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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 24, 2017 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser. the headlines at seven... the parents of the terminally ill baby charlie gard give up their legal fight to get him experimental treatment in the us. they accept that no medical intervention can help him. we are now going to spend our last precious moments with our son, charlie, who unfortunately will not make his first birthday in just under two weeks‘ time. president trump's son—in—law, jared kushner, says all of his actions were proper during the us election, after giving evidence to senators on his contact with russian officials. a new government strategy to develop batteries that store power from green energy sources. the international trade secretary, liam fox, is in washington, laying the ground work for a possible post—brexit trade deal with the us. and six months suspended sentences
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for three men caught racing at 134 isles power. —— miles per hour. a police officer who got them on his dashboard camera said it was the worst case of dangerous driving he had ever seen. and new zealander rowland smith has smashed the eight hour ewe world shearing record at a cornwall farm. the record was 605 — rowland managed 644 ewes. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the parents of the terminally ill baby charlie gard have ended their legal battle to take him to the us for experimental treatment. charlie's father chris gard gave an emotional statement outside the high court, saying they were now going to spend their last precious moments with their son, who would not now make his first birthday in just under two weeks‘ time.
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earlier, their lawyer told the court that "time had run out" for the baby, as an american doctor who examined charlie had said he was no longer willing to offer the therapy, after seeing the results of a new mri scan last week. here‘s our medical correspondent, fergus walsh. the fight over charlie gard‘s future is over. this desperately sick little boy will now be allowed to die. justice for charlie! justice but charlie! justice for charlie! after a hugely emotional hearing, where his parents said they had agreed to let their son go, they emerged to face the world‘s media. our son is an absolute warrior and we could not be prouder of him and we will miss him terribly. his body, heart and soul may soon be gone, but his spirit will live on for eternity and he will make a difference to people's lives for years to come, we will make sure of that. we are now going to spend our last precious moments with our son, charlie, who unfortunately will not
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make his first birthday injust under two weeks' time. charlie has been in great ormond street hospital since october. he has a serious inherited condition, mitochondrial depletion syndrome. he cannot move, feed or breathe unaided. the central question in this case was whether this powder, nucleoside therapy, which is added to food, could boost his muscle function. his parents raised £1.3 million for the treatment in the united states. that money will now go to a foundation in charlie‘s name. but great ormond street, backed by many independent experts, said the treatment was futile because charlie had suffered catastrophic and irreversible brain damage. because charlie‘s parents and doctors could not agree, the matter went to the high court. in april, thejudge ruled that charlie‘s suffering should end. his life support be withdrawn.
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every legal appeal brought by charlie‘s parents failed and then came interventions from the pope and donald trump, the latter tweeting an offer of help. and this has been an extraordinary case, the battle over the fate of a baby boy which was fought out notjust here in court but internationally. the judge said it was one of the pitfalls of social media that the watching world felt it right to have opinions without knowing the facts of the case. he said the court‘s paramount consideration had been charlie‘s best interest at all times. the case came back to court when an american urologist claimed new evidence showed his nucleoside therapy could help charlie and last week he flew over to examine him. new mri body scans were ordered. on friday, charlie‘s parents accepted that these showed his muscle wasting was now so severe he was beyond help. it is an incredibly brave decision
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by charlie's parents, they have thought for themselves what the new evidence shows and they have reached a conclusion, probably the judge would have reached the same. it is very brave of them to do it without waiting to hear what he had to say. in court, connie yates said they would be haunted for the rest of their lives with the what—if — what if their son had received the treatment months earlier? she said he had the potential to be a normal boy but it was now too late. for charlie, we say mummy and daddy, we love you so much. we always have and we always will and we are so sorry that we could not save you. the parents are now with charlie in his final hours. great ormond street said the agony, desolation and bravery of their decision humbled all who worked there. and we‘ll find out how this story
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and many others are covered in tomorrow‘s front pages at 10.40 this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are the public affairs consultant, alex deane, and thejournalist, james rampton. dojoin us for that. donald trump‘s son—in—law and senior advisorjared kushner has publicly denied any wrong—doing or collusion with russian government officials during the presidential election campaign. he was speaking outside the white house after being questioned by a special senate committee investigating links between the trump campaign and russia. this is what he had to say. first in business and now in public service, i have always focused on setting and achieving goals and i have left it to others to work on media and public perception. since the first questions were raised in march, i have been consistent in saying
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that i was eager to share any information i have with the investigating bodies, and i have done so today. the record and documents i have voluntarily provided will show that all my actions were proper and occurred in the normal course of events of a very unique campaign. let me be very clear. i did not collude with russia, nor do i know of anyone else in the campaign who did so. i had no improper contacts. i have not relied on russian funds for my businesses. and i have been fully transparent in providing all requested information. donald trump had a better message and ran a smarter campaign, and that is why he won. suggesting otherwise ridicules those who voted for him. it is an honour to work with president trump
