves and learning the difference between and learning the difference between a heifer and a bull. good morning. and learning the difference between a heiferand a bull. good morning. i think everybody he knows the difference. there are plenty of heifers and plenty of balls behind me all being given a polished. they are allupfor me all being given a polished. they are all up for prizes later today. 7000 head of livestock here and these guys will be up for it. a big day forfarmers these guys will be up for it. a big day for farmers showing off what they can do but the topic of conversation particularly here in has been subsidies. £220 million that farmers get from eu subsidies but what will happen when we leave the union? leslie, let's start with you. you work for the welsh government. when you heard michael gove say on friday that farmers need to earn their subsidies and tom are not just for them to to earn their subsidies and tom are notjust for them to be given out, what did you think?” notjust for them to be given out, what did you think? i think our farmers already recognised that. i do not want to be paying of agriculture bad for the environment. we wa nt agriculture bad for the environment. we want a deal good for both. it is
7:41 am
important that we have these discussions. abbey, you are dairy farmer. how high up your list of priorities for raid post brexit world a re priorities for raid post brexit world are subsidies? subsidies is as important as trade. it is important we can export our goods between us and the rest of the uk, the eu and the rest of the world. that is more important than a subsidy. so, talking about subsidies, is that just an easy thing for the ministers to talk about when really what you wa nt to to talk about when really what you want to see if trade is to mark yes, when you speak to farmers over wales, we have had great stakeholder engagement and the right deal is very important. is there a case, because agriculture is one of the things our policy wise has devolved. welsh government are in charge of agriculture in wales. is an argument to say that post brexit maybe the uk
7:42 am
government should be running agricultural policy for all the nations, for a period of time? absolutely not. those powers belong to the people of wales. i am accountable to them. agriculture, forestry, and foreign men, have been devolved for 20 years. so you could end up with a different welsh policy, different to that of ireland, scotland all england. would that make even more uncertainty than may be needed ? that make even more uncertainty than may be needed? certainly the discussions we have had, i don't think we will end up with widely different agricultural policy but it is right that that policy is made here in wales and we can show that we meet the specific needs of our welsh farmers. abbey, as you say, devolved agricultural policy has been going on for a long time and people are used to it. you see a case at all for it being a little bit morejoined case at all for it being a little bit more joined up case at all for it being a little bit morejoined up than it is right
7:43 am
now in times of who was running the show? we are looking for common overall framework. when you look at things like animal disease, plant disease, protecting those things. we need a common goal because we are an island and we are all together. within that we are looking for flexibility where we will have things specific to wales. here now we have seen the iconic landscape and we need to reflect that in our produce. thank you very much to both of you. quite a lot going on today. michael gove here later today and i am sure he will get some interesting questions. all of these guys are here forjudging later. and this man here, he told me what the difference between a heifer and a bull was. what was the difference? you know the answer, louise. they are just going to laugh it off. when a heifer gives birth to a calf it becomes a cow. and a bull is a... is used for reproduction. a little sneak peek at
7:44 am
a picture that carol will show us. you have been looking at the lake ba rtz. . . you have been looking at the lake bartz... here is carol with either a pond or a lake. your choice in the background. good morning to you both. a beautiful picture from greater manchester. is not alive shot, that having said that, west is best today in terms of whether. this is where we will see the most sunshine and high temperatures. east today will be cloudy with some splashes of rain. in fact, as we go through this week, the weather is changeable. as we go through today and tomorrow it will be warmer, especially in the west but tomorrow we will see some rain moved quickly from west to east and then we returned to sunshine and showers for the rest of the week. west is best because we have a rigid high pressure a cross because we have a rigid high pressure across a. this move steadily eastwards through the day, taking its cloud and rain with it. this morning you can see we have got all this cloud across central and eastern parts of england. in
7:45 am
particular, low cloud across north—east scotland and the east of northern ireland. in the east that will burn away in the sunshine and then western areas generally hanging onto that sunshine. through the midlands, although we will season by break—up and it will brighten up, there are still quite a bit of cloud. it is the same as we travel east into kent, essex and across east anglia. east anglia could see sony breaks. there is the rain, nothing right heavy tick here is the cloud. as we get into scotland there will be a lot of dry weather around today. there is a chance of an isolated shower in the west but that isolated shower in the west but that is it. a dry sunny weather across northern ireland, hides up to 22, 23, possibly 24 degrees. for wales, a similar story 23, possibly 24 degrees. for wales, a similarstory in 23, possibly 24 degrees. for wales, a similar story in that there will beafair a similar story in that there will be a fair bit of sunshine. temperature responding accordingly. south—west england could be heading down to the beach today. cooler on the coast but inland still pleasant. through receiving an overnight you can see how we start to lose some of the shower was. the cold wind comes down and also by date and slackens a
