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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 28, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. increased safety concerns following the grenfell tower fire — dozens of tower blocks fail a new, more thorough, fire safety test. the bbc understands at least 60 buildings will be declared a risk later today. councils warn that the cost of making them safe will run into the tens of millions of pounds. good morning. it's friday, the 28th ofjuly. also this morning, links between how much you drink and developing type 2 diabetes, new research suggests you're no better off being tee—total. good morning. demonstrators are beginning their third day camped out on top of delivery lorries just a quarter of a
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mile away from a fracking side were exploratory drilling is about to begin. —— site. nearly £30 billion in mis—sold ppi compensation has been paid out by british banks, and there's still much more to come. i'll be taking a look at when it will ever end. in sport, england's women ease into the quarter—finals of the european championship, with victory over portugal — but for scotland it's a case of so near, yet so far. and there's confusion at the races as a 50—1 winner turns out to be completely the wrong horse. an investigation has begun. and carol has the weather. good morning. iam i am below the streets of london. these tunnels were built over 100 yea rs these tunnels were built over 100 years ago. they used to be used to transport mail and parcels below the streets of london. they are about to be reopened to the public after being long abandoned. we will find out how and why later on. new line and sarah has the weather. 0ur unsettled theme continues. lots
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of cloud and heavy showers forecast. i will have the details in 15 minutes. first, our main story. bbc news understands that at least 60 high—rise buildings, which used insulation and cladding similar to grenfell tower, have failed a new fire safety test. the test is seen as more thorough than previous ones, as more materials were analysed together for the first time. so far, just nine of the buildings which failed have been identified. they're in salford in greater manchester, where the local council is asking for help from central government to meet the cost of replacements. ministers will publish the full test findings later this morning, as dan johnson reports. while those touched by grenfell tower wait for a full picture of how this fire spread, the residents in other towers are nervous, wondering if they are safe. these blocks in sa lfo rd , if they are safe. these blocks in salford, nine of them, are among the 60 across england we understand will be declared a risk after failing the latest tests. the fire, lying in bed
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at night, thinking that it is not safe, you know... it is bad, isn't it? they should take the lot. i don't care how much money it costs, it is people's lives. i think we are sitting on a tinderbox. some of the cladding had already come down. now the rest will come to. in the first round of tests, panels from every building failed. after criticism that wasn't realistic, experts have 110w that wasn't realistic, experts have now combined cladding and the installation fitted behind it to show which materials are dangerous when they are put together, like they were on grenfell tower. yesterday police said there are reasonable grounds to suspect corporate manslaughter may have been committed by the council or the te na nt committed by the council or the tenant management organisation. more than six weeks since groenefeld burned, the investigation is finding its focus, while the reverberations beat right across the country. —— g re nfell beat right across the country. —— grenfell burned. at 7:10 we'll be speaking to the trade magazine, inside housing.
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its new investigation suggests that hundreds of tower blocks in england have safety flaws, including broken fire doors and holes in walls, which could help a blaze spread. defence cuts have left the uk reliant on other countries to protect british waters, according to labour. according to figures obtained by the party, nato allies sent nearly a0 planes to the uk last year to help with maritime patrols. the ministry of defence says most of the aircraft were for training and military exercises. people who drink alcohol three to four times a week are 30% less likely to develop diabetes than those who never drink. more than 70,000 people took part in a large danish health study that measured their drinking habits. the uk's leading diabetes charity warns this isn't a "green light" to drink excessively. 0ur health reporter katie silver explains. diabetes is one of the biggest health challenge is the uk faces today. more than three and half
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million people currently live with the condition, and the numbers are only getting worse. but new findings from denmark could revive some hope. researchers at the national institute of public health at the university of southern denmark found that people who drink alcohol have the lowest risk of getting type 2 diabetes, beating even the teetotallers. the best results were found for men who drink 1a drinks per week and women who drink nine. but rather than drinking at all on a saturday night, they found this weekly intake has to be spread over three orfour weekly intake has to be spread over three or four days. the study also found that not all alcohol is equal. line appeared to be particularly beneficial, as the chemical compounds, especially in red wine, seem to help manage blood sugar. —— wine appeared. and women were warned to stay clear of gin. a daily tipple of that, or other spirits, to stay clear of gin. a daily tipple of that, or otherspirits, increases their diabetes risk by 83%. diabetes uk warns that the effect of alcohol on developing diabetes differs from one person to the next. where did
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the people who were drinking an awful lot, when was this happening? were there different times of the year that they would thinking more alcohol? which had an impact? for example, if you are in the festive season, people drink a little bit more and eat a little bit more. those kinds of things really were not discussed in much detail. while this study is in its early stages, it is hoped it might spur future research to help some of the 12 million brit on is currently at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. —— britons. aid workers in greece have told bbc news they're dealing with hundreds of extremely vulnerable refugees being held on the island of lesbos. many have suffered torture and sexual abuse at the hands of so—called islamic state in syria and iraq. the european commission said that such refugees should be moved to athens for specialist treatment. we'll be live in lesbos in just over half an hour's time, as our reporter gavin lee tell us more on this story. bags of rubbish are piling up in birmingham as bin collectors continue to strike in the city.
