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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 27, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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headlines: ministers are accused of waiting far too long to consider brexit‘s impact on eu immigration. a new report looking at the costs and benefits of eu migrants is expected to be completed in september 2018 , six months before brexit. a new report looking at the costs and benefits of eu migrants is expected to be completed in september 2018 , six months before brexit. it's completely ridiculous that it has taken them 13 months to commission this basic evidence. the most senior police officer in scotla nd the most senior police officer in scotland has been urged to step aside while he's investigated over allegations of misconduct. wildfires continue to burn in southern france, 6,000 firefighters and troops are now battling the flames. also in the next hour: experts cast doubt on the traditional advice to always finish a prescribed course of antibiotics. some medics argue that taking them for longer than necessary can increase the risk of developing a resistance to them. and, see you later, alligator, a florida police officer tries to control this unwarranted intruder found by a terrified resident on his front porch. tail
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the government has been accused of waiting too long to consider tail too long to consider the government has been accused of waiting too long to consider the impact of brexit on immigration from the european union. a new report looking at the costs and benefits of eu migrants is expected to be completed in september 2018, six months before brexit. the home secretary amber rudd says that there will no "cliff edge" on immigration after march 2019, when the free movement of people between the eu and the uk ends. 0ur political correspondent iain watson reports. getting tough on immigration. the home secretaryjoined a coastal patrol in scotland today. but simultaneously she signalled the government wanted to take a flexible approach to legal migration after brexit. she made it clear a new immigration policy wouldn't be implemented immediately. the independet immigration advisory committee would examine how many eu migrants they might need.
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we want a new, informed, evidence—based eu migration policy. we've commissioned the mac to consult on that. an independent group, they'll be consulting with business. in the meantime there will be an implementation phase when new eu workers who come here will need to register their details. the full new eu immigration policy will be after the mac has reported in the final phase of leaving the eu. the government says it wants the economy to flourish after brexit so a new study from the migration advisory committee will examine what businesses are most reliant on eu labour, the costs and benefits of eu migration and the potential impact of reduction in the number of eu citizens working here. questions are now being raised not just about the substance of the new eu migration study, but about its timing.
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mps aren't here at westminster during the summer to examine its terms of reference. but there is another issue, too, because the government's critics are saying, why on earth are they commissioning this now and not a year agojust after the referendum 7 we've been meeting with businesses talking to different sectors, right across government. since the referendum. this is part of the process. the foreign secretary hadn't even heard of the new immigration study. you bring me news of this report today, so i'm sorry if i don't, i can't comment... it sounds like an interesting report. but there is another issue of timing. the government will set out its broad approach to immigration after brexit later this year. ministers will introduce legislation for a new immigration system early next year. the government's new study on eu migration won't report until much later in 2018. six months before brexit will not be enough time to structure a new migration system. particularly if they want to completely alter the current system. but are business is reassured
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by the government approach? it's very welcome there seems to be broad consensus that a time—limited transition is sensible. now we need to work on their detail. what model is it going to adopt? what does that mean? we suggested a common—sense approach that you stay in the single market and customs union until a deal is enforced. if you voted leave in the referendum to take back control of immigration, the government says it will deliver. but to reassure businesses, ministers are sounding more flexible over how long it will take to reduce the numbers. studio: scotland's most senior police officer has confirmed he is being investigated in connection with claims of gross professional misconduct. details of the allegation against phil gormley haven't been made public. 0ur correspondent catriona renton is
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in glasgow. what do we know? except you what is being investigated and who has made these allegations are not known but we understand there has been a claim of bullying made against the chief constable, by a senior officer, now this is being investigated by the police investigations and review commission, they cannot tell as any detail but what they have said is that if these allegations are proven, they would amount to gross misconduct, if that was sufficiently serious, then that could lead to phil gormley losing his job, serious, then that could lead to phil gormley losing hisjob, phil gormley has been at police scotland for a year gormley has been at police scotland fora yearand a gormley has been at police scotland for a year and a half years the most senior police officer, police scotla nd senior police officer, police scotland is the second—largest force in the uk. phil congdon has said that he is cooperating but he will carry on his duties while he is being investigated. —— phil gormley. this has led to some concerns. the
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former president of the association of scottish police superintendents spoke with us earlier and said there isissues spoke with us earlier and said there is issues around this because it could make people feel uncomfortable. another unusual situation, phil gormley lives on the premises, at the scottish police headquarters. so let's see what has been said. that is a question for the police authority to answer, i don't the evidence... there is a number of things they need to consider, they will need to consider whether the chief constable might intimidate potential witnesses by being there and also you would have to be fair to the chief constable, they cannot prejudge the outcome. they must take a balanced approach. the lasting which is unique is that he actually lives at the headquarters, even by putting him on guardian leave —— gardening leave, you are not abstracting him. these are difficult matters to be considered and weighed