7:46 am
bit. there will be a lot of dry weather around under clear skies. we could see the odd pocket of fog, nothing too drastic. in the glens of scotla nd nothing too drastic. in the glens of scotland the temperature could down to single figures. so if you are in balmoral it will be a chilly night. as we head on through the course of tomorrow, while still slack off when donein tomorrow, while still slack off when done in north coastline, still a lot of sunshine. not as cold as today, much drier, as editor sunshine across the country with your here and there. by the end of the day, the cloud will thicken up across south—west england and you can see some rain already crossed the isles of scilly. this is because we have an area of low pressure coming our way and if you look at the squeeze on the isobars, it tells us that it will be quite windy day. for wednesday, we start off on a dry note in the east, it will not last long because the rain will move quickly from west to east through the course of the day. behind it it
7:47 am
will brighten up with a few showers the rain there and temperatures up to the dizzy heights of 21 celsius. pregnant women who are eating for two risk harming both themselves and their unborn baby, according to experts. new research suggests two thirds of mothers—to—be have no idea how many extra calories they should consume, and many felt under pressure to eat more when in the company of others. john mcmanus has more. when it comes to food and pregnancy, how much is too much? a new study has found that it might be difficult to swallow. 69% of pregnant women did not know how many calories they should be eating, and two out of three said they felt under pressure
7:48 am
to eat more. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists say overweight mothers are risking their own and their babies' health. in the last three lots of pregnancy, only an extra 200 calories are required. that is the equivalent of a handful of nuts and dried fruit, or two slices of wholegrain toast with olive oil spread. it may be bad news for the 26% of women who said they use the excuse of, i am eating for two, when talking about snacks and meals. joining us now is mum—to—be, julia atherton and dr manjeet shehmar from the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists. good morning to you both. you are clearly going to be having a baby at some point. tell us about your approach. do you eat extra when you
7:49 am
are pregnant? in the first trimester, when you've got morning sickness and everything, i think i did eata sickness and everything, i think i did eat a bit more, because it helps to stop the sickness and things i would try to eat what i would normally eat, i am quite healthy, i cook gourmet meals at home. i have tried to stay at that level and not have more, try and keep a level playing field. but the first trimester was hard, more carbs in my diet than normal. what about friends and family? that encouragement, have another sandwich, have one of these, make sure you are preparing for your baby. yes, oh, have a cake, treat yourself, you are allowed now. there is definitely an encouragement generally, an encouragement that it is for the baby rather than for you. what should women be doing?m
7:50 am
pregnancy, until about the last three months, women should eat sensibly and normally, have a healthy and balanced diet. in the la st healthy and balanced diet. in the last three months when you need more energy and calories, but only by about 200 calories. it is a lot less than people realise. it isjust about one biscuit or a couple of pieces of toast? yes, a couple of pieces of toast? yes, a couple of pieces of toast with low—fat spread. do you think there needs to be a change in the way people think about it, and what sort of calories people should be eating? absolutely. i think the important thing to remember is that any way to put on during your pregnancy puts extra strain on the pregnancy, it increases the risk of health disorders, during the pregnancy and after a. do you think there is conflicting advice for mothers? talking to friends who are pregnant
7:51 am
at the same time? yes, i have definitely seen before that it is 300 calories, which is obviously incorrect or outdated advice. other people say you can have whatever you want, you can eat as much as you like and it doesn't matter, which doesn't seem and clearly is not good advice to take. what sort of advice do you give to women who you see and have concerns about? we have a dedicated antenatal clinic for women who have put weight on in pregnancy. pa rt who have put weight on in pregnancy. part of that advice is to refer them to dieticians. pregnancy is a perfect opportunity to take healthy lifestyle choices, people are really motivated not only to lose weight but for other healthy options. we do give advice in terms of what the potential consequences are if women do put weight on, or if they don't lose weight during pregnancy, that
7:52 am