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a row with the council overjob losses and changes to working practices is now in its third week. thousands of residents have been affected, despite council efforts to add extra collections, and many people are complaining about the smell. the strike is set to last until september. istanbul was hit by violent thunderstorms yesterday which caused major disruption in the city and injured at least two people. these pictures show the ferocity of the storm, which led rush hour commuters to take cover as hailstones as big as golf balls fell. the storm also uprooted trees and led to flight cancellations. donald trump's new communications director has launched a foul—mouthed attack against two of his senior colleagues. anthony scaramucci used obscene language to describe the white house chief of staff, reince preibus, and chief strategist, steve bannon. it's the latest drama to hit mr trump's west wing, as our washington correspondent laura bicker reports. president trump's west wing is at
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war with itself. the appointment of the flashy financier anthony scaramucci as the new director of communications has prompted a bitter battle to win the ear of the president. anthony scaramucci has indirectly accused his colleague, white house chief of staff reince priebus, of leaking information about the administration. he called about the administration. he called aus about the administration. he called a us network show to say that only mrtrump a us network show to say that only mr trump could judge with the tense relationship between the two was rapper of all. we have had differences. when i said we were brothers from the podium, that is because we are. but some brothers are like cain and abel. 0ther brothers can fight with each other and get along. i don't know whether this is repairable or not, that will be up to the president. tonight, in an extraordinary phone call with a reporter from the new yorker, anthony scaramucci describe reince priebus as a paranoid schizophrenic. he also talked personally about mr trump's chief strategist, stephen bannon. 0n
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trump's chief strategist, stephen bannon. on twitter he said he would refrain from using colourful language but would not give up the passionate fight for donald trump's agenda. anthony scaramucci has been in the westminster just agenda. anthony scaramucci has been in the westminsterjust one week, and appears to have spent more time launching personal attacks than pushing the president's odysseys. he may also be forcing the chief of staff, and a key republican establishment figure, out the door. we will continue with the saucy theme, perhaps. there's a north—south divide when it comes to what sauce we choose to put on ourfood. new research claims that people in north—west england, scotland and northern ireland are more than twice as likely to have brown sauce on their shelves than those in london. three quarters of us apparently can't eat a meal without a bit of sauce on the side, and half of us have even had to make a dash to the shops to buy some sauce before sitting down to eat. do you have a preference, charlie?” tell you what, one of the things
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that occurs to me, looking at a full english breakfast like that, including baked beans, is that i would sometimes have tomato sauce with a full english breakfast. but i like to separate the beans away from... yes, that is what alan partridge does! he uses the source isa partridge does! he uses the source is a breakwater. —— uses the sausage. you can buy a t—shirt saying that. i will buy that for you to christmas. i am not a particular alan partridge fan, but that is true. it is very important to separate them. yes, you cannot let the egg and the beans merge. very messy. you've got me excited now. the egg and the beans merge. very messy. you've got me excited nowm is so good when you know the perfect present. exactly. i'm definitely a red sauce man. anyway, very exciting to england, but disappointing to scotland in the european championship. —— for scotland. england kept their winning momentum going, and go into their quarter—final against france as the team with the best record so far. after they beat portugal 2—1, in front of nearly 3,500 in tilborg. the lionesses weren't at their best,
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but goals from toni duggan and nikita paris were enough to win the group. but for scotland it was a case yet again of so near but so far. they beat spain but couldn't score enough goals to take them into the last eight. it was a happy homecoming for wayne rooney in his first competitive match back at everton. thanks to leighton baines, they won the first leg of their europa league qualifying tie, 1—0, against ruzomberok of slovakia. this is an amazing tale from yarmouth races where the winner of the first race, mandarin princess, was laterfound to be another horse! she was the shock 50—1winner— or so it was thought, because after routine testing, it was discovered that mandarin princess, here in the blue, was actually stablemate millie's kiss — a horse with more experience. both horses were trained by charlie mcbride, and an investigation has been ordered by the british horseracing authority.
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the result stood. just to be clear, the horse that you said one the race, she actually didn't win the race? no, because it wasn't that horse. but it has been allowed to keep first place? all the punters thought it was the horse that they thought it was, so it wasn't their fault they thought it wasn't their fault they thought it was a different horse, so they were allowed to keep their winnings of 50 to one. but the horse didn't officially win? um... the horse did win, but it was not the force that everybody thought it was. a horse w011. everybody thought it was. a horse won. yes! it had four legs, a mane in the tail. we are never short of the facts here. let's talk to sarah and find out what is happening with the weather. quite a lot of cloud across much of
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the country to begin the day. a little bit of sunshine here and there. this photograph of the sunrise was ta ken there. this photograph of the sunrise was taken by one of our weather watchers in henley—on—thames. a few brighter spells breaking through the clouds. through the day that will increase. sunny spells in the morning, but by the afternoon it should be cloudy in many places, with showers on the heavy side. low pressure still dominating the weather. at the moment it is sitting to the north—west of the uk. quite tightly spaced isobars and a breezy feel to the weather as we move through the day. the breeze coming in from the south—west, bringing with it some showers, especially across scotland and northern ireland through this morning. later this afternoon, and northern ireland through this morning. laterthis afternoon, more of those showers across parts of england and wales, drifting their way east. at four o'clock this afternoon, scotland and northern ireland will see a mix of sunny spells but also blustery showers, with some on the heavy side and they could really odd rumble of thunder. heading south, a bit more brightness
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across yorkshire, but cloud increasing across wales and bringing with it outbreaks of persistent rain pushing in across the south—west of england, where it will be quite windy through the afternoon. largely dry across the south—east in the afternoon. fairly cloudy here, but the brain will push east later in the brain will push east later in the day. for the third test at the 0val, a cloudy sort of day. the wind will pick up later on. we could see a little bit of rain in the second half of the afternoon. this area of weight —— rain across wales and southern england will push north and east through the afternoon. heavy for a time across northern and central england, clearing to the south—east overnight tonight. a speu south—east overnight tonight. a spell of wet weather for many of us. scotla nd spell of wet weather for many of us. scotland and northern ireland also keeping the showery theme to the weather through tonight. what about the weekend? it is looking unsettled steel. —— still. low pressure sitting to the north—west of the uk, dragging in showers. the weather fronts that brought the rain overnight, on saturday it sits off
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the south coast. dry for many of us on the first half of saturday, then that weather front creeps north across parts of southern england during saturday afternoon. we still have showers across scotland and northern ireland, but elsewhere there will be drier and brighter weather. 0n there will be drier and brighter weather. on sunday, another day of sunshine and showers. the same theme continuing through the weekend. some of those showers will bring the odd rumble of thunder as well, towards the north and the west in particular. drier in the south—east, temperatures around 17— 21. all in all, to summarise your weekend weather, it is looking cool, breezy, not a washout, there will be some spells of sunshine, but also some fairly frequent and at times heavy showers as well. sean and mike are back with us now. look at the papers. first, the daily telegraph. this is just look at the papers. first, the daily telegraph. this isjust what look at the papers. first, the daily telegraph. this is just what will be the situation of the brexit? many
