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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 27, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy. the headline that sdm. ministers are accused of waiting far too long to consider brexit‘s impact on eu immigration. it's completely ridiculous that it has taken them 13 months to commission this basic evidence. 71 prisoners in england and wales were released by mistake last year — the highest numberfor a decade. wildfires continue to burn in southern france — 6,000 firefighters and troops are now battling the flames. also in the next hour: experts cast doubt on the traditional advice to always finish a prescribed course of antibiotics. some medics argue that taking them for longer than necessary can increase the risk of developing a resistance to them. see you later alligator. a florida police officer wrestles an alligator after a terrified resident found the reptile outside his front porch. good afternoon and welcome to bbc
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news. the government has been accused of waiting too long to consider the impact of brexit on immigration from the european union. a new report looking at the costs and benefits of eu migrants is expected to be completed in september 2018 — six months before brexit. the home secretary amber rudd says that there will no ‘cliff edge' on immigration after march 2019 — when the free movement of people between the eu and the uk ends. 0ur political correspondent iain watson reports. getting tough on immigration. the home secretaryjoined a coastal patrol in scotland today. but simultaneously she signalled the government wanted to take a flexible approach to legal migration after brexit. she made it clear a new immigration policy wouldn't be implemented immediately. the independet immigration advisory
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committee would examine how many eu migrants they might need. we want a new, informed, evidence —based eu migration policy. we've commissioned the mac to consult on that. an independent group, they'll be consulting with business. in the meantime there will be an implementation phase when new eu workers who come here will need to register their details. the full new eu immigration policy will be after the mac has reported in the final phase of leaving the eu. the government says it wants the economy to flourish after brexit so a new study from the migration advisory committee will examine what businesses are most reliant on eu labour, the costs and benefits of eu migration and the potential impact of reduction in the number of eu citizens working here. questions are now being raised not just about the substance of the new eu migration study, but about its timing. mps aren't here at westminster during the summer to examine its terms of reference. but there is another issue, too, because the government's critics are saying, why on earth are they commissioning this now and not
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a year agojust after the referendum 7 we've been meeting with businesses talking to different sectors, right across government. since the referendum. this is part of the process. the foreign secretary hadn't even heard of the new immigration study. you bring me news of this report today, so i'm sorry if i don't, i can't comment... it sounds like an interesting report. but there is another issue of timing. the government will set out its broad approach to immigration after brexit later this year. ministers will introduce legislation for a new immigration system early next year. the government's new study on eu migration won't report until much later in 2018. six months before brexit will not be enough time to structure a new migration system. particularly if they want to completely alter the current system. but are business is reassured
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by the government approach? it's very welcome there seems to be broad consensus that a time—limited transition is sensible. now we need to work on their detail. what model is it going to adopt? what does that mean? we suggested a common—sense approach that you stay in the single market and customs union until a deal is enforced. if you voted leave in the referendum to take back control of immigration, the government says it will deliver. but to reassure businesses, ministers are sounding more flexible over how long it will take to reduce the numbers. with me is alan soady from the federation of small businesses. we'll talk about flex ability in a moment. are you surprised only now is the government saying we need to look at the implications of this? is the government saying we need to look at the implications of thi57m recent look at the implications of this7m recent weeks the government has been engaging with organisations such as mine at the federation of small
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businesses to find out what the business community, particularly the small business as well as larger firms, one from any future trade deal, migration deal, brexit generally, because to make the post brexit economy a success it needs to bea brexit economy a success it needs to be a pro—business brexit in those different ways. today we hear from amber rudd talk of a transition period on migration. it is along the lines of what we've been saying, too, based on research with our members to employees migrant workers, who, there was a feeling among many members, it was not in any one's interest to have a cliff edge post brexit, that it should be a more gradual change. what does it mean in practice? if there is a transition? what will it make you happy about without that cliff edge? it could be that once we leave the eu is nothing changes immediately, so eu is nothing changes immediately, so there is plenty of time for businesses, particularly small firms without many members of staff, to
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work on this, to adapt to whatever new system it is. it needs to be a new system it is. it needs to be a new system it is. it needs to be a new system that is low cost for small businesses to work with, that doesn't involve lots of extra administration. when it finally comes in that there could be a transition period of three years or so. transition period of three years or so. then a phased implementation period beyond that. it means there is time to prepare for the new system and to look at the education system, look at improving vocational training to plug skills gaps in the uk. what are the gaps? there could be positive implications for people in this country looking for work. there are high levels of employment already in the uk and many people will give the example of fruit pickers and seasonal workers. certainly for certain sectors, particularly agriculture, it is a factor, but in the research we've done with our members we found that of those who employ eu migrant workers, among the small business community, the biggest group they employ is the mid—skills range, sectors like construction, like the
