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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 24, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11:00. the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard return to the high court, with the judge set to consider new evidence from a us neurologist. changes to the way electricity is generated, used and stored — the government says it could save consumers as much as £40 billion a year. more than 30 people have been killed ina more than 30 people have been killed in a suicide bomb attack in the afg ha n in a suicide bomb attack in the afghan capital of kabul. the search for missing toddler ben needham — signs of blood are found on a sandal and soil. also this hour — rebuilding a city devastated by war. two weeks after iraqi forces retook mosulfrom two weeks after iraqi forces retook mosul from so—called islamic state, we return to find out how residents are coping. and remembering princess diana — william and harry pay moving tributes to their mother in a new documentary, marking the 20th anniversary of her death. good morning.
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it's monday the 24th ofjuly. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the parents of charlie gard return to the high court today, with the judge set to consider new evidence from a us neurologist. his parents want to take their terminally ill baby to america for experimental treatment, but doctors at great 0rmond street hospital believe it won't work, and say the ii—month—old should be allowed to die with dignity. we can speak to our news correspondent, helena lee, who's outside the high court. what are we expecting? the case is
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expected to begin at 2pm this afternoon, in what has become an incredibly complex and emotive case. the peasants will come back to court, but we expect is the judge in this case to examine all the new evidence that has been given over the past week or so. we know that the past week or so. we know that the american neurologist who flew over from the american neurologist who flew overfrom america met the american neurologist who flew over from america met with great 0rmond street hospital medics on monday, and he also met for the first time charlie as well, and examined him. so we should hear a bit more about what happened at that meeting, and also crucially, charlie has had a number of new scans carried out including even an mri scan on his brain. we should hear the results later on, and we might hear from that american neurologist as well. he has already given evidence, but thejudge me as well. he has already given evidence, but the judge me want to hear from evidence, but the judge me want to hearfrom him again. vpns will be back, it is due to start 2pm this afternoon. —— the parents will be
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back. we heard from great 0rmond street hospital, who said that doctors and nurses had suffered from thousands of messages of abuse both online and verbally in the street. they have called in the metropolitan police over that, and the parents yesterday said they had suffered from very unpleasant messages from members of the public. so it is a difficult day for the parents, but we expect more this afternoon, and thejudge said he hopes we expect more this afternoon, and the judge said he hopes to give a judgment is tomorrow at some point. and today we have a sense when at thatjudgment comes out, depending on what it is, when things might start to move? it is difficult to say. it depends which way the judgment goes. the parents want to ta ke judgment goes. the parents want to take charlie to america for this experimental treatment, a therapy. the doctor proposing it says it is ina the doctor proposing it says it is in a powderform the doctor proposing it says it is in a powder form which would be given to charlie. that is what they
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want. we understand the hospital has not changed its view. they think that's charlie should be moved to palliative care, so it depends which way thatjudgment palliative care, so it depends which way that judgment goes. palliative care, so it depends which way thatjudgment goes. if it goes in favour of great 0rmond street hospital, then clearly, a sensitive discussion will be carried out between hospital staff and the pa rents between hospital staff and the parents as to how they want to take that forward. when that palliative ca re that forward. when that palliative care will be moved forward, and there will of course be a court order in place for that to happen. thanks very much. the government is promising what it calls a revolution in the way electricity is generated, used, and stored. the business secretary, greg clark, is to announce more investment in battery technology, and details of a competition to boost innovation in energy storage. with me now is our business presenter, ben thompson. what are we expecting to hear? when you talk about battery technology,
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it sounds like it might be boring. but if you think about all the technology we use, driverless cars, mobile phones, any portable devices, they all rely on batteries. and whilst technology gets smaller and smaller, batteries are still a problem because they are heavy and quite big. so this investment by the business secretary, greg clark, will cost around £246 million. they are launching what they call the faraday challenge, rewarding private enterprises that have found breakthroughs in making batteries last longer and be smaller and lighter. and that could open up whole new industries as far as things like electric cars and portable devices are concerned. driverless vehicles, an electric car, for example, we are told that could be the big future, but they are still reliant on batteries and
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there are big questions over how long they take to charge, what happens when they run out of charge, and crucially, whether you can recycle them. some critics say the environmental fallout of those recycla ble environmental fallout of those recyclable batteries is a problem. so this is all part of a challenge, coming up with new ways of storing electricity and looking at the locations it could have for business asa locations it could have for business as a result. business on the one hand, but also for you and me, novel ideas about when our washing machines go on and things like that. if you think about how we generate electricity, most of it comes from fossil fuels and goes on the grid, which makes it very difficult to story that energy, so they generated when we need it. they know when there is good to be picked and roughly, evenings and weekends, there is more gas and electricity use. “— there is more gas and electricity use. —— they know when there is going to be peak demand. we cannot determine when it will be windy or sunny, determine when it will be windy or sunny, so we determine when it will be windy or sunny, so we need to have ways of
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storing solar and wind generated energy. if we have huge, cost—effective batteries that can hold that charge, it could mean more investment in things like renewable energy, so investment in things like renewable energy, so it does not matter when the wind blows or the sunshine is, we can generate energy when it does and saw it for a win we need it, which could be crucial. they are also talking about the money being passed back to us as consumers, so if have solar panels on the roof of my house, i generate some electricity, i can sell it to the national grid and they could storage, which means that our bills could come down and we could in fact get paid for the eldest day we generate. ben, you have excited me. thank you very much we indeed. breaking news from the united states. donald trump's senior advisor and son—in—law, jared kushner, will today face questions from the senate intelligence committee as the investigation into russia's alleged interference in last year's election moves one step closer to the white house. it will take place behind closed doors,
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but he says that his initial security form was submitted prematurely by mistake. it initially omitted all foreign contacts, so that suggests there was some mix—up with jared kushner‘s security quotas, but he was saying that was donein quotas, but he was saying that was done in error. he did not suggest a secret back channel with russia during a meeting with the russian ambassador, which took place in december 20 i6. ambassador, which took place in december 20 16. it was suggested that there been talk of a communication back channel being created. he says he did not suggest a secret back channel with russia during that meeting. we will have more on that throughout the day. we are now going to return to the
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charlie gard story and speak to a neurologist about switching to palliative care. thank you for being with us, this is a difficult case. difficult to does not begin to articulate how complicated things are. i think part of the problem is that it has been distilled into a very black and white, good versus evil, establishment versus the little guy situation, particularly by social media, when in fact there is no absolute right or wrong answer. in medicine, we deal very much in shades of grey, and the debate here is, who is right in terms of where charlie's baseline is. it is probably right that the treatment will help his muscles work better, but whether or not that will
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reverse a ny better, but whether or not that will reverse any damage already done, so there was disagreement which is why it has gone to the court. what has happened subsequently is that everything has gone completely pear shaped, and everybody has got an opinion. we have a situation that i struggle to understand when we have people with entrenched beliefs, great 0rmond staff and management are somehow in some kind of conspiracy and lying about things. and how it has come to this in 2017 is beyond me. so you're saying people underestimate the emotional investment of staffing great 0rmond street hospital as much as the pa rents 7 street hospital as much as the parents? i think when you look after children with chronic diseases that are life—threatening or like shortening, you cannot would after them properly without becoming emotionally involved. you get to know the children and the families intimately, and they get to know you. and it makes it very difficult asa you. and it makes it very difficult as a health care professional when
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these discussions have to take place and when decisions have to be made, because you are emotionally invested, but at the same time as a health care professional, you have to be as objective as possible. the important thing that seems to have been lost in a lot of discussions indymedia is that ultimately it is charlie's best interests that have to be taken as paramount, not his pa re nts' to be taken as paramount, not his pa rents' best to be taken as paramount, not his pa re nts' best interest, to be taken as paramount, not his parents' best interest, not the stuff's best interests. people seem to have forgotten that the staff at great 0rmond street hospital are doing what they think is best for charlie every day, yet they have to come to work being subjected to abuse, intimidation and death threats. he taught about the relationship that builds up between health care professionals and families. —— you talk about. given that, how do you think things have gone so rightly commended up in a court situation? is that very uncommon? —— how things have gone so
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awry that we have ended up in a court situation? we try to help pa rents court situation? we try to help parents be as objective as possible. the difficulty is that, if you are a parent, you will cling on to any hope that comes your way. and i am troubled by the fact that clinicians from outside, without at the time having had the chance to look at all the information, or having had the chance to examine charlie, could confidently predict that an unproven treatment could give a defined percentage chance of improvement. is that fair on the parents? i can understand that if there had been detailed assessment and that had been put forward, it would make more sense. what will be interesting now that that clinician has had the chance to do more detailed assessments, it will be interesting to see what the opinion is now. my other concern is that so much has been invested by the professor from
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america that he could potentially lose face, and of course, is he going to be objective now? i don't know. and i think it is a shame that this has gone to a legal situation, but that is the way forward is when consensus cannot be found between pa rents consensus cannot be found between parents and clinicians. thank you very much for your time. back to the statement being given by jared kushner as he speaks to the senate intelligence committee. you have been having a look at what has been said in these opening stages. what do we know? this is interesting, because we do not often hear from jared interesting, because we do not often hearfrom jared kushner, interesting, because we do not often hear from jared kushner, and interesting, because we do not often hearfrom jared kushner, and he has been the subject of many newspaper report which claimed that he met with the russians at the end of last year during the transition period, and the allegation from us media