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ministers giving their opinions. these are the quotes from the home secretary amber rudd, saying that citizens will be allowed to come to the uk and live and work after wrecks it, for a period of time, as long as they register —— brexit. philip hammond will be with us later. we will try to clear up with him what exactly... what stage we are at with brexit and what we can expect when we officially leave the eu. the ft reports that he has been speaking to business leaders and says he wa nts to to business leaders and says he wants to negotiate a two phased brexit deal, starting with an off—the—shelf transition period, where the uk will maintain a trading relationship with the eu and then the next two years will see further negotiations, or a further transition. we will try to clear this up with him later. 0n the theme of money, on the front page of the times, this is the boss of amazon. is that right? jeff
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bezos. i love the way they have put him on the front page with bill gates. it's like a movie. because jeff bezos founded amazon and he is now worth, well, for a moment yesterday when the shares got high enough it was worth $96 billion, which took him over bill gates, only $90 billion. but when the share price dropped againjeff bezos became the second richest man. i think when you are that which you don't care. but jeff bezos looks like he's enjoying it. why not? many of the papers this morning, the daily mail, the final ruling on charlie gard's situation was made yesterday and many of the papers have those images on the front pages and also the front page of the daily mirror. also a story we are covering on brea kfast also a story we are covering on breakfast this morning, drinking wine can fight diabetes. the study has taken a look at the impact of
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drinking alcohol and diabetes. what this study says is that drinking alcohol three or four days a week can significantly cut the chance of getting diabetes, but this isn't giving the green light to drink excessively. more on the tale of the horses, the two people couldn't tell apart. the editor says there needs to be changes because at the moment they all arrive, they are scanty in with all arrive, they are scanty in with a microchip —— scanned with a microchip. then the stewards checked to make sure they have the same race equipment, the right colour and the right sex. so if two horses look similar, it is possible to see how a mistake like this might happen. the trainer says he is really sorry, it was human error, he was stressed and rushing and somehow the wrong horse went to the wrong race. mandarin
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princess was meant to be the horse running and then kiss went in. she was far more experienced and was able to win, even though everyone thought it was mandarin princess. and everyone was happy because the punters have got their money, the journalists have a story. i think they are paying out. the trainer could face a fine because of this. there is an investigation. it isa this. there is an investigation. it is a bit embarrassing. but people do accept it was genuine human error, but it can't really happen again. thank you very much. fracking, the controversial process of drilling into shale rock to extract gas, could get under way within weeks, after the rig used to drill arrived at a site in lancashire yesterday. protesters are continuing to try and delay the start of the fracking, and are holding a carnival by the site later. 0ur reporterjohn maguire is there. good morning. just give us a sense
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of what's happening. good morning. we've got three delivery lorries that will be servicing the site about a quarter of a mile up the road. protesters have been up there 110w road. protesters have been up there now for three days. they climbed up early in the week and have been up there 20 —— 24/ seven. lancashire co nsta bula ry there 20 —— 24/ seven. lancashire constabulary said they are spending about £500,000 a month. despite the big camp and escalation in demonstrations in the last couple of weeks, the company that is seeking to explore for shale gas up the road has managed to get a major drill into position, so they will be installing mat and building it over the next couple of weeks and fracking, explorer to it fracking, will start. this area is very much
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at the vanguard of fracking in the uk. while the party and protest continued outside the site, insight behind the thin yellow line preparations for the next major step in uk fracking are taking place. this is a big dealfor all sides. local campaigner barbara richardson has fought this fracking site, known as preston new road, every step of the way and believes if shale gas is extracted here than other sites will follow. imagine these every two 25 miles across this beautiful, rural place, known for agriculture and tourism. imagine what it will be like. if you don't stop it now, you're opening the door, so you've got to stop it now. july has in the local t bolstered by protesters the group reclaim the power. they've been trying to disrupt access, climbing on top of lorries, sitting on the road and locking themselves to vehicles. how do you justify
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this? we are not targeting the lorry drivers, we understand they did a job and they need to feed their children and take some money. we are not obviously targeting them, but what they have on the back of their lorries is more equipment for them to get into the fracking site and create the fracking, so the more we delay it has lowered the task is going to be, the more it costs the company. but despite their efforts the drilling will go as low as 3500 metres below the soil and it has just been brought in. they will then drill horizontally, fractured a shale rock and release the gas. and this site will be the most monitored gas exploration site ever, i would say. we are monitoring air—quality, water quality, noise, traffic movement, all of that being monitored 2a hours a day and all of that made publicly available. we also have the environment agency that have already visited a six
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times, we only started constructing injanuary, times, we only started constructing in january, doing their own monitoring. so i can say to people that you don't need to take my word for it. the data will be out there to demonstrate that this is being done properly. the process remains highly controversial. from the for shale gas to the technology, to the way these demonstrations are policed. —— the demand for shale gas. the answer is locked deep within our feet, but not for much longer. let's talk to sebastian kelly, from the campaign group reclaim the power, that has organised a lot of the protest this week. we know this drilling kit has gone through, to allow for the explorer tree says. does that mean you have failed? —— exploratory. not at all. this was never going to hinge on one event or piece of infrastructure. the fight against fracking has been going on
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for many years and it is building up and escalating and the fight will continue. the mood in the camp is good. we would hear a couple of days ago, but there have been issues. there have been confrontations with the police at times. we have heard from contractors, that some other people have verbally abused the contractors. what do you say to people to try to make sure you are protesting lawfully? our focus is a lwa ys protesting lawfully? our focus is always on treating those that we encountered in the course of deploying actions with respect. i've been here much of the month and my own personal experience has been that the protests have been overwhelmingly peaceful in intent and action. unfortunately there has been some violence from the company's been some violence from the compa ny‘s own private been some violence from the company's own private security and on occasion from police but overwhelmingly the mood has been peaceful. i know some of that stuff is being looked into and an investigation is taking place. both
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sides will have a different version of events. when you think about fracking, if the site is successful, it becomes the first in the uk due horizontally phrack for shale gas. if it is successful it's a game changer. you will have lost? we haven't lost. actually, our motto is not here, not anywhere. this is currently the fracking frontline. people have gathered from all over the country, especially this month, to come and support the heroic actions happening locally, the fight quadrilla and the fracking industry and other termination only grows to turn back this toxic on a hazardous, unnecessary, unsustainable industry. thank you very much. you will have heard in the film quadrilla talking about the safeguards they make sure are in place to ensure the practice is in fact say. we will talk to all sorts of different voices throughout the morning, hearfrom some local
