Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 25, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. charlie gard's parents say they will spend their last precious moments with their son after ending their legal fight. they've released this new picture of charlie. great ormond street hospital has praised the bravery of their decision. good morning, it's tuesday 25th july. also this morning, a clampdown on leasehold charges, ben can tell us more. there's been a sharp rise in new houses being sold leasehold rather than freehold, and it could cost homeowners thousands of pounds in hidden costs. the government says it must end. i'll have the details. a vigil has been held in protest at the death of a man who died after a police chase in east london. in sport, it's gold in the pool for adam peaty
6:01 am
at the world aquatics championships as he successfully defends his 100 metre breaststroke title. and as more pubs close, we meet the communities determined to stop last orders at their local. and carol has the weather. i think we are having some problems with the graphics, but we should see her in about 15 minutes. aydin and carol! we will see her later on --i demand carol. good morning. first, our main story. charlie gard's parents say they are preparing to spend their last precious moments with their terminally ill son. it comes after they ended their legal battle to take him to the united states for treatment. in a statement, great ormond street hospital where charlie is on life support said they recognised the agony, desolation and bravery of their decision.
6:02 am
caroline rigby reports. this photograph of charlie gard was released by his parents last night as they accepted their fight is over. they're desperately ill baby boy should be allowed to die. yesterday, they agreed to end their legal battle descent into the us for experimental treatment. emerging from an emotional hearing to pay tribute to do some. our son was an absolute warrior, and we could not be prouder of him and we will miss him terribly. his body, heart and soul may soon be gone, but his spirit will live on for eternity, and he will make a difference to people's lives for years to come, we will make sure of that. they will spend his last few days by his side. the hospital pay tribute to their courage, saying their agony, desolation and bravery had hobbled all who worked there. charlie has beenin all who worked there. charlie has been in intensive care since october. he has a rare, inherited condition that means he cannot move, seed or breathe unaided. injune,
6:03 am
judges that he should be allowed to die, but the case came back to court when this american urologist claimed the evidence that his experimental therapy could help —— feed. new mri body scans were ordered, last week his parents accepted that they showed that his muscles had wasted so showed that his muscles had wasted so significantly that he was beyond help. there was bitterness he did not get the chance of treatment sooner. not get the chance of treatment sooner. a whole lot of time has been wasted. we are now injuly, and our poor boy has been left to just lie in hospitalfor months. great poor boy has been left to just lie in hospital for months. great ormond street street insists earlier treatment would not have saved him. his mother said she would be haunted by the questions for the rest of her life, but for now, they had to let charlie go. up to 150 people held a vigil outside a police station in east london last night in protest over the death of a young black man. there has been anger in the local community following the death
6:04 am
of rashan charles in the early hours of saturday morning. people threw bottles and sticks at police after the vigil, but no officers were injured. keith doyle reports. what do we want? justice! what do we want? justice! anger and frustration was visible on the streets of hackney following the death of 20—year—old rashan charles. he died after being apprehended by police on saturday. a vigil was held outside stoke newington police station last night. during that, rashan charles‘s father called for justice. we ask forjustice on this. basically, i want everybody to understand what happened, this is a peaceful protest. after the vigil, roads were blocked with bins and bags of rubbish. it was relatively peaceful until the police moved in to end the protest. then some of the
6:05 am
crowd threw hands and bricks. it is to 20 a.m. on the police have finally moved in to clear this road that has been blocked for the last seven hours. a lot of local people are shouting things out, there is clearly a lot of anger here. by all accounts, this has been a reasonably peaceful process. the police a rashan charles was seen swallowing something when apprehended, but a campaigning group says it is enormously concerned and angered by his death. the independent police complaints commission is now investigating. sorry, i was talking to ben. that's all right, you were being social. builders could be banned from selling leaseholds on new homes in england under plans put forward by the government today. ben is here to explain more. can you explain to me why this is important? it is a real issue for
6:06 am
many people. there is a big rise in the numberof many people. there is a big rise in the number of new homes that are being sold with a lease. that would traditionally only apply to flights. it means is pacing is like ground re nt it means is pacing is like ground rent and communal services. houses, traditionally they have been freehold, it means you own the land on which the house is built. what we have found is that there have been a lot of elders building new homes, especially in the north—west of england, who are selling them with a lease. it may seem like a semantic change, but it could mean that homeowners are in for thousands of pounds of extra costs. they may want to put an extension on the house, do some renovations. they would have to ask permission from the leaseholder to do so and they could charge them. it also means you have to pay ground re nt it also means you have to pay ground rent every year, there is no limit on how much landlords can charge. there are also associated fees for
6:07 am
extending the lease. if you have a short lease, you would have to pay a lot of these to extend that. in some cases, if it has a short lease, it makes it very difficult to sell it. and difficult to budget, because they could double rent and... absolutely. hidden fees. it is the way for housebuilders to make a bit more money. they may seem like they are lowering the costs, but what we have seen is that these leases are being sold on to other financial institutions. it is not the builder who has built the house by discharging it, it is the financial institution. they say, this is great, homeowners have to pay rent on the lease. i've got a regular income. it could cost thousands. the english government says it needs to stop. we will ask how that is going to be done. and after 8 we'll be speaking live to the communities minister sajid javid. uk animal welfare standards could be threatened if farmers have to compete against cheaper, less—regulated rivals from outside
6:08 am
the eu after brexit. that's the warning from a house of lords committee. it's urging the government to insist on similar standards in any free trade agreements to avoid what it calls a race to the bottom on welfare. the president of the united states says the special relationship between the uk and the us is going to get even better. donald trump described talks between american officials and the international trade secretary, liam fox, as the start of a new chapter of stronger ties. a row has broken out over rail investment after the government said it would work with the mayor of london to progress plans for crossrail 2. it comes after recent announcements cancelling rail electrification schemes in wales and the north of england. we're joined from westminster by our political correspondent chris mason. tell us about the background of this, what does it mean? it all boils down to a row about where
6:09 am
money goes in terms of railway investment. for those who stand up for the north of england are being let down in terms of comparison to london. there was a proposed new london. there was a proposed new london to south railway, but it would not be finished until two to -- 2000 23. a would not be finished until two to —— 2000 23. a discussion around cancelling rail electrification projects in the midlands and the lack district, that has also led those who stand up for the north of england are less than chuffed. those who stand up for the north of england are less than chuffedlj would love to have seen chris grayling stand up in parliament and bring this up. if he had had on that, i think there would have been uproar. where i will go now with this is to contact greater manchester mps and other mp5 across
6:10 am
the north. while this might be the government's view, that it can cancel schemes out of london and give money to crossrail, i doubt it will be parliament's view. there needs to be a vote to see whether or not mps agree that this is the way to proceed with rail investment in our country. andy burnham, well aware of the government numbers needed for votes here. i.e., they struggle to make the numbers add up. he is not the only mare in the north of england to suggest he is a bit frustrated. the mayor of the liverpool region has said something similar. those who say that the cancellation of electrification projects is not as bad as it might sound, because of the of new trains that can run on diesel and electric, but this looks a bit tricky for the government regardless. —— there are those who say.
6:11 am
hundreds of firefighters in the south of france and corsica are battling huge forest fires which have been fanned by high temperatures and strong winds. a blaze has swept through 1,600 acres of the luberon national park in provence, while people have been moved to safety from a town in north eastern corsica. could this be the world's bestjob? this is a zookeeper in southwest china who has to dress up as a panda in order to play with cubs. it's because the animals are due to be released into protective wildlife. the cubs have to learn to live on their own and not rely on humans, so zookeepers pretend to be pandas when they interact with the young animals. you can see the zookeeper cuddling and playing with the cubs, who seem very happy to see the human dressed as an older panda.
6:12 am
pandas, like most animals, would surely know that is a human. they seem surely know that is a human. they seem quite at ease with a human with a massive head in there. we have a very high bar for a massive head in there. we have a very high barfor panda pictures. you should see the panda pictures that we reject. some of the best panda pictures we have ever seen. later on, at ten past eight, we will bejoined by two later on, at ten past eight, we will be joined by two of england's greatest cricket stars. i will be talking about reaction from the crowd and how many people were watching them on sunday. a huge sell—out crowd. but starting with a man who just cannot be beaten in the pool. look
6:13 am
out that bicep, it's just ridiculous. i want to know what he's doing in the gym to get that. he was doing in the gym to get that. he was doing some press ups with one of his friends. remember at thelen pics when he did one of those jumping press ups? —— at the olympics. —— at the it was a great evening in the pool on day two of the world aquatics championships for great britain who won two golds. olympic champion. adam peaty successfully defended his world 100 metre breaststroke title in a new championship record. he finished over a second ahead of his nearest rival. gb's second gold was a bit more of a surprise but no less deserved as ben proud took the 50 metre butterfly title. he's already the commonwealth champion over this distance, but his best event — the 50 metre freestyle — is yet to come. he competes in that at the end of the week. the rfu has been criticised after deciding not to renew contracts for the england women's 15—aside team.
6:14 am
the six nations champions defend their world title in ireland next month, but the rfu has said after the tournament, the focus will be shifted to the sevens squad ahead of next yea r‘s commonwealth games. and manchester city have broken the world transfer record for a defender by signing monaco full back benjamin mendy for 52 million pounds. the france international has signed a five—year deal. what is the debt that within five minutes, we will be calling him benjamin? pronunciation is very interesting, isn't it? this is getting ridiculous though, and they? —— the fees —— aren't they? fingers
6:15 am
crossed that we can see carol now. good morning. cloud that will fade. most of us have sunny spells. pleasa ntly warm most of us have sunny spells. pleasantly warm in the sunshine. you can see cloud in the south and east. some in the west. rain coming our way tonight. in between, dry weather. this is the cloud in the east and south—east producing spots of drizzle. turning over through today. sunshine coming through. across much of the uk, that is generally the story. dry and sunny. having said that, one or two showers in south—west england and wales through the day. in the sunshine, temperatures between 20 and 23. northern ireland, a dry day for you.