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by the authorities. this is being viewed as a very serious situation, politicians from across the board have been getting involved in the debate today, and the leader of the scottish liberal democrats, willie rennie, says that he thinks that phil gormley should step aside while being investigated. you cannot have an important investigation like this conducted while the chief constable is still in position, he needs to step to one side and it would be wise if he took that decision himself, this isa very he took that decision himself, this is a very serious allegation about gross misconduct, therefore it would not be appropriate for the chief constable to remain in position while the investigation is being conducted. 0ther politicians have got involved, the scottish conservatives say that they believe police scotland is currently rudderless and they are asking for the scottish government to ta ke asking for the scottish government to take control of the situation. labour are also asking that the
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scottish government must assure the public that it is in control of policing in scotland. they say that it would be inappropriate for them to comment while this investigation is underway. in terms of a timetable, we do not know when the investigation will be over, they say that it will take as long as it needs to. more on the main story, the government being accused of waiting too long to consider the impact of brexit on immigration. we will speak 110w brexit on immigration. we will speak now with estephanie dunn, regional director at the royal college of nursing. since 2012, between 2012 and 2017, we have seen an increase in the number of eu nationals joining we have seen an increase in the number of eu nationalsjoining the free council register, they have been extremely welcome. they make up about 5% of the nursing and
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midwifery register. you —— are you hearing from them some unease at the uncertainty, there are clearly is at the moment, for we understand what brexit actually means? there is a general unease, that is playing through in the numbers that are leaving the register. since brexit we have seen a reduction, a significant reduction in number, around 96% between april of last yearup to around 96% between april of last year up to now. which is a significant reduction. we cannot afford to lose these nurses. talk of afford to lose these nurses. talk of a transitional period, avoiding the so—called cliff edge, presumably thatis so—called cliff edge, presumably that is something he would welcome? absolutely, the new k —— the uk nursing workforce is not in a position to lose any nurses at this point of time, we have a crisis with about 40,000 to view nurses in the
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system. to have a situation where at the point where brexit is live, to have nurses leaving the system or those who have increasing uncertainty leaving beforehand, would be extremely detrimental to the nhs and social care and care in the nhs and social care and care in the community. let me pick you up on that, if that level of departure continues, what is the impact, what will it mean for people who rely upon social care. it will mean people having to wait longer to have nursing procedures done in the community, you would see a fall in the number of people working in care homes, and in hospitals. all of us who use health services rely on the contributions of these skills and experiences nurses and what they make to the system. do you get sick and tired of constantly being asked what is the benefit of someone coming from the eu to work in the system here? it is a bit frustrating
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given that we have such a lot of evidence to show that the increased numbers of eu nurses and other overseas nurses contributing to care in the uk has been extremely beneficial, at a time when we have not been able to retain the domestic workforce, so the absence of those people doing vital work, does cause concern. presumably, to get people to wa nt concern. presumably, to get people to want to come back, those that have departed, what would that take, first off, they would like to feel welcome, but what about talk about work permits, anything to do with bureaucracy is presumably a turn—off. bureaucracy is presumably a turn-off. it creates massive uncertainty, along with the emotional side not being welcome, but up to those nurses we have, 95% of the register falling, but up to those nurses we have, 95% of the registerfalling, we but up to those nurses we have, 95% of the register falling, we want them to have a sense of certainty,
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we welcome the home secretary's letter to the migration advisory committee, where she talks about a grace period, and we would like to make sure that there is a transition period that avoids the cliff edge, and ensures that in that time, we have stability, we do some really robust work around growing, developing and maintaining the domestic workforce, as well as retaining the national to want to remain and work in the nhs and social care. estephanie dunn, regional director at the royal couege regional director at the royal college of nursing, thank you very much for your time. thank you. wildfires are continuing to burn in southern france for the fourth day. at least 6,000 firefighters and troops are now battling the flames. thousands of people have been forced
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to leave their homes and campsites around the town of bormes—les—mimosas, with many spending the night on beaches, or in sports halls and other public buildings. wyre davies reports. v0|ceover: battling for a third consecutive night, more than 6,000 firefighters appear to be slowly winning the fight against wildfires that have caused so much havoc and damage in the hills above the cote d'azur. thousands of tourists and local residents, who have been evacuated from their hillside homes and campsites, also spent another night camped out on the beaches below. uncomfortable and inconvenient, but glad to have escaped with their lives. translation: it's like wild camping. it's been two days and it's a bit strange, but we are getting used to it. all the same, we would like to get back to the campsite. the most important thing is not being in danger. i have heard, forthe moment, there are no victims and that has to be the most important thing. after destroying some 10,000 hectares of mediterranean scrub and forest, the fire's progress has been halted thanks to the use of more than a dozen water bombers. the aftermath is described as a disaster for the local economy and the environment by regional officials who believe the blaze was deliberately started. among the hundreds of british
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tourists forced to flee but unsure what happens now, isobel heppenstall from surrey. woken up at about half past 12 by the emergency services shouting, "fire, fire," in french. didn't really know what to do. some people were running to the beach and putting life jackets on the children, but we decided to try and drive out. we were directed by the police, eventually reached a safe point where we watched the fire unfold. horrific. really awfully scary. emergency officials are reluctant to stand firefighters down and allow people back to their homes and campsites because of the very real possibility that dry mistral winds will fan the flames once more and the threat will return. indeed, weather conditions across the southern mediterranean are still precarious. hundreds of homes have been evacuated on the island of corsica, and from portugal to the italian riviera, firefighting teams have been trying to contain several smaller fires before they too get out of control. wyre davies, bbc news.