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people and hear some local people against. just to give you an idea of the timescale, because that's important. these are explorer to —— exploratory drilling. then they will have to set up a brand new set of admissions to see if it will be commercially viable. if that than approved we could see shale gas, out of the lancashire shale rock in the next couple of months, probably the first part of 2018, the first part of next year. it is a big if. we will have to wait and see. we will be getting lots of views on this. speak to you later. time now to get the news from our bbc teams across the uk. headlines coming up in a moment. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. hundreds of sensitive documents have been stored in an open room on a south london estate. the paperwork related to child protection and rent arrears issues
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shows names, addresses and other confidential information. it was left at the gardun estate in clapham. the regulator in charge of data protection can fine organisations, including local authorities, up to £500,000 for breaches. lambeth council has secured the site and ordered an urgent review. so the information commissioner's office can impose quite serious fines for this kind of breach, the council was recently fined £60,000 for misplacing some filing cabinets. a computer hacker, who masterminded global cyber attacks from his bedroom in hertfordshire, has had his sentence cut on appeal. adam mudd from kings langley created a malware programme which was used to carry out 1.7 million online attacks around the world. the 20—year—old was jailed for two years in april, but a judge reduced his term to 21 months, saying the original punishment was too tough after he pleaded guilty. heathrow has announced its passengers will not pay more in air fares, despite the cost of building a third runway. the airport says it's confident
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it can keep landing fees, which are passed on to customers in ticket prices, near existing rates. heathrow currently charges around twenty two pounds per passenger. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes so far. 0n the roads, still issues on brixton hill this morning. it's closed between brixton water lane and upper tulse hill because of that burst water main. eight buses have been diverted. in new cross, one lane closed on the a2 eastbound at pagnell street for gas works. while in putney, the traffic lights on the high street at norroy road aren't working. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. sunny spells and heavy showers yesterday, but today it is rather different. it should stay dry for most of us until we get to this evening. much better news for the
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cricket. still breezy. the south—westerly wind picking up at times. we start of the morning on about 14— 15 degrees. the best sunshine this morning and then we start to see the cloud thickened from the west as we head into the afternoon. the breeze is going to pick up, but we should still be dry. top temperature is 21— 22 celsius, which is the cooler side of average for this time of year. through this even in's rush—hour is when we will see showery outbreaks of rain is betting on from the west. that will clear eastwards through the night, the start of the morning at about 14- 15. the start of the morning at about m- 15. still the start of the morning at about 14— 15. still some outbreaks of rain in kentand 14— 15. still some outbreaks of rain in kent and essex first thing. it should be a mostly dry start to the day on saturday. dry for much of the morning. little in the way of brightness. and we have heavy pulses of rain pushing on from the south—west as we had through the afternoon. turning left and staying quite windy. sunday is a much better looking day. we should see some sunny spells and just a small chance ofa sunny spells and just a small chance
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of a couple of showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 6:30. the headlines coming up in a moment. but still ahead this morning, mumford and sons frontman marcus will tell us why he's swapping the studio for football to take part in a big celebrity fundraiser. tim muffett is deep beneath london's streets, discovering six miles of abandoned royal mail tunnels. and last month ba went into global meltdown after a computer glitch — its boss will discuss the impact it's had on the airline. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. bbc news understands that at least 60 high—rise buildings, which used insulation and cladding similar to grenfell tower, have failed a new fire safety test. the test saw the materials analysed together for the first time.
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the only buildings identified so far are nine council blocks in salford in greater manchester, where the local council is asking for help from central government to meet the cost of replacements. ministers will publish the full test findings later this morning. defence cuts have left the uk reliant on other countries to protect british waters, according to labour. figures obtained by the party, show nato allies sent nearly a0 planes to the uk last year to help with maritime patrols. the ministry of defence says most of the aircraft were for training and military exercises. people who drink three to four times a week are 30% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who never touch alcohol. researchers in denmark studied the drinking habits of more than 70,000 people. but the uk's leading diabetes charity says this isn't a "green light" to drink excessively. there are so many other associations
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made with higher intake of alcohol. for example, it will increase your cloud pressure, and your cloud pressure in turn is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. —— increase your blood pressure, and your blood pressure in turn is a risk factor. it is hard to imagine that alcohol have much of a role in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. anthony scaramucci has used obscene language to describe the white house chief of staff reince priebus and chief of staff reince priebus and chief strategist steve allen. it is the latest drama to hit mr trump's west wing. two teenagers are in custody will in connection with one of the recent wildfires in the south of france. the pairare wildfires in the south of france. the pair are suspected to have the liberally set fire to scrubland on tuesday. —— deliberately set fire. the wildfires that to thousands of people, including british holidaymakers, being evacuated this
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week. they have largely been put out. firefighters want people to be vigilant, as other blazes could still start. four men have been arrested after trying to make an explosive device at cardiff prison. the incident came to light when a prison worker contacted a welsh assembly member with concerns about staffing. a driver lost control of his new £200,000 ferrari and careered off a motorway before it burst into flames, after owning it forjust an hour. south yorkshire police released these pictures of the wrecked vehicle, after it left the m1 near barnsley during wet weather. remarkably, the driver escaped with minor injuries. let's talk to mike. good morning. england's football team did really well. scotland's. .. agonising for scotland. it really was. so close in the end, but not enough. england are
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probably the favourites now, even though they have to face nemesis france. they haven't beaten france as 1974 in the quarter—finals. the way they plan, with the best record of the tournament, you would have back them to go all the way. but let's not tempt fate. england's women are through to the quarterfinals of the european championship with a 100% record. they were made to work by portugal, but eventually won 2—1 to finish top of their group. toni duggan and nikita parris with the goals. next up they face france, who have knocked them out of their last three major tournaments. we go into this knockout round feeling like whatever is going to come oui’ feeling like whatever is going to come our way, we feeling like whatever is going to come oui’ way, we have feeling like whatever is going to come our way, we have the answers to those questions and we can find solutions. of course it will be a difficult challenge. france are a great team. we have to get ready for that. it will enjoy tonight first. we have to days to prepare for the quarter—final, which we are already incited by. —— excited by. england's win meant that scotland, in the same group, needed to beat spain by two clear goals.