includes diabetes, high blood pressure, there is an increased risk of pre—eclampsia and cesarean sections. it is a really good time to be motivated to make sure that your weight stays down. and what about the health of the baby? could that have an impact? you could get larger babies, especially if there is diabetes in pregnancy. you have to remember that the child might have different eating habits as well. it increases obesity rates in children as well. are you prescriptive about how much weight is good? we don't give guidelines in terms of target weight and that kind of thing. but we do give general advice about making sure that women don't put on too much weight. physiologically, you would put on weight anyway. we would not want
7:53 am
women to go to the other extreme and stop worrying about their weight gain. theyjust stop worrying about their weight gain. they just need stop worrying about their weight gain. theyjust need to be sensible and healthy in pregnancy, as they would outside. as a mother, if uri read about... —— if you are worried about... you need some practical advice. it is all heavy enough as it is! the strain on the body would be even more from all the extra weight and not eating healthily, that puts and not eating healthily, that puts a strain on you. i would imagine that would be quite tough. it is not the easiest thing in the world.” know i don't sound thataway, just to clarify that. i am not in your position in any way, shape or form. thank you very much for coming to see us. hopefully that has helped you as well. please send us any
7:54 am
questions you might have, you can find us on facebook or on our website. it may not be the most obvious contender for the uk's fastest growing leisure activity, but it appears we're in love with ten—pin bowling. it may have experienced it's heyday in the 1950s, but the sport is once again booming in britain. to find out why, breakfast‘s holly hamilton is at a bowling alley in manchester for us this morning. good morning, i have got the shoes, which is about all i've got to make mea which is about all i've got to make me a professional bowler this morning. a lot of people have been taking up the sport in the last year. a third of us have been going at least once or twice. £285 million of spending in the last year, that is amazing. why are we getting bowled over by bowling again? ben is
7:55 am
incredible, eight years old. he has played amazingly this morning. time to speak to your development coach. how yong do you have to be to get into it? —— young? you can come in at any age. how do you feel about young ben? he is sensational. he has been amazing. a big change for him, he has been practising so much. been amazing. a big change for him, he has been practising so muchm is not just for he has been practising so muchm is notjust for recreation, the professionals a re is notjust for recreation, the professionals are doing quite well as well. time to speak to our representative from the british bowling association. we are competing at the world games, how are we doing? we have got two girls out there at the moment, one is from the manchester area. she might have
7:56 am
even been here. we are seeing some amazing women and competitors in the games, it is great to see the athletes across the disciplines. they are playing against the best in the world. you have to qualify as a country to go there, so it is a really big deal to get into the world games. we have done pretty well. i think rebecca finished about 20th in the singles, a big deal. they are doing really well. we have got some other bowlers who are really making their mark at the moment. dominic barrett is one of the best bowlers in the country and he finished well in an event in munich yesterday. we have also got a bowler from dorset who munich yesterday. we have also got a bowlerfrom dorset who is munich yesterday. we have also got a bowler from dorset who is doing really well. some great athletes. we could talk about the talent all day,
7:57 am
but unfortunately we don't have the time. you have given me some tips, i am going to have a go. i can't pick it up by myself at the moment, i could injure myself. to the right. the second arrow from the right. ok, let's's go. oh, straight into the gutter. we did get that right earlier on. time now for the news, travel and weather wherever you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. starting with the travel. there is major disruption for thousands of commuters heading into waterloo station this morning following a signal failure. it's affecting all south west trains — a few services are running into waterloo, but passengers are being strongly advised not to travel till after nine o'clock this morning.
7:58 am
we also have lots of problems on the tube this morning — none of the weekend engineering works have finished on time. so there's no circle line between edgware road to aldgate via embankment, no district line between parsons green to edgware road and south kensington, and west kensington to south kensington. and the hammersmith and city line has severe delays. the metropolitan line is also experiencing delays. the overground the overg round has the overground has minor delays. and on the roads, chelsea embankment is closed westbound from chelsea to battersea bridge for works. detectives investigating the death of a young woman in south—west london have charged a 33—year—old man with murder, rape and kidnap. the 19—year—old's body was found at a house in kingston on wednesday. the man is also accused of raping another woman. a second man has been charged with kidnap. a mother from woking is calling for doctors and midwives to have more guidance on how to talk about the possibility of having a baby with down syndrome. sarah roberts says a paediatrician called her baby a risk during her pregnancy.