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and his administration as we take on the challenges that he was elected to face — creating jobs for american people, keeping america safe and eliminating barriers to achieving the american dream. no improper contact, fully transparent. let‘s get a view on that. with me now is the former cia officer evan mcmullen, who ran as an independent in last year‘s us president election. hejoins me on webcam from los angeles. very good to see you. thanks are being with us. what do you make of that, fully transparent? the e—mail invitation back in june that, fully transparent? the e—mail invitation back injune to this meeting with the russian lawyer, the head of the e—mail was, russian, clinton, private and confidential. halfway down the e—mail, it said, this is support for your father from the russian government. the idea that we get from mr kushner today is that we get from mr kushner today is that there is nothing to see here
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and he did not read the e—mail. it‘ll be hard to prove whether he read it or not. but i tell you, it is highly unlikely, almost zero chance that the campaign chairman, jared kushner, the son—in—law of the president, and the president‘s own son, donald trump junior, president, and the president‘s own son, donald trumpjunior, would have all attended the meeting in a busy campaign, the same meeting, happy thought it was inconsequential. furthermore, i think it highly unlikely that such a meeting, billed asa unlikely that such a meeting, billed as a meeting about russian efforts to influence the election, to sway the american election, in donald trump‘s favour, would in fact, in substance, be inconsequential. what we saw from jared kushner today in a statement, released after he was questioned behind closed doors by congressional staffers, it essentially just step through all the facts that the media has uncovered over the past several months and then spins then. it spins
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them in the most benign way possible. this administration and jared kushner have very little credibility left on these issues. they have lied so many times. so the investigation will have to go forward and kushner is there one record with his description of events. that can be investigated and it will be. you don't have to be a special prosecutor to spot the flaw in his statement, when he says he‘s been fully transparent, because what we have actually had is a slow accumulation of details of those people that he meant. he has been adding names to his security clea ra nce adding names to his security clearance ever since january. and thatis clearance ever since january. and that is absolutely right. he has restated his forms, or he has submitted updates to his security clea ra nce submitted updates to his security clearance forms to three times. one has to wonder how often and when he is going to have to update his statement. but again, as you point out, he only releasing this statement after he has sat back for
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months and watched what the press has revealed. and now that statement again he is on the addressing that which is revealed by the press and spinning them in the most benign possible way. now, that is probably a good legal strategy but it also telegraphs their defensive posture. what he did today was, at least publicly, not forthcoming. defensive. it leads me to believe... it probably speaks to the calibre of the lawyers on board, defending people in the administration. with your cia hat here, what about his explanation of the difficulty and the time pressure in filling in his security clearance form ? the time pressure in filling in his security clearance form? he is blaming someone who filled it in for him, who sent it too early. does that add up? i do think it is possible that he would be so ignorant about the importance of that. it is possible. but very
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unlikely. i have filled out those forms many times. even when i was in my early 20s, i filled out my first such form when i was in my very early 20s. even then, i knew that this was a matter of serious import andi this was a matter of serious import and i had to take very, very seriously the situation. and i was a young man at that point with no professional experience, very little professional experience, very little professionaljudgment beyond professional experience, very little professional judgment beyond what professional experience, very little professionaljudgment beyond what i was bringing to the situation from school. even as a very young man, i knew it was very serious. and so it is hard to believe that jared kushner would not be would understand that. especially given that he is surrounded by government attorneys and has access to people across the government at that point, who would be telling him how serious this was. it is very hard to believe. i do think it is possible
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that he would have just blown it off because he is a novice to coverings, but unlikely. really important perspective. thank you for being with us. let‘s speak to laura becker now. how has the statement gone down on capitol hill? when it comes to his testimony today, democrats say that there are far more questions that need to be answered. one of the things that came out of the meeting is, why has it taken so long forjared kushner to give his account of events? the first revelations of him meeting with the russian ambassador and banker came out in january with the russian ambassador and banker came out injanuary and march. he said he would be willing to testify under oath and he has not done that today. when it comes to the testimony itself, they say that perhaps there could be more time needed with jared kushner.
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republicans are saying, hang on a second, we want it in to clear things up, that is exactly what he has done. it is interesting to note what exactly went on in front of the white house with that statement. jared kushner stood in front of the white house with the white house seal and made that statement. with that statement and seal, he is speaking with the whitehouse voice. this is a white house that has tried to bat this away and draw line under it. to say, look, we‘re being open and transparent. behind the scenes, donald trump tweets to say this is a witchhunt and hoax and he has criticised republicans for, as he says, not having his back. that is crucial to the base because they are saying, hang on a second, he is being open, giving a statement and perhaps it is time that the media let it all go. whereas democrats are saying that there are far more questions to be answered. this is a very partisan enquiry.