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caroline weir got some help from the spanish goalkeeper to put her side ahead, but scotland just couldn't find that crucial second goal and exit the competition at the group stage. wayne rooney received a hero's welcome at goodison park last night, making his second debut for everton. he played the full 90 minutes in their europa league qualifier against slovakian side rozumberok. it was a scrappy game, settled only by leighton baines deflected second half strike. the second leg takes place next thursday. aberdeen also won their europa league qualifying third round match. they hold a 2—1 lead over cyprus side apollon limassol after the first leg. alastair cook is close to a century after an eventful opening day of the third test between england and south africa at the oval. it rained on and off throughout, but there was still time for england captainjoe root to get caught behind on 29. while one of three england debutants, davvid malan, was bowled for just 1. but former captain cook was at his gutsy best and got to 82 not out as england ended on 171 for 4.
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the series is currently 1—0. he has batted brilliantly throughout the day. hopefully he can continue that tomorrow also. i think obviously the longer the outers are out there, the easier it gets. —— batters. their bowlers may tire as the game goes on. if we can keep going we could be in a good place. great britain's swimmers couldn't add to their medal tally on day five of the world aquatics championships. max litchfield had set a new british record on the way to qualifying for the final of the 200 metre indiviidual medley, butjust fell short of the podium — he's third from top here finishing fourth. he goes in his favoured event, the 400 medley on sunday. next, to the long faces at yarmouth races, where the winner of the first
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race, mandarin and says, was later found to be another horse. —— mandarin princess. mandarin princess, here in blue, was the shock 50/1 winner — but routine testing discovered that she was actually her stablemate, millie's kiss, a horse with more experience. both were trained by charlie mcbride, and an investigation has been ordered by the british horseracing authority. the result stood. finally if you're shopping in the high street of the welsh town of rhiwbina, you might stumble across some valuable sporting memorabilia. that's because the lions captain sam warburton has donated his lions kit from the tour of new zealand to his local charity shop, in rhiwbina high street. warbuton tweeted a picture outside the shop in the town where he played hisjunior rugby — the shop has already been inundated with questions from fans eager to get their hands on the kit. i don't think it will last a very long. i suppose he has a view changes of kit, a cue shorts and shirts and socks. —— a few changes.
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very decent of him. 30,000 migrants have passed through the greek island of lesbos since march 2016, but aid workers say many of them are extremely vulnerable after escaping torture and abuse at the hands of so—called islamic state. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee is in lesbos this morning and we'll speak to him in a moment, but first, he sent us this report. life inside moria migrant camp, lesbos. rare footage from a place journalists are banned. it shows tents have been replaced by containers, a reflection of europe's waiting room being made that little bit more long—term for the 4,000 being held on the island. most are destined to return to turkey to apply for asylum from there as part of the eu migration plan but as they wait for a legal decision, violence, rioting and fires are becoming routine. the camps are full and migrants, though smaller in number, are still making it here by boat.
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the people arriving here in lesbos are different now because of the ripple effect from the conflicts in iraq and syria since so—called islamic state started to lose ground. many who've arrived in greece have escaped attention. men tortured by is fighters, women used as sex slaves, some are pregnant here, there's little support and it's worsening the problem on an already volatile island. we're very worried, we think we need to improve the healthcare given to these people. if they're vulnerable they need to be recognised as such and many to move somewhere where they can get care. the reality is there isn't this care here on the island and they need to move to the mainland to receive it. scars from years of torture, 0sama was once a civilian policeman that was caught by rebel groups and sold to is. he said he was regularly beaten and sexually abused by his captors. "i have so many marks of torture on my body," he tells me, "i've been in captivity for three years, two years locked in one room. i lost my family, i lost my wife, i haven't seen anything about them. all this and now i'm here in this
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humiliation for one year." another man from mosul, who doesn't want to be identified, the greek refugee policy is clear that extremely vulnerable migrants should be taken off the island quickly for specialist treatment in athens. so why are they still here? greek authorities claim they've been overwhelmed by cases and they say some have slipped through the net. i would like at this point to remind that 30,000 people have come through the island since march, 2016, so there can be individual cases, some individual cases, where they may not have been processed as quickly. for the moment those needing the most help are still waiting and with more migrants arriving and the camp increasing, the vulnerable are left to cope in volatile, deteriorating conditions. gavin lee, bbc news, lesbos. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee is in lesbos for us this morning. gavin, good morning. such a
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beautiful setting, where you are, but such a contrast to the needs of these people, who have been through absolute hell, and now authorities have to think of how to help these people integrate, but also move on with their lives. yeah, it is almost two separate issues. there is the asylu m two separate issues. there is the asylum issue for those still on the island, some of whom have been here for more than a year, but there is the separate issue of mental health, the separate issue of mental health, the trauma that these people have been through, and the new wave of people coming through this push back of islamic state in raqqa and mosul, who are still in the island and absolutely deserve trauma care and mental health support. you have the greek government and the european commission all saying that they will be helping them, but the greek government says they are not getting enough cases referred, the charity workers say they are screaming at the greek government to get these people to athens for medical care.