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aduu sectors like construction, like the adult care sector. in many cases they, and sometimes the likes of tech start—up companies needing very specific skills, have found it difficult in some cases defined the people with the right skills. in some cases actual people to fill the roles suitable for that. that's why we don't want a sudden change. since the vote to leave the eu, business, big or small, if that word uncertainty, they stressed it all the time, that's what we don't want to see. are you beginning to feel the uncertainty is being lifted from this whole process? i think it is encouraging this is being talked about, being looked at in some detail. i think it's encouraging the government has been working with business groups such as the federation of small businesses to hear our voice on this as well as listening... is that a change? there was criticism that business wasn't even being talked to. along the way we've always had a good relationship with the government and parties of
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all sides of the political divide, so we all sides of the political divide, so we haven't really seen that, but i think there has been deliberate focus, there been meetings such as in kent where there were a number of business leaders brought together and it was publicised a little while ago and ourchairman and it was publicised a little while ago and our chairman mike cherry met with theresa may in downing street talking with other business groups about all of this the other day. there is certainly movement. i think where there could be some certainty is around the issue of what happens to migrant worker who's come here since the brexit vote, although it comes to the uk before we've actually left the eu, currently scheduled for early 2019, because at the moment the government hasn't made clear where the cut—off point will be to distinguish whether they would fall into the category of eu migrant workers who have been here for longer and will, they hope, have more certainty, and those who would fall into the category of coming post brexit. its enormous uncertainty for the workers,
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certainly enormous uncertainty for their employers. if you are a small business with five employees, somebody highly skilled came from italy and is important to your business, you don't know whether you'll be able to keep that person, lose person, whether they can be replaced with somebody else from an eu country if you want to. it small businesses can't fill those gaps it'll prevent them from growing, which means it'll limit the growth of the economy. it'll frankly limit the ability of smaller businesses being able to take advantage of any trade deals being negotiated, whether with the eu or elsewhere around the world. thank you very much, alan. wildfires are continuing to burn in southern france for the fourth day. at least six thousand firefighters and troops are now battling the flames. thousands of people have been forced to leave their homes and campsites around the town of bormes—les—mimosas, with many spending the night on beaches, or in sports halls and other public buildings. wyre davies reports. battling for a third consecutive night, more than 6,000 firefighters appear to be slowly winning the fight against wildfires that
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have caused so much havoc and damage in the hills above the cote d'azur. thousands of tourists and local residents, who have been evacuated from their hillside homes and campsites, also spent another night camped out on the beaches below. uncomfortable and inconvenient, but glad to have escaped with their lives. translation: it's like wild camping. it's been two days and it's a bit strange, but we are getting used to it. all the same, we would like to get back to the campsite. the most important thing is not being in danger. i have heard, forthe moment, there are no victims and that has to be the most important thing. after destroying some 10,000 hectares of mediterranean scrub and forest, the fire's progress has been halted thanks to the use of more than a dozen water bombers. the aftermath is described as a disaster for the local economy and the environment by regional officials who believe the blaze was deliberately started. among the hundreds of british tourists forced to flee
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but unsure what happens now, isabelle heppenstall from surrey. woken up at about half past 12 by the emergency services shouting, "fire, fire," in french. didn't really know what to do. some people were running to the beach and putting life jackets on the children, but we decided to try and drive out. we were directed by the police, eventually reached a safe point where we watched the fire unfold. horrific. really awfully scary. emergency officials are reluctant to stand firefighters down and allow people back to their homes and campsites because of the very real possibility that dry mistral winds will fan the flames once more and the threat will return. indeed, weather conditions across the southern mediterranean are still precarious. hundreds of homes have been evacuated on the island of corsica, and from portugal to the italian riviera, firefighting teams have been trying
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to contain several smaller fires before they too get out of control. wyre davies, bbc news. john grant has been holidaying in bormes—les—mimosas for the last 15 years and described how the situation became increasingly serious before he was ordered to evacuate the scene. we had some popping around 1130 in the evening and we were wondering what it was. it was only after about 20 minutes we got a call on the cabin door by the owners. they advised us to get to the muster station for possible evacuation. it was at that point we realised the p°ppin9 was at that point we realised the popping was gas cylinders in the ca rava ns popping was gas cylinders in the caravans on a site about a mile away from us. what happened is when we came up to the muster station we looked up and all you could see was the sky, like it was dante ‘s inferno. it was blood red, smoke everywhere, the acrid smell of smoke through the camp was horrendous. it was then we sort of realised how
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sort of serious the problem was actually facing us. we were advised at the time to if we wanted to, to make our evacuation, to go north because we can go south west because the roads were blocked. and currently stood next to one of the mountains, it's burned to a crisp. it's like a moonscape. all day yesterday and today we've had planes, sorties of planes flying over, we had one about two minutes ago that's done another water drop. ican ago that's done another water drop. i can see the people in control of this thing are not standing down any of their firefighters, it's a very serious event and a very scary position to be in. we've been looking at helicopter pictures of the french by minister looking at the french by minister looking at the scene, it does look pretty grim. i'm going to ask a very silly question but how is your holiday going? well, the wind was not lovely. but unfortunately a lot of these vineyards are now closed as a result, your reporter said it