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it is important to say that it is going higher and higher up it is important to say that it is going higherand higher up the chain. while i have got you, the president has been tweeting today. as you said. one of the people involved is attorney generaljeff sessions. allsorts of rumours swirling about him and whether he is likely to be replaced. it looked likely to be replaced. it looked like veiled criticism for him today in the present‘s tweet. how the mighty have fallen. jeff sessions was one of donald trump‘s closest friends are joining the campaign. they stood on the podium together almost right from the start. he was appointed attorney general. but then things seem to have soured through the last few months. there was an interview that donald trump gave with the new york timesjust donald trump gave with the new york times just last week, and donald trump gave with the new york timesjust last week, and in it he seems to be upset withjeff sessions for standing back from the russian enquiry and reducing himself. in fa ct, enquiry and reducing himself. in fact, he told the newspaper, is the newjeff sessions was greater than that, he would never have hired him
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in the first place. and then this morning, during a tweet about the russian investigation, he describes as attorney general as the legal. what an additive to describe your attorney general, especially at this time. —— beleaguered. is he trying to say that he does not have confidence injeff to say that he does not have confidence in jeff sessions? to say that he does not have confidence injeff sessions? he was thrown a question during a photo opportunity today about whether or notjeff sessions should resign and he shook his head and said reporters should not shout out questions. it is an interesting one for the president right now because that seems to be what saying in his tweet. he is shuffling his pack. sean spicer knows. laura becker on the capitol hill. the parents of the terminally—ill baby charlie gard give up their legal fight to get him experimental treatment in the us. a new scan has shown
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that the 11—month year old has irreversible brain damage. president trump‘s son—in—law, jared kushner, says he had been fully transparent with the investigation into russian involvement in the us election. the government promises an energy revolution, investing hundreds of millions pounds in battery technology. hundreds of people are gathering in east london tonight after the death of a 20 year—old man who died after being restrained by police officers in a shop. scotland yard say rashan charles tried to swallow an object and that officers had tried to prevent him from harming himself. the case has been referred to the police watchdog. people in hackney are demanding answers from the met. katharine carpenter reports. in the early hours of saturday, a police officer followed rashan charles into a shop on kingsland road. the police say that he was seen road. the police say that he was seen frank to swallow something.
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there is a struggle. another man also steps in. despite getting first aid at the scene, mr charles died. it has led to questions over the police‘s handling of the incident and anger. that boy should be alive today, sitting in a cell somewhere, being able to tell his side of the story. instead, he is lying in a morgue, waiting for an topsy. within an hourand a morgue, waiting for an topsy. within an hour and a half of the incident, the independent police ‘s commission and instead was investigating. but in hackney, some say that they have little faith in that. three young men have died following contact with the police in the last five weeks. one man died six days after the car he was travelling in was stopped by police. a 16—year—old boy died during a place chasing wimbledon on the 16th ofjuly. and at the weekend, rashan charles also died. we don‘t want this brushed under the carpet. if this continues, we will be standing in a few weeks outside
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another playstation, asking what has happened to her son or daughter and we demand answers. this has gone on far too long and we demand justice and it is time for this to stop. —— another police station. this mp urged the ipcc to announce its findings as soon as possible. we do not know the full facts until the investigation has gone on. i urge everyone to become where we find out the full facts of the situation. i be watching very closely at what the outcome is. this evening, the met says it is committed to learning any lessons that emerge the investigative process. let‘s find out what is going on in hackney tonight. our correspondent is there. i am reading that the chief superintendent, simon laurens, is urging people to keep up—to—date with the ipcc headquarters and state m e nts with the ipcc headquarters and statements they put out because he is aware, as we statements they put out because he is aware, as we can see statements they put out because he is aware, as we can see behind you, that emotions are running high.
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that is right. in that statement from the borough commander, he said he understood that there would be a lot of speculation about this incident, especially because it was filmed on a security camera and that video has been widely shared by a lot of people. a lot of people have strong views about what happened in that video. a lot of people here believe it shows yet another example to them of police brutality. but the borough commander has said that no police officer is exempt from the law and no—one would wish to be. you can see the code here with their placards and flags. they have been here for about an hour or so with his vigil outside stoke newington police station. they have been listening to speeches. we had from the father of rashan charles, the first time you spoken in public. it was a very brief speech but he appealed for calm and peaceful protest. he did not speak and detail
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about what happened in the early hours of saturday morning but he is reported as saying excessive force was used. so the protest and march came here about one hour ago. the road is blocked to traffic at the moment. you might be able to see behind me some of the red buses parked up there. but it appears now that the vigil here at least is over and the marchers are heading down the road to carry on this protest march. thank you very much indeed. the international trade secretary, liam fox, is holding talks in washington to discuss a possible trade deal with the united states after the uk leaves the european union. current eu rules prevent britain signing an agreement until after brexit. but how important is trade between the uk and the us? trade between the two countries is already worth more than £150 billion a year. the total value of goods and services exported by the us into the uk in 2015
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was $123.5 billion. together, the uk and us have around $1 trillion invested in each other‘s economies. the trading relationship between the uk and the us supports over a million jobs in both countries. speaking earlier today, mr fox said the talks cover a number of strands including "continuity of existing deals". he also set out why the two countries‘ economies were well suited to trading with one another. and it is perhaps a cliche for a british secretary of state to come to the us and talk about the special relationship. yet the fact a phrase is well used does not make it any less true. britain and america are united by language, culture, history, security, and of course commerce and trade. it is perhaps fortuitous we are also the first and fifth largest economies in the world. so the economic value of our bond