6:16 am
lots of sunshine. 20 degrees in belfast. for much of scotland, dry and sunny. the north—east. more cloud. dark cloud producing showers. that will depress the temperature. the south—east, patches of fair weather cloud. not spoiling it. a beautiful day for most. highs of 22. overnight, clear skies. through the night, cloud building in the west ahead of the band of rain coming in a company by blustery winds. not a cold night. double figures for most. it is courtesy of this level of low pressure. it will be windy. tomorrow, rain sweeping in from the west and moving east. heaviest in northern ireland, scotland, northern
6:17 am
england. and lightest in the south of the country. it will go north—east towards north—east scotla nd north—east towards north—east scotland into the north sea. behind that, brightening up to be sunshine and showers. some cloud across southern and south—eastern parts. temperatures down on what we are looking at today. 21, possibly 22. the back edge of that is pulling away towards the near continent on wednesday night. low pressure close to us. squeezing isobars. thursday. northern ireland and scotland in particular it is going to be wet and blustery. moving away from that, back on to the sunshine, pleasant. highs of 21. back to you. it has been just glorious where i was yesterday. i know some did not have it. goodbye. iwas yesterday. i know some did not have it. goodbye. i was in the north—west. ben isjoining us. i'm
6:18 am
getting some grief for having dyed hairand you foryour getting some grief for having dyed hair and you for your creased tie. your hair? it got bleached in the sun. while you are looking at that, the papers. the times. many have pictures of charlie gard and his pa rents. pictures of charlie gard and his parents. they have been talking about that story about ministers ending the scandal of rip—off leaseholds. we will talk to sajid later about that. this is the picture they released yesterday of charlie gard. as you were saying, his picture on the front of most papers. the guardian. talking about a big rise in personal debt. talking
6:19 am
about that later and charlie as well. height and obesity fears as well. height and obesity fears as well. what have you got over there? we are in good company. a story that came out yesterday. worth mentioning today. the office for national statistics. they have shrinkflation items, items getting smaller. it was all being blamed on brexit initially yesterday. importing is more expensive. sugar and chocolate is getting more expensive and they are used to make these. producers can either put up the price will make the product smaller and keep it at the product smaller and keep it at the same price. if you have a feeling they are getting smaller, you are correct. some have got smaller and the price stayed the same. it is being dubbed
6:20 am
shrinkflation, the price going up but you get less. you have to buy it more regularly to pick consumers feeling the squeeze are feeling the impact. —— regularly. feeling the squeeze are feeling the impact. -- regularly. the england women's world cup rugby team. they will lose their contracts under this cyclical funding team. the 7s team will be funded ahead of the commonwealth games. incredible. they will play next month in ireland and could lose their jobs will play next month in ireland and could lose theirjobs and financial support and the contract. many people are disappointed about that. we are talking about the women and their success. the guardian sport section saying there is a possibility cricket t20 could go to the olympics for the women's world cup. talking about jordan spieth yesterday. this is the head of the
6:21 am
man who he hit on the noggin on the 13th. it hit his head and bounced a bit further on and he went on to win. it looks like a bruise. look at this quote. "have i got a claret mug?" it is the way you said "landed". surely jordan spieth will give him a present to say sorry. "landed". surely jordan spieth will give him a present to say sorrym might bea give him a present to say sorrym might be a hat. the school summer holidays are well under way across much of the country, and while many pupils will be relaxing, the trussel trust, which runs hundreds of food banks across the uk, says thousands of children risk going hungry during the break. brea kfast‘s graham satchell is at a food bank in salisbury for us this morning. good morning. good morning. a real struggle for some families. we are at one of the now 400 food banks
6:22 am
across the country. they handed out about 11,000 tons of food last year. everything you can see here, 90% of it has been donated by the public. activity going on this morning. emergency food supplies being sorted out by trussel trust volunteers. 47% of children who were helped last summer were of children who were helped last summer were of primary school age, between the ages of five and 11. 67,000 handouts in total last summer. 67,000 handouts in total last summer. they have a spike over the summer summer. they have a spike over the summer months as families struggle. they will be put on special clubs to help them. i was talking to a single mother almost there, and this is her story. —— mother, sarah. my name is sarah and i've got a nine—year—old son and i'm a teacher's assistant.. i work 16 hours a week so it is quite a struggle. hi.
6:23 am
hello. you've a voucher? yes, please. and it's for... it is for an adult and a child. any dietary requirements? we're vegetarian, please. summer holidays i find quite a struggle because of extra costs, you know, outings, activities and going out with friends and things like that. feeding, there's three times a day. two times, extra snacks, extra activities. itjust all adds up, really. it is making that choice, isn't it? do i pay the bills, do i pay the rent, or do i pay for food? and that's what we're here for, 'cause actually we are here to help you. if you need any toiletries orfeminine hygiene, or anything like that, we have that there as well. and shampoo, yes. must look after the hair laughs. thank you. the prices are going up in the shops. the gas, electrics going up, you know, every year. the council tax‘s going up, the rent goes up. i think people can't always keep up
6:24 am
because your wage does not seem to go up as much as other things and i think people will have to look at that as well. please, don't be scared to come and see us again if you really need us, 0k. we're always here the people in a crisis. i really appreciate it. it's alright. 0k. bye. it's not just people on benefits that struggle, it's people that work that can struggle that little bit more because they get less help from the government. and we heard just before from graham satchell who was at a food bank this morning. a few technical issues with him. we will need to him later. -- talk to him. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning. when last orders were called for the final time at a derbyshire watering hole, the regulars rallied round in attempt to re—open its doors. we'll speak to the locals turned
6:25 am
shareholders who've created a community hub in their pub. they basically bought it and now they own it. we have been wondering, if you had a pub, what would you call it? we have had a few suggestions. this is lou's lounge. a nice number you're rocking there. is lou's lounge. a nice number you're rocking therelj is lou's lounge. a nice number you're rocking there. i prefer this one. where isn't it? come on. —— is it. this is going well... what is going on? what would you call it? dan's dive? i quite like walkers about. do you want a wireless fact? legitimately, you can get five
6:26 am
"ands"in legitimately, you can get five "ands" in the same sentence. george and dragon. you can say i want the same space between george and "and" and "and" and dragon. and whatever. time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm katharine carpenter. a review into the death of a baby in luton, who was murdered by his mother's partner, has found failings in the way the local authorities handled his case. noah serra—morrison was 13 months old when he died from a fractured skull. the family had moved from ealing to luton. patrol cars will have five litre
6:27 am
bottles of water to treat acid attack sufferers at the scene. cleaners, porters, and patient catering staff have gone on strike at four hospitals in london in a dispute over pay. their employer, serco, says all staff are paid the london living wage. barts nhs trust, which runs barts, whipps cross, the royal london and mile end hospitals, says it hopes both sides will negotiate. the trust says it's doing what it can to mitigate the impact on patients. it was once a scene of severe congestion, but six years after a tunnel was built under the devil's punch bowl in surrey, the former site of the a3 has been recognised as a wildlife haven. the hindhead tunnel was built to divert a stretch of the a3 under the beauty spot. now rare and diverse breeding birds have returned to the area and endangered historic heathland has been restored. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the trains, services through woking and surbiton are delayed by around half an hour.
6:28 am
a line to waterloo is still closed for track repairs. on the roads, this is thornton heath where london road is closed southbound at thornton heath pond because of an accident. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. a cloudy start this morning. it will be in and break. spells of sunshine. on the whole, warmer than yesterday. cloud to start. especially in the east. that will gradually start to disappear. sunny spells on the way. patchy cloud. light winds and it will be dry. 22. a pleasant and to the day. evening sunshine. some more cloud working in into tomorrow morning. clear spells in the meantime. a warm night as well. 15 —
6:29 am
16 for the meantime. a warm night as well. 15 — 16 forthe minimum. meantime. a warm night as well. 15 — 16 for the minimum. tomorrow morning, thickening cloud. rain is coming in from the west. that will fragment. patchy rain through the afternoon. not as warm. not as much sunshine. a maximum of 20. low pressure to the north of the uk brings fresh wind. feeling chilly in the breeze. showers around. dry weather. that continues into the weekend. changeable. showers. also spells of sunshine. and that is all for me for now. we will be back in half an hour. we will have another update from the bbc london newsroom. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. it's tuesday 25th ofjuly. we'll have the latest news and sport
6:30 am
injust a moment and coming up on breakfast today. following the decision by the parents of the terminally ill baby charlie gard to end their fight over treatment for their son, we'll discuss the decisions that families and doctors have to make involving desperately ill children. also this morning, after a stunning fightback at a packed lords, we'll be speaking to two of england's cricketers, tammy beaumont and alex hartley, about sunday's thrilling world cup final and what life is like for the new world champions. and the moon might not be made of cheese, but new research suggests there is water. we'll discuss what this means for hopes to build a base there and explore space. if you have just turned on your television, we can promise you the best panda pictures you have ever seen best panda pictures you have ever seen coming best panda pictures you have ever seen coming your best panda pictures you have ever seen coming your way later on this morning. but now a summary of this morning's main use. —— news. the parents of charlie gard say they are preparing to spend their last precious moments
6:31 am
with their terminally ill son. it comes after they ended their legal battle to take him to the united states for treatment. in a statement great ormond street hospital where charlie is on life support said they recognised the agony, desolation and bravery of their decision. charlie's father spoke outside the high court after the hearing. our son is an absolute warrior, and we could not be proud of him and we will miss him terribly. his body, had in seoul may soon be gone, but he will live on for eternity in spirit and will make a difference to people's lives for years to come, we will make sure of that —— heart and soul. builders could be banned from selling new houses as leasehold properties under proposals put forward by the government today. it comes after it emerged some housing developers have been selling the leasehold on to investment firms — without always telling homeowners, leading to extra costs or rising charges for them.
6:32 am
up to 150 people held a vigil outside a police station in east london last night in protest over the death of a young black man. some bottles and sticks were thrown at police after yesterday's vigil. no one was injured. 20—year—old rashan charles died in the early hours of saturday morning after being apprehended by police. the police watchdog, the independent police complaints commission is now investigating. uk animal welfare standards could be threatened if farmers have to compete against cheaper, less—regulated rivals from outside the eu after brexit. that's the warning from a house of lords committee. it's urging the government to insist on similar standards in any free trade agreements to avoid what it calls a race to the bottom on welfare. the president of the united states says the special relationship between the uk and the us is going to get even better. he's tweeted after american
6:33 am
officials held talks with the international trade secretary, liam fox. president trump says the us and uk are beginning a new chapter for stronger trade. vatican authorities have begun turning off around a 100 fountains in the city state, in response to a prolonged drought. the fountains in st peter's square were among the first to go dry. a vatican spokesman said the decision was an act of solidarity with the people of rome, who have water in short supply. it's the moment you've been waiting for. could this be the world's bestjob? this is a zookeeper in southwest china who has to dress up as a panda in order to play with cubs. it's because the animals are due to be released in protective wildlife. the cubs have to learn to live on their own and not rely on humans, so zookeepers pretend to be pandas when they interact with the young animals.
6:34 am
you can see the zookeeper cuddling and playing with the cubs, who seem very happy to see what appears to be an older panda. the cubs seem to be enjoying themselves greatly, but look at the size of the feet. there is a clear difference there. who does not want to be that zookeeper? it looks just lovely! what do you think would be the best job lovely! what do you think would be the bestjob in the world? your idealjob, if you could have it? let us know. good morning. iwasjust thinking what a good football mascot she or he would make. one team have a bear called vernon. carroll says she wants to be a panda cuddler,
6:35 am
pandas all over the world are celebrating. it was a great evening in the pool for great britain on day two of the world aquatics championships in hungary, as they won two gold medals. as expected, olympic champion adam peaty successfully defended his 100 metre breaststroke title, just missing out on his own world record. he now holds the top ten times in the world for this distance, finishing over a second ahead of his nearest rival. ijust i just feel like a little ijust feel like a little boy i just feel like a little boy again, going out to the crowd. we got the award record for a reason, the performance was just completely different to that swim. i was on target, but ijust missed out. gb's second gold went to commonwealth champion ben proud in the 50 metres butterfly. this isn't even his favoured event — that's the 50 metres freestyle, which he competes in at the end of the week. the gold medal was a bit of a surprise, and for no one more than proud himself! i wasn't thinking about the race at all. the thought of winning hasn't
6:36 am
been on my mind since last night. i just went in, maybe a medal would be nice, but... idon't just went in, maybe a medal would be nice, but... i don't know! he can't quite believe it. there's been criticism of the rfu's decision not to renew contracts for the england women's fifteen—a—side team. the world champions defend their title in ireland next month, but afterwards the rfu will shift focus to the sevens squad ahead of next year's commonwealth games. the rfu say several players will be offered sevens contracts. those who are involved in the 15's by those who are involved in the 15's rugby at the moment at the elite and will potentially have to look for further employment to sustain being athletes. that is where the frustrations are coming about. what's positive is that there is funding and support, it isjust what's positive is that there is funding and support, it is just not enough. there needs to be further investment, not just in enough. there needs to be further investment, notjust in rugby but in other sports as we have seen in england's cricket. england's cricket captain heather knight says their win in the world cup final could be a watershed moment for the women's game and for women's sport.
6:37 am
a sell—out crowd at lord's watched her side narrowly beat india on sunday as they secured the world cup trophy for a fourth time. there has never been a better time to play women's sport or cricket in this country. a lot of people growing up, including myself, we looked at the landscape when we were younger and didn't have a lot of role models. i think we would be very proud that a lot of young girls now can watch women's cricket. it is a great thing to strive for. manchester city have broken the world transfer record for a defender by signing monaco full back benjamin mendy for £52 million. the france international has signed a five—year deal. after the signings of kyle walker and danilo, city have spent almost £130 million on fullbacks this summer.
