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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 25, 2017 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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donald trump used similar words as he had on twitter to describe the attorney general. and disappointed in him. he should not have refused himself immediately after taking office. his son-in-law has again been questioned over russia. the us congress is set to slap new sanctions on russia. in other news, muslim leaders have called on worshippers to boycott a holy site in eastjerusalem worshippers to boycott a holy site in east jerusalem after worshippers to boycott a holy site in eastjerusalem after metal detectors were installed and then removed. europe has been hit by extreme temperatures and floods. we speak to the weather team about what has been causing yet. president trump launched a public
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tarried of tweet againstjeff sessions. then he said these words a few minutes ago. and disappointed in the attorney general. he should not have recused himself almost immediately after he took office. and if he was going to accuse unselfish and told me prior to taking office and i would've quite simply picked somebody else. sighting that's a bad
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thing not for the president but for the presidency. i think it is unfair to the presidency and that is the way i feel. thank you. many americans must be wondering if the president is trying to pry open the office of attorney—general to appoint someone during the august recess who will fire special counsel moller and shut down the russian investigation. first, let me state for the record now democrats will never go along with the recess appointment of that situation arises. be ready to use tools in our action to stymie action. if jeff
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sessions recused himself some months ago, why is donald trump saying all the snow? robert moller is hiring a crack team. we are looking at possible business dealings with russia. plus you have this house intelligence committee bringing in people. i think because this investigation has been ramped up, it may be part of the reason why donald trump is being more anxious and assertive. i want to point out. when donald trump said jeff sessions should've told him he would recused
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himself, back then we didn't even know there was an fbi investigation into the trump campaign and its ties to russia. none of that was out in public until it was said during committee testimony. i believe that was in february or march. there was no wayjeff sessions could tell donald trump he was going to recused himself from an investigation that didn't happen. that is a bit of a historical revision on the part of donald trump. the tweets about jeff sessions have become more and more vitriolic. what our voices in washington saying about how long he could last in the job? jeff sessions has a lot of allies in this town. he has a lot of allies in this town. he has friends in the senate were sticking by him. he has allies in the conservative media. and is
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popular amongst the anti—administration right before donald trump came on the scene. donald trump came on the scene. donald trump came on the scene. donald trump incorporated in his campaign. he will not be an easy person to force out of his position. donald trump has the ability to fire jeff sessions. that will anger a lot of people in washington. that would bea of people in washington. that would be a difficult situation ifjeff sessions did not go quietly into the night. health care is also an president trump's twitter feed. let's bring you news update. it isa it is a pretty significant hurdle. it is a pretty significant hurdle. it had lost their vote, would've
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been it for now. if they can't get toa been it for now. if they can't get to a debate, there is no way they can get torvill. this was the very first step to getting something passed. it was a 50—50 vote broken by mike pence to get to this point. they will bring everything up. the night break some appeals down and try to vote on individual amendments. it will be hard to cobble together 50 republican votes to sign off on anything. this is a big step, but they're not out of the woods. john mccain has had grave
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health news in recent days. he was there. he flew in from arizona. he had brain surgery a week ago to remove a mass behind his right eye. it turned out to be a cancerous mass. he is suffering from brain cancer. it was risky friend to get ona cancer. it was risky friend to get on a plane. he cast a decisive vote that allowed it to proceed and give a speech about senate traditions and bipartisanship and everyone needing to come together. a little nugget buried in his speech was that he said there was no bell out there in the senate that he will vote yes for. he will still have to be convinced to vote for something. it shows you what a long while republicans have in the senate to try to cobble together a 50 foot
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high on anything which could be brokered by mike pence. thank you. the lower house in the us is due to vote on fresh sanctions against russia. the bill is expected to pass. here is the democratic whip saying... if it does pass, it will go through the senate and be signed off by the president. what makes all this awkward as there are three separate investigations. jared kushner are