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studio: john grant has been holidaying in bormes—les—mimosas for the last 15 years and described how the situation became increasingly serious before he was ordered to evacuate the scene. around 11:30pm we heard some pimping, around 11:30pm we heard some popping, we wondered what it was, and it was only after 20 minutes we got a call by the owners, and they advised us to get to the muster station, for possible evacuation. at that point we realise the popping was gas cylinders in the caravans about one mile from us. when we came the muster station, all you could see was the skylight it was dante ‘s inferno, it was just blood red, smoke everywhere, acrid smell through the camp was horrendous. it
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was then that we realised how serious the problem was facing us. we were advised at the time, if we wa nted we were advised at the time, if we wanted to, to make our evacuation, go north, we could not go south west, the roads were blocked. i currently am stood next to one of the mountains, and it is like... it is like a moonscape, all day yesterday and today, people had sorties of planes flying over, just had one two minutes ago, for another water drop, and i could see the people in control of this thing, it isa people in control of this thing, it is a very serious event, and a serious position to be in. we have been looking at images of the french president looking from a helicopter. how is the holiday going? perhaps a silly question. unfortunately, a lot of the vignettes are now closed, it
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does affect the economy, and this is where it will hit them. —— vineyards. the holidays for a lot of people here have stopped, and their livelihoods have stopped, some of them, for good. the holiday, the weather is fantastic of course, u nfortu nately weather is fantastic of course, unfortunately the last couple of days it has been a very challenging and testing area, a very resilient place, and certainly a blaze which we will not leave for long, we have been here 15 years, we have seen some fires but nothing of this magnitude. there was a stage on tuesday, wednesday morning, 4pm, i was looking from the left to the right and for 180 degrees i could see a wall of flame, it was, both mesmerising and terror rising at the same time. you can get in your car and head home, if the need is that bad but plenty of people who live in the area have no choice. that's right, we do feel for the local population here, because there is a
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lot of people, jetting back a little early, not coming down, because they change their plans, because they are worried about the state of play down here, which is understandable. you feel for the locals, i'm stood next to one of the sites, a caravan park, for when caravans are in use, 250 ca rava ns for when caravans are in use, 250 caravans here, not a single one has survived. their house, their livelihood, the people who owns the company, it is all gone. it is a very sad sight to see. this place is used to these fires, but this is a magnitude that has not been seen for some time. it is only with great thanks to the italian and spanish who have chipped in with the aeroplanes, salty after sortie of these planes, which have been amazing to see. it is odd to see people on holiday, with the whole of the countryside in flames. —— sortie after sortie. it really is something else. breaking news from the high court on
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charlie gard, we are hearing that thejudge, mrjustice charlie gard, we are hearing that the judge, mr justice francis, charlie gard, we are hearing that thejudge, mrjustice francis, has approved a plan which will see charlie inevitably die shortly after being moved to a hospice and having support treatment withdrawn. that is a statement to the high court from thejudge, charlie's parents have initially said they wanted the 11—month—old to spend days with them at home before dying. great ormond street has said it was not practical to provide life—support. hence the agreement that charlie should be taken to a hospice. charlie gard will inevitably die shortly after being moved to a hospice and having life—support treatment withdrawn. that is the latest on a case that we have been bringing you over the last few days. and most distressing case for all concerned. that is the latest from the high court, we will have more a bit later. a high court
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judge has approved a plan which will see charlie gard die as he's moved toa see charlie gard die as he's moved to a hospice and have life—support treatment withdrawn. the government has asked independent experts to produce a report assessing eu migration but critics argue it should have been commissioned a year ago. scotland's most senior police officer has been urged to step aside while he is investigated over allegations of misconduct. in sport, england wickets continued to fall at the oval, the test debutant david milan is latest out. rain has now come to england's rescue and stopped play. england say the momentum is with them as they prepare to face portugal in their final group game at the women's euros, a draw will see them win the group. and jordan spieth‘s bid to com plete group. and jordan spieth‘s bid to complete a career grand slam will be
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on the bbc, who have won the rights to show the pga championship. —— dawid malan. talks between britain and the european union on their future relationship are now less likely to start in october, the eu's top negotiator michel barnier has said, because of lack of progress on brexit divorce issues so far. however, an eu source has told the bbc that ‘nothing has changed‘ regarding the timetable. let‘s get the latest from our brussels reporter adam fleming. well, that is clear as mud(!) good afternoon, and welcome to brussels(!) michel barnier, chief negotiator for the eu, brussels(!) michel barnier, chief negotiatorfor the eu, has said he will have tojudge negotiatorfor the eu, has said he will have to judge there is sufficient progress made on the first round of brexit talks on big things like citizens rights, the brexit bill and ireland, before he will be able to recommend to the other 27 eu leaders that they start thinking about the future relationship between the un the uk. that is the reallyjuicy stuff that