6:38 am
and former manchester united forward javier hernandez has signed for west ham from bayer leverkhusen for £16 million. chicarito is mexico's leading goalscorer and becomes the fourth signing at west ham this summer. six years after partially severing his arm in rally crash, robert kubica's hopes of returning to formula one will move a step closer next week when he tests a current renault car in hungary. the 32 year old pole has already done two tests in a 2012 car and claims his physical limitations don't affect his driving. the official two—day test will allow renault to compare his performance against other teams and drivers. when you think about the injuries that he sustained in that crash, arm, leg, all down one side, it is incredible that he has even come back to this point. he says having done this test, he is stronger than he thought he was. he is concerned. it must be a bit of a psychological battle with yourself. can i get back ina car? battle with yourself. can i get back in a car? do i have the control and co—ordination? he said he surprised himself that he could do it.
6:39 am
britain lays claim to world—leading animal welfare standards, but members of a lords cross—party eu committee are warning that brexit could undermine that. the concern is that once britain leaves the european union, trade deals could leave farmers competing against cheap, imported food from other countries which could see a dip in standards here. peter stevenson is from compassion in world farming, an animal welfare organisation. hejoins us now. thank you for coming along. is it a bit of scaremongering going on here? no, not at all. last friday, michael gove, agriculture minister, said that we need to improve animal welfare standards in britain. the lords report that this could be very difficult, because after brexit, our farmers could be undermined by the import of cheap meat and milk that
6:40 am
lower animal welfare standards. if that happens, farmers are going to resist animal welfare standards and ask to lower them. what sort of impact is, if we were to lower them, farmers in this country say they are compassionate and go out of their way to look after the animals. what good the impact be? it could be disastrous for our farmers and animal welfare, and for our food safety. the answer is that when we negotiate new trade agreements with the us, the eu and others, britain house to insist on the inclusion of a clause that allows it to require imports to meet our animal welfare and food safety standards. if you haven't got that, it could be a race to the bottom, which could be a disaster for to the bottom, which could be a disasterfor animal to the bottom, which could be a disaster for animal welfare and food safety. give us some examples of where standards might slip
6:41 am
differential, as you say, they are not maintained? all the talk at the moment is about a trade deal with the us. if we can't prevent lower welfare imports coming in from the us, they could flood our market with hormone fed beef, chlorine washed chicken, meat and milk from genetically engineered animals. we don't allow chicken to be washed in chlorine, for example, but you can do that in america? exactly. the reason it is washed in chlorine is to re m ove reason it is washed in chlorine is to remove the bacteria. there are very low animal welfare and hygiene standards in american slaughterhouses. how would we know that those standards were being adhered to? you are quite right, that can be a difficulty. part of any trade agreement, where you are agreeing on certain standards, part
6:42 am
of it is that uk inspectors would have a right to go into the us and check that the standards would be meeting the agreed standards. the standards in the us are much lower than our own. thank you very much, very interesting. in a statement, the government says leaving the eu provides an opportunity to develop gold standard policies on animal welfare. what's going on this morning, carol. most of us will have sunny spells which is good news if you like sunshine. we do some cloud around across eastern parts of the country. that is producing some patchy drizzle. to the west, patchy cloud. in between, some dry weather. the sun is coming up and it is a pleasa ntly warm sun is coming up and it is a pleasantly warm start to the day. temperatures that 15 celsius. down
6:43 am
the east coast, we saw cloud this morning and drizzle. breaking up throughout the day. without the keen wind of yesterday, not feeling as cold as it did, either. in the west, starting brighter. sunshine through the day. we cannot rule out a shower across south—west england or wales. they will be the exception rather than the rule. most will stay dry, with sunshine. northern ireland staying dry, highs of up to 20. in western and southern scotland, staying in the sunshine. a bit more cloud in the north—east producing showers. those will be fairly hit and miss. northwest england getting away with a fine and dry day. a bit more cloud left, but it is high. a fine day through east anglia and the midlands. heading through the evening and overnight, clear skies for a time. the cloud building all the time out towards the west,
6:44 am
heralding the arrival of a band of rain and blustery winds. not a cold night, temperatures in double figures across the board. this wind and rain is courtesy of low pressure and rain is courtesy of low pressure and eight cold front. rain rattling through quickly from west to east. the heaviest rain across northern ireland, northern england, the north—west and scotland. as it crosses the south, looking at lighter rain. the wind will be quite blustery. brightening up across northern ireland, then scotland, wales and south—west england. quite a lot of cloud in the wake of this rain across the rest of england. despite the showers, still looking at high temperatures of up to 22 degrees. that clears overnight from the south—east. low pressure still very close to the north—west. we still have a squeeze on the isobars as well. translated, it means more rain across northern ireland and
6:45 am
western scotland. breezy across the rest of the uk. in some sunshine. very few showers, highs of 220—21. a quick look at friday. a low pressure centre close to the north—west producing some rain, for much of the uk, dry. more rain waiting in the wings to swing in on saturday. builders could be banned from selling new houses as leasehold properties under proposals put forward by the government. ben is here to explain. thank you. this is to do with how builders have been selling new houses recently. also, some of the details and costs that not all buyers have known about. when you buy a property, you buy either "leasehold" or "freehold." leasehold means you rent the right
6:46 am
to use the house from the person who actuallly owns the building for a number of years, and have to pay some extra charges. a leasehold agreement is normal if you're buying a flat but they've become increasingly popular with the firms selling new build houses too. in 2010, around 3,400 new build leasehold houses were registered. but by 2016, that had more than trebled to 10,300. that's causing problems for an estimated 100,000 households. to find out why, let's speak to sebastian o'kelly from the leasehold knowledge partnership who have been campaigning on this issue. good morning. good morning. first of all, the charges that buyers could be stung with. they are very significant, devaluing the properties of around 100,000 people around the country, who are now living in houses they cannot sell. why were these charges brought in? they are common if you have a flat,
6:47 am
but they were not common for houses. for pure profit for developers and their friends, for pure profit for developers and theirfriends, investors. people are buying homes. they think they can live in them and raise a family. having a leasehold house creates asset at the rate expense that can be sold off to those offshore. —— at their own. where can people be hit with fees? there is ground rent, an annual charge on the lease. it could also be consequential if you want to make improvements. this can be a lucrative form of the leasehold game. you need consent to rent out toa game. you need consent to rent out to a tenant, you need consent if you wa nt to to a tenant, you need consent if you want to build a conservatory, change walls, put in a patio, even lay
6:48 am
carpet. this comes at a cost, leading to significant revenue streams. that doesn't necessarily go to those who built the houses, but those who package up houses and sell them to institutions. that is true. it is not reputable institutions. in fa ct, it is not reputable institutions. in fact, very few of the ground rent owners want to admit they hide behind nominee directors. many are offshore. it is a racket and it needs to stop. you can say homeowners should read the small print. is it not down to those who buy things to read the law you have to have sympathy for homebuyers in these cases. in the selling of new build property, it is incredibly slick. there is a lot of complex bureaucracy. you can get incentives
6:49 am
if you use the developers' mortgage advisers and services and valuer. in these professionals have warned people there are clauses which could devalue houses in the least. add to that the buy scheme, where taxpayers pay 20% of the mortgage to get on the property ladder, it is difficult to get out of the loop when you are in that. thank you very much for that. explaining some of that. we should say there is an eight—week consultation from the government about that. they are calling it unfair that be it applies to england only. more on that later. —— unfair. pubs throughout the uk are calling time permanently at an alarming rate, but for a few determined communities there is still hope. there are dozens of community pubs,
6:50 am
run and owned by local shareholders where they not only pull the pints but also call the shots. breakfast‘s john maguire is at the latest one in the derbyshire village of holbrook. i think he has a cow. a cow. good morning. good morning. good morning from holbrook and penny the cow. it is freezing. this pub only opened up eight days ago. they have a banner. friends in high places. it was painted by picasso. time to meet some locals. the beer and the banter is in full flow in holbrook. it was closed down two years ago and marched to be demolished and replaced with housing. —— marked. and then some
6:51 am
locals got together to save it. this was the hub of the community. this was the hub of the community. this was where people met in the village. it was a good restaurant, it was a good pub. when it closed, many people is topped going out. —— stopped. we came and looked at it when we first bought it and thought, oh my god, what have we done. it was awful. but so many people turned up and help during the weekends and week and so on. many hours went into making this happen, actually. and now it is incredible. as the project gathered pace, builders, structural engineers, and carpenters from the village, they were all getting together to help. there are now 51 community pubs across the uk, though the first one opened more than 20 yea rs the first one opened more than 20 years ago. the start—up costs for a is around £350,000. the average investment is around £1000. much of
6:52 am
the rest of the money is raised through mortgages and loans. but for those at holbrook, the survival of the pub may be desirable, but is a viable? all of those people investing. they have a vested interest in its succeeding. their rust deal some finishing touches, but there is now a cafe as well. —— ? ?macr01 but there is now a cafe as well. —— ? ? macro! the but there is now a cafe as well. —— ? ?macr01 the bovine theme is everywhere. compared to the 30 pubs closing in the uk each year, the number of these remains very small. but no community pub closed down last year. that is ruth, then, that they can survive with support. —— proof. a lot of support, especially from local people. i will say good
6:53 am
morning to some of them. you are a retired teacher. what did you do here? what did i do? oh my goodness. itook here? what did i do? oh my goodness. i took part with a vast number of volunteers with great talents and skills who worked together with us and turned it from a derelict mess into this lovely building you see now. it has been open for eight days. it was packed last night. a labour of love. definitely. when we arrived the brambles were eight feet tall. all sorts of delightful things we found. it was a case of laying waste to start with and then making it look loved, which we did. there are two other pubs in the village. you were not bereft of a pub. why was this one important? they are
6:54 am
excellent. but this is a particularly loved building. many people have been in the village for 40- 50 people have been in the village for 40— 50 years. there are many memories, many happy times, people have had here. it is a beautiful building. it has a special magic about it. people love it. you can see people enjoying themselves on the lawns. it is a wonderful place to be. the landlady. good morning. i am sure the locals will not mind me saying you are the professional here. 20 odd years of experience. why work for these guys instead february? i have to be careful what i say with them he —— brewery. it is quite scary. i am the one who knows how to do it, they say. my goodness. but using skills you forgot you even had to get it up and running is
6:55 am
fabulous and a wonderful experience. it has been great ever since it opened. it has been wonderful. lovely. thanks a lot. a lot more from the pub later on. we are just drinking coffee this morning. just coffee. honestly. it didn't look like that when you open the door the wrong way. but it is early. interesting. absolutely brilliant. and this morning we're asking you what you'd call your local if you took over running it. we've come up with a few ideas for ourselves. i am not sure if this is your suggestion. we've got lou's lounge. minsch inn. and dan's dive. that doesn't look inviting. to why have they neck? it has disappeared.
6:56 am
—— doi have they neck? it has disappeared. —— do i have a. have they neck? it has disappeared. -- do i have a. we don't serve milk at this one. no children allowed. various suggestions that i cannot mention. the chemist. the swagger inn and swagger out. the white horse. that's boring. pub names. join in. now for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are watching this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm katharine carpenter. a review into the death of a baby in luton, who was murdered by his mother's partner, has found failings in the way the local authorities handled his case.
6:57 am
noah serra—morrison was 13 months old when he died from a fractured skull. the family had moved from ealing to luton and the serious case review calls on councils to do more to share information about children at risk. two men have beenjailed for a total of 18 years for stabbing a moped rider and stealing his bike in south london. john tusting and lucian riviere were on the back of a scooter when they knocked the victim to the ground, knifed him in the chest and took his moped. cleaners, porters, and patient catering staff have gone on strike at four hospitals in london in a dispute over pay. their employer, serco, says all staff are paid the london living wage. barts nhs trust, which runs hospitals including barts, whipps cross and the royal london says it hopes both sides will negotiate. the trust says it's doing what it can to mitigate the impact on patients. it was once a scene of severe congestion, but six years after a tunnel was built under the devil's punch bowl in surrey, the former site of the a3 has been recognised as a wildlife haven. the hindhead tunnel was built
6:58 am
to divert a stretch of the a3 under the beauty spot. now rare and diverse breeding birds have returned to the area and endangered historic heathland has been restored. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning on the trains, services through woking and surbiton are delayed by around half an hour. a line to waterloo is still closed for track repairs. on the roads, this is thornton heath, where london road is closed southbound at thornton heath pond because of an accident. and in west norwood, vale street remains closed by the police following an unlicenced music event last night. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. a cloudy start this morning. it will thin and break. spells of sunshine. on the whole, warmer than yesterday. cloud to start.