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cannot be overstated. the united states is britain's largest export market, buying more than $200 billion of uk goods and services every year, more than france and germany put together. the stock of investment we hold in other other's economy stands at over $1 trillion. the us is the number one destination for uk investment. thousands of british firms have a presence in the us, from car companies to financial services. us firms employ more than one million people in the united kingdom, and the uk firms employ more than one million americans here. us companies are investing in the uk, seeing a familiar environment built on economic funmentals, which allow businesses to flourish. they are attracted by our low tax, low regulation economy, universities which sit alongside their american counterparts in all global top ten lists, a highly skilled and educated workforce, a cutting—edge research environment,
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and the ability to operate in the perfect time zone for global trading. these fundamentals will not change, and the uk will always be open for business. liam fox speaking earlier. joining me now from washington is jacob funk kirkegaard, from the peterson institute of international economics — a washington—based think tank. thank you very much for being with us. thank you very much for being with us. the united states is already britain‘s biggest export market. so how would we further benefits from an open and bigger trade deal, a free—trade deal? an open and bigger trade deal, a free-trade deal? i think the reality is precisely because of the scope and jets of the existing relationship, in order to further enhance and deepen it, you would have to get down to some of the very tough political issues that relate not to traditional trade barriers,
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but really environmental, food product regulation, financial regulations and the like. and there, once you get to the nitty—gritty, you will find that actually the transatlantic differences might be quite a lot larger than you think. yes. from a strictly trade perspective, the uk is the requesting party and we are in a hurry. so we don‘t have much room for manoeuvre, which worries people. well, i mean, yes. donald trump said it himself in the art of the deal. you don‘t want to be the most desperate party in a deal. there is no doubt that the uk will be in this case. it is sobering to remember that when the us was negotiating with the year as a whole, the willingness of the us to change its own domestic regulations in any meaningful way to get a trade deal with the eu as a whole was very
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close to zero. which means its willingness to deal so far a deal with a much smaller uk economy is probably even smaller. but the thing that concerns people here, for other benefits that can be seen from financial services and things like that, is that we always look to public procurement and the american involvement there will inevitably be in the national health service, and particularly agricultural products. the result was a lot made of chlorine washed chicken and hormonal reared beef. that is the sort of thing forced onto the uk market if we are so thing forced onto the uk market if we are so desperate for a deal, isn‘t it? we are so desperate for a deal, isn't it? i can say that for sure, those of the things the us agricultural lobby will put as a condition for any deal. and that lobby is going to prove very powerful in these negotiations. and as you mentioned, so will the pharmaceutical lobby, the hospitals at sector —— etc. the whole issue of
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public procurement. once you get into the nitty—gritty of trade negotiations. it is a sort of give and take and you will negotiate not with the trump administration, but a whole host of very powerful special interests even the united states. and the definitely want their own agenda and their pound of uk flesh, so agenda and their pound of uk flesh, so to speak. if this trade deal is done, we know that he‘s to mexico after this meeting in washington, and we are already close to canada, because we have a commonwealth relationship with them, why can‘t we just plug into nafta? is that not possible? i think that would be possible? i think that would be possible but right now there is a renegotiation of nafta going on between the us and canada and mexico. the outcome of which, i am fairto mexico. the outcome of which, i am fair to say, is highly uncertain. for them to attach the united states as well, i think that would be highly contentious here in the
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united states. and we should always remember the role of controversy. the uk government seems to have nailed its colours to, you know, what is one of the most unpopular president in us history already. in the event that after the midterms in 2018 the house of representatives changes to the democrats, you could find yourselves with a very different international trade agenda here in washington and one that does not resemble the one that we see at the moment. so there is certainly a lot of uncertainty at the moment and prospects of this deal because it will at least be several years into the future. very interesting. thanks for being with us this evening. it is almost have par—7. the headlines shortly, but let‘s get the weather first. if you‘re fortunate enough to have the sunshine today, temperatures we re the sunshine today, temperatures were as high as 25 celsius. it really was one western parts of the uk that enjoyed that. and in the
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cloud, further east, temperatures struggling to 15 celsius. still some shelly bursts of rain in with that, slowly drying off overnight but probably hanging onto cloud and breezed in the eastern side of england. clear skies further west. after the warmth in the sunshine, temperatures down to or 14 celsius. we will see cloud pick—up across eastern england and sunny spells here. a nice day for most of us were sunshine at times. the breeze will ease in the east as well. cloud thickens in the south—west later. isolated shower in the south—west, possibly into scotland in the abdomen. not quite as warm as today. still pleasant. 20 cells glasgow. behind me, the cloud is advancing to bring wet and windy weather on wednesday. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines at 7.30pm: the parents of the terminally—ill baby charlie gard have ended their legalfight for treatment in america. president trump‘s son—in—law, jared kushner has said he had been
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fully transparent in relation to the russia investigation. he repeated that he had not colluded with russia, nor did he know of anyone else in the trump campaign who had done. the government announce a new strategy to develop batteries that store power from green energy sources. ministers say it could save consumers up to 40 billion pounds by 2050. the international trade secretary, liam fox says he wants to ensure commercial ties between the uk and us are not disrupted post—brexit, as he meets officials in washington. let‘s return to our top story — the news that the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard have ended their legal fight to take him to america for an experimental treatment. connie yates and chris gard have been fighting to prevent doctors at great ormond street hospital from turning off the life support for ten month old charlie. from turning off the life support it follows many months of legal
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wrangling, beginning in march this year at a hearing in the family division of the high court in london. on april the 11th the high court ruled that doctors could stop providing life—support treatment. then at the start of may, charlie‘s parents asked court of appealjudges to consider the case. the court of appealjudges dismissed the couple‘s appeal on may 25th. and onjune the 8th charlie‘s parents lost their fight in the supreme court. later that month, judges in the european court of human rights looked at the cae but they they refused to intervene. of human rights looked at the case but they they refused to intervene. at the start ofjuly, as the case gained coverage worldwide, the pope and us president donald trump offered to help provide care. charlie‘s parents then returned to the high court, after doctors applied for a fresh hearing to examine new evidence. but today they announced they were ending their legal fight. this is what they had to say afterwards: firstly, i‘d like to think our legal team who have worked tirelessly on our behalf for free.