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affects the economy and this is where it hits them. the holidays for a lot of people here have stopped and quitea a lot of people here have stopped and quite a lot of livelihoods have stopped, some of them for good. yeah, the holiday, the weather, of course, in southern france, it's a beautiful place to be. unfortunately the last couple of days it's been a very challenging and testing area, but it's a very resilient place and certainly a place we won't leave alone. we've been here 15 years and we seen some alone. we've been here 15 years and we seen some fires but nothing of this magnitude. as i say. there was a stage on tuesday, wednesday morning about aam, i was looking from left to right and for about 180 degrees i could just see a wall of flame. yeah, it was both mesmerising and terrorising at the same time. you can get in your car and head home if the need is that bad but of course there are plenty of people who live in this area who have no choice. that's right. we do feel for the local population here because there are a lot of people, even
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friends of ours that were coming down, who arejust friends of ours that were coming down, who are justjetting friends of ours that were coming down, who arejustjetting back friends of ours that were coming down, who are justjetting back a little bit early or not coming down because they're changing their plans because they're changing their plans because they're changing their plans because they are worried about the state of play down here which is understandable. you do feel for the locals. as i say, i'm stood next to one of the caravan parks, there were 250 caravans here, not a single one has survived. their house has gone, there has, their livelihood, their own vehicles, the people who own the company, it's all gone. it's a very sad sight to see. this place is used to some of these fires, but this is ona to some of these fires, but this is on a magnitude that hasn't been seen for quite some time really. it's only with great thanks to the italian and spanish also chipped in with the planes that have been, as i say, saudi after sorting of these planes, which have been amazing to see. it's odd to see people on holiday, but the whole of the countryside in flames, really. yes, it is something else. john grande talking to me an hour ago. latest figures show that a record 71 prisoners were released from prisons
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in england and wales last year by mistake. 0ther statistics from the ministry ofjustice suggest violence in prisons in england and wales is increasing. there were 26,643 assaults in the year to march 2017. and there were also a record number of self—harm incidents — more than 40,000. the figures showed that 15 prisoners escaped — and earlier our home affairs correspondent danny shaw explained how that relates to previous years. i think the most concerning figure is this number of 71. those are people who were released in error. usually due to an administrative mistake by a member of prison staff or court staff or someone else that's let them out early. there was one example earlier this month, a man called ralston dodd had been given a nine—year prison sentence for seriously attacking someone with a knife. expecting to serve four and a knife. expecting to serve four and a half yea rs a knife. expecting to serve four and a half years in prison. and he was released after a matter of months. the reason why was because someone
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had inaccurately recorded, instead of saying nine years they put nine months down and he was out... simple as that? simple error like that and he was out. whether there were certain checks in the system not carried out, that is now under review. clearly a very serious mistake. he was described as an exceptionally dangerous individual. fortu nately exceptionally dangerous individual. fortunately he was recaptured. looking at the figures for assaults on people in prison, this is quite a stark increase. an increase of 2096, the number of assaults. 0f stark increase. an increase of 2096, the number of assaults. of those 26,000, many are classified as a serious assaults and over 7000 were assaults on staff, which means every day 20 prison officers or members of prison staff are being attacked by prisoners. that's one of the reasons why the prison officers association has been demanding extra measures, extra security measures and extra numbers of staff so they can feel
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safer and to prevent so many attacks taking place. what does the ministry ofjustice say? it says it's been making investment in prisons, it's boosting the number of officers by two and a half thousand. it says it is on track to deliver that by the end of next year, i think over 500 now in prisons. also investing in new technology to try and crack down on the former legal high drugs, psychoactive su bsta nces on the former legal high drugs, psychoactive substances that are thought to contribute to this rise in violence. and also this record number of self harm incidents. danny shaw talking to me a little earlier. the government has asked independent experts to brit is a report assessing eu migration. critics say it should have been commissioned a year ago. 71 prisoners in england and wales were released by mistake last year, the highest number in a decade. wildfires continue to burn in southern france, 6000 firefighters and troops are battling the flames. in a moment, we'll hear about the medics who argue that taking antibiotics for longer than necessary can increase the risk of developing a resistance to them.
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if frustrating day for england in the third test against south africa. they lost their third wicket. the skipper has gone, joe root out of 29, england 114—3. play hasjust resumed after a rain delay. chris froome is going to race in next month's grand tour the vuelta espana. the four—time tour de france champion is aiming to become the first man to do the double in the same year since 1978. and the swimnming world championships continue in budapest. mollie renshaw is into the 200 metre breastroke semi—finals. ross murdoch has also reached tonight's 200 semi—finals. scotland's most senior police officer has confirmed he is being investigated in connection with claims of gross professional misconduct. details of the allegation against phil gormley haven't been made public. 0ur correspondent catriona renton is in glasgow. what's going on? exactly what is
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being investigated and who made those allegations is not known, but we do understand there has been a claim of bullion made against phil gormley. —— claim of bullying. it's been made by a senior officer. the case is being investigated by the police investigations and review commission, they can't give any further detail on the investigation but what they've said is that if these allegations are proven, they would amount to gross misconduct and if that were sufficiently serious it could lead to phil gormley losing hisjob. phil gormley is could lead to phil gormley losing his job. phil gormley is the could lead to phil gormley losing hisjob. phil gormley is the most senior police officer in scotland. police scotland is the second biggest force in the uk. he's been in post now for about a year and a half and says he'll continue with his duties while he is under investigation and he says he is cooperating fully with the