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reports that he tried to create a secret back channel with the russians. the first point is that he addresses that, saying that he did not suggest a secret back channel, i did not suggest an ongoing secret form of communication for then or form of communication for then or for when the administration took office. crucially, he says, i did not collude, nor do i know of anyone else in the campaign who colluded with any foreign government. i had no improper contacts. he says it was not just no improper contacts. he says it was notjust him, but nobody in the trump campaign colluded with the russians at all, that is what he is saying. this is a statement from him from behind closed doors? there will not be cameras on this like there was forjames, a's hearing, he is answering questions to this senate committee. —— james, a. answering questions to this senate committee. ——james, a. it is very comprehensive but it is notjust this committee that wants to know about the contact he had with the russians, we also know why jared
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kushner did not disclose these. —— they want to know. it is worth reminding you that jared kushner is president trump's son—in—law, married to a ivanka trump, but he also works in the white house. he did not disclose these contacts with the russians, he has outweighed the meetings he had, has had a few during the campaign. —— outlined the meetings. he did not disclose those in his security clearance, so he was also criticised not just in his security clearance, so he was also criticised notjust for having the meetings, but for covering them up. he says that he was very busy getting ready to move to washington, finalising the scramble of finalising the scramble of finalising the scramble of finalising the involvement of his company, meant he was not filling out the form and a complete way, so it has been reported that his submission at omitted on the contact with russians. in the accidental airless omission of the form, all
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foreign contacts were omitted. that is what they will want to know, because there is a procedure in is what they will want to know, because there is a procedure i if z— was--- was-” a bit was. a bit confused and had on. 1 5,5. 3:21 z;;§ you a bomb exploded at 7am, in the
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middle of kabul. 0verwhelmingly, the people who were injured and killed in this attack were civilians. if the taliban was intended to target terror intelligence officials, this attack failed, and as you can see from the pictures, the devastation was absolutely awful. and as i say, the warning is that casualties numbers are only likely to increase. how do you assess security in the city at the moment? that is a good question. less than two months ago, there was an enormous bomb. the bomb two months ago was absolutely huge, killing more than 150 people, more than a50 were injured. it happened less tha n than a50 were injured. it happened less than 200 metres from where i am sitting now and targeted the main diplomatic area where the bbc office is based. after that, there was huge
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anger in kabul. they said, how could you have letters down? to the government, how could you have let a bomb like this through the security cordons to protect the city? the government said they would protect the city and make it safer. this shows us just how vulnerable kabul still is. thank you, justin. scientists say they're examining a potential breakthrough in the case of the missing sheffield toddler, ben needham, who disappeared on the greek island of kos 26 years ago today. human material has been found in soil samples gathered last year by british police. we gathered a lot of evidence about
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what happens to them, coming to the conclusion that we did. submitted some of its two further forensic work, and the result of its today shows signs, i am led to believe, of some human decomposition around items that we did bring back from kos. in april it was predicted that the economy would grow by 2%. that has now been downgraded to 1.7%. this shows the importance of the good brexit steel with the eu. the nine—month battle for mosul claimed tens of thousands of lives and forced 700 people —— 700,000
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people to flee their homes. people are slowly returning to the city. the bbc‘s yalda hakim has travelled to mosul to see what life is now like. injune, 201a, so—called islamic state militants captured iraq's second—largest city. the whole city is completely flattened. after co nsta nt after constant bombardment and shelling, and easily silenced now hangs over mosul. this woman has returned to her neighbourhood with her two children for the first time ina her two children for the first time in a month. they had attempted to get the widget in the battle, but we re get the widget in the battle, but were captured by isis soldiers and imprisoned. her husband was shot dead. translation:
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imprisoned. her husband was shot dead. translationzlj imprisoned. her husband was shot dead. translation: i may now be liberated, but it means nothing without my husband. life has become even more difficult. the people of mosul are still paying the price for their freedom. mosul are still paying the price for theirfreedom. at mosul are still paying the price for their freedom. at the local hospital, there is chaos. every day, people queue up, the injured, the sick, and the traumatised. the battle is officially over, but it is not safe in mosul. isis wrecked houses and buildings with booby—traps. returning houses and buildings with booby—tra ps. returning home houses and buildings with booby—traps. returning home now could still mean death. there are unexploded devices all over the city, and it is up to the iraqi military to clean it up. translation: there was a car bomb over there. today we detonated it. we are moving forward because there are more unexploded devices over there. is that another one? all over
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this city now, iraqi forces are working day and night to clean up unexploded devices and booby—traps so unexploded devices and booby—traps so that families can return to their homes. this unit has been working for the last two days to get rid of everything. the task of rebuilding this city is monumental. but reconstruction will be easy compared to building trust. real reconciliation will be a long way off. thousands of fighters have been killed, but the ideology has not died with them. and who's to blame for devastation of mosul? this man says his tribe did not support isis, but when the iraqi military fled the city, they had no choice. translation: the iraqi military control all of mosul, but when isis
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came, they ran. we had no weapons to fight them. he now has a stark warning for baghdad and the world. fight them. he now has a stark warning for baghdad and the worldlj blame what happened on our city on the world. politicians need to strike a deal. if they do not come up strike a deal. if they do not come up with an agreement, we will be victims again. laughter is once again allowed in mosul. children need to take advantage of the new freedom. many have known nothing but life under isis. the iraq they will inherit has arguably never been more divided, and this generation will be tested again and again, as old scars in this country often become fresh wounds. yalda reporting from mosul, there. a little earlier, she gave us an update on the rest of iraq. you just saw the situation in mosul. the whole city is completely flattened. you also heard the anger there from the sunni tribesmen.
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we have to remember, why did isis come to power to begin with? power they were angry, angry at the government in baghdad, the way they were being oppressed in their cities. this was being felt by sunni tribesmen across this country. as we know, isis controlled different parts of iraq for three years. and before mosul was liberated, with the cities of falluja and ramadi in al—umba province were liberated about 12 months ago. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, paul adams, has managed to get rare access inside falluja to give us an idea of how people are coping 12 months on. what does a city do when islamic state is gone? when the caliphate with all its religious austerity and extreme violence has been driven out. is showed off a modest version of this fanfare two years ago, but it's no longer a place of propaganda.
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one year after the militants left, the people of this troubled city are back, just beginning to unwind. but the scars are everywhere. nine—year—old mohammed was caught in an explosion three years ago. he lost a leg, and is still suffering. his grandmother worries about his hand. translation: yes. we can say that the islamic state is finished, but we are still afraid. for myself, i always feel fear inside me. for example, this morning there was an explosion. i lost it, and when i came to, i was on the couch shaking. falluja has barely known a day's peace in 1a years. the americans fought bitter battles here and when they left, the government in baghdad stoked sectarian divisions and isis took advantage. when the government finally regained control, the city
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was almost deserted. look at it today. over the past year, 80% of the city's population has returned. falluja feels secure. but it's a fragile peace. at friday's prayers, the imams still tells worshippers to abandoned the idea is that destroyed the city. afterwards, the concerns are more basic. the city's ha rd—pressed mayor faces a barrage of questions about the lack of electricity and jobs. he gets little support from baghdad and hisjob feels impossible. so—called islamic state raid on poverty and people's frustration so—called islamic state prayed on poverty and people's frustration with the government in baghdad. that's why it was able to take over in places like this. three years on, the poverty is still evident and so too
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the frustration of the people here. those should be warning signs for the government in baghdad. not everyone has returned to the city. we travel out into the desert to find the people nobody wants back. in dismal camps, and uncertain future for the families of those suspected of playing along with islamic state. this man's family stayed in this room suburb under isis rule, only fleeing during the fighting last year. they've all been cleared to return, but they can't. it is not clear why. it could be jealous neighbours, tribal politics or a vengeful militia. translation: we find the man in charge in the town. and said, if you have any proof that my sons were involved with islamic state,
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that they dressed like them, or carried a kalashnikovs then we are ready to slaughter them. the war against so—called islamic state is being won, slowly and at great civilian cost. but the challenges that come in its wake are immense. if falluja is a model for life after the caliphate, it's a model with many flaws. pauladams, bbc news, falluja. a rare glimpse of what life is like in falluja, 12 months after was liberated from so—called islamic state. we all know that the fight to regain control of mosul was the toughest and fiercest, so if the situation is as he says, we can only imagine how difficult it will be to gain the conciliation and a lasting
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peace in mosul. the polish president has announced he is to veto a controversial bill to support the country's judicially. he said he will not support the proposals to replace supreme court judges with government nominees. thousands of protesters had taken to the streets in recent weeks, opponents arguing that the changes would undermine the independence of the judiciary. we'll have the headlines any moment, but first he is the weather. across many eastern areas, it is rather clouded, but blue skies here in cornwall. and that sunshine, as you can see, many western areas. towards eastern parts, cloudier skies, showers towards east anglia,
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and is feeling quite chilly on that course. further west, the sunshine and temperature is getting into the low 20s. 0ne and temperature is getting into the low 20s. one or two heavier showers across norfolk and suffolk before those clear away, and such is looking drierfor most those clear away, and such is looking drier for most areas of the uk. 0ne looking drier for most areas of the uk. one or looking drier for most areas of the uk. 0ne ortwo looking drier for most areas of the uk. one or two showers across scotland, and on the isle of scilly and the far west of cornwall. 0therwise sunshine, rise of 17 to 23 celsius, but wednesday will be the wettest day of the week. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: donald trump's son—in—law and adviser, jared kushner, has denied colluding with russia to help his father—in—law win the election. in a statement released ahead of questioning by us senators today, he also said he did not know of anyone in the trump campaign colluding with a foreign government.