6:59 am
especially in the east. that will gradually start to disappear. sunny spells on the way. patchy cloud. light winds and it will be dry. 22. a pleasant and to the day. evening sunshine. some more cloud working in into tomorrow morning. clear spells in the meantime. quite a warm night as well. 15—16 for the minimum. tomorrow morning, thickening cloud. rain is coming in from the west. that will fragment. patchy rain through the afternoon. not as warm. not as much sunshine. a maximum of 20. low pressure to the north of the uk brings fresh wind. feeling chilly in the breeze. showers around. dry weather. that continues into the weekend. changeable. showers. also spells of sunshine. and that is all for me for now. we will be back in half an hour. we will have another update from the bbc london newsroom. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast
7:00 am
with louise minchin and dan walker. charlie gard's parents say they will spend their last precious moments with their son after ending their legal fight. they've released this new picture of charlie — great ormond street hospital has praised the bravery of their decision. good morning, it's tuesday 25th july. also this morning, a clampdown on leasehold charges — ben can tell us more. there's been a sharp rise in new houses being sold leasehold rather than freehold, and it could cost homeowners thousands of pounds in hidden costs. the government says it must end. i'll have the details. a vigil has been held in protest at the death of a 20 year old man who died after a police chase in east london.
7:01 am
in sport, it's gold in the pool for adam peaty at the world aquatics championships as he successfully defends his 100 metre breaststroke title. welcome to the spotted how, the 51st community pub in the uk. it is run and owned by local people. —— cow. we are looking for the names of pubs this morning, i bet if carol had won, it would be called the isobars. just a few showers across western wales in south—west england later, but otherwise, mostly sunny —— ice above the mac isobar. sorry about
7:02 am
that terrible joke, carol. good morning. first, our main story. charlie gard's parents say they are preparing to spend their last precious moments with their terminally ill son. it comes after they ended their legal battle to take him to the united states for treatment. in a statement great ormond street hospital where charlie is on life support said they recognised the agony, desolation and bravery of their decision. caroline rigby reports. this photograph of charlie gard was released by his parents last nightjust hours after they accepted their fight is over. they're desperately ill baby boy should be allowed to die. yesterday, they agreed to end their legal battle descent into the us for experimental treatment. our son was an absolute warrior, and we could not be prouder of him and we will miss him terribly. his body, heart and soul may soon be gone, but his spirit will live on for eternity, and he will make a difference to people's lives for years to come, we will make sure of that. charlie has been in intensive care since october. he has a rare, inherited condition
7:03 am
that means he cannot move, feed or breathe unaided. charlie ‘s parents wanted to send him to america for treatment, but by his ruled that treatment was futile. the case came back to court when this american urologist claimed the evidence that his experimental therapy could help. a whole lot of time has been wasted. we are now injuly, and our poor boy has been left to just lie in hospitalfor months. great ormond street street insists earlier treatment would not have saved him. the hospital has praised the courage of his parents, saying the agony, and desolation and bravery of their decision has humbled all who worked there. his parents will now spend charlie's last few days by his side. up to 150 people held a vigil outside a police station —— builders could be banned
7:04 am
from selling leaseholds on new homes in england under plans put forward by the government today. ben is here to explain more. what should we be looking at? we are —— traditionally relate leases to renting, however, nowa —— traditionally relate leases to renting, however, now a new builders are selling them with houses. it may seem are selling them with houses. it may seem like a semantic change, but it could mean that homeowners are liable for thousands of pounds of extra costs. they will not only have to pay rent on at least every year, but if they want to make any changes to the home, extended, but on a kitchen or similar, they have to ask for the permission from the person who owns the lease. lastly, if they
7:05 am
wa nt to who owns the lease. lastly, if they want to extend that lease, it could, and a significant cost. they are saying, we need to read the small print. make sure you know whether your house is being brought under a lease or not. it is not fair that these houses are potentially being sold with a leasehold. the government says it will consult on that for homes within england. and after 8 we'll be speaking live to the communities minister sajid javid. up to 150 people held a vigil outside a police station in east london last night in protest over the death of a young black man. there has been anger in the local community following the death of 20—year—old rashan charles in the early hours of saturday morning. people threw bottles and sticks at police after the vigil, but no officers were injured. keith doyle reports. what do we want? justice! the anger and frustration was visible on the streets of hackney following
7:06 am
the death of 20—year—old rashan charles. he died after being apprehended by police on saturday. a vigil was held outside stoke newington police station last night. during that, rashan charles‘s father called for justice. we ask forjustice on this. basically, i want everybody to understand what happened, this is a peaceful protest. after the vigil, protesters blocked with bins and bags of rubbish. it was relatively peaceful until the police moved in to end the protest. then some of the crowd threw bottles, cans and bricks. it is 2:20 am and the police have finally moved in to clear this road that has been blocked for the last seven hours. a lot of local people are shouting things out, there is clearly a lot of anger here.
7:07 am
but by all accounts, this has been a reasonably peaceful process. the police say rashan charles was seen swallowing something when apprehended, but a campaigning group says it is enormously concerned and angered by his death. the police watchdog, the independent police complaints commission, is now investigating. uk animal welfare standards could be threatened if farmers have to compete against cheaper, less—regulated rivals from outside the eu after brexit. that's the warning from a house of lords committee. it's urging the government to insist on similar standards in any free trade agreements to avoid what it calls a race to the bottom on welfare. the president of the united states says the special relationship between the uk and the us is going to get even better. donald trump described talks between american officials and the international trade secretary, liam fox, as the start of a new chapter of stronger ties. a row has broken out over rail
7:08 am
investment after the government said it would work with the mayor of london to progress plans for crossrail 2. it comes after recent announcements cancelling rail electrification schemes in wales and the north of england. we're joined from westminster by our political correspondent chris mason. i will ask you to explain why you don't have a jacket a bit later on, but first, the more important news. it isa but first, the more important news. it is a question of rail investment and where we are spending taxpayer's money. chris grayling said yesterday that he is pretty keen on the idea of crossrail two, the rail line between surrey and hertfordshire. it would not be built for quite a long time. and there are questions about where the money will come from. the other day, there was an announcement of the cancellation of some electrification projects in south wales between cardiff and swansea.
7:09 am
they are upgrading the rail lines between newcastle and northmead. those standing up for the north of england are not exactly chuffed. what we need a substantially better rail services than the ones we've got. trains old, tired, packed out. they are frequently late. the system is creaking. when you go to london, you see the public transport system. for every £1 that the government gives to the north of england, london gets six. as a result of this decision today, that gap will get even bigger. it is quite frankly outrageous. so, a lot of noise coming out of their. that is a pneumatic drill that pulled up behind mejust as i decided to talk to you! impeccable timing. and what
7:10 am
about the jacket? i was wearing a jacket at six o'clock this morning, not at seven. i could see a big staying in a very prominent position, and i thought, you know what, i just position, and i thought, you know what, ijust don't position, and i thought, you know what, i just don't think position, and i thought, you know what, ijust don't think i can wear it. it is going to be a nightmare for a it. it is going to be a nightmare fora dry it. it is going to be a nightmare for a dry cleaner. ifear my it. it is going to be a nightmare for a dry cleaner. i fear myjacket isa for a dry cleaner. i fear myjacket is a goner. it is not particularly warm enough to be going without a jacket, either. you could fashion yourself one. vatican authorities have begun turning off around a 100 fountains in the city state, in response to a prolonged drought. the fountains in st peter's square were among the first to go dry. a vatican spokesman said the decision was an act of solidarity with the people of rome, who have water in short supply. could this be the world's bestjob?
7:11 am
this is a zookeeper in southwest china who has to dress up as a panda in order to play with cubs. it's because the animals are due to be released into protective wildlife. the cubs have to learn to live on their own and not rely on humans, so zookeepers pretend to be pandas when they interact with the young animals. i have my doubts about this because iimagine the i have my doubts about this because i imagine the animals probably know that it would be a human, rather than a panda inside there. but they seem than a panda inside there. but they seem to be really happy. what a wonderfuljob. in time to have a look at the panda mascot. look at that. quite similar, really. always had his sights on being crowned scotland's top mascot. there are a
7:12 am
lot of great candidates, paisley panda is just one of them. they used a piece of toilet roll for the shirt, that was deemed unacceptable. paisley panda, very interesting. the parents of charlie gard have ended their legalfight over his treatment and have accepted it is time to allow him to pass away peacefully. but the case has highlighted the awful dilemma faced by the parents of terminally ill children — when to stop fighting. yesterday, chris gard paid tribute to his warrior son. our son is an absolute
7:13 am
warrior, and we could not be prouder of him and we will miss him terribly. his body, heart and soul may soon be gone, but his spirit will live on for eternity, and he will make a difference to people's lives for years to come, we will make sure of that. we are now going to spend our last precious moments with our son, charlie, who unfortunately won't make his first birthday in just under two weeks' time. we would ask that our privacy is respected at this very difficult time. to charlie, we say, mommy and daddy, we love you so much. we always have and we always will, and we are so sorry that we couldn't save you. the
7:14 am
pa rents of that we couldn't save you. the parents of charlie gard have released a new photo of their son, which has made the front page of many of the papers. charlie's case has drawn support far and wide, including from the president of the united states and the pope. but it has also raised questions about the relationship between doctors, parents, their children and the courts. iain brassington is a senior lecturer in medical ethics at the university of manchester and hejoins us now. throughout the court battle, we have seen throughout the court battle, we have seen this issue highlighted. there are difficult decisions to be made all the time in hospitals. it is not often it gets to this. how is it prevented and how can we stop it getting to these... they have spent months in court talking this? getting to these... they have spent months in court talking thi57m getting to these... they have spent months in court talking this? it is very tricky, because inevitably there will be a case that throws up issues that are just tired. it has been suggested in the last 24 hours
7:15 am
that there might be ways of mediation. for myself, i am that there might be ways of mediation. for myself, iam not quite persuaded by those arguments. a lot of the time, i can see how case like this, there may have been problems with communication and mediation may have helped smooth discussions. but there will always be cases where the parents are insistent that one thing happens, and the doctors are insistent that something else happens. it is not mediation, it isjust something else happens. it is not mediation, it is just a something else happens. it is not mediation, it isjust a case something else happens. it is not mediation, it is just a case of medicalfact. there is an mediation, it is just a case of medical fact. there is an answer to be found, that is where the judges have to come in. even if there were to be some kind of mediation, i suspect it would have to be negotiated by the court. and, a new medical expert could come in and say, what about this therapy, this experimental technique? say, what about this therapy, this experimentaltechnique? it say, what about this therapy, this experimental technique? it must be so experimental technique? it must be so difficult for a judge to try and work out whether there is any need all reason to say, we can
7:16 am
it was suggested there was up to a 10% chance it would work. the question that has to be asked is, is 10% enough? shouldn't be 5%? 20%? —— should it be. when it is a child, it is very emotional. but maybe this is not a game worth playing any more. the chance was so low. it was his pa rents the chance was so low. it was his parents that have stopped this action because of his scans. his father on the steps of the court talked about time and the time it has taken for this whole court process to go along. he is saying that may have impacted on the medical condition. can anything be done about timescale? it will be one of those difficult questions. there