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investigation. but there are concerns from some that if he remains in postjust now, while being investigated, this could be uncomfortable for the staff he is working with. there is also another unusual situation here in that phil gormley actually lives at the premises of police scotland's headquarters. earlier the premises of police scotland's headquarters. earlierthe former president of the association of scottish police superintendents, niven rennie, spoke to us. that's a question for the police authority to answer. i don't know the strength of the evidence. there was a number of things they have to consider that they'll need to consider, whether the chief constable might intimidate potential witnesses by being there. it would also have to be fair to the chief constable, they can't prejudge the outcome of the investigation, they must take a balanced approach. the last thing which is unique in this situation is that the chief constable lives at the force headquarters so even by putting him on gardening leave your not obstructing him from the workplace. these are difficult matters to be considered and weighed by the
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authorities. now, politicians are getting involved in this, they're saying this is a very serious situation to be in. earlier, the leader of the scottish liberal democrats, willie rennie, called for him to step aside while he is being investigated. you cannot have an important investigation like this conducted while the chief constable is still in position. he needs to step to one side. i think it would be wise if he took that decision himself. this is a very serious allegation about gross misconduct. and therefore it wouldn't be appropriate for the chief constable to remain in position while the investigation is being conducted. we've also heard from the scottish conservatives, who described police scotland as being rudderless. they say it's the latest prices in a series of crises to hit the force. they're asking the
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scottish government to take control of the situation. scottish labour also say the scottish government must assure the public it is in control of policing in scotland. the scottish government said it would be inappropriate for them to make any comment at this time. we don't know how long this investigation will take. because the commission has said it will take as long as it needs to. catriona renton in glasgow. the deadline for reaching an agreement over the end of life care for the terminally ill baby charlie gard passed at midday today. charlie's parents had accepted that he would spend his final days in a hospice, but chris gard and connie yates wanted to spend more time with their son before his life support is taken away. a 16—year—old girl found dead on a railway is thought to have been electrocuted. taiyah peebles was discovered at herne bay station in kent on wednesday morning. british transport police said the teenager was pronounced dead at the scene after sustaining serious injuries s. serious injuries.
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a postmortem examination will take place on friday. police and child protection workers have been criticised for failing to protect two teenagers from brighton who were killed in syria in 2014. 18—year—old abdullah deghayes secretly travelled to the country with his 17—year—old brotherjaffar, to fight alongside jihadists. but a serious case review found their radicalisation came as a ‘total shock‘ to the authorities — despite a number of warning signs. traditional medical advice says that we should always finish a course of antibiotics — even if we feel better — in order for them to be effective; but now a group of scientists has cast doubt on that recommendation. an article in the british medical journal argues that taking antibiotics for longer than necessary can increase the risk of developing a resistance to them. however england's chief medical officer says more research is needed before any change in policy. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. # antibiotics, we are wonderful pills. all sorts of ways are being used to spread the word antibiotics need
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to be used sparingly. that message is becoming ever more urgent as fears grow over the dangers posed by microbes that are resistant to the drugs. traditionally we've always been told to finish a course of antibiotics. but some believe that might actually be making the situation worse. what we worry about is that many patients are already colonised with resistant bacteria and they might not be part of the infection, they might be in your gut, on your skin, up your nose, and if we use antibiotics for longer than is required, what we're doing is enhancing the chances those resistant bacteria will take over and colonise us more. following alexander fleming's discovery of penicillin in the late 19205, discovery of penicillin in the late 1920s, the belief was not taking enough could lead to bacteria developing resistance. the modern day official advice is still to complete the course you've been prescribed.
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now questions are being raised about whether that advice is correct. some doctors are concerned patients will be confused. i'm very fearful people will hear the headlines without seeing the truth of the story behind the headlines and will decide on their own accord to take antibiotics for a shorter amount of time than prescribed, which is potentially unsafe, just because you start to feel better doesn't mean the infection is completely gone. today's report acknowledges more research is needed before the finish the course advice is changed to something like, stop when you feel better. the serious concerns about drug resistant bugs mean long established practice is now being questioned. dominic hughes, bbc news. the duke of cambridge will work his last shift as an air ambulance pilot today, before taking up his royal duties full—time. for the past two years, prince william has been working for the east anglian air ambulance service, based in cambridge. its chief executive described him as a much loved and valued member of the crew. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. it's a job which has clearly meant a great deal to him — to work as member of the emergency services, valued for what he does, rather than for who he is, flying an air ambulance and helping
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to save lives. it was more than two years ago that william first reported for duty with the east anglian air ambulance. he had finished as an raf search and rescue pilot but chose to retrain and qualify for this new role. on his first morning, he explained how much it mattered to him. i am just fantastically excited to be here today, the first day. it has been a long time coming, many exams and training to get here, and i'm hugely excited to bejoining a very professional bunch of guys and girls doing a unique, complex job with the air ambulance. in the months since, william has piloted the air ambulance to scores of emergencies. he has seen tragedy and extremes of emotion at close quarters. writing in the eastern daily press this morning, he says he is hugely grateful for having had the experience. he says it has instilled in him "a profound respect for the men and women who serve in our emergency services which i hope to continue to champion, even as i leave the profession." william has always known his