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the parents of charlie gard return to the high court today — with the judge set to consider new evidence from a us neurologist. his parents want to take their terminally ill baby to america for experimental treatment, but doctors at great 0rmond street say it won't work. the government's proposing changes to the way electricity is generated, used and stored — the energy regulator says it could save consumers £a0 billion a year. new rules will make it easierfor people to generate their own power, store it in batteries and sell it to the national grid. the taliban have claimed responsibility for a suicide bomb attack in the afghan capital, kabul, killing more than 30 people. the blast in the west of the city struck a bus carrying government employees. 0n the 26th anniversary of his disappearance, a possible breakthrough in the case of missing toddler ben needham. signs of blood have been found in soil samples gathered by british
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police during a visit to the greek island of kos last year. more to come all all those stories but first let's turn our attention to sport. england's women have won the cricket world cup for a fourth time. they beat india in a thrilling fimnal at lords. they were heading for defeat after setting india a modest 229 for victory but anya shrubsole took six wickets, five of them injust 19 deliveries. she was player of the match, as england lifted the trophy that they last won in 2009. cricket is a funny game and pressure isa cricket is a funny game and pressure is a funny thing and in a world cup final we knew we would be in with a chance but it did feel like it was slipping away a little bit, 190—3
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but we fought hard in this tournament and today was no different, so proud of the girls and it has been acting with the tournament, as fighting hard and holding our nerve which we did today. chris froome says he'd like to keep racing in the tour de france for another five years. he's now second on the all—time list, his fourth title, putting him one behind the likes of miguel indurain and eddie mercx. it was the traditional victory parade on the champs elysees with his yellowjersey unchallenged. this was his third triumph in a row, and he did it without winning a single stage. his winning margin of 5a seconds was his narrowest and he said this tour was his hardest because his rivals were so much better this year. incredible feeling, to ride onto the champs elysees. even after having done it three times previously, it doesn't diminish it at all. it's still — all the same emotions are here. it's just incredible, absolutely incredible. american jordan spieth had a roller—coaster of a final round at the open.
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he threw away his three—shot overnight lead in the first four holes and then went walkabout on the 13th hole, slicing his drive, he spent 20 minutes, first finding his ball which was unplayable, then working out where to drop it, which he did with the help of r&a officials in the middle of the practice area. three birdies and an eagle in the next four holes saw spieth claim the claretjug by three shots. he's 23 and has also won the masters and us open. jack nicklaus is the only other player to have won three major titles before turning 2a. england look almost certain of a quarterfinal spot at the women's european championship in the netherlands. they beat spain 2—0 and were helped by the referee. england were 1—0 up when ellen white handled the ball in the box. the referee awarded spain a penalty but changed her mind with a little clarification from england players that it had been accidental. after that let—off england jodie taylor doubled the lead. scotland's hopes of reaching
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the quarters is out of their hands. they are bottom of the group, after losing 6—0 to england they lost 2—1 to portugal last night. erin cuthbert had equalised with just over 20 minutes to play but fell behind again just a couple of minutes later. the scots will need a big win against spain in their final match and hope england beat portugal. the world para athletics championships came to a close last night and uk athletics say they will try and bring it back to london for the next championships in 2019 it would be the first city to host the championships twice and no country has staged the worlds back to back before. the british team won 39 medals and came third in the medal table. uk athletics say a high level of positive feedback was received from team leaders and athletes during the week with a number of partners indicating support for a 2019 event in london. the london stadium hopes the world
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athletics championships next week. eilidh doyle has been voted british team captain for next month's world athletics championships, doyle — seen here winning the a00 metres hurdles at the british team trials in birmingham earlier this month — won a ballot of the great britain squad, beating defending world champions mo farah and greg rutherford to the role. great britain and northern ireland will feel a 78—strong team at next month's championships. i think we will do well, you see the effect home support can have on us and do so what happened in london 2012, we have a big team, we have tried to fill as many spots as we can't and you can see some special moments out there. that's all sport for now. let's return to those changes to the energy market. the government is setting out changes to the energy market which it says could save consumers as much as £a0 billion a year.
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the rules will be changed to make it easier for someone with solar panels to store electricity in batteries, and sell it to the national grid. with me now is chris hewett, policy manager at the solar trade association. this is interesting because we have seen a this is interesting because we have seen a lot of houses and businesses with solar panels on the ruins but the difference is whereas if you have a feed in tariff now you can sell electricity to the grid, you cannot store it but you may be able to pass it on, so what is being proposed? this subsidy was coming to when end, and after that you will be able to use power stored in the battery in order to put it back to the grid later when demand is higher. in terms of technology, is this something that exists? it's out there already, casts are dropping
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like a stone, the electric car market are investing a lot of money and companies like taz love are doing home installations. in germany, every other home now has a battery in stored alongside it. can you see that happening here for other still barriers? there are, costs are falling but in terms of wanting a battery can do, if you aggregate the electricity with millions of homes across the country, when the grid reaches a peak you could generate a little more, at the moment access to those markets is not available for solar and battery technology, it's much easier if you are a diesel generator so we easier if you are a diesel generator so we need easier if you are a diesel generator so we need access to easier if you are a diesel generator so we need access to that market. when it comes to people who are thinking about putting solar panels
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on the roads, there were some generous subsidies in place to encourage people, those have come to win them, so what makes somebody think it's worth forking out to do this? costs are falling so it will become more affordable in the near future and some people will want to try this out in their homes. there are things, at a commercial level you can see this happen, in offices and factories. we need a fairer tax treatment, at the moment the 80 is 20% on batteries but it is an energy—saving technology so it should be 5%, that is something the government should do. business rates, it's a barrier to installing batteries at the moment, other green technologies like cap, gas fire lighting for power, that is exempt from business rates, at the moment
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solar and batteries are not and we would like to see that exemption equalised. one of the other suggestions we are hearing in the government's plans is the idea that somehow a lot of our devices might be rigged up to the way we are fed power, so be rigged up to the way we are fed power, so your washing machine, you can programme it but it will not come on until there is enough power coming from their solar panels. how complicated is that? it's smart technology, it's out there, it's making sure the data is available in the home, it can be done but it's about access to markets so companies could do this if they could compete, the national grid has a market which allows people to bid into that but at the moment it's easier if you are at the moment it's easier if you are a diesel generator, which is hardly the most green technology, to access
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that market than it would be to have a set of fridges were washing machines and reduce their demand for increased demand if there is more solar on the grid in 2013, it might be cheaper to increase outputs when there is a lot on the system. thank you. a man has appeared in court charged with the kidnap, rape and murder of a 19—year—old woman. the 33—year—old is also accused of the kidnap, rape, and attempted murder of a woman in her 20s. another man, 28, is charged with the kidnap of both women. the 19—year—old's body was found at a house in kingston on wednesday. the men were remanded in custody. nearly three years ago, so—called islamic state fighters swept through northern iraq, where the country's oldest ethnic minority were living — the yazidis. they expelled thousands of them from their homes in the sinjar region. many of the men were shot, while the women and children were kidnapped, taken as hostages and some were raped repeatedly. the german government has stepped in to help by resettling many of the women who have managed
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to escape captivity. we've been given exclusive access to a small group of them who are living in a secret location in germany. you may find some of the details in fiona lamdin's report upsetting. 17 yazidis are living on this corridor in the middle of a psychiatric hospital in germany. it's a long way from their home in northern iraq, but at least they're safe here. three years ago, on 3rd august 201a, they were attacked by is fighters. many of the men were shot, and the women and children were captured. this girl was 1a at the time. she and her family tried to escape up the mountain, mount sinjar, but they couldn't run fast enough. she was then kidnapped, torn apart from her mother,
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and locked in a prison. she told me she saw things that will always haunt her. things which i found very difficult to listen to. we're not allowed to show you where the girls are living. it's for their own safety. many of their families are still in captivity. but not far from here, those 17 yazidis are integrating into german society. many of them are even going to school here as they start the journey to rebuild their lives. so we focus on certain emotions like love, peace and joy, and here to help them, a team of mentors from across the world. leading this team is jacqueline isaac, an american lawyer,
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when i first met her, her head was done, all their heads were done. we had councillors to give the girls counselling and i thought, this is not the time to give girls cancelling yet, this is a time to recognise them as human beings. these girls are now starting to live again, but they are living with deep, deep scars. some breaking news coming to us from
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switzerland via the reuters news agency, at least five people have been injured, two seriously, in an attack by an 11 defied male suspect ina attack by an 11 defied male suspect in a swiss town. this is in northern switzerland. reports of an unidentified male attacker. five injured, two seriously, we do not know what has happened. nine people have died after what immigration officials in texas said was an immigration operation gone wrong. people were locked in the truck without any water or air conditioning. the alarm was raised after one broke out of the vehicle. it is still not clear exactly how many people were packed into this truck when it arrived in san antonio.