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the latest this morning appears to be that the greek government is saying it is looking urgently at the situation. we may see some movement. some people could be taken off the island in the next few days. gavin, thank you. that was gavin lee in lesbos. the main stories this morning: the bbc understands cladding and installation used in at least 60 tower blocks in england has failed a new fire safety tests following the g re nfell tower new fire safety tests following the grenfell tower disaster. people who drink 3—4 times per week are less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who never drink, danish research has suggested. you know that moment when you read a drinking story and you sound like you have been drinking? and then you hear the laughter in your ear. those danish researchers, they are the best in
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the business. sarah, will you save me, please? good morning. lots of cloud across much of the country this morning. this was the scene in suffolk, this picture taken by one of our weather watchers. similar skies across much of the country. some sunshine in central england through this morning. some sunny spells around, but also scattered showers, and they could be quite heavy later in the day. certainly that unsettled weather is set to stick around for a few days. low pressure to the north—west of the uk is going to be feeding in showers coming from the atlantic. plenty of showers from scotla nd atlantic. plenty of showers from scotland and northern ireland through the morning. not two further south england and wales. in the afternoon you will see cloud increasing across england and wales. more persistent rain here, and the breeze picking up as well. some of the showers across scotland and northern ireland could be quite heavy. the odd rumble of thunder as possible. they will be hit and miss, some sunshine in between. and if you
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spells of sunshine developing this afternoon across northern england as well. —— a if you spells of sunshine. in the south—west of england and wales, you can see this rain moving in, quite heavy at times. drier in the south—east, but quite cloudy and quite breezy as well, as we head into the afternoon. so the wind is picking up. if you're heading to the oval today there will be lots of cloud around, turning glossary later. there is the chance we could see some of that rain arriving in the second half of the afternoon at particular. that area of rain across wales and the south—west of england marchers north and east through this evening and overnight. it will clear towards the south—east in the overnight period. tomorrow morning, many of us with clear skies, but still the scattered and blustery showers in the far north—west of the uk. during the day tomorrow it is a slight improvement in terms of losing that low pressure from the south—east quite quickly, but we still have low pressure to the north—west, and that is going to drive in further showers across scotla nd drive in further showers across scotland and northern ireland. england and wales have a pretty
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decent day, actually. some sunshine here. but during the afternoon notice this area of rain creeping in across southern england and pushing up across southern england and pushing up towards east anglia as well. temperature wise, 18— 22, pleasant enough or you get those sunny skies, but still quite breezy. 0nto sunday, another day of sunny spells and scattered showers. you might see the odd thunderstorm around as well, especially across northern and western parts of the country. those heavy showers drifting east through the day. temperatures nothing to write home about. rather cool for this time of year. quite breezy on the weekend. some sunshine, so not all bad news in terms of the weather, but you are likely to see plenty of those heavy and at times thundery showers through the course of sunday, and on saturday as well for some of us. at one to hear about that, just the sunshine! selective hearing. we'll find out later this morning how much more banks,
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like barclays and santander, are having to put aside to pay back customers affected by the pp! scandal. we got a little snippet yesterday from lloyds bank, quite an expensive snippet, and today we will hear more from other banks about how much that ppi scandal will cost them overall. good morning. you might have thought online was being drawn under the scandal, at payments keep coming. the idea of ppi is to cover those loan repayments people might have if they fell ill or lost theirjob, but the problem was it was mis—sold to millions of people who didn't need it or wanted and the compensation pay—outs have piled up ever since. since january 2011, more than £27 billion has already been paid back to people who have complained that they were mis—sold ppi. santander, rbs and barclays have set
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aside more than £37 billion to pay back people affected, although that figure could still rise. but there is now a deadline. from the 29th august 2019, injust over two years, people will no longer be able to make a claim. with so many still claiming, is the deadline fair? let's talk to personal finance expert hannah maundrell. we have talked about this lost —— lots before. never—ending. is it fair that there is a deadline with so many people claiming? what the financial regulator wants to do with the deadline is give banks some reprieve after year after year putting massive amounts aside to repay people, and it is hoping by then most people will have had the opportunity to reclaim. it will be doing a massive awareness campaign to try to encourage people to go to
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their lender to find out if they we re their lender to find out if they were mis—sold ppi had actually something has changed again so that even more people will now be eligible to be considered as mis—sold. so if you haven't ever checked, whether you even had ppi, it is definitely worth checking because there is quite a good chance you may have been mis—sold it. because there is quite a good chance you may have been mis-sold it. but a reprieve for the banks is how they will look at it a little bit, but if there are so many people still to claim, 9008 weeks up until that date, does that mean some people might miss out because there is a deadline? —— 9000 a week. might miss out because there is a deadline? -- 9000 a week. yes, some people could lose out and it isn't right to put that deadline there. if people were mis—sold they shouldn't have a limit on when they can get it back. are some people claiming that probably won't mis—sold it in the first place? we get all of these calls saying we can help you make a claim. the fact of the matter is everybody should check. if people
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about a loan agreement or credit ca rd about a loan agreement or credit card agreement in the last 17 or 18 yea rs, card agreement in the last 17 or 18 years, you should check whether you had ppi years, you should check whether you had pp! and didn't know about it because many people simply won't aware that they had this insurance is added on, which could have added up is added on, which could have added up to 15% — 30% of the premiums. any claims are managed by people —— by companies, encouraging people to make claims, but because of the new ruling that people are entitled to compensation if the amount of commission their banked it was over 50% of the premium, that means even people who had their ppi claim rejected might now have a case.“ you think you've got a case what's the first thing you do? the first thing is to go to a claims management companies are might you can check yourself call. go back to your loan and credit card details, and contact your lender. ask them whether you are going to have payment protection insurance, or whether you had payment protection insurance. if they are not sure or you can't remember who you had a
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loa n you can't remember who you had a loan with, check your credit report, it was details from the last six yea rs it was details from the last six years will be on there. if the lender is an sure, and they should be able to help you, any of the big banks have dedicated teams to help you with this, it's a very simple process. there are so many temp late letters online. —— template. if you do it yourself you can keep all of the money yourself and it is simple. thank you very much. people are getting thousands back but it is worth it. and it will keep going on. those thousands are adding up to billions for the banks. in a few minutes, berkeley is, sat on debt and royal bank of scotland will announce whether they are making more provisions. —— barclays, santander. for 75 years, an underground network of railways used by royal mail ran under the streets of london, sorting the city's post. but in 2003 mail rail closed and the system was abandoned. this morning, tim muffett is following the six and a half miles of underground tracks before they open to the public