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opportunity to do a regular job would be limited. his grandmother fully supported his wish to postpone full—time royal duty for as long as possible. but now, as the generational shift within the royal family becomes more apparent, william has had to accept the inevitable. and so, after tonight's shift, william will finally embark on the role which has always been his destiny and with which he now seems comfortable — as a full—time working member of the british royalfamily, taking on more responsibilities in support of the queen, but with what are clearly deeply embedded memories of his time as pilot william wales of the air ambulance emergency service. nicholas witchell, bbc news. a police officer in florida has been promoted — to the role of official alligator wrestler. this is 0fficer alfredo vargas responding to a call out
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of a reptile outside a resident's front door. this is the body cam footage taken by 0fficer alfredo vargas. he decided to deal with the himself because the trap would take another hour to get there. let's listen to how calmly he did this. he wrestled with the alligator for a while. eventually managed to put him into a bag and put him on the back of his patrol car and drove him to a canal. if a trapper had been called to deal with this he would have shocked the alligator straightaway, so shocked the alligator straightaway, so there is a bright side to this. i know you're thinking, rather him than me, that's what we're all thinking. he took the alligator to a
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canal where he let him go and did not say simulator. service did not say, see you later. that's get a weather update, nick miller has the latest on the other side of the newsroom. follow that! you've done all the jokes, so get straight on with it. there are some really hefty downpour to content with over the next few hours, some heavyin with over the next few hours, some heavy in the london area for the test match at the oval, there's been a bit of sunshine but this showers may not be too far away. southern and eastern parts of the uk will lose most of the showers, but continuing with a gusty wind. let's ta ke continuing with a gusty wind. let's take you on to tomorrow. showers continuing on and off during the day. it will be a dry spell for england and wales but then later in the day, more topics of rain pushing
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through the sap —— outbreaks of rain pushing through the uk. quite a cool breeze. more of us will see the rain in england and wales tomorrow, still showers in northern ireland and scotla nd showers in northern ireland and scotland and the threat of outbreaks of rainfor scotland and the threat of outbreaks of rain for some in the south—east of rain for some in the south—east of england on saturday. still a lot to play for in the detail of the forecast, keep watching for updates. sunshine is sunshine and showers again. —— sunday is sunshine and showers again. hello, this is bbc news with me, simon mccoy. the headlines at 3.30pm. the government has been accused of waiting too long to consider the impact of brexit on immigration from the european union. the number of assaults in prison is at a record high, and the performance of ten jails in england and wales is causing "serious concern" according to new figures. wildfires are continuing to burn in southern france for the fourth day. at least 6,000 firefighters and troops are now battling the flames.
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we looked up and all you could see was the sky like it was dante's inferno. it was blood red, smoke everywhere, the smell of smoke, the acrid smell through the camp was horrendous. scotland's most senior police officer, phil gormley, is being investigated over claims of gross misconduct. the details of the allegation have not been made public. in a moment...the nominations for the 2017 mercury prize have been announced, grime star stormzy is among those up for an award. let's get the sports now. it's very frustrating, not you, the cricket! england have lost another wicket in the third test at the oval. joe root won the toss and chose to bat first against south africa but his is the latest wicket to fall.
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he made 29 after a brilliant catch from keeper quinton de kock. vernon philander also dismissed opener keatonjennings for a duck. debutant tom westley went for 25. it's been a very cautious innings from alastair cook. he's just reached his 55th half—ce ntu ry he's just reached his 55th half—century for england. it came off 128 deliveries. he's holding things together at the moment. four—time tour de france champion chris froome will ride in this year's vuelta a espana in pursuit of a rare double. the 32—year—old, who won the tour last sunday, has finished second in the vuelta three times. only two men have won both tours in the same year, but that was when the spanish race was in april. it starts on august 19th and finishes in madrid on september 10th. great britain's molly renshaw is through to the semi finals of the 200m breaststroke
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at the swimming world championships in budapest. the 21—year—old beat the commonwealth champion taylor mckeown into second place. ross murdoch was second fastest in the corresponding men's event. both the men's and women's semi—finals take place in the coming hours. england and scotland are preparing for their final group games at the women's european championship tonight. both can qualify, scotland will have to beat spain by two goals to have any chance. and they also need england to beat portugal. a point will be enough for england to top the group. if they win without conceding a goal, they'll become the first england side, male orfemale, to progress at a major tournament with a 100% record and without letting in a single goal. we want to improve, we want to get better. we've said before we want to be the best team in the world and so far we have had a good performance against scotland, in other areas a better performance against spain, it's about bringing those two together now and improving again and keeping the snowball rolling because we want to go into those knockout stages feeling confident, feeling that we're a team with momentum and not only
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will we feel that but the rest of the tournament will feel it as well. everton fans should be out in force tonight to welcome home wayne rooney as he makes his first competitive start since rejoining the club from manchester united. ronaldo koeman's side face slovakian side ruzomberok in the first leg of the third qualifying round in the europa league. the manager's already seen the impact rooney has had at the club. what i like is his ambition, in training, and showing the young people, the young lads in the team, experience, explaining things. discussions about football, about positions. i think it's really what i expected. manchester city manager pep guardiola says his £52 million signing benjamin mendy won't play for "two or three weeks" because of a muscle problem. his side beat real madrid 4—1 in los angeles. a record crowd of more than 90,000 saw city earn theirfirst win of their pre—season tour.