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some fled the scene, only those too ill to move remained. several survivors are seriously ill in hospital. for now, their welfare is more important than the fact that they crossed the border illegally. our most important focus right now is to deliver compassionate care. you know, ourfirst responders, immediately were on the scene delivering first aid, transporting sometimes by air, critical condition patients to local hospitals in trying to prevent more loss of life than what had already occured. it is now obvious that this was an organised large—scale operation. nearby security cameras showed other vehicles waiting for the truck. a local reporter says those on board were probably had been taken to work in low—wagejobs. it's mostly younger males trying to, um, generally go in for farm labour. the kind of hotel maintenance, construction. the truck's driver was arrested and will face charges.
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investigators are now trying to identify others involved but with trafficking and smuggling of people across the border rising, not falling, all those involved know that this will not be the last such tragedy. in the moment then we'll have a summary in the moment then we'll have a summary of the business news. first, the headlines. donald trump's son—in—law and adviser, jared kushner, has denied colluding with russia to help his father—in—law win the election. in a statement released ahead of questioning by us senators today, he rejected claims that he had improper contacts with russians. the parents of charlie gard return to the high court today — with the judge set to consider new evidence from a us neurologist. the government's proposing changes to the way electricity is generated, used and stored — the energy regulator says it could save consumers £a0 billion a year. hello. i'm ben thompson. these are
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the top business stories. the international monetary fund has lowered its growth forecast for the uk, warning that activity has been weaker than expected in the first part of the year. the imf said the economy would grow by 1.7%, instead of the 2% it initially forecast. it lowered its prediction for the uk and the united states, but upgraded the outlook for several eurozone countries. budget airline ryanair has announced a 55% rise in profits for the three months tojune, but said the figures were boosted by this year's early easter. its share price has dropped 5%, after the firm said it expected prices to fall in the coming months. it's also warned it may have to stop flying certain routes if the uk doesn't do a deal with the eu over air routes. we were going to tell you about oil
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prices, the picture is suggesting there is an 0pec meeting. more on that when we get to the markets. you might have noticed that some foods — particularly chocolate bars — have got a bit smaller lately. maltesers and toblerone some of the products that have been named and shamed as getting smaller. the manufacturers say that's because their ingredients including cocoa and sugar cost more — primarily because they come from overseas. so producers have had two options — either put up prices or make the products smaller. many have chosen the latter. economists call it "shrinkflation" and the office for national statistics has been looking into this and they have found that more than 2500 products have shrunk in size over the past five years, but are being sold for the same price. let's speak to the chief economist at g+ economics, lena komileva, who joins us from the newsroom.
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it's an interesting one because we have all seen those products that look the same and then you open them and there is less in the packet and it's a stark choice for producers, make them smaller or put the price up make them smaller or put the price up because all the staff that goes to make some costs. exactly. packages are shrinking book ‘s same, this is hidden inflation, shrinkflation, as you put it, across a range of products. chocolate is the big one but statisticians and journalists have noticed this is also there for beer, chips, coffee and sugar. this is an easy way for producers to manage the costs of higher import and higher import prices due to the fall of the pound
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since the vote last year but shrinkflation has been around for five years now, it'sjust shrinkflation has been around for five years now, it's just that we have seen acceleration because consumers are less likely to notice a smaller package than higher prices in the shops and at a time when wages are stagnating, a smaller wage makes consumers more sensitive to a smaller goods and services by. either they put the price up and make it smaller, and given that our incomes are so squeezed, they have probably chosen the latter so we will keep buying them. it is the lesser of two evils for producers. as ever in macroeconomics, there is a producer side and i consumer side, producers are facing so much uncertainty that they are looking to preserve margins to stay viable in
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the face of this uncertainty by u nfortu nately the face of this uncertainty by unfortunately having to pass higher costs to consumers, for consumers we have an economy that is running at record unemployment yet wage growth has been about half of the previous decade in this last decade, so consumers are having to swallow higher prices in their purchasing power. both sides are suffering and this seems the least painful way. excuse the pun about swallowing the high price, i suppose it comes down to the ethics of business about whether they are conceiving customers, there is this thing they think they know that it has smaller things in it. macro economic factors have socio economic consequences and we have all become sensitive to that in these days when real wages are shrinking and so is the consumer basket at a higher cost, so the fact
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we have the higher pressures of a wea k we have the higher pressures of a weak exchange rate and higher import prices is not going away any time soon prices is not going away any time soon but smaller packages to preserve profit mad since, —— margins goes right to the heart of consumerfairness, so margins goes right to the heart of consumer fairness, so this margins goes right to the heart of consumerfairness, so this is margins goes right to the heart of consumer fairness, so this is a delicate matter but with producers facing this uncertainty and consumers facing stagnant wages, it is not going to go away any time soon. is not going to go away any time soon. thank you for explaining that. asi soon. thank you for explaining that. as i was going to tell you at the start, oil prices. the world's leading oil producing countries are meeting in russia today. earlier in the year they tried to cut prices and boost profits. we have also been talking about
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ryanair, its have also been talking about rya nair, its profits have also been talking about ryanair, its profits are up and they are making an offerfor a ryanair, its profits are up and they are making an offer for a sleep's largest airline, which has been beset by problems of late and ryanair could be a potential suitor for that. the duke of cambridge has revealed how he tells his children stories about their grandmother, diana princess of wales. as they approach the 20th anniversary of their mother's death, princes william and harry have been giving an insight into how they try to keep her memory alive. greg dawson reports. a mother's photograph of her two boys. made public for the first time, it is an image that sums up the sense of fun princes william and harry describe about diana in a new documentary. nearly 20 years on from her death, prince william, now a parent himself, talks of reminding his children of the grandmother they never met. we've got more photos up round the house now, of her, and we talk about her a bit and stuff. and it's hard, because obviously catherine didn't know her, so she can't really provide that level of detail.