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and to the nurses and staff at great ormond street hospital, who have cared for charlie and kept him comfortable and stable for so long. we‘d also like to thank everybody who supported us, including all the people here for us today. this is one of the hardest things that we will ever have to say, and we‘re about to do the hardest thing that we‘ll ever have to do, which is to let our beautiful little charlie go. put simply, this is about a sweet, gorgeous, innocent little boy, who was born with a rare disease, who had a real, genuine chance at life, and a family who love him so very dearly, and that‘s why we fought so hard for him. we are truly devastated to say that, following the most recent mri scan of charlie‘s muscles, as requested in the recent mdt meeting by dr hirano, as charlie‘s devoted and loving parents, we‘ve decided it‘s no longer in charlie‘s best interests to pursue treatment, and we‘ll let our son go and be with the angels.
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the american and italian team were still willing to treat charlie after seeing both his recent brain mri and eeg perfomred last week, but there is one simple reason why treatment cannot now go ahead, and that is time. a whole lot of time has been wasted. we‘re now injuly, and our poor boy has been left to lie in hospital for months without any treatment whilst lengthy court battles have been fought. tragically, having had charlie‘s medical notes reviewed by independent experts, we now know had charlie been given the treatment sooner, he would have had the potential to be a normal, healthy little boy. despite his condition injanuary, charlie‘s muscles were in pretty good shape. far from showing irreversible, catastrophic, structural brain damage, dr hirano and other experts say his brain scans and eegs were relatively normal for a child of his age.
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we knew it ourselves, because as his parents, we knew our son, which is why we continued fighting. charlie‘s been left with his illness to deteriorate, devastatingly, to the point of no return. it has also never been about "parents know best". all we wanted to do was take charlie from one world—renowned hospital, to another world—renowned hospital, in an attempt to save his life and to be treated by the world leader in mitochondrial disease. we will have to live with the what ifs, which will haunt us for the rest of our lives. despite the way our beautiful son has been spoken about sometimes, as if he‘s not worthy of a chance at life, our son is an absolute warrior, and we could not be prouder of him. and we‘ll miss him terribly. his body, heart and soul may soon be gone, but his spirit will live on for eternity, and he‘ll make a difference
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to people‘s lives for years to come. we‘ll make sure of that. we‘re now going to spend our last precious moments with our son, charlie, who, unfortunately, won‘t make his first birthday in just under two weeks‘ time. and we‘ll ask that our privacy is respected at this very difficult time. to charlie, we say, mummy and daddy, we love you so much, we always have and we always will and we‘re so sorry we couldn‘t save you. sweet dreams, baby, sleep tight, our beautiful little boy, we love you. desperately sad. dr ravi jayaram is a paediatrician, who has dealt with several cases where he‘s had to discuss, like the charlie gard case, switching from active to palliative
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care with the parents. hejoins me from our salford studio. thank you. it‘s one of those cases where no one is right and no one is wrong, but right at the heart of this case is the fact that there was a marked breakdown in trust between doctors and the parents treating him. why do you think that happened? it's him. why do you think that happened? it‘s a really good question. trust is at the key of these decisions being made the right way. if the pa rents being made the right way. if the parents and the clinicians have a breakdown in trust, it is virtually impossible to find common ground. normally in these situations, you have time. you have time to build up a relationship with the parents and with the child and the parents build up with the child and the parents build upa with the child and the parents build up a relationship with the teams is looking after them as well. that relationship is key, because it that relationship is key, because it that relationship is key, because it that relationship is strong, then you can actually together make the right decisions forwards. now, where things breakdown is a really good
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question. there are lots of reasons why things may breakdown. in this situation, as all parents, you would cling on to any hope this is throwing away. what is unclear is what hard evidence there was to say that the treatment would have made a significant difference. charlie‘s dad ‘s statement did say that in his opinion, and in the opinion of the clinicians from america and rome, that had the treatment then given earlier, it might have had a chance of success. the problem is, it is opinion. medicine is not black—and—white. we deal in shades of grey. if you ask ten different people different things, they will give you different opinions. the trouble is, as a parent, you will pick and choose the one that you wa nt to pick and choose the one that you want to hear. 0k.