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17—year—old brahim diaz was among the scorers. meanwhile manchester united's tour of the us ended with a 1—0 defeat to barcelona in washington. neymar scored the only goal of the game. finally, the bbc has won the live tv, radio and digital rights to broadcast next month's us pga championship at quail hollow. you can see ifjordan spieth can complete his career grand slam with highlights and live coverage on bbc two, the red button, online and five live, from the 10th to the 13th of august. the cricket at the oval, england are now four down. bold 414 england. —— another wicket lost. a alastair cook
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is still going strong. well, thank you! let's talk more then about a new report ordered by the government looking at the role eu nationals play in the economy as it attempts to draw up a post—brexit immigration policy. the home secretary, amber rudd, said the report she has commissioned from the migration advisory committee would help the government decide what kind of immigration policy was needed after brexit. freedom of movement is the phrase people use about being part of the eu from what we have at the moment. what we have said is we want a new informed evidence—based eu migration policy. we commissioned the mac to deliver on that, an independent group and they will be consulting with business and in the meantime there will be an implementation phase when new eu workers who come here will need to register their details, but the full new eu immigration policy will be after the mac has reported in the final phase of leaving the eu. you say you want businesses to be sure there won't be a cliff edge and there will be flexibility, what does that look like?
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is it work permits? we have all those possibilities in the sort of thing we might discuss after the mac has concluded the review, but let me be very clear, what they are doing is gathering the evidence. it will be for the government to set the policy. but we want to hear from businesses and what their views are as we look at this during the next year. on that evidence clearly different industries and different parts of the country want different things. how will you satisfy them all? we will have to look at the evidence to make sure we try and do that. we are leaving the eu and we will be having a new policy but part of what i am announcing today is show that we will make sure it is evidence—based and that we are going to make sure that it works for the whole country. i am here in scotland today to celebrate the launch of a new type of boat that will help to keep our borders secure. this is going to be a really national consultation so that we look at the different regions and make sure the policy we finally arrive with does support the whole country. on that, the groups of peers and mps
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in the scottish government has said the possibility of a different arrangement for scotland should be left on the table. is it on the table or something you should be considering? we haven't seen evidence for that working in any way but we have absolutely asked the mac to make sure they look at the whole of the country, the whole of the union to see what would work best. does that mean the possibility of a different deal is on the table or has it been ruled out? it hasn't been specifically set out by the mac. but we asked them to look at the different areas of the country. the move by the government is designed to restore public confidence and to help bring reassurance to businesses in the uk. the deputy director general of the confederation of british industry, josh hardie, said that this was a sensible first step. we've always said that it's really important that we have an honest conversation about immigration. you've got businesses who are genuinely concerned about whether they'll be able to access the skills, the labour that the uk needs to build our roads, our rail, to grow our industries, to staff our hospitals. at the same time, you've got genuine public concern about the social
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impact of immigration. we've got to have an honest conversation to find the middle ground, to find a consensus so we can build a model that works for business and society. but make no mistake, this is urgent. this is affecting individuals right now who, despite good initial offers from the government, still aren't sure whether to take up a job, whether to stay, whether to put their children into schools. it's affecting businesses who may get planning permission on a plant but who aren't sure whether to take that planning permission because they don't know whether they'll have the labour to staff it in the future. so we've got to move quickly. joining me now from our westminster studio is rachel marangozov, senior research fellow at the institute for employment studies. the need is urgent, we heard there, and this is the first step but it's more than a year since the vote the leave the eu. i surprised it's taken this long? i think so,
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leave the eu. i surprised it's taken this long? ithink so, ithink today's report is welcome and the migration and advisory committee are well—placed to do something like this. but we have known for a long time that key sectors of the economy are heavily reliant on eu migrants. 10% of workers in manufacturing come from europe, 10% of our doctors. there are some nhs trust in london and the south—east where 20% of their nurses come europe. we know some of this for awhile. definitely the need is urgent. and the suggestion of a transitionary period seems to get broad backing. absolutely, i don't think it's in everyone's interest to have a perfect chip brexit or some kind of clea n perfect chip brexit or some kind of clean break. businesses and sectors need time to prepare for this. and they're heavily relied on the skills and the labour from europe and they need to put in place plans to a low then to prepare sensibly for this. we always hear how businesses hate
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uncertainty and people who are already working in this country up robbie quite uncertain, how much damage is that causing? it already like damaging, the net migration figures, there was a drop of 80 4000. mostly driven by eu workers leaving the uk. we know there's been a96 leaving the uk. we know there's been a 96 drop in the number of eu nurses registering to work here. there's been a 30% rise of academic leaving britain. ashman are academics leaving britain's universities. people need to know what their futures are. we have not even resolve the issues about the status of eu nationals in the country. the uk insists it will attract the best and brightest people to this country. it's a work permit system likely to put people off? it could do. it depends what form it takes.
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0ne do. it depends what form it takes. one thing is certain, it will place a huge administrative burden on employers and all the home office, and isa employers and all the home office, and is a need to prepare for that. there's a question on whether 20 months will be sufficient for that. u nfortu nately, months will be sufficient for that. unfortunately, it could be the best and the brightest who will be the first to leave because they are the best and the brightest and they know that their skills are wanted and valued in other parts of the world. and when we're looking at, you highlighted some sectors like the health sector where there are going to be uncertainties until we know how this report will be adopted by the government, what is it that people are wanting when they're looking on the continent, coming to britain, in the next couple of yea rs, britain, in the next couple of years, is there anything that would bridge that gap, if you like, and make them build a little more co mforta ble make them build a little more comfortable with committing to our time in this country? they want to
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know that their rights are going to know that their rights are going be in place and their rights as citizens will be secure and they wa nt to citizens will be secure and they want to know what the future holds. the government haven't come to any arrangement regarding that. they also want to feel welcome. i think a lot of workers are leaving because post—brexit, they don't feel particularly welcome in this country and they want to know that britain will remain open to accessing their skills and all the talents that they bring to key sectors of our economy like the nhs. so the message to the government isjust get like the nhs. so the message to the government is just get on with it? absolutely. thank you forjoining us. the prime minister says the conservatives have come a long way on the issue of gay rights, but that there's still more to do to achieve equality. theresa may was marking today's 50th anniversary of the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality in england and wales. the introduction of the sexual 0ffences act of 1967 meant it was no longer a crime for gay men aged 21 and over to be in a relationship in private.