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so i do regularly, putting george or charlotte to bed, talk about her and try to remind them that there are two grandmothers — there were two grandmothers — in their lives. prince harry was a boy ofjust 12 when he lost his mother. in a conversation with one of herfriends, sir eltonjohn, they reflect on her compassion, particularly her work with hiv charities. everybody in that photograph is smiling. because of her. yeah! i mean, she had an energy, she had a radiance. look at her face. in every photograph, there's a positive global, wonderful glow. also, she had this incredible ability which he kind of inherited — and i told him that, and he said "thanks very much" — to make people feel at ease and make them feel that everything will be all right. much has been said and written about diana in the years since her death. but, for this anniversary, it is her sons who are keen to remind people of her impact on their lives and the world. the sri lankan navy are trying to
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rescue people but yesterday to allow fa ns rescue people but yesterday to allow fans needed help. the rescue took place after coast of the country. they coded into to other fans back into a rascal barrier. earlier this month they rescued and elephant found eight miles offshore in the indian ocean. the headlines are coming up, but first let's have a look at the weather. we have mixed fortu nes look at the weather. we have mixed fortunes across the uk at the moment, for some of us its cloudy with some rain but for many we have sunshine and this is the scene in devon at short time ago, plenty of blue skies that if we look at the satellite picture, we have clear skies through much of scotland and western areas but towards the east, more click here and in norfolk and
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suffolk, lots of grey skies and for some a bit of rain. that rain and cloud is courtesy of this weather front, just rattling east anglia, it will clear away east but it will remain cloudy with outbreaks of rain across parts of east yorkshire and lincolnshire into the afternoon, but sunshine continuing into england and south wales, we could see a bit of sunshine in norfolk and suffolk, what or two showers here but more clothes and further east you are and some rain. bright skies in north—west england, northern ireland and much of scotland is fine and dry, temperatures in the west getting up to 2a or 25 but it's done those coastal areas of eastern england and scotland, where you have the sunshine, that is where temperatures will be in the 20s. this evening and unlike much of the rain will clear away from the far
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east, a quiet life across the uk going into tuesday morning, clear spells, a bit of mist and fog, overnight temperatures down to 11 or 12 in the north, 1a in the south. tuesday should be a better day for central and eastern areas, a fair amount of cloud which will thin and break—up, some sunny spells, a few showers across central scotland and some rain moving its way into the eyes of silly, top temperatures around 17 degrees, but wednesday, this area of low pressure will move in from the west, stronger winds, look at those isobars, tightly packed, so wet and willie conditions for many of us and for some there will be some heavy rain on wednesday, that show that rain clears away to the east and behind that it should clear up late in the day with sunny spells and a few
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showers but thursday should be a quiet day, they may be a few showers here and there are otherwise dry, a fairamount of here and there are otherwise dry, a fair amount of cloud and temperatures perhaps up to 21 degrees and friday looks pretty good as well. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 12:00. president trump's son—in—law and senior adviser, jared kushner, denies colluding with russia over trump's election campaign. the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard return to the high court. the judge will hear new evidence from a us neurologist. more than 30 people are killed in a suicide bomb attack in the afghan capital, kabul. also this hour, rebuilding a city devastated by war — two weeks after iraqi forces retook mosul from so—called islamic state,
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we return to find how residents are coping. and friends of princess diana join william and harry in paying moving tributes to their mother in a special programme marking the 20th anniversary of her death. donald trump's son—in—law and adviser, jared kushner, has denied colluding with russia to help his father—in—law win the election. in a statement released ahead of questioning by us senators today, mr kushner said that he had been asked to become a point of contact for the trump campaign for foreign government officials,
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saying there had been "hardly any" contacts with russia or russian representatives. he also said he did not know of anyone in the trump campaign colluding with a foreign government. 0ur washington correspondent, laura bicker, joins me now. this is a closed session, but there has been a statement in advance. yes, jared kushner by his own admission does not seek the spotlight, but today he finds themselves centre stage of this investigation into whether or not russia meddled in the us presidential election, and colluded with the trump campaign. ahead of his evidence, jared kushner has released a statement. he says... in that quote, he is referring to a
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meeting with the russian ambassador, one which he did not disclose in any of his grievance farms for the white house we think, for his white house role. —— any of his clearance forums. he also said... in other words, he is saying that this is nothing, speculation in regards to him and meeting either the russian ambassador or the head of a russian bank. he is saying that he has done nothing wrong. now, the key thing that senators will be asking about isa that senators will be asking about is a meeting that he took with donald trump jr, arranged is a meeting that he took with donald trumer, arranged by donald trump donald trumer, arranged by donald trumer, donald trumer, arranged by donald trump jr, with donald trumer, arranged by donald trumer, with a russian lawyer. in the arrangement for that meeting, donald trump jr was promised
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information that would incriminate donald trump's hillary clinton —— donald trump's hillary clinton —— donald trump's hillary clinton —— donald trump's rival, hillary clinton. jared kushner went along with donald trump jr, clinton. jared kushner went along with donald trumer, he said he turned up late. you said they were actually discussing russian adoption is due to the meeting, nothing too today with the campaign. —— nothing today with the campaign. —— nothing to do with the campaign. he said he realised that was a waste of time and e—mailed his assistant asking her to call him to get him out of the assistant. that corroborates donald trump jr's the assistant. that corroborates donald trumer‘s story the assistant. that corroborates donald trump jr's story that this was a waste of time, a nothing. when it amounts to these contacts with bilious blossoms, he says they were all in an official capacity and they we re all in an official capacity and they were not in any way colluded with russia to win the campaign. thank you very much indeed. the parents of charlie gard return to the high court today, with the judge set to consider new evidence from a us neurologist. his parents want to take their terminally ill baby to america for experimental treatment, but doctors at great 0rmond street hospital believe it won't work,
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and say the 11—month—old should be allowed to die with dignity. we can now join we can nowjoin our news correspondence at the high court, helena lee. the case should resume here around two o'clock. we expect charlie's paeans to arrive shortly with the legal team. we've expect to hear what happened in that meeting with the american immunologist who flew to london and went to great 0rmond street hospital on monday last week. —— american new role and just. that was the first time he met charlie gard and was given access to his medical records, speaking to other staff who had treated charlie.
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he will be looking at that crucial evidence. —— the judge will be looking at that crucial evidence. we will also expect to hear the results ofa number of will also expect to hear the results of a number of scans carried out on charlie, particularly mri scan carried out last week on his brain. we males of you from that american doctor himself via skype in the courtroom this afternoon. —— we may hear from. charlie's courtroom this afternoon. —— we may hearfrom. charlie's parents want courtroom this afternoon. —— we may hear from. charlie's parents want to be taken to america for experimental treatment. the hospital's view has not changed. they believe that china should be allowed to die with dignity. and helena, looking behind you, there are supporters of the appearance behind you. this has been an emotive case, a complex case, i expect the number of supporters will
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grow. they call themselves charlie's army, and they have been throughout the number of cases involving charlie gard. wheels are heard over the weekend from great 0rmond street hospital. —— we also heard. they said that various members of hospital staff had received thousands of abusive messages in connection with the charlie gard case, not only online, but also verbally on the street, and family members going into the hospital with their sick children, their lives had been disrupted as well. the hospital said they had cold in the metropolitan police to look into that. last night, the parents of charlie gard said that the, too, had been extremely upset by abusive m essa g es been extremely upset by abusive messages they had received. both sides telling people to calm down over this case, and everyone in this case wants what is best for charlie, even though both sides disagree. helena, thank you very much. helena
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lee there. some news that came into others in the last half—hour or so, we are getting reports from switzerland via reuters, there has been an incident in the swiss town of schaffhausen. at least five people have been hurt, at least two of them seriously, by an attack by an unidentified man. police have not given any more details yet but have sealed off the town on the german border, and there has been a webcast from a swiss newspaper, police saying they are searching for the suspect. very little formal detail, but on social media, there are unconfirmed reports that the attacker was armed with a chainsaw, but as all has always an element of caution. a number of reports from
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people in the area suggesting that. we will try to get more information from for you, but an attack in the swiss town of schaffhausen. more than 30 people have been killed and as many as 50 injured in a suicide bomb attack in the afghan capital, kabul. it's understood the attacker detonated the car bomb close to a bus carrying government employees in the west of the city. the taliban have claimed responsibility. 0ur correspondent, justin rowlatt, has this report. the suicide attacker struck at around 7am this morning, causing massive damage. the taliban has set the target was intelligence officials. a bomb exploded near a bus. translation: after the blast, it was a horrific scene. many people
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we re it was a horrific scene. many people were on the ground, then i managed to get myself to the ambulance. this woman lost her son in the blast. security forces cordoned off the area. the fear is that the number of casualties is likely to rise. this bomb comes less than two months after an even bigger suicide truck bomb killed more than 150 people knew the diplomatic area of the city. the government promised to improve security men. this attack shows just how vulnerable the city still is. justin rowlatt, bbc news, kabul. the government is promising what it calls a revolution in the way electricity is generated, used, and stored. the business secretary, greg clark, is to announce more investment in battery technology, and details of a competition to boost innovation in energy storage. there will also be incentives for more flexible energy schemes and
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investment for improving battery technology. the research, development and application of energy storage technologies, specifically battery storage, is a huge opportunity for the energy sector and the automotive sector alike. as part of our industrial strategy challenge fund, i am today launching the faraday challenge, which will bid to london £a6 million into research, innovation and the scale up of battery technology. led by the engineering and sciences research council to bring the best minds together to create a that the institute. the most promising institute completed by the incident will be moved closer to the market for industrial collaborations led by innovative uk. the energy sector will work with the automotive sector to find the best proposition for a new state—of—the—art national
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battery manufacturer. the work will quite literally power of the automotive and the energy revolution we re automotive and the energy revolution were already the uk is playing a leading role in the world. the energy minister, greg clark. scientists say they're examining a potential breakthrough in the case of the missing sheffield toddler, ben needham, who disappeared on the greek island of kos, 26 years ago today. human material has been found in soil samples gathered last year by british police. marta newman has more. been needham was three years old when he disappeared on the greek island of kos. that was 26 years ago. —— ben needham. a search was conducted around the farmhouse where
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he was last seen. after it emerged the toddler may have been crushed to death by a digger, and now on the 26th anniversary of his disappearance, a possible breakthrough. signs of blood have been found on items recovered by police during last year's search. some of the items that we took back we submitted to further forensic work. and the result of that to date, i am led to believe, shows signs that there is still some human decomposition around those items that we did bring back from kos. the sandal and toy truck believed to have belonged to ben will now be tested for his dna in aberdeen. around 60 items were brought back to the uk for analysis. what we are providing is information that there isa providing is information that there is a strong indication from this chemical profile that we were able to ascertain, a strong indication that this was presence on these items as an example of blood
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decomposition. police hope that this latest development will go some way improving what happened to this little boy. police in switzerland say at least five people have been hurt, two of them see this though, by an attack in schaffhausen. we can talk now with a local reporter... i think we may have lost that connection now. unfortunately, we haven't got that, butjust connection now. unfortunately, we haven't got that, but just to tell you a little more about it. i think we can rejoin him now. thank you very much for being with is here on bbc news. what can you tell us about this attack? there were five people hurt, two of them see this wounded. iam here hurt, two of them see this wounded. i am here directly at the crime scene. the attacker did his attack
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ina scene. the attacker did his attack in a shop. wheels are some rumours that it was with a chainsaw, but we still have no confirmation yet. it is still disrupting. what i can tell you is the person who committed this crime is still on the run. the police do not know at this time where this person is. all the people living here behind me in these flats and working in the shops, they are now told to stay inside, not to go out, and we are waiting now for further information here. very concerning for people who live there. what can you tell is about there. what can you tell is about the town of schaffhausen? is it a big place? it is quite a little
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place, a city with around 30,000 inhabitants, in the north of switzerland. normally a very peaceful place. 0bviously switzerland. normally a very peaceful place. obviously a tragic thing has happened here now. no suggestion at this time about the identity of the attacker? not at all. we do not know if this crime has some terrorist connection, or maybe a person with a psychological problem. we do not know yet, waiting for further information here. we are very grateful for your time, thank you very much. the headlines on bbc newsroom live — president trump's son—in—law and senior adviser, jared kushner, denies colluding with russia over trump's election campaign. the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard return to the high court. the judge will hear new evidence from a us neurologist. more than 30 people are killed in a suicide bomb attack in the afghan capital, kabul.