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the british government wants to get its teeth into, that is about trade and future cooperation. everybody thought this was heading towards october, when this judgment would be made, sufficient progress has been made, sufficient progress has been made, always kept his options open and said it could be in later months, november or december, what it looks like today is that michel barnier has hinted in a meeting to eu ambassadors that it is looking like it will not be october, he makes that decision, the reason is progress on brexit talks has not been as fast as he would like. that is why all this matters. he sort of would say that, wouldn‘t eat, i wonder how wound up brussels are getting by seeing liam fox in washington, announcement of huge deals with the united states, other deals with the united states, other deals with the united states, other deals with india, these were supposed to be organised only after brexit had happened. eu diplomats are relaxed about that sort of thing because they say as long as it is not actual trade talks taking place,
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because that would be against eu law, countries are absolutely fine to go and meet other countries and talk about and scope out future deals they could do as long as they are not taking part in official, legal negotiations about trade deals, which would be illegal and contravene eu rules. what people in brussels want clarified is not deals with mexico, brazil, india, the usa, it is more detail about the uk position on the withdrawal issues. 0k, position on the withdrawal issues. ok, the uk has issued a paper about citizens rights, they are happy to get that detail here, diplomats, civil servants looking for more details on what the uk thinks about the financial settlement and more details about how to maintain things on the island of ireland, and michel barnier has said several times when he has appeared in public that he is frustrated, that he has produced nine papers on these topics, and the uk has produced only one. i should say, what diplomats from the uk
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states are saying is that privately they have been working to a timetable about moving to the next phase in october, or december. —— eu states. and getting down to future talks in january states. and getting down to future talks injanuary next states. and getting down to future talks in january next year, states. and getting down to future talks injanuary next year, the suggestion things may not be as off—track as people are fearing today. did he say that the clock is still ticking? yes, but no wesselingh(!) laughter thank you very much. updating you on the situation with charlie gard, and richard lister, following this, explain what has happened in the last few minutes. little bit of context, at noon today, that was the deadline by which charlie gard‘s parents had to come up with a plan for great ormond street hospital which would enable them to spend some more time with charlie before he is life is basically ended with the withdrawal of the life—support system that he is on. we heard nothing at noon,
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that suggested there was no plan agreed. in fact, the high court has now made a ruling on this, the high courtjudge who has been dealing with this, as apparently approve a plan which will see charlie gard moved to a hospice and he will, in quotation marks, inevitably die shortly afterwards. the plan had a lwa ys shortly afterwards. the plan had always been, since the last court case, that he would be moved to a hospice, charlie‘s parents decided they would no longer fight for him to be taken home, they agreed he could go to a hospice, but they wa nted could go to a hospice, but they wanted to have more time with him, before life—support was withdrawn. now it seems that plan has not come to fruition, and so he will be moved, life—support will be withdrawn shortly afterwards. the family, charlie will get the privacy which, because of a high profile nature of this, they have not had in recent weeks and months. mrjustice francis had ordered that there would be no details disclosed, about the
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actual movement of charlie to a hospice, and that timings of what ever followed. i‘m likely to hospice, and that timings of what everfollowed. i‘m likely to be hospice, and that timings of what ever followed. i‘m likely to be any sort of announcement now. really, tragically, until we get confirmation of the death of charlie gard at some point. thank you very much, the latest on the charlie gard case. traditional medical advice says that we should always finish a course of antibiotics, even if we feel better, in order for them to be effective; but now a group of scientists has cast doubt on that recommendation. an article in the british medical journal argues that taking antibiotics for longer than necessary can increase the risk of developing a resistance to them. however england‘s chief medical officer says more research is needed before any change in policy. here‘s our health correspondent dominic hughes. # antibiotics, we're wonderful pills...#. v0|ceover: all sorts of ways ways are being used to spread the word that antibiotics need to be used sparingly. that message is becoming ever more urgent, as fears grow over the dangers posed by microbes which are resistant to the drugs. traditionally, we‘ve
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always been told to finish a course of antibiotics, but some believe that might actually traditionally, we‘ve always been told to finish a course of antibiotics, but some believe that might actually be making the situation worse. what we worry about now is that many patients are already colonised with resistant bacteria, and they might not be part of the infection, they might be sitting in your gut, or on your skin, or up your nose, and if we use antibiotics for longer than required, what we‘re doing is enhancing the chances that those resistant bacteria will take over and colonise us more. the world—famous discovery of penicillin... following alexander fleming‘s discovery of penicillin in the late 1920s, the belief was that not taking enough could lead to bacteria developing resistance. the modern day official advice is still to complete the course you have been prescribed. but now questions are being raised about whether that advice is correct, some doctors are concerned patients will be confused. i‘m very fearful that people will hear the headlines today
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without seeing the truth of the story behind the headlines and will decide on their own accord to take antibiotics for a shorter amount of time than prescribed, and that is potentially unsafe. just because you are starting to feel better does not mean the infection is completely gone. today‘s report acknowledges more research is needed before the "finish the course" advice is changed to something like "stop when you feel better." serious concerns about drug resistant bugs means long—established practice is now being questioned. dominic hughes, bbc news. and emergency call with a difference to 911 in florida. a resident had rang the police and said, get here, and make it snappy... the reason is, this... this is a film by the police officer‘s bodycam. .. an this... this is a film by the police officer‘s bodycam... an alligator, this is how he tries to deal with it. this is officer alfredo vargas