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the law changed in northern ireland and scotland later. here's sophie long. westminster lit up to mark 50 years since it enacted the law which partially decriminalised homosexuality. it may have been the beginning of legalisation but it did not stop the arrests. after 1967, pride celebrations became annual events, promoting equality and challenging prejudice. but over the decades, thousands of gay or bisexual men were convicted for behaviour which would not have been a crime if their partner had been a woman. terence stewart said he was wrongly found guilty of soliciting in 1981. 14 years after the act came into effect. the offence remains on his record today and has affected every aspect of his life. i was stopped from choosing particular careers. it also meant if i applied for a mortgage, i could not get a mortgage because that would come into play in an application
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for a mortgage. so it affected where you lived as well. it had a huge affect on my health and well—being as well. i am very happy to announce that you are now legally husbands. cheering. it was not until three years ago, that people in britain were able to marry the person they loved, regardless of their sex. david and peter were one of the first gay couples to tie the knot. david told me today marks an important anniversary, and an opportunity to look back at a long, hard fight that people can be proud of. 50 years ago marked the beginning of a very long journey that a lot of people devoted their lives to, put themselves at personal risk and all the rest. now when we look back over the 50 years, we can see all these small but very important steps that people and the government and society have made leading up to today.
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it is a very momentous time to look back and see the progress we have made. but campaigners say there is still more to do to make sure young people can grow up confident that they can be whoever they want to be. the short list for one of britain's most prestigious music awards has been announced. among the nominations for this year's mercury music prize are stormzy, the xx and ed sheeran and the winner will be announced on 14th september. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba has been catching up with the nominees. mzimba has been catching 0ne mzimba has been catching of the nominees are din joining one of the nominees are dinosaur, joining me, how does that feel? absolutely amazing, the mercury prize is so amazing, so many different types of music are celebrated. so many different types,
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your sound, what would you call it, electric jazz? your sound, what would you call it, electricjazz? maybe your sound, what would you call it, electric jazz? maybe we try and avoid thej word! it's the improvised a music, trumpet led. avoid thej word! it's the improvised a music, trumpet ledm certainly is jazz but something like this gives us a chance to appeal to access a wide audience. for me it's trumpet led instrumental music. everyone us can decide what the sticker is. how does it feel to be up sticker is. how does it feel to be up against artists like stormzy and ed sheeran who have a slightly higher profile than you, it would be fairto higher profile than you, it would be fair to say? i think ed sheeran should be careful because the dinosaur streams are going to rocket, and trumpet with take over the world! irish singer—songwriter ‘s will be old news! i'm joking, obviously. it's fantastic, their artists who been so dedicated to their craft and really worked at it over time. it's an absolute honour to be amongst these kind of names.
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how important are awards like this in celebrating the album as an artform at a time where people just strea m artform at a time where people just stream or download individual tracks so stream or download individual tracks so much? super important, it's such a statement of an artist to make an album, you can put so much love and ca re album, you can put so much love and care into that. it's really important to continue that at this time of streaming, for artists to be able to put out big statements. all was like this at the break that and turn audiences onto it. —— awards like this. the government asks experts to work out the costs and benefits of eu migrants, more than a year after britain voted to leave the european union. critics argue it should have been commissioned a year ago. 71 prisoners in england and wales were released by mistake last year, which is the highest number for a decade. wild fires are continuing to burn in parts of southern france. in the business news.