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time for a look at all the sports news. england's women have one the cricket world cup for a fourth time. the beat india by nine runs, anya shrubsole the beat india by nine runs, anya shru bsole taking six the beat india by nine runs, anya shrubsole taking six wickets, five of them injust 19 shrubsole taking six wickets, five of them in just 19 deliveries. shrubsole taking six wickets, five of them injust 19 deliveries. she was player of the match as england lifted the trophy that the last one backin lifted the trophy that the last one back in 2009. it is a funny game, and we knew that any world cup final, if we held our nerve, we would be in with a chance. it did feel like it was slipping away a little bit at 190—3, but we have fought hard in this tomb, and today was no different. so proud of the girls, and an ear, with how we fought back. —— in this tournament. we held our nerve today, luckily.
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chris froome said he would like to compete at the tour de france for another five years. he compete at the tour de france for anotherfive years. he is now a four—time winner, with a traditional literary parade on the shuns a lazy. —— the champs elysses. he said this tour was his hardest because of rivals were much better this year. jordan spieth had a roller—coaster ofa jordan spieth had a roller—coaster of a final round at the open. he threw away his three shot overnight lead in the first four holes, the losses we on the 13th hole, allowing fellow american matt kuchar to take the lead, but then spieth bounced back with three birdies and an eagle to claim his first claretjug by three shots. he is 23 and has also won the masters and the us open. jack nicklaus is the only other
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player to have won three major titles at that age. the world para athletics championships came to a close last night, and uk athletics so we close last night, and uk athletics so we will try to bring back to london for the next championships in 2019. it would be the first city to host the temperatures twice, no country having staged the world's back—to—back before. the british tea m back—to—back before. the british team won 39 medals and came third in the table. uk athletics say a high level of positive feedback was received from team readers and athletes chillingly weak with the number of partners indicating support for the 2019 events to be in london again. the london stadium hosts the world athletics championship from the end of next week. eilidh doyle captain the british team. she won the a00 metres hurdles at the british team trials in birmingham earlier this month. she beat defending world champions mo farah and greg rutherford to the role. that is all the sport for now.
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with me is peter sasieni, who is professor of biostatistics and cancer epidemiology at queen mary university of london. thank you for coming in. let's talk first of all about this change, which seems to have been brought about by the switch from one type of smear about by the switch from one type of smear test to another. what will women see changing with the test? smear test to another. what will women see changing with the test7m the short—term, very little, the sample taken will be exactly the same. but when it reaches the laboratory, instead of being looked at under a microscope, it will be
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subject to a molecular test by a robot. so the new test is considerably better, we estimate that it will save about ten additional women from getting cancer each week, so 500 or so a cure or so across the uk. —— 500 or so a year. when you say it will be done by a machine, is that because it's just will be able to see things more clearly? is it easy to explain to a layperson? instead of looking at cells and deciding whether the cell looks different, it is actually looking forward the dna from a virus, and so it is too small to see, but they are very accurate tests which will tell us, this little piece of dna has come from a virus, and if that is present, then we need to run other tests. the additional tests may include the current test, but it will mean that far fewer women current test, but it will mean that farfewer women will have current test, but it will mean that far fewer women will have the cells looked at under a microscope, and
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when people are doing that, they know that there is much more likely that it know that there is much more likely thatitis know that there is much more likely that it is something we need to stop. in the meantime, the sousa have been a backlog created in these cove na nts have been a backlog created in these covenants testing regime. why has that happened. —— there seems to have been. people are leaving, retiring, is a differentjob, and knowing that the new test is going to come in from april 2019, nobody wa nts to to come in from april 2019, nobody wants to train to do the old test, looking under the microscope... because they will need fewer people, essentially? they will need far fewer people to do that, so there is a skills shortage, if you like. and it is very difficult to do anything about it, because why would someone train for something that the soon—to—be videos will demand for in a few yea rs' soon—to—be videos will demand for in a few years' time? some women are having to wait longer than the two
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weeks target that was the challenge. how problematic is that from a clinical point of view? not a big problem at all. it will not make a big difference. the screening is for people who do not have symptoms, they think they are healthy, and a few weeks delay does not matter. but i think it is about managing expectations. a few years ago it took three months to get screening results, which most people thought was unacceptable. there is no reason for it, but i remember when the change happened, a nurse told a woman that she would get her results in about three months, and when it came in two weeks, she got there must be something wrong! so knowing thatis must be something wrong! so knowing that is to take a month has grown to be absolutely fine, but being told that it be absolutely fine, but being told thatitis be absolutely fine, but being told that it is good to be two weeks, i would get cross of i was told i would get cross of i was told i would get cross of i was told i would get the results in two weeks and it takes five. so your advice is for people to not be overly concerned and beer with the system? do not be overly concerned, and nhs
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england and public health england need to think about how they went to manage this issue, because i imagine it will only get before april 2019, and allow the new test to be rolled out gradually before then, or have some other process of how to handle the demand for the smear test which they cannot provide the moment. thank you for talking us through that. britain's economic growth forecast has been downgraded by the international monetary fund — following a weaker than expected performance at the start of the year. in april, it was predicted the economy would grow by 2% but figure has now been revised down to 1.7%. the treasury says the report highlights the importance of a good brexit deal with the eu. a man has appeared in court charged
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with the kidnap, rape and murder of a 19—year—old woman. another man aged 28 is charged with a kidnap of two women. the 19—year—old's body was found at a house in kingston on wednesday. both men were remanded in custody. polish president andrzej duda has announced that he's to veto a controversial bill that aims to reform the country'sjudiciary. in a statement, the president said he will not support the proposals to replace supreme courtjudges with government nominees. thousands of protesters had taken to the streets in recent weeks to oppose the bill, with opponents arguing that the changes would undermine the independence of the judiciary. figures obtained by the victoria derbyshire programme show that powers being used to curb dog attacks are not being used properly.
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they were brought in years ago. they give police and local authorities more powers to demand dog owners ta ke ste ps more powers to demand dog owners take steps to control the animal. more than three quarters of the 311 councils who responded to the freedom of information request have not issued a single gnosis since they were introduced. and for a full summary they were introduced. and for a full summary of the news, you can go to our website where you will be able to get more details. about 100 people are thought to have been locked in the back of a truck in the city of san antonio, texas, and nine people have died. the alarm was raised after one of the occu pa nts was raised after one of the occupants managed to break out of the vehicle. it is still not clear exactly how many people were packed into this truck when it arrived in san antonio. some fled the scene, only those too ill to move remained. several survivors are seriously ill in hospital.
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for now, their welfare is more important than the fact that they crossed the border illegally. our most important focus right now is to deliver compassionate care. you know, ourfirst responders, immediately were on the scene delivering first aid, transporting sometimes by air, critical condition patients to local hospitals in trying to prevent more loss of life than what had already occured. it is now obvious that this was an organised large—scale operation. nearby security cameras showed other vehicles waiting for the truck. a local reporter says those on—board were probably had been taken to work in low—wagejobs. it's mostly younger males trying to, um, generally go in for farm labour. the kind of hotel maintenance, construction.
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the truck's driver was arrested and will face charges. investigators are now trying to identify others involved but with trafficking and smuggling of people across the border rising, not falling, all those involved know that this will not be the last such tragedy. bill hayton, bbc news. the duke of cambridge has revealed how he tells his children stories about their grandmother, diana, princess of wales. as they approach the 20th anniversary of their mother's death, princes william and harry have been giving an insight into how they try to keep her memory alive. greg dawson reports. a mother's photograph of her two boys. made public for the first time, it is an image that sums up the sense of fun princes william and harry describe about diana in a new documentary. nearly 20 years on from her death, prince william, now a parent himself, talks of reminding his children of the grandmother they never met. we've got more photos up round the house now,
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of her, and we talk about her a bit and stuff. and it's hard, because obviously catherine didn't know her, so she can't really provide that level of detail. so i do regularly, putting george or charlotte to bed, talk about her and try to remind them that there are two grandmothers — there were two grandmothers — in their lives. prince harry was a boy ofjust 12 when he lost his mother. in a conversation with one of herfriends, sir eltonjohn, they reflect on her compassion, particularly her work with hiv charities. everybody in that photograph is smiling. because of her. yeah! i mean, she had an energy, she had a radiance. look at her face. in every photograph, there's a positive global, wonderful glow. also, she had this incredible ability which he kind of inherited — and i told him that, and he said "thanks very much" — to make people feel at ease and make them feel that everything will be all right. much has been said and written about diana in the years since her death. but, for this anniversary, it is her sons who are keen to remind people of her impact on their lives and the world. greg dawson, bbc news.