7:59 am
the royal college of midwives says it's working on new training around the language used by staff. when they delivered the news, it was, i am so sorry to tell you this, we suspect oscar has down syndrome. i kind of feel like, if she had opened it with, congratulations, you've got a beautiful baby boy, i'm about to tell you something that isn't the news you were expecting, but please don't panic... i don't think i would have felt so sad for quite so long. time for the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. what a damp start to the week. a healthy mix of wet and dry weather over the next few days. pretty cloudy today from the start, outbreaks of rain pushing southwards and eastwards. we will see that much of the day, some dry spells in between. the cloud is not really going anywhere. the best chance of brightness this afternoon, a north—westerly breeze as well, temperatures getting up to about 19 degrees. in some spots barely getting above the midteens. rain clearing away overnight, the second half of the night is looking largely dry.
8:00 am
temperatures 13—14 degrees. clear spells tonight, but tomorrow, very different. largely dry and fine with sunny spells. one or two very isolated showers, you would be pretty unlucky if you catch those. temperatures getting up to about 24 celsius. back to wet weather on wednesday, a band of rain pushing eastwards. thursday, weather is trying to break through but not very successful. a day of sunny spells and fairly light showers, a similar picture for friday. the temperatures are flip—flopping all over the place, high teens today, mid 20s tomorrow. rain and lots of travel problems, sorry about that. that's all for now, i'll be back in around half an hour with the latest from the bbc london newsroom. now it's back to dan and louise. hello this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. charlie gard's parents return to the high court as a judge
8:01 am
prepares to decide what will happen to their son. it's the latest stage of their 5 month legal fight over his future — they want him to be treated by a specialist in the us. good morning, it's monday 24thjuly. also this morning. there are two grandmothers, there we re there are two grandmothers, there were two grand mothers in their lives so it's important they know who she was. prince william on keeping the memory of his mother alive through his children — as the royal family prepares to mark 20 years since diana's death. it's the drug that turns people into the "walking dead". how spice is still causing havoc on britain's streets more than a year after it was banned. he's battled bulimia for more than
8:02 am
20 years. we hearfrom nigel owens as it's revealed more men seek help for eating disorders. good morning. the government says farm subsidies should be earned, notjust given out. this morning at the ago cultural show in powys, we are prepping the livestock and finding out what farmers think about the future of their industry. what a weekend of sport, england are world champions after beating india by nine runs in the women's cricket world cup final at lord's. chris froome wins an extraordinary fourth tour de france and jordan spieth has won open championship at royal birkdale, his third major championship and at 23, he's the youngest open winner since seve ballesteros. and carol has the weather. if you are after sunshine today, west is best. sunny, warm and mostly dry. if you are in central and
8:03 am
eastern areas, more cloud around, splashes of rain and with an on shore wind down the north sea coastline, here it will feel cool. more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the parents of charlie gard return to the high court today, with the judge set to consider new evidence from a us neurologist. his parents want to take their terminally ill baby to america for experimental treatment, but doctors at great ormond street hospital believe it won't work, and the 11—month—old should be allowed to die with dignity. our reporter tom burridge is outside the high court this morning. good morning, tom. another day of debate, of looking at the evidence and we expect some sort of decision tomorrow, is that right? well, dan, i think the decision can come from thejudge any i think the decision can come from the judge any time from tomorrow. remember, the decision is whether or not charlie's parents, connie and chris, should be allowed to take
8:04 am
young charlie to new york for experimental treatment, a type of therapy, or whether the experimental treatment, a type of therapy, orwhetherthejudge decides, as doctors at great ormond street hospital have argued, that the chances of success are so small that actually it's in his best interests for him to die with dignity. now he suffers from a very rare genetic disease, mitochondrial depletion syndrome, irreversible severe brain damage. over the weekend we have been learning from great ormond street hospital on saturday how doctors and nurses have been suffering or been at the receiving end of verbal abuse and abuse online. charlie's parents saying they've suffered a backlash. the evidence will be heard this afternoon and the judge will have to make that very, very difficult decision. the mother of the missing airman, corrie mckeague, has urged suffolk police to continue efforts to find her son. on friday, officers called off their 20—week search of a landfill site near cambridge — after no evidence was found relating to his disappearance.