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lloyds has set aside another £1 billion to cover the cost of insurance mis—selling and the treatment of mortgage customers. the announcement comes after the banking group posts half—year pre—tax profits of £2.5 billion. uk car production fell by 13.7% injune compared to a year earlier, london heathrow airport has reported its results for the first six months of 2017. pre—tax profits are up 36% to £102 million with passenger traffic up 3.9% to 37.1 million. uk car production fell by 13.7% injune compared to a year earlier, the third month in a row that output‘s taken a dive. the society of motor manufacturers and traders said the uk market was cooling in line with forecasts, following a long period of record growth. a lot of companies are complaining
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about uncertainty over brexit but eurotunnel seems to be happy about its forecasts. it operates high—speed trains between brussels, paris and london and also the shuttle trains which contain cars, coaches, freight as well. it's right in the thick of cross—channel traffic and last year it made £514 million. this year it expects 530 million, the year after, 560 million. the ceo is with me. i remember after the announcement at the referendum, your shares fell very sharply. that was because people felt you were going to be in the firing line. it turns out it hasn't happened that way, why not? hello, a chilly, i am the ceo for eurostar. not publicly traded like eurotunnel. they are the operations
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managers of the tunnel, but we are privately held. but when brexit happened, a lot of people thought, what will happen to the traffic? but we have a very good first half of the year. we had a lot of american tourists coming back to europe, they didn't come last year and they came back, up to more than 24% year—on—year. back, up to more than 24% ear—on— ear. we're back, up to more than 24% year—on—year. we're very pleased with what happening at the moment. do you think this is because it's the european economy which is doing well at the moment rather than the uk economy? we definitely see the french economy picking up nicely at the moment. but on the business market, it's on both sides between london, paris and brussels, the traffic is strong for the business market. actually, we see also the netherlands going very well. it's interesting for us because at the end of the year, we start a new
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service linking london to amsterdam directly. at the moment, there are no real signs of worry for us. you're talking about the european customers doing well, but what about the british customers, ie doing as well there? -- are you doing as well with them? yes, the british market is doing well as well. the uncertainty of the run of elections which happened this year and last year, consumers can be very cautious but this year it was actually, it was just a very short—term leave, people have been consuming short—term city breaks quite a lot. what about when we get to a point of brexit where we have more control of the borders? what is the impact of more customs checks and more delays, would it not be, at the borders? how are you preparing for that? we're preparing hard for that, we have
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engaged with the uk government and their eu counterparts, and i think there's a genuine understanding and willingness from all parties to make sure that the transition is as smooth as possible for the passengers. we already have passport checks anyway, so there could be some changes to that, we have also have x—ray machines to check luggage. so hopefully customers will not see the difference in terms of operations when brexit takes place. in other business stories we've been following. a sharp fall in the shares of the drugmaker astrazeneca. they are down more than 16% after announcing disappointing results. the firm said first—quarter revenue fell 10%. it also reported a major setback in trials of a new lung cancer drug therapy. profits have collapsed at two of the country's estate agent chains. countrywide profits were almost wiped out, falling 98%. foxtons, based largely in london saw profits plunge 64%. both numbers for the first six
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months of 2017 foxton's head nic budden said demand had slowed due to "unprecedented economic and political uncertainty". profits at sky tv have taken a tumble because it's spending more for premier league rights. it's adding more customers, particularly in germany, italy and austria. but having to pay an extra £600 million or so more for football rights has given their profits a bit of a dent. pre—tax profit have fallen £27m to £1.05bn. here are the markets. the ftse is not really going anywhere. lloyds bank down a touch. countrywide and there is that damage. thank you very much. the british museum says it's lost a diamond ring
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worth three quarters of £1 million. the cartier ring is thought to have been donated anonymously. it was reported missing six years ago but it's only now that the museum ‘s annual accounts have been published that the losses been revealed. the british museum said the ring was not published —— public display went it went missing and security has been improved. any information, give them a ring! get me out of that, nick miller! you're on fire! lets damn thing you down with the showers across the uk. hefty ones, —— let's get you damps down. anything is going on in the sky at the moment, this is the radar today, some thundery showers in the midlands and the north—west and northern ireland. you may have heard a rumble of thunder in the past hour in the north. the showers will live on into the evening but as we go
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into the night, southern and eastern parts of the uk will turn more dry. that showers kidding going across north—west ireland, scotland, and northern england. as we start the day tomorrow, some of us will have showers from the word go, others will have a respite. the showers at 8am, plenty of showers across scotla nd 8am, plenty of showers across scotland and north—west england. prepare your umbrellas. 0ther scotland and north—west england. prepare your umbrellas. other side of the pennines, not too many showers and further south across england and wales, it will be a dry stored, variable cloud and sunny spells. an isolated shower. through the day, we will keep a feed of the showers going across northern ireland, western england, the odd one more easterly. western england and wales gets dry weather but cloud
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increases and our books of rain into south—west england and wales. it's getting wetter. temperatures into the high teens. a few spots 20 degrees, the exception rather than the rule. tomorrow there is a change in the weather halfway through the day, we could get showers towards the end of the day. we're not certain how quickly the rain will spread across england during the evening. potentially some heavy bursts and difficult driving conditions through friday evening. the rain will be there for some of us. the rain will be there for some of us. still weather front close to the south—east on saturday and whether in the north—west, if you're close to that low pressure front, some showers around. if you're close to the south—east, the potentialfor outbreaks of rain. in between, you could escape, mainly dry on saturday. not many people escaping on sunday because it's sunday so
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sunshine and showers. some could be on the heavy side. the weekend, cool on the heavy side. the weekend, cool, breezy, showery and there will be some sunshine at times but not friendly length of time. headlines: ministers are accused of waiting far too long to consider brexit‘s impact on eu immigration. a new report looking at the costs and benefits of eu migrants is expected to be completed in september 2018 , six months before brexit. a new report looking at the costs and benefits of eu migrants is expected to be completed in september 2018 , six months before brexit. it's completely ridiculous that it has taken them 13 months to commission this basic evidence. the most senior police officer in scotla nd the most senior police officer in scotland has been urged to step aside while he's investigated over allegations of misconduct. wildfires continue to burn in southern france, 6,000 firefighters and troops are now battling the flames. also in the next hour: experts cast doubt on the traditional advice to always finish a prescribed course of antibiotics. some medics argue that taking them for longer than necessary can increase the risk of developing a resistance to them. and, see you later, alligator, a
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