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time now to take a look at the weather forecast. the weather is actually beautiful across many western parts of the uk today. western britain is basking in sunshine, whether it's in the east, a different story. it is cloudy, it is drizzly, it is not a pretty picture. 0n the coast of lincolnshire, it is only 15 degrees, damp, soa lincolnshire, it is only 15 degrees, damp, so a massive contrast between the west and the east. the warm spot today, or a hot spots will be the south—west of scotland, possibly glasgow, 2a or perhaps even 26 celsius. lovely day across the west. across the evening and overnight, we
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will lose some of that low cloud and drizzle across eastern areas of the uk. it will store hang around for a time, but eventually tomorrow, it will brighten up in almost all parts of the uk, so overall tomorrow, the best day of the week. temperatures typically into the low 20s, and then on wednesday, you canjust typically into the low 20s, and then on wednesday, you can just about see on wednesday, you can just about see on the edge of the forecast area, rain. different on wednesday. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: donald trump's son—in—law and adviser, jared kushner, has denied colluding with russia to help his father—in—law win the election. he'll be questioned by us senators this afternoon. the parents of charlie gard return to the high court shortly — with the judge set to consider new evidence from a us neurologist. his parents want to take their terminally ill baby to america
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for experimental treatment. the taliban have claimed responsibility for a suicide bomb attack in the afghan capital, kabul, killing more than 30 people. 0n the 26th anniversary of his disappearance — a possible breakthrough in the case of missing toddler ben needham. signs of blood have been found in soil samples gathered by british police during a visit to the greek island of kos last year. five people have been injured, two of them seriously, in an —— in the northern swiss town of schaffhausen. unconfirmed reports say the attacker was armed with a chainsaw. let's return to the news that the parents of charlie gard return to the high court this afternoon — with the judge set to consider new evidence from an american doctor who examined the baby last week.
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earlier on i spoke to dr ravi jayaram, a paediatrician who has dealt with several cases where switching from active to palliative care with parents has had to have been made. he said how difficult this case was for all of those involved. i think part of the problem is that it has been distilled into a very black and white, good versus evil, establishment versus the little guy situation by the media and social media when there is no absolute right wrong answer. in medicine we deal very much in shades of grey the debate is along who is right in terms of where charlie's baseline level is, the treatment will probably help those muscles work better but it's a question on whether that will reverse any damage done and there was disagreement with pa rents done and there was disagreement with parents and professionals and so it has gone to the court. subsequently
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everything has gone pear shaped, eve ryo ne everything has gone pear shaped, everyone has an opinion and we have a situation that i struggle to understand where we have people with entrenched beliefs that great form and streets staff and management are in some kind of conspiracy and lying about things and how it has come to this in 2017 is beyond me. are you saying people underestimate the emotional investment of staff at great 0rmond is it as much as the pa rents. great 0rmond is it as much as the parents. that's import, when you look after children with diseases that are life—threatening, you cannot look after them properly without becoming emotionally involved. you get to know the children and families and it makes it difficult when these discussions have to take place and when the decisions have to be made because you are emotionally invested that at the same time, as a health care
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professional you have to be as objective as possible. the important thing that seemed to be lost in a lot of the discussions is that it is charlie's best interests that are paramount, not his parents' best interests, not the staff's best interests, not the staff's best interests, and people seem to have forgotten that the staff at great 0rmond is a are doing what they think is the best for charlie every day but are having to come to work subject to abuse and intimidation and death threats. you talked about the relationship between health care staff and families, given that, how have things gone so right that we have things gone so right that we have ended up in a court situation? it is uncommon, ordinarily we try never to rush parents into decisions, we talk to them, give
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them information, help them be as objective as possible. if you are a parent, you will cling onto any hope that comes your way and i'm troubled by the fact that clinicians from outside, without at that time having had a chance to look at the information, without having examined charlie, could confidently predict that an unproven, untested treatment could give a 5% chance of improvement and is that fair on the pa rents ? improvement and is that fair on the parents? i could understand if there had been a detailed assessment and that would put forward, it would make sense. what will be interesting, now the chance that clinician has done more assessments, what the opinion is now. my other concern is that there is so much invested by the professor from america that he could lose faith and is he going to be objective now? i
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don't know and i think it's a shame this has gone to a legal situation that that is the way forward when consensus cannot be found between pa rents consensus cannot be found between parents and clinicians. just to update you on the news we brought you earlier, reports of an attack in the northern swiss town of schaffhausen in which five people had been injured, we are now hearing via reuters that police say that attack by a man with a chainsaw was not an act of terror. there were some questions about who the attacker might be, the police there say they have the fight that attacker, no details given but he does remain at large and they have sealed off the path of the town where the attack happened, police say they are seeking this man but
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not in connection with an act of terror. five people are reported to have been injured, two of them seriously, in the attack this morning. it took three years for iraqi forces to recapture the country's second largest city, mosul, from islamic state militants. the brutal occupation and fierce nine month battle for the city claimed tens of thousands of lives, flattened whole neighbourhoods and forced 700,000 people to flee their homes. people are slowly returning to the city — just two weeks after its liberation. the bbc‘s yalda hakim has travelled to mosul to see what life is now like. western mosul. for three years this was the islamic state's capital in iraq. now it's the broken heart of the caliphate. this is what liberation looks like. the city has been flattened, turned into a
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graveyard. after constant bombardment and shelling, an eerie silence now hangs over mosul. hundreds of thousands have been displaced, their lives, like the city, in ruins. no wyle has returned to her neighbourhood with her two children for the first time in a month. they had attempted to get away during the battle but were ca ptu red away during the battle but were captured by isa soldiers and imprisoned. her husband was shot dead. she says she may now be liberated but it means nothing without her husband. life, she says, has become even more difficult. the people of mosul are still paying the price for theirfreedom. at people of mosul are still paying the price for their freedom. at the local hospital there is chaos. everyday people queue up, they injured, the sick and the traumatised. the battle is officially over but it's not safe in mosul. i sis
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officially over but it's not safe in mosul. isis rate officially over but it's not safe in mosul. i sis rate houses and buildings with booby traps. returning home now could still mean death. the rot unexploded devices and it is now up to the military to clear that up. translation: there was a car bomb over there. today we detonated it. there are iuds nearby and in the school so we are moving forward because there are more unexploded devices over there. sutton on? all over this city are a few forces are working day and night to clear the areas from unexploded devices and booby traps so families can return to their homes. this unit has been working for the last two days to get rid of everything. the task of rebuilding the city is monumental. but reconstruction will be easy compared to building trust. real reconciliation will be a
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battle. thousands of fighters for the caliphate have been killed at the caliphate have been killed at the ideology hasn't died with them. and who's to blame for the devastation of mosul? translation: the iraqi military complaint all of mosul that they ran. he now has a stark warning for baghdad and the world. ran. he now has a stark warning for baghdad and the worldlj ran. he now has a stark warning for baghdad and the world. i blame what happened to our city and politics and the leaders. all additions need to strike a deal. if they don't come up to strike a deal. if they don't come up with an agreement, we will be victims again. laughter is once again allowed in mosul and children leave to take advantage of their new freedom. many have known nothing but
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life under licence. the iraq they will inherit has arguably never been more divided and this in generation will be tested again and again as old scars in this country often become fresh wounds. yalda reporting from mosul there. a little earlier she gave us an update on the rest of iraq. use all the situation in mosul, the whole city is flattened and you heard the anger from the sunni tribesmen. why did i sis come to power to begin with? they were angry at the government in baghdad, angry that they were being repressed in cities and this was a feeling felt by sunni tribesmen across this country. i sis control different parts of iraq for about three years and before mosul was liberated, the cities of falluja and rabada date we re cities of falluja and rabada date were liberated. paul adams has
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managed to get rare access inside falluja to give us a sense of hope people are coping 12 months on. what does a city do for an islamic state is gone? nine—year—old mohammed lost a leg in an explosion three years ago. translation: we can't say the islamic state is finished but we are still afraid. for myself, i always
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feel fear inside me. this morning there was an explosion. when i came to, i was on the coach, shaking. falluja has barely known a day's peace in 1a years. the americans fought bitter battles here, and when they left the government in baghdad stoked sectarian divisions and i sis took advantage. when the government finally regained control, the city was almost deserted. look at it today. 0ver was almost deserted. look at it today. over the past year 80% of the population has returned. falluja feels secure. but it is a fragile peace. at friday prayers the amount still tells worshippers to abandon the ideas which destroyed their cities. afterwards, the concerns are