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those questioned this afternoon by the house intelligence committee. let's cross to washington. this will pass through the lower house without any problems we think? it looks that way. there is bipartisan support for this in the senate and house, which is unusual. it is a republican—controlled congress. in a way, it is a revolt. i came, they don't have any doubts that russia interference in the election. what they do also is the limit the president's ability to unilaterally rollback sanctions. for national security reasons, he can usually waive sanctions. but this says he
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asked to consult congress first. it puts president trump in a bind. they have said they expect him to support after changes were made. really he doesn't have too much choice if that is going to be such a large number of lawmakers who supported they could override a veto. it has placed him ina could override a veto. it has placed him in a difficult position over his russia policy. there is opposition from the white house and europeans worried about the expanding sanctions that would target more companies doing more business with the russian energy sector, which might affect their business involving russian pipelines bringing gas. there is an element of how allah is feel about expanding sanctions on russia. the bill
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includes fresh sanctions against iran and north korea. the us ambassador to the un said this about china's corporation of america. ambassador to the un said this about china's corporation of americali think they have cooperated. i was pleased with the response we got back. i think some seriousness has been shown. the true test will be what they have worked out with russia. that is the real test. just hearing that from the us ambassador to the un, there are un sanctions but also united states on sanctions? yes, the sanctions on the bill would authorise sanctions against businesses which deal with north korea. it would be a way of putting
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pressure on china because they do the most business that north korea. it is something the administration has pushed aggressively. at the un, they are saying when it comes to tightening international sanctions, airand tightening international sanctions, air and travel restrictions, possibly oil restrictions and north korean guest workers, when they initially proposed to china were thinking of, the initial response was quite serious and she was pleased by. that her take on what is happening there. china has pushed back against the emphasis it has to do more. china would like to see a diplomatic process alongside sanctions, like negotiations so there would be a way of de—escalating rather than just
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escalating the situation. thank you. stay with us. we will have more on rising tensions in jerusalem. bmw has ended speculation that brexit would result in the new all—electric mini being made outside the uk. the firm says the new model will be assembled at its plant near oxford , assembled at its plant near oxford, as all previous generations of the car have been starting in 2019. the company insists it hasn't received any commitments from the british government, regarding trading arrangements after brexit.
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the business secretary, greg clarke, explained why he thought britain was attracting such investment. rei nvest reinvest with the automotive sector. the environment we have created for investment in the future has led companies like bmw, and others, to recognise this is a great place to be. our top story: donald trump has taken the our top story: donald trump has ta ken the unusual step our top story: donald trump has taken the unusual step of publicly attacking his own attorney general, calling him a week for failing to investigate hillary clinton properly. other stories been reported around the bbc right now. bbc hindi report that six people in mumbai have died after
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a four—storey building collapsed. emergency workers are struggling to rescue around ten people still trapped under the rubble. 15 more have been pulled from the wreckage — some with serious injuries. protesters in a french town have built a wall around the entrance to a former hotel to prevent it being used as a migrant shelter. they said the local authorities had failed to discuss with town residents the plan to house up to 85 migrants in the building. that's on bbc world service. and among the most read on the bbc website. alice cooper says he found a classic andy warhol artwork in his storage — more than a0 years after being given it. the singer had forgotten about the work presented as a gift in the 19705. a similar version of the warhol artwork sold in 2014 for $10.5 million. a decision on the right for charlie gard's parents to take him home to die will be made within 2a hours. the matter was before the high court today, day after charlie's parents ended their legalfight today, day after charlie's parents ended their legal fight to take him to the us for treatment. judge said charlie could be taken to a hospice