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responding to a call out of a reptile outside a resident‘s front door. the officer wrestled with the snappy customer before putting it in custody. and it‘s not the first time officer vargas has had to deal with an unusual suspect, which is why his police chief thinks he deserves the new title. eventually they manage to get it into a patrol car. it is terrifying! they drove to a canal and released the alligator, hopefully not... hopefully not going to be seeing it again. a police officer going way beyond the call of duty, there to
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arrest... an alligator. a less dangerous job is the weather. i suppose you have to climb stairs to get to the newsroom though? you can see some of the complaints we get. today is one of the better days. a little bit of sunshine today but there have been heavy showers, you may have got caught in some of those. there are a few of those around us forget this evening. a rash of showers across the uk, you may hear a rumble of thunder, and sam hail. they will fade across southern and eastern parts of the uk. through the night, they continue in northern ireland, western scotla nd in northern ireland, western scotland and north west england with a gusty wind. around 10—15d, the overnight temperature. tomorrow, showers weather for they are scattered around northern ireland
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and maybe scotland. the rest of england and wales, apart from the odd shower, has a quieter weather. more rain is poised to move in 2000 west england and wales. —— south—west england. tomorrow evening, we will see a bit of rain running through a large part of england and wales. on saturday, it may still be lingering across the far south and south—east of england. fry, if you showers but some dry weather for some of us before the showers are more widespread again on sunday. this is bbc news, the headlines. a high courtjudge has approved a plan which will see charlie gard "inevitably" die shortly after being moved to a hospice and having life support treatment withdrawn. after announcing a new consultation, the government has been accused of waiting too long to consider the impact of brexit on immigration from the european union.
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scotland‘s most senior police officer has been urged to step aside while he is investigated over allegations of misconduct. the details of the allegation have not been made public. wildfires are continuing to burn in southern france for the fourth day. thousands of people have been forced to leave their homes and campsites around the town of bormes—les—mimosas. we looked up and all you could see was the sky like it was dante‘s inferno — it was blood red, smoke everywhere, the smell of smoke, the acrid smell through the camp was horrendous. the number of assaults in prison is at a record high, and the performance of ten jails in england and wales is causing "serious concern" according to new figures. time for the sport. and i see you now, i must have got the time of day run? i pop up at all times. just keep you your toes. good to see you
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on this thursday evening. good evening all good afternoon. it‘s that sort of grey area between. rain has given england a chance to regroup after wickets continued to fall on the third test of the oval. joe root won the toss and chose to bat first against south africa, but his, was one of the afternoon wickets to fall. he made 29, before a brilliant catch from keeper quinton de kock, saw him traipse back to the pavilion. vernon philander also dismissed, opener keatonjennings for a duck. debutant tom westley went for 25 and fellow first timer, keeping hopes alive on his own has been former captain, alastair cook who has reached 72. four—time tour de france champion chris froome will ride in this year‘s vuelta a espana in pursuit of a rare double. the 32—year—old — who won the tour last sunday — has finished second in the vuelta three times. only two men have won both tours in the same year, the last time in 1978, but that was when the spanish race was staged in april.
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it starts on august 19th and finishes in madrid on tenth september. england‘s women play their third group match tonight, at euro 2017, against portugal. a win would mean they will win their group, but would have to face their nemesis france in the quaretr—finals. they haven‘t beaten france since 1974. but england have been the form team so far. if they win and keep a clean sheet, they‘ll become the first england side — male orfemale — to progress at a major tournament, with a 100% record without conceding a goal. we wa nt we want to improve, want to get better. we have set before we want to be the best team in the world and so far we‘ve have a good performance against scotland. in other areas, better performance against spain. bringing those two together and improving again, keeping the snowball rolling, because you want to go in the knockout stage feeling confident, feeling the momentum, and not only will we feel that but the
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rest of the tournament fulfil that as well. scotland coach anna signeul says her side need to believe in themselves as they face an uphill task to reach the last eight. they need to beat spain by two goals and hope that england defeat portugal everton fans should be out in force tonight to welcome home wayne rooney as he makes his first competitive start since rejoining the club from manchester united. they face slovakian side ruzomberok in the first leg of the third qualifying round in the europa league. the manager‘s already noticed the impact rooney has made at the club. what i like is his ambition, in training, and showing the young people, the young lads in the team, experience, explaining things. discussions about football, about positions. i think it‘s really what i expected. the bbc has secured the live tv, radio and digital rights, to broadcast the final
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golf major of the year, the us pga championship at quail hollow next month. so highlights and live coverage on bbc two, the red button, online and five live, from the tenth to the 13th of august. finally if you‘re shopping in the high street of the welsh town of rhywbina you might stumble across some valuable sporting sporting memorabilia. that‘s because the lions captain sam warburton has donated his lions