8:05 am
they've done a phenomenal amount of work in searching the landfill so far. all the individual officers i will never be able to thank them enough. but let's make the last 20 weeks that they have searched worth something. i know they're desperate to find corrie but let them finish. ask for help from the military. they've never been officially asked. i know they have to get ministerial approval, i know they could say no, but why not ask. that wouldn't cost the police anything. the duke of cambridge has revealed how he tells his children stories about their grandmother, diana princess of wales. as they approach the 20th anniversary of their mother's death, princes william and harry have been giving an insight into how they try to keep her memory alive. greg dawson reports. a mother's photograph of her two boys.
8:06 am
made public for the first time, it is an image that sums up the sense of fun princes william and harry describe about diana in a new documentary. nearly 20 years on from her death, prince william, now a parent himself, talks of reminding his children of the grandmother they never met. we've got more photos up round the house now, of her, and we talk about her a bit and stuff. and it's hard, because obviously catherine didn't know her, so she can't really provide that level of detail. so i do regularly, putting george or charlotte to bed, talk about her and try to remind them that there are two grandmothers — there were two grandmothers — in their lives. prince harry was a boy ofjust 12 when he lost his mother. in a conversation with one of herfriends, sir eltonjohn, they reflect on her compassion, particularly her work with hiv charities. everybody in that photograph is smiling. because of her. yeah! i mean, she had an energy, she had a radiance. look at herface. in every photograph, there's a positive global, wonderful glow. also, she had this incredible ability which he kind of inherited — and i told him that, and he said "thanks very much" —
8:07 am
to make people feel at ease and make them feel that everything will be all right. much has been said and written about diana in the years since her death. but, for this anniversary, it is her sons who are keen to remind people of her impact on their lives and the world. greg dawson, bbc news. at least 35 people have been killed and more than 40 injured in a suicide bomb attack in the afghan capital, kabul. it's understood the attacker detonated the car bomb close to a bus carrying government employees in the west of the city. it's not yet clear who was behind the attack. the young boy was last seen near a rundown farm house on the greek island of kos 26 years ago. south yorkshire police say they believe ben died as a result of a tragic accident. but it's now been revealed soil samples taken during excavations last year, indicate potential signs of human decomposition. ben needham. disappeared in 1991. in
8:08 am
the years that followed, ben's mother kerry pleaded with anyone that knows about her son's disapaoernts to come forward. last october, an extensive 21—day search was conducted of land around the farmhouse where he was last seen and a second site close by. after it emerged the toddler may have been crushed to death by a digger. and now on the 26th anniversary of his disappearance, a possible breakthrough. signs of blood have been found on items recovered by police during last year's search. some items brought back we submitted for further forensic work and the results of that to date i'm led to believe show signs that there is some human decomposition around the items we brought back from kos. the sandal and toy truck will now be
8:09 am
tested for ben's dna in aberdeen. about 60 items in total were brought back to the uk for analysis. we are providing information that there is a strong indication from this chemical profile that we were able to ascertain that this was present on the items as a result of blood decomposition. south yorkshire police hope this latest development will go some way in proving what happened to this little boy. commuters face travel chaos this morning after south west trains was forced to cancel services running into the uk's busiest station, london waterloo. a signalling problem on the woking line means services across the network are unable to run. the company said passengers are "strongly advised" not to travel — with delays and cancellations expected throughout the morning. waterloo is the uk's busiest railway
8:10 am
station. the business secretary is to announce a boost in innovation and energy storage. under the plans, households could save up to £40 billion by the year 2050. if you are just waking up to this, this is a question that has worried viewers of doctor who for ages. the doctor who writer has laid to rest one of fans‘ most fiery debates, what is the time lord's name? it comes as a first glimpse of peter capaldi's final outing in this year's christmas special has been released. writer steven moffat insists the real name is "doctor who" and not "the doctor" as many argue.