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to pass away. the legal battle over this desperately sick boy now centres on where and how soon he dies. charlie needs a mechanical ventilator to breathe. he's tube fed and cannot move. yesterday, his parents give up theirfight to take him to the united states and agreed no more treatment could help him. but charlie's mum, connie, was back at court this afternoon to make it clear she did not want him to die in the intensive care unit where he's been since october. the parents' lawyer said it was their last wish that charlie dies at home, for a few days of tranquillity outside the hospital setting. the hospital says it won't stand in the parents' way and yet, it is putting up obstacles. lawyers for the parents said they would pay private nurses to take over his care and later seek to recover the costs from the nhs. but the court heard there were practical
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issues to be resolved, for example, whether charlie's ventilator would fit through their front door. great ormond street hospital said it wanted to honour the parents' wishes but the care plan must be safe and spare charlie all pain. the hospital says it won't stand in the parents' way and yet, it is putting up obstacles. lawyers for the parents said they would pay private nurses to take over his care and later seek to recover the costs from the nhs. but the court heard there were practical issues to be resolved, for example, whether charlie's ventilator would fit through their front door. great ormond street hospital said it wanted to honour the parents' wishes but the care plan must be safe and spare charlie all pain. it must protect his dignity. charlie is a child who requires highly specialised treatment. his care cannot be simplified. it must be provided in a specialist setting by specialists. the dispute over where and how soon charlie should die
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typifies the utter breakdown in the relationship between the parents and the hospital. the judge said this was a matter crying out for mediation. great ormond street said it offered that but the parents refused. the judge said the parents were entitled to decide where they spent the next few days but this should not extend into weeks. that would be unacceptable as it would simply extend the grieving process. this woman lost her son, guy, when he was five. he was profoundly disabled and tube fed. she, too, had searched for a cure for his condition. they've got to learn to let him go at all sorts of levels. stuff happens and they must not be bitter because it will only eat them. there's no point in that. what they've got to do is look at all the positive things. the hospital has offered a compromise for charlie to be transferred to a hospice, where doctors from great ormond street would supervise his palliative care and death after a period of some hours. charlie's parents said they want days, not hours, and a hospice is a second—best option. israel has removed metal detectors from outside a holy site
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in eastjerusalem after uproar from palestinians over their recent introduction. it's known tojews as the temple mount and muslims as haram al—sharif. here's yolande knell with the story. relative calm restored at the gates to the third holiest site in islam. palestinian worshippers now hope to enter after a week of protests over new israeli security controls. so israel's removed the metal detectors that were just there. instead, it says it's going to do what it calls smart checking, using more surveillance around the old city. it follows over a week of violence and tensions that even crossed borders. the removal of all these cameras and the removal of all these gates prove that there were not needed for security. it was a political measure by israel to impose fact on the ground and we forced them to reverse that.
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this is how the crisis began. guns were taken inside the al—aqsa mosque grounds and used to kill two israeli policemen at the gates. when the mosque was re—opened with new metal detectors, palestinians continued praying outside, accusing israel of using security as an excuse to extend its control over the site which is also the holiest place forjews and known as temple mount. israel denied that. in clashes with israeli security forces, five palestinians were killed. and in this west bank settlement, a palestinian stabbed to death three israelis in their home. then an israeli embassy guard killed two jordanians, apparently after one attacked him. jordan is the custodian ofjerusalem's mosques. overnight, amid fears of a wider escalation, the metal detectors were quietly taken away.
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israel is making sure there is a realfreedom ofjerusalem. 50 yea rs 50 years after israel captured unoccupied the old city of jerusalem, it remains at the heart of this conflict. 50 years after israel captured the old city ofjerusalem, recent pictures have shown once again how it remains at the heart of this conflict. greece has sold its government debt
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to international investors for the first time in three years. the greek government managed to raise 3.5 billion dollars in a move which could signal the end of austerity in the country. since 2010, greece has received around 380 billion dollars of emergency funding, but this has come with certain conditions attached. greece's creditors — which include the international monetary fund and the eu — have insisted that the government raise taxes and slash pensions in order to improve its public finances. our economics correspondent andrew walker explains why today's sale is significant for the country. this is a tall in the water. there we re this is a tall in the water. there were offers to buy more than twice that amount. i think this is a view that amount. i think this is a view that greece has done an awful lot to improve the position of its public finances. back in the red this year.