7:17 am
will always have to be time to digest the evidence. that will take time. you cannot rush it. in the gard case, in april, thejudge made a ruling treatment should be withdrawn. then it was subsequently suggested this treatment might help. then you have to start again. you need time to get the experts in. that takes time. but then you get this rather unpleasant drawing out of the process. one of the things thejudge said was of the process. one of the things the judge said was pointing of the process. one of the things thejudge said was pointing out of the process. one of the things the judge said was pointing out the fa ct the judge said was pointing out the fact his parents could not get legal aid. how much will that be part of the discussion going forward? aid. how much will that be part of the discussion going forward7m might be. it was tucked away towards the end. some of it was powerful. thejudge said his the end. some of it was powerful. the judge said his family had the end. some of it was powerful. thejudge said his family had public support. but, there are other families in similar positions who could never take that kind of
7:18 am
action. the comments of the judge could never take that kind of action. the comments of thejudge in his ruling... it is only a couple of sentences, but i think it is powerful. that might be one of the more important things coming out of the case. thejudge more important things coming out of the case. the judge looking at things as they stand not doing what was intended. so difficult. thank you. £1.3 million is being raised to find his treatment. —— fund. his pa rents find his treatment. —— fund. his parents have said the money will be used to start a foundation in his name. thank you very much. the weather. carol is name. thank you very much. the weather. carol is with name. thank you very much. the weather. carol is with us. name. thank you very much. the weather. carol is with us. good morning. good morning. cloud around this morning. sunny spells later on. the clouds in the at the moment. this is where it is at its biggest. producing drizzle. low cloud in northern
7:19 am
ireland. most will break. sunshine coming through. we will have it down the east coast. the exception of northern ireland, it is bright and sunny. northern ireland willjoin in the next few hours as the cloud melts away. western scotland, sunshine. cloud. a few showers. northern england. fair weather cloud to be yorkshire, lincolnshire, east anglia. heading south. back into the sunshine. temperatures picking up. the east coast will not be as cool because the wind is not as strong. wales, dry and sunny. however, you cannot escape showers completely. they will be isolated. northern ireland. breaking low cloud back into the sunshine. 20 degrees, possibly more in belfast. overnight,
7:20 am
a lot of dry weather. out towards the west, building cloud. that brings this next band of rain accompanied by blustery winds. it will not be cold. temperatures in towns and cities staying at double figures. you can tell from the squeezing isobars that it will be fairly windy. that will push this wind and rain around from west to east quickly. the heaviest will be in northern ireland, scotland, and northern england, especially the north—west of england. more light towards the rest of england and wales. brightening up initially as it goes away. you can see behind that cloud in central and eastern england, one or two showers. the highest temperatures at 22. that eventually pulls away onto the near continent. the centre of low pressure is very close to the north—west of the uk. squeezing isobars. western
7:21 am
north—west of the uk. squeezing isoba rs. western scotland north—west of the uk. squeezing isobars. western scotland and northern ireland on thursday, another wet and blustery day. moving away from that, just a few showers ahead of that. and then the rain gets in the eastern scotland. for most, remaining dry with highs of 21. 21 in the sunshine and a gentle breeze, it will feel pleasant for the time of year. absolutely. thank you. quite pleasant. see you later on. the school summer holidays are well under way across much of the country, and while many pupils will be relaxing, the trussel trust, which runs hundreds of food banks across the uk, says thousands of children risk going hungry during the break. brea kfast‘s graham satchell is at a food bank in salisbury for us this morning. we can go there now to see some of the food. good morning. good morning. yeah. there are 400 food banks like this around the country. they handed out 11,000 tons of food. 90% of what you can see is donated either public. a little bit of
7:22 am
activity. lucy and james willing emergency boxes. it is a tricky month, summer, as school holidays are in. 47% of the children receiving food handouts were of primary school age, 5— 11. 67,000 handouts in total last summer. they have a spike over the summer months as families struggle. they will be put on special clubs to help them. i was talking to a single mother, sarah, and this is her story. my name is sarah and i've got a nine—year—old son and i'm a teacher's assistant.. i work 16 hours a week so it is quite a struggle. hi. hello. you've a voucher? yes, please. and it's for... it is for an adult and a child. any dietary requirements? we're vegetarian, please. summer holidays i find quite
7:23 am
a struggle because of extra costs, you know, outings, activities and going out with friends and things like that. feeding, there's three times a day. two times, extra snacks, extra activities. itjust all adds up, really. it is making that choice, isn't it? do i pay the bills, do i pay the rent, or do i pay for food? and that's what we're here for, 'cause actually we're here to help you. if you need any toiletries orfeminine hygiene, or anything like that, we have that there as well. and shampoo, yes. must look after the hair. laughs. thank you. the prices are going up in the shops. the gas, electrics going up, you know, every year. the council tax's going up, the rent goes up. i think people can't always keep up because your wage does not seem to go up as much as other things and i think people will have to look at that as well. please, don't be scared to come and see us again if you really need us, 0k.
7:24 am
we're always here the people in a crisis. i really appreciate it. it's alright. 0k. bye. it's not just people on benefits that struggle, it's people that work that can struggle that little bit more because they get less help from the government. i would like to say thank you very much to sarah. it is not the easiest thing to talk about. families to face extra pressure over the summer period. they do. over the term they have free school meals. once the holidays come in, financial pressures ca n holidays come in, financial pressures can kick in. it can be an extra 30— £40 per week. we like to offer support as much as we can do feel that gap to bite that is enough to push some people over the edge. it is. —— gap. it can cause a crisis
7:25 am
in the family. you are hosting playgroups. yes. we have them across the country. we usually work with families referred from schools and children's centres. we aim to be there for people that do need the support. sometimes we open at wider if we can. but the whole idea is to break that social isolation and support them during that time. thank you. the government said the best way out of poverty is employment. the truth is that there will be thousands of families this year relying on the banks to get them through the summer. that is it for now is in salisbury. —— in. through the summer. that is it for now is in salisbury. -- in. thank you. it is difficult to talk about. you are watching breakfast. we are
7:26 am
talking about the art of craft. a new series that is giving people the handy tips to recreate the latest trends at home themselves. last night the bbc breakfast team asked if you have ever made anything? it took me 4000 years, but i made this kitchen board. that is very good tip you look at that! this is a car but i made with panels fashioned from chinese fabric to match the curtains. —— cupboard. it does not look like it, but it took me a long time. it looks better than seeing everything in it. impressive. ten out of ten for that. time to get the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are watching this morning. we will be back with the headlines soon. good morning from bbc london news.
7:27 am
i'm katharine carpenter. a review into the death of a baby in luton, who was murdered by his mother's partner, has found failings in the way the local authorities handled his case. noah serra—morrison was 13 months old when he died from a fractured skull. the family had moved from ealing to luton and the serious case review calls on councils to do more to share information about children at risk. it also highlights a high turnover of staff and poor management in luton. two men have beenjailed for a total of 18 years for stabbing a moped rider and stealing his bike in south london. john tusting and lucian riviere were on the back of a scooter when they knocked the victim to the ground, knifed him in the chest and took his moped. cleaners, porters, and patient catering staff have gone on strike at four hospitals in london in a dispute over pay. their employer, serco, says all staff are paid the london living wage. barts nhs trust, which runs hospitals including barts, whipps cross and the royal london says it hopes both sides will negotiate.
7:28 am
the trust says it's doing what it can to mitigate the impact on patients. it was once a scene of severe congestion, but six years after a tunnel was built under the devil's punch bowl in surrey, the former site of the a3 has been recognised as a wildlife haven. the hindhead tunnel was built to divert a stretch of the a3 under the beauty spot. now rare and diverse breeding birds have returned to the area and endangered historic heathland has been restored. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads, this is thornton heath, where london road is closed southbound at thornton heath pond because of an accident. and in west norwood, vale street remains closed by the police following an unlicenced music event last night. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. well, we may have a bit of a cloudy start this morning.
7:29 am
the cloud will thin and break. spells of sunshine. on the whole, warmer than yesterday. cloudy to start, especially in the east. that will gradually start to disappear. sunny spells on the way. perhaps a little bit of patchy cloud. light winds and it will be dry. the temperaturs will reach 22 degrees. a pleasant end to the day. evening sunshine. some more cloud working in to tomorrow morning. clear spells in the meantime. quite a warm night as well. 15—16 celsius for the minimum. tomorrow morning, thickening cloud. tomorrow morning, thickening cloud, rain coming in from the west. that will fragment. we will get patchy rain through the afternoon. not feeling quite as warm. not as much sunshine. a maximum of 20. feeling chilly in the breeze.
7:30 am
showers around. dry weather. that continues into the weekend. changeable. some showers. also spells of sunshine. and that is all for me for now. we will be back in half an hour. hello this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. more on our main story. the parents of charlie gard say they are preparing to spend their last precious moments with their son. it comes after they ended their legal battle to take him to the united states for treatment. in a statement, great ormond street hospital, where charlie is on life support, said they recognised the agony, desolation and bravery of their decision. charlie's father spoke outside the high court after the hearing. builders could be banned from selling new houses as leasehold properties under proposals put forward by the government today. it comes after it emerged some housing developers have been selling the leasehold on to investment firms without always telling homeowners, leading to extra costs or rising charges for them.
7:31 am
up to 150 people held a vigil outside a police station in east london last night in protest over the death of a young black man. there has been anger in the local community following the death of 20—year—old rashan charles in the early hours of saturday morning. a small number of people threw bottles and sticks at police after the vigil, but no officers were injured. uk animal welfare standards could be threatened if farmers have to compete against cheaper, less—regulated rivals from outside the eu after brexit. that's the warning from a house of lords committee. it's urging the government to insist on similar standards in any free trade agreements to avoid what it calls a race to the bottom on welfare. hundreds of firefighters in the south of france and corsica are battling huge forest fires which have been fanned by high temperatures and strong winds.
7:32 am
a blaze has swept through 1,600 acres of the luberon national park in provence, while people have been moved to safety from a town in north eastern corsica. that hot weather is causing problems in various countries. vatican authorities have begun turning off around a 100 fountains in the city state, in response to a prolonged drought. the fountains in st peter's square were among the first to go dry. a vatican spokesman said the decision was an act of solidarity with the people of rome, who have water in short supply. carol will be bringing of the weather in about ten minutes. but for now, we have been talking about what we would call a pub if we had won. louise has got the minch in. karel has got isobar. what about the sally pally? we could take it up
7:33 am
to sally palace, make it even fancier. it was a great evening in the pool for great britain on day two of the world aquatics championships in hungary, as they won two gold medals. as expected, olympic champion adam peaty successfully defended his 100 metre breaststroke title, just missing out on his own world record. he now holds the top ten times in the world for this distance, finishing over a second ahead of his nearest rival. i just feel like a little boy again, going out to the crowd. we got the world record for a reason, the performance at the olympics was just completely different to that swim. i was on target, but ijust missed out. gb's second gold went to commonwealth champion ben proud in the 50 metres butterfly.