8:11 am
he said it was established in the 1966 episode ‘the war machines', starring william hartnell. but he admitted the doctor doesn't often call himself "doctor who" because in moffat‘s words, it's a "stupid name". it leads to many questions if you say "my name is doctor who. coming up say "my name is doctor who. coming up later, michael phelps will take ona up later, michael phelps will take on a shark. what would that look like? who will win? we'll show you later on. we are going to look at the history of man versus animals to see if the animal... what more could you want! stay with us for that. the international rugby referee, nigel owens, has never been afraid of challenging stereotypes. he was one of the first figures in the macho world of his sport to come out as gay. now, as part of a bbc panorama special, he's
8:12 am
revealed his decades long battle with bulimia. it's a condition he's suffered from throughout his career including during the rugby world cup final two years ago. in a moment, nigel will be here to tell us why he's decided to speak out about this now. but first let's see a clip from the programme. he's refereed some of rugby's biggest games but off the pitch nigel owens has faced a tougher battle. i've struggled with an eating disorder for over half my life. it's a very secretive illness. men in particularfind it very difficult to talk about it. as a teenager he struggled with his own sexuality and depression. the type of person that i was finding attractive was not finding me attractive or would not find me attractive because i was fat, overweight, obese. i started making myself ill. i wanted to lose weight. so i'd go to the toilet and make myself sick pretty much every meal nearly, you know.
8:13 am
the uk's largest eating disorder charity is beat. its advice centre here in warrington receives 20,000 calls a year. around one fifth are from men and boys. it is definitely the case that men and boys are not seeking help as regularly. many of them don't want to be seen as suffering from what is perceived as a girls' problem or a women's problem. panorama says there's been a large increase in the numbers of men seeking help. thank you forjoining us and massive respect for you for talking about this because it's so important. tell us how bulimia's affected you and when did you realise you had a problem?” affected you and when did you realise you had a problem? i was about 19 when it started when i was having issues dealing with my sexuality and suffering from depression and stuff then. i lost a lot of weight through becoming
8:14 am
bleepic, went from 16 and a half stone to 11 and a half stone, then i went to the gym and got hooked on steroids. i used the bulimia then to keep control of the weight. for the first four or five years of when it suffered with it, i probably suffered with it, i probably suffered and started to feel sick two or three times every day. i didn't know i was suffering from bleep ya five or six years later when i heard a friend saying one of their friends suffered from it and then i realised. i think of it as something like a controlling thing, like i controlled it to keep my weight at that level, i guess. over the years, how has it affected you? are there certain times you find it more difficult and other times when it's almost like a normal life?m is now. the first few years was intense, pretty much every day, you
8:15 am
would eat your main meal, if you are out eating with friends, having dessert, you wouldn't have it, you would go to the toilet, make yourself ill, come back and eat the dessert. when i acceptd who i was, went through a difficult patch and nearly ended up losing my life dealing with my sexuality and stuff, the bulimia became something to control the weight frequently then. imum was control the weight frequently then. i mum was diagnosed with terminal cancer in 2008 and when she told me and my dad that she only had a year to live, i was eating a bit to comfort myself then and went the toilet to make myself sick, i couldn't do it. i realised my mum is fighting every day to spend more time with us and fighting an illness she can't do anything about and i thought, i've got an illness i can do something about. i stopped for three orfour do something about. i stopped for three or four years do something about. i stopped for three orfour years then. do something about. i stopped for three or four years then. it kicked backin three or four years then. it kicked back in 2013, 2014, i needed to
8:16 am
achieve the fitness levels that are quite high for somebody my age, you have to pass a fitness test to become a referee same as somebody in the 20s, so i used it as losing the kilograms to help me get through the fitness. it's been there since but not as frequent ait was in the early yea rs. listening to you, there are so many things you have said that a so insightful. it has like it is exhausting, something you can't escape from. so many people will be watching this programme in a similar position, unable to speak about it. how do you move on? is it something you have always got to live with?” hope that isn't the case. but i have been living with it for about 27 yea rs been living with it for about 27 years now. i thought i was in control of it. i just years now. i thought i was in control of it. ijust needed to lose some weight. but busy i am not in
8:17 am
control otherwise i would not be suffering. but speaking to experts after doing the programme, and speaking to individual cases on the programme, i realised the hell they and their family had programme, i realised the hell they and theirfamily had been through, and theirfamily had been through, and some of them have been through it much worse than me, and it is only now i realise that the clear message is if you are suffering from it, the sooner you accept yourself, as with any issues in your life, whatever they are, the sooner you accept yourself that you need help and you talk to somebody and get the correct help, and it is a different story whether the correct help is there, but as soon as you accept that, that is the biggest challenge. as soon as you that, that is the biggest challenge. as soon as you can that, that is the biggest challenge. as soon as you can identify it and get the right help, the better the chance you have of recovering. that was the clear message for people out there. get the help as soon as you can. you don't want to be at my stage, 30 years on, still having to suffer from it. it is amazing how