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kit from the tour of new zealand to his local charity shop ion rhiwbina high street. warbuton tweeted a picture today outside the shop in the town where he played hisjunior rugby — the shop has already been inundated with questions from fans eager to get their hands on the kit let‘s talk more then about a new report ordered by the government looking at the role eu nationals play in the economy as it attempts to draw up a post—brexit immigration policy. i home editor is with me now. lots of figures, let‘s hear some. i home editor is with me now. lots of figures, let's hear some. let's look at what eu migration looks like to britain. met eu migration is currently 150 3000. that‘s down more than a quarter from a year currently 150 3000. that‘s down more than a quarterfrom a year ago. it will fall a bit further because right now that uk does not look very attractive to eu migrants, the lower pound, the uncertainty of a brexit. only forms a part of overall net migration, which is currently as 248,000, that's the 2016 migration, which is currently as 248,000, that‘s the 2016 figure, the latest one. again, that is well above the government‘s target of getting migration down to the tens of thousands. the under 100,000. what we are talking now is a
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significant change to the uk economy, reducing net migration dramatically. and changing from being relatively high migration to a low migration economy. that adapting is going to be difficult, if you turn the tap softy will get gaps in the economy. let‘s look at some of the economy. let‘s look at some of the numbers we know from different industries and the effect the eu has from. let‘s look at the hospitality sector, he is giving you your copy in the morning? it won‘t be surprising in london to know that 700,000 eu nationals are employed in hospitality, three quarters of waiters and waitresses. art eu national. a quarter of chefs are eu national. one area, farming and fishing. 35,000 full—time workers in eu are in agriculture and fishing. but a lot of these are temporary workers, tens of thousands of both. they will work out how to do. uk manufacturing has grown with the help of eu workers, the hundred and
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20,000 of them. again, they need to be replaced somehow. looking at health and social care, a big area, we know that something like 2009000 eu citizens work in the health sector and the social care sector, particularly in the south is, something like 60% of carers in london in the south is that the mother and are foreign—born. we seek that impact. the creative industries federation, which represents creative industries, published a report yesterday, urging the government to reflect on the hugely profitable sector that employs some 117,000 eu workers. did you know a third of people working in that hugely profitable area of visual effects, in which britain leads the world, a third of them are eu workers and a quarter of architects.
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extraordinary to think of that. so it is hugely complex, and changing to becoming a low migration economy is going to be a real challenge. of course we can train british workers to ta ke course we can train british workers to take over those jobs, we can‘t do it just like that. there to take over those jobs, we can‘t do itjust like that. there is the problem, what is the government going to do? what do they think is the solution? it's all about taking control. that is what was promised asa control. that is what was promised as a result of brexit. we have heard the phrase australian style points system. actually i don‘t think we we re system. actually i don‘t think we were given that, if bureaucratic and expensive. and actually in australia, we saw immigration rise. it's australia, we saw immigration rise. it‘s not quite that. what i think the are talking about is a system where we control the number of people in different sectors, using a work permit. what is interesting in the letter from the government to the letter from the government to the migration advising committee is they are looking potentially at varying that in different parts of
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the country. in london there might be particular issues with financial services, in some other areas that the construction and so on. so we might see that. i think what is odd about all of this is that we are only really getting into the detail now, and there are some real questions as to why, and we will not get the results of this report until september next year. by that time the government aren‘t sir‘s will already be there. —— the government a nswe rs already be there. —— the government answers will already be there. so it looks like the cart before the horse. it will be hard and the interim reports will be thinking ha rd interim reports will be thinking hard about the challenges and choices we make when we try to reduce immigration to the level the government wants. he raised an eyebrow at how long it took. a lot of people said this should have been done years ago. you could argue that when the government, back in 2010, said they wanted to cut emigration to the tens of thousands, that could
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have been a good time to ask out when the fixing of a squat immigrants did to us? at the time of the referendum campaign or the time of article 50, at all of those points you could have said, having a good understanding of eu migration, where are the areas we will think about the future? that is something some people say we should have done earlier, we are doing it now, and i think it will play into what kind of system we have. i think there will be a transitional time, and implementation period, perhaps oche years or maybe longer. when we can hopefully iron out some of these difficulties. we will be talking about it again, thank you. joining me now is catherine barnard, professor of european union law at cambridge university and a member of the uk in a changing europe. just keep just did pick up on the transition
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plan, that is what people are saying makes this possible? that's right, and the eu expects a transition phase as well. there are three phasesin phase as well. there are three phases in the negotiation strategy, we are in phase one trying to sort out the rights of eu citizens in the uk, and uk citizens abroad. but the second phase is transition and the third phase will be about a future deal. what is the best way, i don't wa nt to deal. what is the best way, i don't want to use the word policing of it, but if the government says they want to introduce work permit, is that something that goes too far? to introduce work permit, is that something that goes too far7m depends what the government wants. as you heard, on the one hand there are certain sectors that are highly dependent on migrant labour, and particularly the nhs, care sector, academia... we cannot just particularly the nhs, care sector, academia... we cannotjust train those people overnight. so there may bea those people overnight. so there may be a long transition where you have more less free movement and you‘ve got at the moment. on the other hand, there are parts of people in the cabinet who say we want to stop