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as a tourist attraction. let's find out where about underground tim is. other trains actually big enough for people to travel in, if mail used to be in them? they are. construction on these tunnels began 100 years ago and opened the mail rail 90 years ago. it transformed the way post was moved across the capital. it sped up the service. from september, passengers will be able to write in these tunnels again. it is all part of the new postal museum, most of which opens today in london. it explains the extraordinary story behind our postal service. i've been taking a look. throughout its 500 year history, the royal mail's mission has remained pretty much unchanged. now down the chute... to harness technology of
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the day, to deliver letters and parcels as quickly and accurately as possible. this new postal museum shows how deliveries have evolved. by shows how deliveries have evolved. by the early 20th century, the mail system in london faced two big problems. heavy fog caused by smoke billowing from chimneys and heavy traffic. the answer lay below ground. in1927, traffic. the answer lay below ground. in 1927, this underground rail network opened. on the post 0ffice tube railway, over 20,000 bags travel through six and a half miles... for 75 years unmanned trains shuttled male between six and sorting offices and two railway stations, liverpool street and paddington. a bit of a squeeze. i guess it was designed for letters, not people. the service was stopped in 2003 and passengers will soon be
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able to write specially adapted trains through the tunnels. it was a really important part of moving the mailand really important part of moving the mail and speeding really important part of moving the mailand speeding up really important part of moving the mail and speeding up the process. it was essential to allowing that communication to happen quickly and to get that mail delivered as quickly as people needed it. switch caverns, keep everything under control, ringing trains to a stop on loading platforms. about 220 people we re loading platforms. about 220 people were working on the railways in a shift pattern, it was a pretty four—hour operation and there was a huge team of people with different jobs and response abilities. in 2003, the service stopped. the running costs were deemed too high, transporting mail above ground was considered more cost effective, even though some disagreed. this is one of the mail platforms, where the male would have been loaded into containers. the suddenness of the system's closure also surprised many. it almost looks like it was abandoned. it pretty much was. the
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equipment was left down here, newspapers and things like that still laying behind, trolleys, the train was still down here. soon to become a quirky visitor attraction, for some the mail rail has been underappreciated. it is really the first social network, allowing people to stay in touch over distance and quickly and it was important, the speed was imported, and that's what this was about, speeding the system on. what an extraordinary story and we have special permission to walk on these tracks. that won't be available to members of the public. the mail rail system will open at the beginning of september. the rest of the postal museum opens today. you are from the postal museum. an extraordinary story. most people have never seen this part of london. how does it feel to shortly be opening? it feels fantastic. after six years of working on this project, the trains are nearly ready to go. rob sitch —— from september
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people will be able to take the plunge down the tunnels and see themselves. i assumed that when you reopened there would be mice and rats. but that wasn't the case. why not? white right. that's because there were no passengers on this railway, as it was always meant for post, and as a result there is no food and so there isn't that problem. what did this do for post? it revolutionised how it was carried, it made it so much easier for it to pass through london. it took 4 million letters a day through the system, under the streets, avoiding the congestion above at its heyday and it made such a difference. thanks ever so much. later we will talk to some people who worked on the system. an extraordinary story, these specially converted trains, soon to be open to the public. that's really interesting. abandoned train, underground... i like that. still to come, 0lympic
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gold—medallist chris boa rdman i like that. still to come, 0lympic gold—medallist chris boardman is greater manchester's first ever cycling and walking commission. we'll be asking him about his plans. time now to get the news where you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. hundreds of sensitive documents have been stored in an open room on a south london estate. the paperwork related to child protection and rent arrears issues shows names, addresses and other confidential information. it was left at the gardun estate in clapham. the regulator in charge of data protection can fine organisations, including local authorities, up to £500,000 for breaches. lambeth council has secured the site and ordered an urgent review. so the information commissioner's office can impose quite serious fines for this kind of breach, the council was recently fined £60,000 for misplacing some filing cabinets.
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a man has been charged for life after stabbing a man to death. this man was killed last september while walking in peckham when a man drove a car towards walking in peckham when a man drove a cartowards him, walking in peckham when a man drove a car towards him, then running after him and stabbing him. campbell will serve a minimum of 36 years. heathrow has announced its passengers will not pay more in air fares, despite the cost of building a third runway. the airport says it's confident it can keep landing fees, which are passed on to customers in ticket prices, near existing rates. heathrow currently charges around twenty two pounds per passenger. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, still issues on brixton hill this morning. because of that burst water main. eeight buses have been diverted. in new cross, one lane closed on the a2 eastbound at pagnell street for gas works. in putney, traffic lights aren't
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working at norroy road. just a reminder it's ridelondon this weekend. it means roads around westminster will be closed most of the day tomorrow and sunday. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. sunny spells and heavy showers yesterday, but today it is rather different. it should stay dry for most of us until we get to this evening. so much better news for the cricket. still quite breezy. the south—westerly wind picking up at times. we start off the morning at about 14—15 degrees. the best sunshine will be this morning and then we start to see the cloud thicken from the west as we head into the afternoon. the breeze is going to pick up, but we should still be dry. top temperature is 21—22 celsius, which is the cooler side of average for this time of year. through this evening's rush—hour is when we will see showery outbreaks of rain spreading from the west. that will clear eastwards through the night, we start
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off the morning at about 14—15. still some outbreaks of rain in kent and essex first thing. it should be a mostly dry start to the day on saturday. dry for much of the morning. very little in the way of brightness and we have heavy pulses of rain pushing in from the south—west as we head through the afternoon. so staying quite windy. sunday is a much better looking day. we should see some sunny spells and just a small chance of a couple of showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. increased safety concerns following the grenfell tower fire. dozens of tower blocks fail a new more thorough fire safety test. the bbc understands at least 60 buildings will be declared a risk later today. councils warn that the cost of making them safe will run into the tens of millions of pounds.