8:18 am
honest you are about it, considering the world you live in, the macho by the world you live in, the macho rugby world. here you are saying that in preparation for the world cup final, you were struggling with bulimia. what has the response been from your peers? you are regarded as the best referee in world rugby. from your peers? you are regarded as the best referee in world rugbym depends who you speak to! but hugely supportive. from the first challenges in my life, accepting her i was, challenges in my life, accepting her iwas, and challenges in my life, accepting her i was, and coming out in the macho world of rugby, and then talking about that later on more in—depth, andi about that later on more in—depth, and i have never spoken about bulimia before, but the responses in the last day over social media, there's the board has been massive. that is encouragement for anybody suffering. —— that support has been massive. it is not a sign of wea kness to massive. it is not a sign of weakness to talk about your issues. it helps you to gain strength. it certainly helped me in the last 24 hours seeing the responses on social media. the sad thing is actually
8:19 am
seeing how many people are going through it. there are a lot of m essa g es through it. there are a lot of messages from people of all ages who say they have been going through it for years. i am very lucky that i am in the great sport that rugby is, we are close—knit family, people do rally and support you. that is important. not just to rally and support you. that is important. notjust to get through life but through any issues that we come across in life. you need the support of your family and friends and rugby is just one support of your family and friends and rugby isjust one big family. thank you so much for coming to talk about it. lots of people will feel affected and if you are, if someone you know is affected by the issues raised in this interview, and you wa nt to raised in this interview, and you want to find out more, there are details of organisations offering information and support on eating disorders at the website. and you can also call for free to hear recorded information any time. we will put that on twitter and facebook as well. bbc panorama: men, boys & eating disorders is on bbc one
8:20 am
tonight at 8:30pm and afterwards on bbc iplayer. now here is carol with another look at the weather. good morning. mixed fortu nes at the weather. good morning. mixed fortunes depending on where you are. useful pictures in this morning, this one from cambridge. a lot of cloud and spots of rain. that is the story for central and eastern areas. but in the west, cornwall, a lovely start to the day with beautiful sunshine and the same across the wirral as well, blue skies. where we have got clearer skies, it is quite chilly with temperatures picking up quickly. under the cloud, temperatures will not rise particularly high as we go through the course of the day in the east. if you are on the east coast itself, we do have a brisk wind coming in from the north sea, accents rating that cold feel. it is this weather front producing the showery outbreaks of rain drifting east. but
8:21 am
in the west there is high pressure. through the cause of the morning and into the afternoon, we hang on the cloud in central and eastern areas. splashes of rain and drizzle and a keen northerly wind. towards the west, different story. low cloud around at the moment will burn away. in most western areas we are looking at sunshine. some holes develop in the cloud, so it will brighten up across the midlands, east anglia, down to sussex. we have also got some showery outbreaks of rain here and there and not everywhere. across the pennines and into southern scotland, variable amounts of cloud. more cloud in north—eastern scotland, not the low cloud of this morning, and then further west, sunshine. just the risk of an isolated shower. in northern ireland, the cloud will burn away and there will be high temperatures of 23. in wales and south—west england, a sunny afternoon again. if you are tempted down to the
8:22 am
coastline, it will be cooler on the coast. this evening and overnight the showers will fade and the winds will lighten. clear skies will develop. clear skies left over from the daytime as well. there may well be pockets of fog that nothing too dramatic. across the sheltered glens in scotland it will be a cool nights down to single figures. tomorrow we start off with a fair bit of sunshine, much drier down the east coast, the wind is not as strong, so not feeling as cold. some showers here and there. and in the south—west we have a new set of weather systems coming our way. low pressure is coming moving swiftly from west to east on wednesday. you can see from the squeeze on the isobars that it will be windy as well. there is the rain coming from the west to the east. behind it we see something drier and brighter but still a few showers to be had. it looks like a busy day. thank you. earlier this year, we told
8:23 am
you about the shocking effects of the drug spice. it's a former legal high, which leaves users in a zombie—like state. bbc breakfast has been told that despite being banned more than a year ago even more virulent versions of the drug are now on our streets. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has spent time with those on the front line in newcastle as they try to tackle the issue. it's 6am in newcastle. volunteers from the homeless charity changing lives are checking on rough sleepers. are you all right? traditional drugs they know how to deal with, but it is the constantly changing nature of new, psychoactive su bsta nces which cause concern. spice isjust one. mps is unknown, it is constantly evolving. we find the effects of it can be really extreme. peter tells us he is hooked. i'm actually trying hard to come off it. how long have you been doing that?