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free movement from the 29th of march 2019. that is what brandon lewis, the minister immigration said this morning. so it is quite complicated because there are these conflicting tensions between control and also recognising what effect it might have on the economy. all of adds to theissue have on the economy. all of adds to the issue of uncertainty, which is something everyone says is helpful to know one. we have already seen the number of registrations to be a nurse have dropped by 96%. we have already seen a drop in the number of migrants coming to this country, of about 80 6000. so the reality is, already having —— uncertainty is already having —— uncertainty is already having —— uncertainty is already having an effect. for those who pointed leave, the answer is that great because we are taking back control. but on taking back control, it‘s difficult. people
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think taking back control thinks taking back control of the border. in fact border control does very little in terms of immigration control. immigration control is largely done by employers, and landlords. so the question is, to a nswer landlords. so the question is, to answer your earlier point about work permits, does that make more bureaucracy for employers who are going to have to manage these work permit schemes? and the answer is obviously yes? the answer is yes. the other question is cost. for non—eu nationals coming from the united states or pakistan, there are quite expensive costs associated with a visa scheme. five—year beezer, you are talking thousands pounds plus the nhs surcharge at the moment, for eu nationals, there is no charge at all. what will happen going forward? will there be a work permit scheme for eu nationals treated in exactly the same way as a pakistani citizen? that is what some
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people have been calling for? others say we are so reliant on eu nationals in key sectors, they shouldn‘t be charged a thing. nationals in key sectors, they shouldn't be charged a thing. thanks for joining shouldn't be charged a thing. thanks forjoining us. bringing you some news from, a tweet that i want to retreat to lineker bring you from our north america editor. —— our north american editor. he says the tweet means the military high command were totally blind sided, in his words, by donald trump‘s comments on transgender people in the armed forces. yesterday he said they had no place in america‘ armed services. there are saying in this tweet that there will be no modifications to the transgender policy as a result of those tweets. the marine general
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wrote a message to the chief of services and leaders that the military will continue to treat all of our personal with respect. i know there are questions about the announcement about transgender policy by the present, he says there will be no modifications to the policy and to the present‘s direction has been received by the secretary of defence and the secretary of defence and the secretary has issued implementation guidance. clearly, shocked, probably very angry, that donald trump issued that tweet yesterday without speaking to them. but anger is thumbing through clearly in that message. we will have more from our washington correspondent later. latest figures show that a record 71 prisoners were released from prisons in england and wales last year by mistake. other statistics from the ministry ofjustice suggest violence in prisons in england and wales is increasing. there were 26,643 assaults in the year to march 2017. and there were also a record number of self—harm incidents — more than 40,000.
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our home affairs correspondent danny shaw has more. i think the most concerning figure is this number of 71. those are people who were released in error. but a lot of these are temporary workers, tens of thousands of both. i think the most concerning figure is this number of 71. those are people who were released in error. usually due to an administrative mistake by a member of prison staff or court staff or someone else that‘s let them out early. there was one example earlier this month, a man called ralston dodd had been given a nine—year prison sentence for seriously attacking someone with a knife. expecting to serve four and a half years in prison. and he was released after a matter of months. the reason why was because someone had inaccurately recorded, instead of saying nine years they put nine months down and he was out... simple as that?
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simple error like that and he was out. whether there were certain checks in the system not carried out, that is now under review. clearly a very serious mistake. he was described as an exceptionally dangerous individual. fortunately he was recaptured. looking at the figures for assaults on people in prison, this is quite a stark increase. an increase of 20%, the number of assaults. of those 26,000, many are classified as a serious assaults and over 7000 were assaults on staff, which means every day 20 prison officers or members of prison staff are being attacked by prisoners. that‘s one of the reasons why the prison officers association has been demanding extra measures, extra security measures and extra numbers of staff so they can feel safer and to prevent so many attacks taking place. what does the ministry ofjustice say? it says it‘s been making investment in prisons, it‘s boosting the number of officers by two and a half thousand. it says it is on track
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to deliver that by the end of next year, i think over 500 now in prisons. also investing in new technology to try and crack down on the former legal high drugs, psychoactive substances that are thought to contribute to this rise in violence. and also this record number of self harm incidents. danny shaw talking to me a little earlier. get more on the military high command in the us contradicting the policy of donald trump let‘s go to our correspondent in washington, laura pictor. this is a bit of a mess? this time yesterday donald trump said one thing, today they say no? if you remember, yesterday donald trump tweeted that transgender people will be banned from the us military. he called it a tremendous cost to the military. is talking about treatment that transgender people talking about treatment that tra nsgender people can talking about treatment that transgender people can receive