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pick and choose the one that you want to hear. ok. i'm thinking of the previous case of i chicane, the little boy who had a brain tumour. his parents took him out of southampton hospital and to spain and in prague, it reminds me of that case because i wonder if because there are so many experts in great ormond street hospital, our hospitals open minded enough that they may be expertise somewhere else in the world that might help children? because there may be a suspicion, and clearly these parents had the suspicion that these doctors we re had the suspicion that these doctors were kings in their own domain and wide open to the idea that maybe there was something else somewhere else. they have talked about their baby going in there and effectively being held in prison, is the word i he used. i think the comparison with the a shipping cases a difficult one, because there were very different issues there. he had a condition that was treatable. and theissue condition that was treatable. and the issue there was more around when the issue there was more around when the therapy should be used, how it
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should be done. i won‘t go into the details .com confidentiality reasons but there were wider issues than those reported. are we in a situation where we have doctors at the centre of excellence who cannot look beyond their blinkered view. actually i don‘t think that‘s right. the world of the specialty of mitochondrial disease is very small. it's mitochondrial disease is very small. it‘s a very rare condition and the specialists at great ormond street would have had communication with all the specialists around the world. if they felt that there was ha rd world. if they felt that there was hard evidence to say that other treatments would have worked, they would have explored them and sure enough, i‘m sure they did explore them. but phelps but in risk versus benefits, the risks outweighed the benefits. bear in mind i do not have access to any details i cannot say for sure. do you think it is the case that we are on the razor edge
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of some extraordinary developments in this disease, and really sadly, they are not coming soon enough for this little baby boy. that's a really good question. some of the treatments that are being developed, having read about them, are going to revolutionise treatment. the trouble is, the treatment that was proposed that charlie was unproven, untested, and there is one argument to say why not have a go anyway, but we have to remember, we as paediatricians have to act in the best interest of the child. not in the best interest of the parents, or indeed the clinicians. indeed. thank you for being with us, very interesting. a large—scale police manhunt is under way in switzerland following an attack with a chainsaw. police described the man responsible as a loner who mostly lived in the woods. five people were injured in the attack which took place in schaffhausen near the german border. swiss police said the attack was aimed at a local
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health insurance company and was not terror related. police searching for the missing toddler ben needham have found signs of blood on part of a sandal, and on soil inside a toy car. ben was 21 months old when he disappeared on the greek island of kos injuly 1991. south yorkshire police said forensic work was being carried out in aberdeen to try to extract dna from the blood. consumers in the uk could save up to 40 billion pounds by 2050 through major changes to the way electricity is made, used and stored, according to ministers. the business and energy secretary greg clark announced plans to invest a quarter of a billion pounds in battery technology — saying he wanted the uk to lead the world in its development. richard westcott has this report. from obvious things like our phones to london‘s new whispering black cab... here on secret tests in norway to this experimental aircraft, battery power is taking off around the world.
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the problem is they still run out too quickly, so today the government has promised to invest millions the technology. joining together the research, development, application and the manufacture of energy storage technologies and specifically battery storage is a huge opportunity for the energy sector and the automotive sector alike. right now, britain is a front runner with battery research, like here at warwick university, where they are trying to solve the two biggest issues — making batteries weigh less and last longer. this room is four times drier than the centre of the sahara desert because it is where they physically put the batteries together and any moisture can ruin the process. they are taking sheets like this containing the lithium ions and they are sandwiching them together in this machine. here they have welcomed this latest investment but warned that competition from china, japan, korea and america is serious.
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we are producing the cells that we are producing, and even our competitors, they are saying that it is 80 or 90% better than what they have got. but we have got to keep it up. they will catch up and they will beat us if we do not watch it. as governments around the world scramble to cut pollution, demand for batteries is soaring. in china, they used £5 million worth of batteries three years ago, that will double by next year. it is the same story across western europe, again production will nearly double from 1.2 billion to £2.3 billion. batteries could also make wind and solar power more productive. one idea being floated is to use old electric car batteries to store energy from wind turbines. i think we will see, and people are already working on this in the uk, to combine batteries with the production of renewable power.
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if you can do that successfully, at scale, you can remove the challenge that the wind does not blow all the time and the sun does not always shine and you can have a continuous flow of energy into the grid. the future looks electric, but now the pressure is on to make sure batteries that can keep up. richard westcott, bbc news, coventry. the headlines: the parents of the terminally—ill baby charlie gard have ended their legalfight for treatment in america. president trump‘s son—in—law, jared kushner has said he had been fully transparent in relation to the russia investigation. the government announce a new strategy to develop batteries that store power from green energy sources. ministers say it could save consumers up to 40 billion pounds by 2050. an update on the market numbers
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for you — here‘s how london‘s and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. three men have been given suspended prison sentences, disqualified from driving and fined, after being filmed racing at 134 mph on a dual carriageway near birmingham. amar paul, tejinder bhuee and zafar iqbal, were being followed by undercover police. thejudge at birmingham crown court said they avoided being sent to jail, only because there wasn‘t an accident. phil mackie reports. driving conditions were horrendous, it was dark, there was torrential rain, but that didn‘t stop this terrifying illegal street race. tejinder bhuee and zafar iqbal were driving their mercedes at breakneck speeds alongside amar paul, in a golf. they seemed oblivious to the risks they were taking with theirs and others‘ lives. this was a disinterested zafar iqbal being questioned immediately afterward.