7:34 am
this isn't even his favoured event — that's the 50 metres freestyle, which he competes in at the end of the week. the gold medal was a bit of a surprise, and for no one more than proud himself! i wasn't thinking about the race at all. the thought of winning hasn't been on my mind since last night. ijust went in, maybe a medal would be nice, but... i don't know! he can't quite believe it. there's been criticism of the rfu's decision not to renew contracts for the england women's 15—a—side team. the world champions defend their title in ireland next month, but afterwards the rfu will shift focus to the sevens squad ahead of next year's commonwealth games. the rfu say several players will be offered sevens contracts. those who are involved in the 15's rugby at the moment at the elite end will potentially have to look for further employment to sustain being athletes. that is where the frustrations are coming about. what's positive is that there is funding and support, it is just not enough. there needs to be further investment, notjust in rugby
7:35 am
but in other sports as we have seen in england's cricket. england's cricket captain heather knight says their win in the world cup final could be a watershed moment for the women's game and for women's sport. a sell—out crowd at lord's watched her side narrowly beat india on sunday as they secured the world cup trophy for a fourth time. there has never been a better time to play women's sport or cricket in this country. a lot of people growing up, including myself, we looked at the landscape when we were younger and didn't have a lot of role models. i think we would be very proud that a lot of young girls now can watch women's cricket. it is a great thing to strive for. manchester city have broken the world transfer record for a defender by signing monaco full back benjamin mendy for £52 million. the france international has signed a five—year deal. after the signings of kyle walker and danilo, city have spent almost £130 million on fullbacks this summer. six years after partially
7:36 am
severing his arm in rally crash, robert kubica's hopes of returning to formula one will move a step closer next week when he tests a current renault car in hungary. the 32 year old pole has already done two tests in a 2012 car and claims his physical limitations don't affect his driving. the official two—day test will allow renault to compare his performance against other teams and drivers. he will be driving the 2017 car, which will be faster and more challenging. he is very worried about whether he would have the same power, co—ordination and control, but i think he surprised himself. are we talking about something else now? millions of pounds are to be invested in order to develop new antibiotics that
7:37 am
can tackle superbugs, in an effort to stem the global danger of drug resistant bacteria. £13.5 million will be shared between research bodies in six countries, as part of a five—year project. projects in the uk, india, ireland, france, switzerland and the us will receive the funds. currently, 700,000 people die worldwide each year because of drug—resista nt infections. but there are warnings this could rise to 10 million by 2050. if antibiotics lose their effectiveness, then key medical procedures — including stomach surgery, caesarean sections, joint replacements and chemotherapy — could become too dangerous to perform. we're joined now by tim jinks, head of drug—resistant infections at the wellcome trust. queue forjoining us. —— thank you. why do we need this new research? we need it because we need to fill the
7:38 am
pipeline of drugs in development, as we are losing the fact of drugs. this is the problem with resistance as it occurs, it is that resistance is causing us to lose the utility of the current drugs that we have. so we need to build up the pipeline with drugs that are affected. what bacteria are we most risk from? the ones that are the most threatening at the moment are the ones we refer to as grand negative bacteria, for example, e. coli. they cause serious and life—threatening illnesses. they have generated resistance and we have generated resistance and we have fewer treatment options in development today. why do you think we have waited so long to develop new antibiotics? have we thought that the drugs that we have would
7:39 am
have been able to deal with all the issues we have today? that is a very good question. there are a couple of problems that have really got us to where we are. first of all, the natural phenomenon of resistance is a lwa ys natural phenomenon of resistance is always going to occur. historically, we have been able to invent our way out of this problem. as it stands today, the business case that supports private industry has become much less favourable. industry has backed away from investing in this space. at the same time, resistance continues to grow. the two together are creating something that could turn into a perfect storm, we could have significant failure in our ability to treat these infections. 10 million predicted by 2050. when can we expect new antibiotics to become available? how long will we
7:40 am
become available? how long will we be waiting? the ones we are looking at today that the initiative is investing in is probably going to be about ten years before it is fully licensed and can be made available to patients on a broad scale. it ta kes a to patients on a broad scale. it takes a lot of time to develop the candidates and take them through the necessary safety studies that have to be done before they can be made available. it is a long process and thatis available. it is a long process and that is why we need to move with urgency to press for now. if it is such a serious problem, why haven't we been treating this before?m such a serious problem, why haven't we been treating this before? it is not that there hasn't been an effort to do this, but it is something we have been aware of in the community for a very long time. actually, we need to change how we approach the issue and how we deployed the activities to get it done. that is why organisations such as the
7:41 am
wellcome trust and our partners in the us are pushing incentives and not relying on the industry alone to move things forward. thank you so much for your time this morning. coming up on the programme today, the parents of charlie gard today say they have decided to let their son go after their legal fight to ta ke son go after their legal fight to take him abroad for treatment. the government is planning to ban builders from selling leaseholds on new homes to protect buyers from long—term financial abuse. and on that subject, we will be talking to the communities secretary in about half an hour. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. 21 degrees in dorset would be lovely. most of the cloud breaking
7:42 am
up lovely. most of the cloud breaking up this morning, most of us will see sunny spells. those of us have cloud down the east coast of the country, thatis down the east coast of the country, that is where it is producing some patchy drizzle. patchy cloud across northern ireland lifting, all areas will have sunshine through the course of the afternoon. that doesn't mean it is going to be own dry. waddle to showers around, you're more likely see them to the north of the central belt. most of scotland, dry with sunshine away from the north—east. northern england has sunny spell through the afternoon. cloud knotting away. in the east coast, we have lost a brisk wind. not feeling as cold. east anglia and the midlands, a lot of dry weather. in south—west england and wales, looking at a sunny afternoon. here, there is the risk ofa afternoon. here, there is the risk of a shower. fairly isolated, most of a shower. fairly isolated, most of us missing them. it could be unlucky to catch one. in northern
7:43 am
ireland, a sunny afternoon with highs of 20. in the west, cloud building. rain arriving, accompanied by blustery winds. it is not dissimilar to what we have the moment. 14— 15. rain is coming in courtesy of this weather front attached to low pressure. looking at those isobars tells me it is going to be quite windy. rain coming in from the west, rattling towards the east. heaviest across northern ireland, scotland and northern england. lighter as it moves across southern areas. it will clear, except for the of scotland. writing up except for the of scotland. writing up from the west behind it with some sunshine and a few showers. you can see, for the bulk of england, we are looking at quite a bit of cloud tomorrow. a 21— 22. through the evening and overnight, losing that
7:44 am
front, south—east. low pressure moving ever closer to us. you can see the isobars squeezed together. for west of scotland, northern ireland, rain coming in. spreading over to eastern scotland. northern england seeing cloud and a few showers. for the rest of england and wales, a pretty fine day. in the sunshine, eyes up to 21. that will feel quite nice. on friday, here is the centre of low pressure bringing in some rain across northern scotland. for the rest of us, bright spells, sunshine and showers. and breezy. that would be lovely. your money won't go as far when you're travelling in europe this summer. ben's got more on making the most of your cash. don't blame. i always have to give the bad news. we will give you top
7:45 am
tips to negate it. yes, morning. it's pretty bad news if you're off on holiday to france or spain and haven't bought your euros yet. you can see from this graph how the value of the pound against the euro has been on overall downwards trend for the last few months, probably as many people were planning and booking their holidays. it isa it is a bit depressing. towards the end of last week it hit the lowest rate for around eight months, which had a big effect on the exchange rates on offer. at cardiff airport travellers were getting just 88 euro cents for a pound. so, what can you do to make your holiday money go a bit further? pippa jacks is from travel trade gazette. good morning. we have to deal with it somehow. what can we do to make what money we have go further? the first thing is preparing to go away. how can you get a better deal? don't turn up at the airport and exchange at the airport because rates will be as bad as possible. do it on line before you go. you can do it at a
7:46 am
supermarket or a train station. those rates can be good. even if you do it at the airport, order them 24 hours beforehand. that way you get a better rate. some of those rates are pretty atrocious. they are. as long as we keep paying them, you know, they will keep offering them. people still do it. they are cashing in on the fact people have not prepared to go. many people are using prepaid credit cards. they are great to budget. you can fly to japan with £1000 and know what you asked bending. they are safe. if you lose it, if it is stolen, you can get it back. watch out for hidden charges on them as well to initiate the card, to withdraw the maximum fee. those are the things people get a
7:47 am
nasty surprise about. they get cash out from the atm. they find they charge. can you avoid it? if you are going on holiday regularly, it might be worth getting a specialist credit card, like halifax who do them. that way you do not pay pounds every time you withdraw ten quid, pay for a coffee. over a week or two, that can add up. we will talk about the thing that we have discussed before on this programme. you get to the checkout, you pay for the restaurant bill. they ask you whether you want to pay in euros or pounds. always the local currency. you rose. it is easy to panic and say surely pounds are better. —— euros. but the rate they give you is likely terrible.
7:48 am
chances are after a bottle of wine you will not know the exchange rate a nyway you will not know the exchange rate anyway that be thank you so much for that. —— anyway. always choose the local currency. very good advice. pubs! we have been talking about them all this morning. pubs throughout the uk are calling time permanently at an alarming rate, but for a few determined communities there is still hope. there are dozens of community pubs, run and owned by local shareholders where they not only pull the pints but also call the shots. breakfast‘s john maguire is at the latest one in the derbyshire village of holbrook. it is lovely there this morning. it is lovely there this morningm looks really lovely. good morning. where are you? good morning. you will see me in a second. it is a beautiful view for the people of holbrook looking out over the
7:49 am
derbyshire countryside. they have reopened one of the local pubs in the village. it is called spotted cow. have a look inside. the beer and the banter is in full flow in holbrook. it was closed down two years ago and marked to be demolished and replaced with housing. and then some locals got together to save it. this was the hub of the community. this was where people met in the village. it was a good restaurant, it was a good pub. when it closed, many people stopped going out. we came and looked at it when we first bought it and thought, oh my god, what have we done. it was awful. but so many people turned up and help during the weekends and week and so on. many hours went into making this happen, actually. and now it is incredible. as the project gathered pace, builders, structural engineers,
7:50 am
and carpenters from the village, they were all getting together to help. there are now 51 community pubs across the uk, though the first one opened more than 20 years ago. the start—up costs for a is around £350,000. the average investment is around £1000. much of the rest of the money is raised through mortgages and loans. but for those at holbrook, the survival of the pub may be desirable, but is it viable? with 250 people investing, have a vested interest in its succeeding. there are still some finishing touches, but there is now a cafe as well. or a "cowfay" as they call it. the bovine theme is everywhere.
7:51 am
compared to the 30 pubs closing in the uk each year, the number of these remains very small. but no community pub closed down last year. that is proof, then, that they can survive with support. when you think of a community pub, it is not just when you think of a community pub, it is notjust a community hall and a couple of kegs. they are even doing bnb rooms and food. this is one of the builders. so much of this was your responsibility. how big a task was it? it is a big task. if you have the right guys, it is easier. and volunteers? many. a lot of work went into it. it is good to see. what does it mean to have this pub back up and running and very
7:52 am
busy as we have seen in the last 24 hours? it is great, it is brilliant, yeah. thank you. these are some of the shareholders we have been talking to this morning that the good morning. how are you? you have spent enough time in the pub over the last couple of months, haven't you? you the last couple of months, haven't you ? you put the last couple of months, haven't you? you put your money where your mouth was. i think the number of hours we have put in has been amazing. we did not have the money to do it any other way. eight days. it has been busy here. we talked to steph in the film about it. can it survive? yes. so many of the locals have said they are pleased it is back. i have been here for decades. i have never seen community spirit
7:53 am
like it. people are coming from miles away as well to see what it is like and to say how lovely they think the inside is and how the little areas were together and stuff. we a re little areas were together and stuff. we are pleased with it. you have to make some questions for the benches. —— cushions. these are the te na nts. benches. —— cushions. these are the tenants. what is your surname? brew. 0f tenants. what is your surname? brew. of course it is. you are the professionals. decades of experience. how is it for you? we knew it would be busy, but we have been overwhelmed by the support for the community and from the community. people have said the pub feels loved now. because so many people have invested in it and will use it, i love it. it is amazing. people talk about the pub as the
7:54 am
hub. some people are idealistic. but you know better than most it is a business. how important is it for it to survive? it has brought people together the blue very much so. it will be an integral part of the village. —— together. it will help support other pubs in the area as well. it will bring people to the village to see that it is a beautiful village. one with three pubs. thanks. i know you have been discussing names for pubs. some suggestions. i want to hear them. 0k. suggestions. i want to hear them. ok. for dan, an antipodean themed
7:55 am
bar, walker about, heard that one? for louise, just pepping bar, walker about, heard that one? for louise, just popping down to the minsch for a drink. i love the audience are laughing. they had not heard of before. this is all new material. it looks like a lovely pub. thank you very much. material. it looks like a lovely pub. thank you very muchlj material. it looks like a lovely pub. thank you very much. i think he is enjoying himself this morning. what would you call it? thank you for your suggestions. thirsty walker. and the leg of mutton and cauliflower. the gym. then you could legitimately say you are going to the or the l legitimately say you are going to the orthelorthe legitimately say you are going to the or the l or the library. classy.