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through the military. and he said they would no longer be allowed to serve. this has left things rather unclear, especially for the several thousand tra nsgender members unclear, especially for the several thousand transgender members who already served in the armed forces. it also took the pentagon off guard. the even the pentagon was on holiday yesterday. —— the chief of the pentagon. when it comes to the augmentation, it seems an clear. we‘ve had a letter from a marine ten to general, who says there will be no change in the policy of the military until more details of the sea. he until more details of the sea. he until then he says all personnel will be treated with respect and all will be treated with respect and all will remain focused on a doing our mission. until then, things will stay as they are while they work out how to implement this policy going
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forward. laura, thank you. in a moment a look at how the financial markets in europe closed the day, but first, the headlines on bbc news. a high court judge a high courtjudge has approved a plan which will see charlie gard inevitably died shortly after being moved to a hospice and having treatment withdrawn. the government has asked independent experts to produce a report assessing eu migration — but critics argue it should have been commissioned a year ago. scotland‘s most senior police officer has been urged to step aside what of investigated over allegations of misconduct. now a look at how the markets in europe have ended the trading session. we are deep in the middle of earnings season with companies telling shareholders how they‘ve done over the last three months. lloyds bank has to set aside more money to compensate people it missold insurance to, and two estate agents countrywide and foxton have said profits have collapsed because the slow housing market. let‘s concentrate on three companies though: shell first,
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profits were at $3.6 billion. most analysts had been expecting a figure closer to $3 billion. perhaps more important is the chief executive has been saying he thinks oil isn‘t going to go much higher that the 40—50 dollars it‘s at now — and it can still make money at these levels. a sharp fall in the shares of the drugmaker astrazeneca. they are down more than 16% after announcing disappointing results. the firm said first—quarter revenue fell 10%. it also reported a major setback in trials of a new lung cancer drug therapy. and this story has broken in the last 15 minutes. air france/klm is buying a 31% in virgin atlantic from richard branson‘s virgin group. it‘s paying about £220 million. that mean virgin group is no longer the majority foxton ‘s has plunged in its
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numbers. it says it is due to this and to lineker . let‘s get some analysis. jonny may is tom stevenson from fidelity. let‘s concentrate first on the housing market. it tells us the housing market. it tells us the housing market. it tells us the housing market is slowing and in particular, it is slowing in london. there is a lot of uncertainty as the company said, following the eu referendum last year. also, they are rushed to pursue transactions at the beginning of last year, ahead of a change in stamp duty rates. so comparators don‘t look very good. clearly, the market is slowing. onto the bigger companies like shell. they say they make money even though they don‘t think it‘s going to go anywhere apart from 40— $50. we are
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forever alone? that's right, shell boss described shell as hurting itself it for the 40s, what it meant by that was shell is assuming they will struggle to get above a level. the saudis are cutting production to push the price higher. they have really struggled to get it above $50 a barrel. the figures from shell we re a barrel. the figures from shell were good but the oil price has risen compared in the year ago but plainly, it‘s not going anywhere fast. oil companies have to get used to. how they make money? what shell is doing is it is playing the long game here. it‘s saying look, the oil price is not going anywhere. demand will peak sooner than we thought, electric cars are coming in, we have to change our focus. so shell is
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focusing on renewable energy and in particular, the electricity supply game. so it can mean that demand from electric vehicles. fascinating. what about astrazeneca this was a big fall? this was a big fall. they had a trialfor a long cancer treatment, a combination of two injectable treatments, and the study concluded that it was no better than chemotherapy. all the hopes for astrazeneca has been focused on this trial. so it is a big blow. it casts doubt on the future of the chief executive. he rejected a bid from pfizer three years ago on 53 pounds a share, today it is less than £43. that says a lot. thanks forjoining us. just to recapture on the
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markets. i haven‘t got those up there but we saw a 9% fall on countrywide. the ngo, which makes drinks liked tenets and smirnoff, had its shares rose 5%. lloyds are having to pay out more money that it missed old insurance too. round—up of the top business stories and our website. —— on our website. now a let at the latest forecast of the weather. this will gradually fade over the evening. they only last over the evening. they only last over about five or ten minutes before the sun appears, but gusty
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winds as well. notice there are fewer after midnight but they are still there for northern ireland, north—west england and western scotla nd north—west england and western scotland is the night, and gusty winds. temperatures in double figures, showers from the word go. north—west england tomorrow has them. if you will put east across them. if you will put east across the northern half of the uk, but many in england and wales will have dry weather with some sunshine. cloud increases, bringing rain back to south—west england and wales, going through the afternoon and into the evening. high teens to load 24 tablature. if you showers in northern ireland and scotland but outbreaks and rain in england and wales, hanging around parts of south—east england on saturday as well. i swear, south—east england on saturday as well. iswear, saturday looks south—east england on saturday as well. i swear, saturday looks like the drier day, showers more widespread again on sunday. today at 5... a promise there‘ll be no cliff—edge on immigration, after brexit. the home secretary says there will
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be in implementation phase and she is asked a group of experts to report on the impact. we are leaving the eu, we will have a new policy but part of what i am announcing todayis but part of what i am announcing today is to show we will make sure it has evidence —based and make sure it has evidence —based and make sure it works for the whole country. six month before brexit will not be enough time to structure a new migration system, particularly if they want to completely alter the current system of users. we‘ll have the latest. the other main stories on bbc news at 5...
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