8:24 am
for the past few years. i have never been in this state in my life and i want offer it. the images of so—called spice zombies caught the headlines, for a while. but while the press attention has faded, the problem hasn't. these outreach workers are among 250 people who have been given special emergency training. when darren and his colleague found a rough sleeper, unresponsive, lips blue, they knew exactly what to do. while he was on the phone to emergency services, i was busy giving chest compressions until the ambulance service arrived. how was the guy? he is doing well, doing fine. that was one life saved, but latest official figures show that while nps deaths are rare, they are increasing byjust over a quarter in one year to 114 deaths. paramedics who help
8:25 am
train people like darren tell us casualty rates are rising again. we are starting to see a spike again. what is that down to? an increase of different and new drugs now on the market. the current threat is a new drug called super spice. at newcastle a&e, they tell me the ban has led to a change, but only in the kind of user being admitted, not the number. i am not convinced that the pressures have changed much. we would expect to see a number of people each day. some may be unresponsive, some aggressive. it all depends on what is in the drug. this sample, we have extracted... they are trying to find that out in this lab at manchester metropolitan university. they have a new and unique way of working with police. samples are analysed within 24 hours instead of the usual four weeks.
8:26 am
toxicity results are immediately fed back to users and the emergency services dealing with the fallout. this sample was one of the ones linked to a significant rise in hospitalisations a few months ago, about 53 people hospitalised. because of one batch? yes. how old were you when you first started? probably about 14. if the ban had been in place from the start, rhys might never have started taking drugs. instead he lost ten years of his life. today, he's kicked the habit, but he says young people are finding new ways of buying on the street and online. is there any evidence that the problem is going away? no, if anything it is getting a lot worse. walking through the streets of newcastle, kids are starting younger and younger with it. the problem is getting ignored. it is not being ignored
8:27 am
by the government. nps is mentioned in its drug strategy for the first time. but with no additional funds to tackle it, some say this is a problem which won't easily be fixed. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. the home office told breakfast that the government's new drug strategy is supporting people through treatment while also tackling the supply of illegal drugs. we will have the headlines wherever you are now. see you in a few minutes. low pressure dominated the weather over the weekend. it won't be too
8:28 am
far away this week either. it will be changeable. warmer sunnier spells but the wettest weather is likely to arrive on wednesday. this morning, we have this weather front across the east, giving us a bit of cloud, outbreaks of rain in eastern yorkshire, lincolnshire and towards the south—east of england. further west it's largely fine and dry. into the afternoon, plenty of dry weather with some sunshine in south—west england and wales. we'll see temperatures getting up into the low 20s. further east, it's cloudy and especially on the coast. quite cool at 15 and 16. sunny spells in north—west england, northern ireland and most of scotland where again temperatures are up to 24, for example, in glasgow. on the coast along the north sea, it will be a little fresher. through the evening, little fresher. through the evening, little change. the cloud will start to disappear into the early hours of tuesday morning. elsewhere, we'll keep some clear skies. temperatures
8:29 am
overnight about 13 or 14. during tuesday, it should be an improved day across eastern parts. we start off the morning with some cloud around. that will break up and there'll be some good spells developing here. the odd shower in scotla nd developing here. the odd shower in scotland and north—west england, but for most, tuesday is looking like a drier day with sunshine. temperatures getting up into the high teens, low 20s, up to 2 in london. wednesday is the wettest day of the week with this area of low pressure here moving in bringing wet and windy conditions across most parts of the uk. all of us should expect some rain at times on wednesday and gusty winds to go with that at times as well. bye. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and ben thompson.
8:30 am
doctor fox goes to washington. the uk‘s international trade secretary meets his us counterpart to talk trade. live from london, that's our top story on monday the 24th ofjuly. a deal between the us and uk could boost trade by tens of billions of dollars — but can't be struck until after britain leaves the european union. also in the programme.... the international monetary fund cuts the growth prospects for the uk and us — while boosting its forecasts for china, japan and the eurozone.

67 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on