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more basic. the cities hard—pressed mayor faces a barrage of questions about the lack of electricity and jobs. he did little support from baghdad and his job feels impossible. so—called islamic state preyed on poverty and people's frustration with the government in baghdad, that is why it was able to ta ke baghdad, that is why it was able to take over in places like this. three yea rs on take over in places like this. three years on the poverty is still evident and so is the frustration of the people. those should be warning signs for the government in baghdad. not everyone has returned to the city. we travel out into the desert to find the people nobody wants back. in dismal camps, an uncertain future for the families of those suspected of playing along with islamic state. this family stayed in
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the rural suburb under is rule, only fleeing during the fighting last year. they have all been cleared to return but they cannot. it's not clear why. there could bejealous neighbours, tribal politics or a vengeful militia. translation: we found the men in charge and said if you have any proof my sons were involved with the islamic state, that they dressed like them or carried kalashnikovs, we are ready to slaughter them. the war against islamic state is being won, slowly and at great civilian cost, but the challenges that come in its wake are immense. if falluja is a model for life after the caliphate, it's a model with many flaws. a rare glimpse of what life is now
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like in falluja, 12 months after it was liberated from the rule of so—called islamic state. we know the fight to regain meisel was the toughest of any place in this country so if the situation is a fragile peace in falluja, you can only imagine how difficult it will be to gain reconciliation and lasting peace in mosul. nearly three years ago, so—called islamic state fighters swept through northern iraq, where the country's oldest ethnic minority was living — the yazidis. thousands were expelled from their homes in the sinjar region. many of the men were shot, while the women and children were kidnapped, taken as hostages and some raped repeatedly. the german government has stepped in to help by re—settling many of the women who have managed to escape captivity. we've been given exclusive access to a small group of them who are living in a secret location in germany. you may find some of the details in fiona lamdin's report upsetting. 17 yazidis are living on this
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corridor in the middle of a psychiatric hospital in germany. it's a long way from their home in northern iraq, but at least they're safe here. three years ago, on 3rd august 201a, they were attacked by is fighters. many of the men were shot, and the women and children were captured. this girl was 1a at the time. she and her family tried to escape up the mountain, mount sinjar, but they couldn't run fast enough. she was then kidnapped, torn apart from her mother, and locked in a prison. she told me she saw things that will always haunt her. things which i found very difficult to listen to. we're not allowed to show
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you where the girls are living. it's for their own safety. many of their families are still in captivity. but not far from here, those 17 yazidis are integrating into german society. many of them are even going to school here as they start the journey to rebuild their lives. so we focus on certain emotions like love, peace and joy... and here to help them, a team of mentors from across the world. it's been amazing to see what you love, all of you smile and all of you share what you felt. tears, sadness, no eye contact... leading this team is jacqueline isaac, an american lawyer, who met the girljust days after she escaped. when i first met her, her head was down. all of their heads were down. there was no eye contact in the beginning. i was thinking, what do i say to them?
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there were counsellors we had brought, they were sitting on the right—hand side, on stand—by to give the girls counselling. irememberthinking, this is not the time for counselling yet. this is the time tojust recognise them as human beings. more than two years on, the friends are now starting to live again — living, though, with deep scars but at least they are safe. it's estimated between 2000 to a000 yazidi women, children and men are still in captivity. you're watching bbc news. a survey of people aged over 65 in britain has found more than a0% of them think they've been targeted by scammers. the charity, age uk, also found that those living on their own were two and a half times more likely to be picked on. they said 16% of older people paid
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out money to fraudsters. the bbc has been told that, despite being banned more than a year ago, even more virulent versions of the drug spice are now on our streets. it's a former legal high, which leaves users in a "zombie—like" state. it's becoming a particular problem amongst the homeless community. jayne mccubbin has spent time with the emergency services and those on the front line in newcastle as they try to tackle the issue. it's 6am in newcastle. volunteers from the homeless charity changing lives are checking on rough sleepers. are you all right? traditional drugs they know how to deal with, but it is the constantly changing nature of new, psychoactive substances which cause concern. spice isjust one. mps is unknown, it is constantly evolving. we find the effects of it can be really extreme. peter tells us he is hooked. i'm actually trying hard to come off it.
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how long have you been doing that? for the past few years. i have never been in this state in my life and i want off it. the images of so—called spice zombies caught the headlines, for a while. but while the press attention has faded, the problem hasn't. these outreach workers are among 250 people who have been given special emergency training. when darren and his colleague found a rough sleeper, unresponsive, lips blue, they knew exactly what to do. while he was on the phone to emergency services, i was busy giving chest compressions until the ambulance service arrived. how was the guy? he is doing well, doing fine. that was one life saved, but latest official figures show that while nps deaths are rare, they are increasing byjust over a quarter in one year to 11a deaths. paramedics who help train people
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like darren tell us casualty rates are rising again. we are starting to see a spike again. what is that down to? an increase of different and new drugs now on the market. the current threat is a new drug called super spice. at newcastle a&e, they tell me the ban has led to a change, but only in the kind of user being admitted, not the number. i am not convinced that the pressures have changed much. we would expect to see a number of people each day. some may be unresponsive, some aggressive. it all depends on what is in the drug. this sample, we have extracted... they are trying to find that out in this lab at manchester metropolitan university. they have a new and unique way of working with police. samples are analysed within 2a hours instead of the usual four weeks. toxicity results are immediately fed back to users and the emergency
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services dealing with the fallout. this sample was one of the ones linked to a significant rise in hospitalisations a few months ago, about 53 people hospitalised. because of one batch? yes. how old were you when you first started? probably about 1a. if the ban had been in place from the start, rhys might never have started taking drugs. instead he lost ten years of his life. today, he's kicked the habit, but he says young people are finding new ways of buying on the street and online. is there any evidence that the problem is going away? no, if anything it is getting a lot worse. walking through the streets of newcastle, kids are starting younger and younger with it. the problem is getting ignored. it is not being ignored by the government. nps is mentioned in its drug strategy for the first time. but with no additional funds to tackle it, some
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say this is a problem which won't easily be fixed. the home office told the bbc that the government's new drug strategy is supporting people through treatment, while also tackling the supply of illegal drugs. some breaking news from thames valley police. a 16—year—old boy from kent has been arrested at sta nsted from kent has been arrested at stansted airport on suspicion of terrorist offences. the world's first full—scale floating wind farm has started to take shape off the north—east coast of scotland. eventually, five giant turbines will stretch for more than 175 metres and supply power to 20,000 homes. the first turbine was put into place off peterhead in aberdeenshire. the remaining four arrive from norway in the coming weeks. the sri lanka navy are trained to rescue people, but yesterday it was two elephants that needed help after being swept out to sea.
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the rescue took place off the north east coast of the country. navy patrol boats towed the two elephants back to a jungle area near foul point, according to local media. the bbc news at one is coming up with clive myrie. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with for a look at the weather with tomasz shafernaker. let's see what the week ahead will bring because it looks mixed across the uk and that might be an understatement. there is some changeable weather, wet on wednesday and then thursday and friday brighter but still with some showers. today a huge contrast between the cloudy and damp east and the sunny west, and in western areas temperatures will climb, in some parts of south west scotland it could warm up to 25 degrees and fine
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weather will be in place across the west country, west midlands, wales, beautiful weather, eastern areas cloud, we have had spots of rain, that will continue into the afternoon and you can see the cloud plug—in that north sea coast but out west it's stunning, just the chance ofa west it's stunning, just the chance of a couple of showers perhaps across the high ground of scotland and once again the warm spot will be across south—west parts of scotland, perhaps glasgow getting to 26. tonight we will see some of that murky, drizzly weather pushed away towards the east so the weather will improve as we entered tuesday, so tuesday over role will be the best day of the week, we can't almost guaranteed dry weather for 95% of the country so a fine day, maybe
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just a few spots of rain and if you're lucky you might catch a shower but on balance a lovely day. very different from wednesday onwards, a powerfuljet stream will send low pressure and weather front in our direction so that means a few hours of soggy weather, and it looks like the morning might start of dry in the east but the weather front will quickly sweep through and that rain will not last for long so by the second half of the afternoon, that brent will have cleared out into the north sea and then by thursday, very blustery weather, low pressure to the north of scotland, so pressure to the north of scotland, soa pressure to the north of scotland, so a blustery day with a mixture of sunshine and showers and then maybe a little better on friday, so summer is on hold, still. donald trump's son—in—law and senior adviserjared kushner, denies colluding with russia, during the president's election campaign. he also says he's never
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relied on russian money, to finance business activities in the private sector. mr kushner issued the denials in a statement, hours before appearing before a congressional panel, investigating russian meddling in last year's presidential election. also this lunchtime: a high court judge will hear new evidence from an american doctor, in the case of the terminally ill baby, charlie gard. the government promises an energy revolution, investing hundreds of millions pounds, in battery technology. human material has been discovered in soil samples taken in greece, by british police searching for ben needham. and princes william and harry arejoined by friends of their late mother, paying tribute to diana, princess of wales, 20 years after her death.
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