7:56 am
we will have the headlines in a moment. for now, all of the headlines wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm katharine carpenter. a review into the death of a baby in luton, who was murdered by his mother's partner, has found failings in the way the local authorities handled his case. noah serra—morrison was 13 months old when he died from a fractured skull. the family had moved from ealing to luton and the serious case review calls on councils to do more to share information about children at risk. it also highlights a high turnover of staff and poor management in luton. as part of a response to the rise in acid attacks across london, the capital's police are being equipped with one thousand "acid crime response kits." by the end of the month, patrol cars will carry five—litre bottles of water, so that officers can begin treating victims of acid attacks on the scene. they will also have protective gear. cleaners, porters, and patient catering staff have gone on strike at four hospitals in london
7:57 am
in a dispute over pay. their employer, serco, says all staff are paid the london living wage. barts nhs trust, which runs hospitals including barts, whipps cross and the royal london says it hopes both sides will negotiate. the trust says it's doing what it can to mitigate the impact on patients. it was once a scene of severe congestion, but six years after a tunnel was built under the devil's punch bowl in surrey, the former site of the a3 has been recognised as a wildlife haven. the hindhead tunnel was built to divert a stretch of the a3 under the beauty spot. now rare and diverse breeding birds have returned to the area and endangered historic heathland has been restored. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning on the trains, services through woking and surbiton are delayed by around half an hour. a line to waterloo is still closed for track repairs. on the roads, this is thornton heath, where london road is closed southbound at thornton heath pond because of an accident. and in west norwood, vale street remains closed by the police following an unlicenced music event last night. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning.
7:58 am
well, we may have a bit of a cloudy start this morning. the cloud will thin and break. spells of sunshine. on the whole, warmer than yesterday. cloudy to start, especially in the east. that will gradually start to disappear. sunny spells on the way. perhaps a little bit of patchy cloud. light winds and it will be dry. the temperaturs will reach 22 degrees. a pleasant end to the day. evening sunshine. some more cloud working into tomorrow morning. clear spells in the meantime. quite a warm night as well. 15—16 celsius for the minimum. tomorrow morning, thickening cloud, rain coming in from the west. that will fragment. we will get patchy rain through the afternoon. not feeling quite as warm, not as much sunshine, but a maximum of 20. low pressure to the north of the uk brings fresh wind. feeling chilly in the breeze. showers around. dry weather. that continues into the weekend. feels rather changeable. some showers. also spells of sunshine.
7:59 am
and that is all for me for now. we will be back in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. charlie gard's parents say they will spend their last precious moments with their son after ending their legal fight. they've released this new picture of charlie. great ormond street hospital has praised the bravery of their decision. good morning, it's tuesday, 25thjuly also this morning? also for you on the programme... a clampdown on leasehold charges. ben can tell us more. there has been a sharp rise in new houses being sold leasehold. it
8:00 am
could cost homeowners thousands and hidden costs. the government says it must end. i will have the details. a vigil has been held in protest at the death of a 20—year—old man who died after a police chase in east london. in sport, it's gold in the pool for adam peaty at the world aquatics championships as he successfully defends his 100m breaststroke title. hello from the uk's 51st community pub, owned and run by local people. we are in a derbyshire village. not only a pub but there is a cafe too. lovely. in a moment, in ten minutes time, we will bejoined by lovely. in a moment, in ten minutes time, we will be joined by two of england's world cup winning cricketers on the sofa. and carol has the weather. a cloudy start for some of us, patchy drizzle in the east, sunny intervals with just a few showers across northern scotland, wales and south—west england. more details on 15 minutes.
8:01 am
we will put you in 4815. thank you. —— we will put you in for 8:15am. good morning. first, our main story. charlie gard's parents say they are preparing to spend their "last precious moments" with their terminally ill son. it comes after they ended their legal battle to take him to the united states for treatment. in a statement, great ormond street hospital where charlie is on life support said they recognised the agony, desolation and bravery of their decision. caroline rigby reports. this photograph of charlie gard was released by his parents last night as they accepted their fight is over. theirfight to their fight to send charlie to the us for experimental treatment is over. our son is an absolute warrior and we could not be proud of him and we will miss him terribly. his body, heart and soul may soon be gone, but his spirit will live on for eternity and he will make a difference to people's lives for years to come, we will make sure of that. charlie has
8:02 am
beenin will make sure of that. charlie has been in intensive care since october, he has a rare inherited condition, mitochondrial depletion syndrome, meaning he cannot move, feed or breathe unaided. his parents had wanted to send him for therapy in america butjudges ruled he should be allowed to die after great ormond street hospital argued the treatment was futile. the case came back to court when this american neurologist claimed new evidence that his treatment could help. but that his treatment could help. but that doctor has now told them it is too late to treat charlie. a whole lot of time has been wasted. we are now injuly lot of time has been wasted. we are now in july and lot of time has been wasted. we are now injuly and our poor boy has been left to just lie in now injuly and our poor boy has been left tojust lie in hospital for months. great ormond street insist earlier treatment would not have saved him. the hospital has praised the courage of his parents, saying the agony, desolation and bravery of their decision has humbled all who work there. his pa rents humbled all who work there. his parents will now spend charlie's last few days by his side.
8:03 am
his picture is on the front page of many newspapers. elsewhere this morning... builders could be banned from selling leaseholds on new homes in england under plans put forward by the government today. you have been looking at this? you have been looking at thi57m could mean thousands of pounds in extra costs for new homeowners. leasehold is something you traditionally associate with flats and when you buy a flat eu pay a ground rent and service charge for communalfacilities. ground rent and service charge for communal facilities. —— you ground rent and service charge for communalfacilities. —— you pay. when you buy a house, traditionally it would be freehold, you own the land on which it is built. a lot of house builders now offer houses as leasehold so there could be extra costs. they may have to pay extra costs. they may have to pay extra costs to renew the lease, they may also have to pay a yearly charge and there is no limit on how much can be
8:04 am
charged. crucially, for things like home improvements, if you want to add an extension, change the layout, you would have to ask the permission of the leaseholder and they could charge you for that. this is one of the big issues the government wants to look at, it has launched an eight week consultation and that applies to homes in england, but they want to homes in england, but they want to look at whether it is fair because this could cost homeowners thousands of pounds in extra costs. thank you. we will in a few minutes speak to the communities secretary, sajid javid, about some of the questions raised. some of the other headlines... up to 150 people held a vigil outside a police station in east london last night in protest over the death of a young black man. there has been anger in the local community following the death of 20—year—old rashan charles in the early hours of saturday morning. a small number of people threw bottles and sticks at police after the vigil, but no officers were injured. keith doyle reports. what do we want?
8:05 am
justice! the anger and frustration was visible on the streets of hackney following the death of 20—year—old rashan charles. he died after being apprehended by police on saturday. a vigil was held outside stoke newington police station last night. during which rashan charles‘s father called for justice. we ask forjustice on this. basically, i want everybody to be peaceful, this is a peaceful protest. after the vigil, protesters blocked with bins and bags of rubbish. it was relatively peaceful until the police moved in to end the protest. then some of the crowd threw bottles, cans and bricks. it is 2:20 am and the police have finally moved in to clear this road that has been blocked for the last seven hours. a lot of local people are shouting things out, there is clearly a lot of anger here. but by all accounts, this has been a reasonably
8:06 am
peaceful process. the police say rashan charles was seen swallowing something when apprehended, but a campaigning group says it is enormously concerned and angered by his death. the police watchdog, the independent police complaints commission, is now investigating. uk animal welfare standards could be threatened if farmers have to compete against cheaper, less—regulated rivals from outside the eu after brexit. that's the warning from a house of lords committee. it's urging the government to insist on similar standards in any free trade agreements to avoid what it calls a race to the bottom on welfare. a row has broken out over rail investment after the government said it would work with the mayor of london to progress plans for crossrail 2. it comes after recent announcements cancelling rail electrification schemes in wales and the north of england. we're joined from westminster by our political correspondent chris mason. this is about where the money is
8:07 am
spent? the essence of politics. across wales will open relatively soon. across wales will open relatively soon. now talk of crossrail two which will run from hertfordshire to surrey —— crossrail will open relatively soon. butjust surrey —— crossrail will open relatively soon. but just the other day, the cancellation of some electrification projects in the midlands between kettering, not in in sheffield, and in south wales between swansea and cardiff, and in the lake district, there are concerns about the slow nature of improvements on the trans—pennine route between liverpool and manchester, and on to leeds and york and newcastle. the sense from those who stand up for the north of england, the mayors, the north is being ignored and london is getting all of that investment. you get a sense of a coming round, particularly when mps return to
8:08 am
westminster in the autumn, tricky for the government to justify, sounding positive about london and a few days earlier pulling money out of the north of england for other projects. they say that it is not just electrification that matters. quite a few of the viewers are worried about the fact you do not have a jacket. people offering to bring you a jumper. you have the offending garment with you? you know the challenge of getting up and getting dressed in the dark. this suit has a massive stain on it which idid not suit has a massive stain on it which i did not notice when i came to work this morning. thankfully, it does not smell too bad, but i thought, standards and all that, i should not wear it. i am like phil collins, no jacket required. wonderful. excellent sniffing live on brea kfast. excellent sniffing live on breakfast. too much detail! i know about it after my dress back to front. difficult getting dressed in the dark. very difficult. could this
8:09 am
be the best job the dark. very difficult. could this be the bestjob in the world? it is south—west china and the zookeeper has to dress up as a panda, as you can see. it is because these baby pandas are going to be released into protective wildlife. lots of people saying, i would love to do thatjob. it does look like a pretty good way to spend a few hours. we were saying earlier about panda mascots, st mirren have a family of panda mascots, but it is notjust paisley panda. say hello to pandemonium. fantastic name! regular visits to the gym and a solid sleeping pattern. very well—dressed! very black and white, that story! shall i go? don't go! we would miss the jokes, even though i do not laugh all the time. when england cricket captain
8:10 am
heather knight lifted the ultimate prize in women's cricket on an emotional sunday afternoon at lord's, it marked a triumph not only for england, but the sport itself. 50 million people watched the competition around the world, and the dramatic final played out in front of a sold out lord's and was the most—watched game of women's cricket in history. we're joined now by two of the winning team tammy beaumont and alex hartley. we'll chat with them in a moment. salary willjoin us as well. but first, let's look back at that fantastic win. gayakwad on strike. shrubsole. six wickets for anya shrubsole, england's hero. england win the world cup in front of a packed house at lord's. going nuts, the crowd. england in a huddle. applause. listen to that noise. england's women team winning the world cup on home soil in 2017 and england have done it byjust nine runs at lord's. an amazing weekend.