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but not a large deficit. think they recognise things a great deal. they ta ke recognise things a great deal. they take the view that probably if it comes to the crunch, the rest of the eurozone would be unlikely to want to see greece getting into a default and perhaps once again reigniting fears of contagion from five years ago. general motors says it's going to manufacture fewer cars in the us due to a build—up of stock on its forecourts. the biggest carmaker in the united states reported a 14% drop in profits in the last three months. let's get more with michelle fleury who joins us from new york. some of this news was expected. we are seeing american car sales coming offa are seeing american car sales coming off a record high in 2016, so people had expected that perhaps 2017 might
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not be as strong. this is a continuation of that trend. the company had to take a write—down on several of its other deals. you may recall it sold off some of its assets in europe. all of this as it tries to become more focused and shift its strategy on to more fast—growing markets such as india and china. the announcement by gm saying they will build fewer cars in the us will be up setback for president trump's plans for more americanjobs. president trump's plans for more american jobs. donald trump give an interview to the wall streetjournal in which he said he had heard from the chief executive of apple saying the chief executive of apple saying the company was ready to build three big plants in america. we haven't had confirmation of that ourselves,
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but it is worth pointing out that if you look ever since donald trump came into office he made a point of prioritising america first and spoke of creating jobs here and factories. that lead to companies responding to the pressure and to talking about doing more to create jobs the pressure and to talking about doing more to createjobs in the pressure and to talking about doing more to create jobs in the past, apple has said it will create a$1 past, apple has said it will create a $1 billion fund. presumably some of that money will be used for these plans. thank you. we will be back in a few minutes. stay with us. ina in a moment, the latest on the weather across europe. but i want to start of an update on the monsoon in south asia. things are drying out across the southern half of india.
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not so further north. not one but two areas of cloud. two monsoon depressions. that enhances the rainfall. across the north—west of india, a lot of rain to come on wednesday. there has already been flooding. could well be more of the same. as we drift further south across myanmar and parts of thailand, laos and vietnam, you can see the south—westerly winds driving torrential downpours of rain. some places you could see a metre of rain over the next few days and that could cause big problems. things looking stormy over the other side of the pacific. three tropical storms. tropical storm greg and hurricane irwin and also hurricane hillary. we are staying out to sea and not affecting any land areas. bigger disruption could well be caused across parts of the usa. the
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midwest and the north—east will see torrential downpours and thunderstorms drifting eastwards. that could cause travel disruption and possible flight delays. also disruption over parts of europe. lumps of cloud over central portions of the continent. torrential downpours of rain. these continue on into wednesday. an area of low pressure very slow—moving. likely to see further downpours over kiev and minsk. particularly wet over germany. further outbreaks of rain. perhaps over 100 millimetres in places. some flash floods. some showers drifting down over the balkans. for italy, we've been hearing about how dry it has been over places like rome, some showers showing up but another largely dry
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day. to the west of that, strong winds over the south of france fanning wildfires. also for corsica and sardinia. the winds will ease over the next few days. staying dry. heavy downpours tending to ease for the likes of berlin and warsaw. back home, wednesday looks like a soggy affair. heavy rain drifting eastwards. strong and gusty winds, brightening up from the west later in the day. what do the prospects look like further ahead? find out in half an hour. hello, i'm karin giannone, this is outside source. donald trump has attacked his own attorney general, calling him weak, as rumours swirl that he may fire him soon. but i am disappointed in the attorney general. you should not have recused himself. almost immediately after he took office. two rival libyan leaders agree
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to a conditional ceasefire during a meeting in paris, but how long is it likely to last? europe is being hit by extreme temperatures and floods. we'll speak to the bbc weather team about what's causing it. and in outside source sport: we'll be talking about adam peaty. he's broken two world records in the pool today.
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