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what are you doing in excess of 120? no? this is the stretch where the racing usually occurs, down here. among the officers in pursuit, pc mark hodson. literally these people drive their cars like they think they're in a film or on a video game. of course, it's not like a film or a video game, because it's real life, things do go wrong. they go wrong all the time, when people drive in this manner. the consequences are just tragic and we have to pick up the pieces. illegal street racing in the west midlands has already cost lives. student rebecca mcmanus was killed while waiting at a bus stop with a friend on the way to a hen party. there‘s now a permanent memorial at the place where she died. it‘s the complete stupidity of the whole thing. to race like that, with no thought of the consequences, when the consequences have been so devastating. rebecca lost her life.
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we‘ve lost our daughter, rebecca has been lost to so many people. they lost their liberty fora bit, and... they brought ridicule on their own families for doing such a stupid thing, and it is a stupid thing to do. local authorities have begun to take out high court injunctions like this, giving the police greater powers to stop motorists gathering and taking part in illegal racing. there is some evidence they are working. in places like this the problem has declined, but there is still a hard—core of motorists willing to take part in illegal street racing, putting theirs and other people‘s lives at risk. police believe that if the three men had been sent to jail, it would have sent out a strong message to street racers. an operation targeting them has already seen the number of incidents fall dramatically. more than 20 drivers have been disqualified and more than 60 cars have been seized. armchair critics of britain‘s most powerful warship need to "shut up
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for a while" according the defence secretary, sir michael fallon. he‘s been on board hms queen elizabeth in the moray firth today, where she is undergoing sea trails. he argued that american carriers had been crucial in the campaign against the so—called islamic state, and britain‘s new aircraft carriers would be vital to the nation‘s defence over the next 50 years. catriona renton reports. these are the first pictures of hms queen elizabeth on her sea trials. four weeks ago she sailed for the first time from forsyth. they are testing everything from radar all the way through to power and propulsion. there have been teething problems. what has been described as a minor issue with a propeller has already been fixed. the captain is confident she is a ship for the future. you have to see this aircraft carrier is notjust a ship, she is a sea base from which amount a range of operations, whether that is bombing targets offshore, through
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to humanitarian assistance or disaster relief. all the way through to bespoke smaller scale operations against people like is and terrorism. hms queen elizabeth is designed to project power. she is the largest warship ever built for the largest warship ever built for the royal navy and you can see from the royal navy and you can see from the scale of this that she is sending out a message to the rest of the world. but what is that message? russia, whose carrier sailed through the english channel last year, has described hms queen elizabeth is a convenient, large maritime target. big decks and fastjets on our back... meeting the crew, the defence secretary hit back. that is carrier mv. we are one of only four countries in the world building new aircraft carriers. the united states, china, india and ourselves. we are building two of them. these are aircraft carriers, they will help defend our country, they will help defend our country, they will help keep the peace around the world
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and without an aircraft carrier, the coalition would not have made the progress that has made in defeating daesh terrorism in iraq. it's not just technology being trialled. this ship is the size of a small town so catering is being tested as well. at the moment we are catering for about a thousand people per meal time. we need to look at how we can effectively achieve that with the time constraints we have got. critics of the carrier programme argue they‘re too expensive and absorbing too many resources. that is not an argument the government or the crew of ship except. an opportunity that can‘t be missed — that‘s according to the head of women‘s cricket clare connor following their stunning world cup triumph. england beat india by nine runs in front of a sell—out 26 thousand crowd at lord‘s yesterday. our sports editor dan roan has been asking if this is a watershed moment for women‘s sport. world cup winners! it was the perfect platform
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for women‘s sport. england‘s cricketers crowned champions on home soil. anya shrubsole had been the team‘s hero, her record—breaking spell of 6—46 securing a thrilling victory over india. before the match, her father ian posted photos of his daughter visiting lord‘s in 2001. and this morning, in the exact same spot and after a night of celebrations, she told me what it was like to return a world cup winner. i remember being here as a nine—year old watching, and wishing one day i could be back here playing. never in my wildest dream did i think it would be unable cup final. be in a world cup final. it has come true, that dream. it absolutely has come true. it shows you can have a dream, and sometimes they do come true. england have won the tournament at lord‘s before in 1993. back then, they weren‘t allowed to go into the pavilion unaccompanied. today, in the hallowed long room, the woman in charge told me progress must continue. we can't miss this opportunity. we have to celebrate properly,
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and enjoy this moment, and the players had to enjoy it, but certainly, we all have to start thinking very strategically about what opportunities this gives us. this is about a lot more than what this team achieved here at lord‘s yesterday. both in terms of the attendance here in the ground, and the estimated 100 million television audience following the action around the world. it broke all records. the sense that this was the defining moment of a ground—breaking summer of british women‘s sport. johanna konta‘s already become the first british woman in a wimbledon semifinal for 39 years. england‘s footballers, meanwhile, are doing well at the euros, last night beating spain. but away from performances, there is still a gender gap. in terms of prize—money, 83% of sports now award women and men equally, and 5% of sports media coverage is dedicated to women, and even less when it comes to sports sponsorship.