8:11 am
tammy beaumont and alex hartley join us now. when you look back and listen back to that, you thankfully have... you have got them trophy. have you come to terms with that achievement over the weekend yet? i have not come to terms with it personally, but it was obviously the best day of my life. i wa nt to obviously the best day of my life. i want to relive it every second. amazing. two days later, still having to pinch ourselves. some of that, you world cup champion. 0k, that, you world cup champion. 0k, thatis that, you world cup champion. 0k, that is great. it is what we dreamt of. to play at lord's, sell—out as well, incredible. we talked about it yesterday, in the context of sport altogether, but you particularly, nerves of steel, came right down to the wire. how were you all feeling? over the course of the tournament, we had a number of close games, and we had a number of close games, and we kept finding a way to win. alex
8:12 am
was saying earlier anya shrubsole has been a hero for the last two games. once she got the ball, she was so games. once she got the ball, she was so determined to get the wickets and she homed in on the stumps. we have a lot to thank her for. at one point, india set a really achievable target. what was going through your minds? did you think you had lost it? at one stage, i am not going to lie, i knew what we had to come, i knew anya had to come back, get the run rate to sixs and then we knew we could win from there. the steely determination. we saw chris froome, jordan spieth on the weekend. india were 191—3, looked like they were cruising. only needed 229, the england total. then the game was turned on its head. incredible. we have just the game was turned on its head. incredible. we havejust got the game was turned on its head. incredible. we have just got anya to thank for that. when that starts happening, do you think, we are on a
8:13 am
roll? you get a wicket and go, one more, and you get down to the tail end and! more, and you get down to the tail end and i was thinking, we have won! you are giving me goose bumps. end and i was thinking, we have won! you are giving me goose bumpslj end and i was thinking, we have won! you are giving me goose bumps. i had goose bumps the entire day the moment they mentioned rachel at the beginning and we signed the national anthem. iwas beginning and we signed the national anthem. i was on the boundary going, just get one more, and it was amazing. women paying tribute to other women gone before you, set apart, ina other women gone before you, set apart, in a way. it was a massive celebration as well. we had a 105—year—old ringing the bell who played in the 30s and 40s. she is amazing. she does yoga, more flexible than the captain! i bumped into the opening batters from the world cup final in 1973 in the long room afterwards, just incredible, to
8:14 am
have all of them there, they were so proud. almost like a bit of a sisterhood. can we talk about generations? we have gone to budding young cricket players in didsbury in greater manchester and they have got questions. we will play the questions. we will play the questions. this is from annie. were you intimidated by the other team? were you intimidated by the other team? we knew they had a special team, but i think we weren't that intimidated. here is the next one. this is from hannah who plays for the same team. did you think the game would be as close as it was? we a lwa ys game would be as close as it was? we always knew it was going to be a close game. two good teams deserve to be in the final. yeah, it was a lwa ys to be in the final. yeah, it was always going to be a close game. one more. they're not finished with you yet! this is from olivia. what inspired you to play cricket? that's
8:15 am
a good question. we saw the pictures yesterday of annia shrubsole as a 12—year—old. what was your inspiration to get into the game? for me, ijust inspiration to get into the game? for me, i just fell inspiration to get into the game? for me, ijust fell in love with the game from when i was maybe 12 years old and i thought i want to represent my country. so i was just determined to do that. ever since. mine was my dad probably. every weekend he was down the local cricket club and idolised my older brother and when he started playing cricket i wanted to do everything he did. so it is all their fault! how old were you when you started playing cricket? eight. iwas 12. now people might think 12 is a bit late p would they or not? we are still getting girls joining late p would they or not? we are still getting girlsjoining at late p would they or not? we are still getting girls joining at 15 and 16 who are good at cricket. i would encourage everybody to pick up a bat and a ball. and actually, you
8:16 am
area a bat and a ball. and actually, you are a relatively young squad and you could keep going. how many more yea rs could we could keep going. how many more years could we see you winning world cups? i got a few of the girls to shake hands that they would be here forfour more years. shake hands that they would be here for four more years. i shake hands that they would be here forfour more years. i don't shake hands that they would be here for four more years. i don't know. we'll see. we spoke on the sofa after the olympics. we had the hockey good medallists and they were talking about the uptake in the sport since rio, it is essential that happens in cricket as well and if we're talking about this 12 months down the line that they are keptin months down the line that they are kept in the sport as well? yeah. there has never been a better time to start playing women's cricket and i think young girls out there, it is just a great sport to get involved in and there is such great opportunities now for young girls. well, thank you very much. it is wonderful to see you here. the cup, it is still broken, is it? it came broke. it is a little bit wobbly.
8:17 am
any insight into what you drink or ate out of it it has holes in it. chocolate buttons! i know you will talk about your own inspiration, but you are inspiring the next generation of notjust women cricketers, but young boys as well. thank you very much. thank you very much. thank you. see you later. shall we catch up on the weather? carol has been talking about 21 celsius for some people. today temperatures could be higher. at the moment we have got a fair bit of cloud around, but most of that will thin and break and for most of the uk it will be dry with sunny spells. just a few showers here and there. this morning, the thickest cloud is towards the east. here we have got patchy drizzle. we have got low cloud across northern ireland. all of that will break and then you can see where we've got the sunshine out towards the west, but through the day, we are not immune to the odd shower across swention and wales
8:18 am
and northern scotland, but most of us will miss them. so through the afternoon you can see how quite nicely the cloud is breaking up. so it will brighten up across northern england where we've got the cloud at the moment. there will be areas of cloud at times, but it won't necessarily spoil it and it is not going to feel as cold along the east coast. from east anglia and the midlands and towards kent and the isle of wight and towards south—west england a lot of dry weather and sunshine, but here there is the risk of showers too as there is across wales. most of us will miss them and have a beautiful sunny, dry day. for northern ireland, as the cloud brea ks northern ireland, as the cloud breaks up, the sun will come out. a pleasa nt breaks up, the sun will come out. a pleasant afternoon for you and for western and southern scotland. again, a lot of sunshine, but the north—east hanging on to a bit more cloud and north of the central belt we are not immune to the showers, but they are showers so not all of us will catch one. through the evening and overnight, we lose the showers, but you can see out towards the west, the cloud thickening. the rain arriving and the wind picking
8:19 am
up. temperature wise, similar to the temperatures we have right at this moment. so, tomorrow, we've got low pressure nearby with its attendant fronts. the squeeze on the isobars tells you it's going to be windy and the rain is coming in from the west moving eastwards. it will be hovy as it crosses northern ireland and northern england and scotland and lighter as it crosses wales and the rest of england, but it is going to be blustery around this band of rain. however, as it clears, it will brighten up initially in northern ireland, and then scotland, western england and also wales with a few showers. but you can see the tail end of this front will still be across parts of the south so we are looking at a fair bit of cloud and some showers. nothing too heavy. temperatures tomorrow, up to 21 celsius. so through the evening and overnight there goes that set of weather fronts on to the near continent. the centre of low pressure m oves continent. the centre of low pressure moves closer to northern ireland and scotland. still a good squeeze on the isobars. so it's going to be wet out towards the west. drier towards the east.
8:20 am
perhaps not as gloomy as this picture is painting. as we head on into friday, the low pressure centres out to the north—west bringing in rain. further east that you travel, the drier and brighter it will be and the temperatures up to 21 celsius. pretty good knowledge, lou. i do watch you carol i pay knowledge, lou. i do watch you carol i pay close attention. the summer holidays are under way. but the trussell trust run hundreds of foodbanks and they say thousands of foodbanks and they say thousands of children risk going hungry during the summer break. graham satchell is ata the summer break. graham satchell is at a foodbank in salisbury. good morning, graham. good morning, louise. this is just morning, graham. good morning, louise. this isjust one morning, graham. good morning, louise. this is just one of the 400 foodbanks across the country. they handed out 11,000 tonnes of food and the summer can be particularly tricky because children who will
8:21 am
have had free school meals don't get them anywhere. the guys are filling emergency boxes. the trussell trust put out some interesting figures. this morning. they are saying that 47% of the children who were helped last year were primary school children aged between five and 11. there were 67,000 hand—outs to children last year in the months july children last year in the months july and august and that's a peak between the months before and after. so particularly in the summer and they are going to be running summer holiday clubs this year for families struggling. i spent the day yesterday in chichester with sarah who is a single mum and this is her story. my name is sarah and i've got a nine—year—old son and i'm a teacher's assistant. i work 16 hours a week so it is quite a struggle. hi. hello. you've a voucher?
8:22 am
yes, please. and it's for... it is for an adult and a child. any dietary requirements? we're vegetarian, please. summer holidays i find quite a struggle because of extra costs, you know, outings, activities and going out with friends and things like that. feeding, there's three times a day. two times, extra snacks, extra activities. itjust all adds up, really. it is making that choice, isn't it? do i pay the bills, do i pay the rent, or do i pay for food? and that's what we're here for, 'cause actually we're here to help you. if you need any toiletries orfeminine hygiene, or anything like that, we've got that there as well. and shampoo, yes. must look after the hair. laughs. thank you. the prices are going up in the shops. the gas, electrics going up, you know, every year. the council tax's going up, the rent goes up. i think people can't always keep up because your wage does not seem to go up as much as other things and i think people will have to look at that as well. please, don't be scared to come and see us again if you really need us, 0k.
8:23 am
we're always here the people in a crisis. i really appreciate it. it's alright. 0k. bye. it's not just people on benefits that struggle, it's people that work that can struggle that little bit more because they get less help from the government. i'd like to say thank you very much to sarah. not the easiest thing. let's talk to lucy from the trussell trust. explain to me why you think there is extra pressure over the summer there is extra pressure over the summer holidays? well, families value the free school meals during term time, but when the holidays hit that's a financial gap to fill and sometimes this will be as much as £30 or £40 a week per child. when you are on a low income or low budget that's a lot to find. people need to be referred, don't they, to foodbanks. you can't just need to be referred, don't they, to foodbanks. you can'tjust turn up? no, we have professional agencies.
8:24 am
if you are struggling that's where you will find support. they will give you a voucher so you can get your parcel. james works for the trussell trust. the number of people coming to you over nine and ten yea rs has coming to you over nine and ten years has gone up every year. why do you think it happens? is it an indication of absolute poverty, do you think we are getting poorer? or do you think there is flaws in the system, there is the gap between losing yourjob and getting the benefits? we are not all getting poorer, but analysis shows that those at the bottom seem to be getting poorer and you're right, there are problems with systems. and we really welcome dialogue with government about what they can do about delays, or problems particularly with the benefit systems where there are difficulties. if this gap of six weeks came down to days, the demand would fall off a cliff, wouldn't it? it would reduce significantly. it is not the only factor, but it would reduce significantly and we welcome the conversations we have with
8:25 am
government about what they can do to make their systems better. you wonder why that isn't happening. so the statement from the government this morning is we've doubled the childcare to help parents into work. we're spending £90 billion a year on support. what do you make of that? those figures are correct. at the same time it is a massive problem and it is not going to be an easy one to crack. it is one where the charity sector plays its part, but the government must play its part as faras it can. the government must play its part as far as it can. well, there you are. an indication that logical be a lot of families struggling over the summer of families struggling over the summer holidays and relying on foodbanks. with that, from salisbury, it is back to you. studio: graham, thank you very much indeed. we will be speaking to sajid javid soon. we will be speaking to sajid javid soon. he will be talking about the leasehold issue that ben has been talking about. fingers crossed he will be in the studio in the next few minutes. more on the weather, sport in a few minutes. the national headlines in a few minutes. it's time to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
8:26 am
it is going to be a dry day for most of the uk today. yesterday, quite a bit of cloud in eastern parts. for many of us today, some sunny spells. still a bit of cloud this morning on eastern coasts, but the cloud will break up this afternoon. elsewhere, starting off with sunshine and you will probably end the day with sunshine as well. maybe the odd shower in south—west england later this afternoon. one or two showers may be in wales as well. hit and miss. for most, dry. much more sunshine in east anglia, the south—east of england. warmer here too. north—west england, wales, much of scotland, dry with the sunshine, the odd shower in central scotland. perhaps a little bit chilly on the coast across eastern scotland. through this evening and tonight, fairly quiet across eastern areas. in the west, this band of rain
8:27 am
moving its way in, it will not be a cold night, temperatures way up into double figures. the chilliest of the weather in the far east. for wednesday, the area of low pressure, quite deep for the time of year, throwing weather fronts across the uk. heavy rain for a time on wednesday across scotland, northern england. rain more patchy in wales, southern parts of england. quite breezy. a lot of the rain will clear to the east. northern and western parts, turning drier and brighter in the afternoon. top temperatures of 18-21. the the afternoon. top temperatures of 18—21. the low pressure is still with us on thursday, outbreaks of rain across northern and western areas, staying largely dry in the south—east of the uk with highs again into the high teens and low 20s. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and rachel horne. hit by the eu — profits fall
8:28 am
at google's parent company, alphabet, after a huge fine levied by the european union live from london, that's our top story on tuesday, 25th ofjuly. shares fall for the owner of google, as revenues surge by 21% but are hit by the eu's multi—billion dollar fine. also in the programme... us retailer michael kors snaps up the luxury shoe brand jimmy choo for $1.2 billion.
8:29 am
8:30 am

87 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on