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i think there‘s still a long way to go in terms of women in the boardroom, and women running sport, as well as being participants, women in coaching, women in refereeing and umpiring, all of us know there is still a long way to go. but we have made huge progress. it emerged today that despite preparing to defend their world cup title next month, most of england‘s rugby players will not have their contracts renewed by the rfu. on a day when england‘s cricketing world champions were busy trying to leave a legacy with this coaching session at lord‘s, it was a reminder of how tough life can still be for some sportswomen. but for the next generation, never before has there been so much inspiration to draw upon. dan roan, bbc news. now if you haven‘t had enough of sporting world records —
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there was another attempt taking place in cornwall today. sheep—shearer rowland smith has been hard at work since seven this morning trying to beat the world record for the number of sheep—sheared in eight hours. so did he do it? here‘s heidi davey. the pressure is on. those watching look anxious, but the main man? well, he is calm and determined. oh and by the way, he is sharing 80 sheep an hour. tests have shown that sharing this many sheep is the same energy as running a marathon, so essentially he is running three marathons back to back. to beat the current record, rodent has to share each sheep in under 47 seconds. the challenge has been broken down into four sections, in one run he shared 167 sheep and has managed to keep that pace up throughout the afternoon. this time beats every 45 seconds see have to mentally keep yourself around that, doing a sheep every 45 seconds. if you are a bit slow you have to try and catch up.
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it can be really tough. physically and mentally. every two hours he ta kes a and mentally. every two hours he takes a short break but that focused never falters, and having takes a short break but that focused neverfalters, and having a takes a short break but that focused never falters, and having a world record holder as a brother gives him an added incentive. sharing is quite amazing. to get two guys at the top of theirgame like amazing. to get two guys at the top of their game like this, at the same time. it's pretty special. i have met their father and he's pretty proud. roland is keeping a really good pace. we are stood back istomin and get in his eye line. it‘s really important we don‘t distract him. these sharing fans have been here since seven o‘clock this morning. magnificentjob. i since seven o‘clock this morning. magnificent job. i could since seven o‘clock this morning. magnificentjob. i could not do it. fellow shearers, how hard is it?|j could not do it. never. at 5pm, roland sheared his final sheep making him the new world record holder. he shared 644 use, smashing the previous record. how you
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feeling? good. glad it's over. are you not too bad. not as bad as you would think. but still pretty tired. my my back aches just watching that. let‘s get some weather. if you‘re in an area that did not get the sunshine today, prospects look much betterfor get the sunshine today, prospects look much better for tomorrow. get the sunshine today, prospects look much betterfor tomorrow. one area that did not get the sunshine, london. grey overcast skies. contrast that with the sunshine and south—west of scotland where temperatures were as high as 25 degrees. under the cloud, across eastern areas of england with shari bursts of rain as well, damages were near a 15 degrees or so. this cloud and rain, the last of the wet weather we had over the weekend, slowly easing away overnight, so many places becoming dry, some clearer skies north west. damages will be down to around 1314 degrees.
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not falling much across eastern england where there will still be a good deal of cloud overnight. that cloud should tend to sunny spells the relevant widely. any remaining showers are cool breeze tending to move away into the net continent. we will see cloud thickening out towards the south—west later on in the day. it will be a woman a day in the day. it will be a woman a day in the sunshine, but we will see more cloud in the south—west. —— a warm enough day. temperature is a good deal higher across many eastern parts of england than we had today, low 20s quite likely. away from those immediate coastal parts of eastern england. not as warm in scotland and northern ireland as today, but some sunshine around. one ortwo ireland as today, but some sunshine around. one or two showers, could be quite sharp in scotland later. most places a dry day. wet weather still to come. into the atlantic, this is a satellite picture from earlier. this cloud will head our way as well. convert a good set of weather
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fronts, all merging into one. this area of low pressure deepens and spills wind and rain towards our shores on tuesday night and into wednesday. for many western parts of the uk, for rush hour it will be wet and windy. eastern areas catch the train and it doesn‘t move across very quickly at all. a good six hours of rain, white and usual this time of the year. eventually some brighter skies, sunshine following on from the west during the afternoon in particular, giving those temperatures a late boost into the afternoon. a good few hours it will be quite soggy. do the rest of the week in that fresh air that comes in behind that, we will have some sunny spells but there will be showers, particularly towards the north—west the uk. this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm. the parents of the terminally—ill baby charlie gard give up their legal fight to get him experimental treatment in the us. they accept that no medical intervention can help him
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we are now going to spend our last precious moments with our son, charlie, who unfortunately will not make his first birthday in just under two weeks‘ time. president trump‘s son—in—law, jared kushner, says all of his actions were proper during the us election, after giving evidence to senators on his contact with russian officials. let me be very clear. i did not couude let me be very clear. i did not collude with russia, nor do i know of anyone else in the campaign who did so. the international trade secretary, liam fox, is in washington laying the ground work for a possible post—brexit trade deal with the us. three men are given six—month suspended sentences,
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