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good morning, it's friday the 28th ofjuly. also this morning: links between how much you drink and developing type 2 diabetes. new research suggests you're no better off being tee—total. campaigners continue their lorry top protest near to the entrance of what is now the uk's premierfor most uk fracking psych. —— psych. —— psych. good morning. there's been strikes, disruption and a massive power failure in a difficult few months for british airways. i'll be speaking to willie walsh, the boss of the company that owns the airline. in sport, england's women ease into the quarter—finals of the
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european championships with victory over portugal, but for scotland it's a case of so near, yet so far. and there's confusion at the races as a 50—1 winner turns out to be completely the wrong horse. beneath an investigation has begun. beneath the streets of london these male trains have been reopened. we will find out why later. —— mail. and sarah has the weather. a bit of sunshine this morning but equally some heavy showers, especially later. a full forecast in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. bbc news understands that at least 60 high—rise buildings which used insulation and cladding similar to grenfell tower have failed a new fire safety test. the test is seen as more thorough than previous ones as more materials were analysed together for the first time. so far, just nine of the buildings which failed have been identified. they're in salford in greater manchester where the local council is asking
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for help from central government to meet the cost of replacements. ministers will publish the full test findings later this morning. it comes as police say they may pursue corporate manslaughter charges. dan johnson reports. while those touched by grenfell tower wait for a full picture of how this fire spread, other residents in other towers are nervous, wondering if they‘ re safe. these blocks in salford, nine of them, are among the 60 across england we understand will be declared a risk after failing the latest tests. the thought of you not being safe when you're sleeping in bed of a night—time, thinking that that's not safe, do you know? it's bad, isn't it? yeah, really bad. they should take the lot.
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i don't care how much money it costs, it is people's lives at the end of the day. i think we're sitting on a tinderbox. some of the cladding had already come down. now the rest will come too. in the first round of tests, panels from every building failed. after criticism that wasn't realistic, experts have now combined cladding and the installation fitted behind it to show which materials are dangerous when they are put together, like they were on grenfell tower. yesterday police said there are reasonable grounds to suspect corporate manslaughter may have been committed by the council or the tenant management organisation. more than six weeks since grenfell burned, the investigation is finding its focus, while the reverberations beat right across the country. dan johnson, bbc news. defence cuts have left the uk reliant on other countries to protect british waters, according to labour. figures obtained by the party, show nato allies sent nearly 40 planes to the uk last year to help with maritime patrols. the ministry of defence says most of the aircraft were for training and military exercises. people who drink alcohol three to four times a week are 30% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who never drink. more than 70,000 people took part
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in a large danish health study that measured drinking habits. the uk's leading diabetes charity warns this isn't a "green light" to drink excessively. 0ur health reporter katie silver explains. diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges the uk faces today. more than 3.5 million people currently live with the condition, and the numbers are only getting worse. but new findings from denmark could provide some hope. researchers at the national institute of public health at the university of southern denmark found that people who drink alcohol have the lowest risk of getting type 2 diabetes, beating even the teetotallers. the best results were found for men who drink 14 drinks per week and women who drink nine. but rather than drinking it all on a saturday night, they found this weekly intake has to be spread over three or four days. the study also found that not all alcohol is equal. wine appeared to be particularly beneficial, as the chemical
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compounds, especially in red wine, seem to help manage blood sugar. and there was a warning to women to stay clear of gin. a daily tipple of that, or other spirits, increases their diabetes risk by 83%. diabetes uk warns that the effect of alcohol on developing diabetes differs from one person to the next. where did the people who were drinking an awful lot, when was this happening? was there different times of the year that they were drinking more alcohol which had an impact? for example, if you are in the festive season, people drink a little bit more and eat a little bit more. those kinds of things really weren't discussed in much detail. while this study is in its early stages, it is hoped it might spur future research to help some of the 12 million britons currently at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. katie silver, bbc news. donald trump has failed in his latest attempt to replace barack 0bama's healthcare law.
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three republicans voted against the so—called skinny repeal bill in the senate within the past hour. the bill was a watered—down version of trump's first plan which he originally launched during last year's election campaign. former republican presidential nomineejohn mccain was among the senators that voted against. two teenagers are in custody in connection with one of the recent wildfires in the south of france. the pair are suspected to have deliberately set fire to scrubland on tuesday, the wildfires, which led to thousands of people, including british holidaymakers, being evacuated this week have largely been put out. firefighters have warned people to be vigilant as other blazes could still start. aid workers in greece have told bbc news they're dealing with hundreds of extremely vulnerable refugees being held on the island of lesbos. many have suffered torture and sexual abuse at the hands of so—called islamic state in syria and iraq. the european commission said that those refugees should be moved to athens for specialist treatment. bags of rubbish are piling up in birmingham as bin collectors
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continue to strike in the city. a row with the council overjob losses and changes to working practices is now in its third week. thousands of residents have been affected, despite council efforts to add extra collections, and many people are complaining about the smell. the strike is set to last until september. there's a north—south divide when it comes to what sauce we choose to put on ourfood. new research claims that people in north—west england, scotland and northern ireland are more than twice as likely to have brown sauce in their kitchens than those in london. three quarters of us apparently can't eat a meal without a bit of sauce on the side and half of us have even had to make a dash to the shops to buy some sauce before sitting down to eat. you know, you like tomato sauce but
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separated? i like all sauce, there is almost no source i don't like. would you have brown and tomato? yes. tabasco sauce? they are all goodin yes. tabasco sauce? they are all good in my book. the sport coming up later and also the weather. some of the front pages now. we'll talk to philip hammond later on. lots of stories about brexit. 0n the front page of the papers here. the telegraph is looking at the freedom of movement continuing after brexit and whether or not eu citizens will have the right to work in britain after a transitional period as long as they register. that phrase has been picked up in other newspapers as well. let's show you the front page of the financial times. 0ne as well. let's show you the front page of the financial times. one of the questions people are casting, what is going on with the government position on brexit? —— are asking.
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the immigration minister yesterday told us how it would shape up in terms of who would be allowed to stay and what would happen post—brexit. philip hammond, who we will speak to in about half an hour, has apparently been speaking to business leaders outlining how he sees what they are calling this transition period and we will try to get to the bottom of what he is suggesting later on this morning. we'll find out later this morning exactly how many tower blocks in england have failed the government's new fire safety test. tests on the cladding and insulation have been carried out in the weeks since the grenfell tower disaster, a previous method of testing was criticised for being unrealistic. meanwhile, the industry magazine inside housing has carried out its own research, suggesting hundreds of tower blocks have safety flaws. let's talk to peter apps from the magazine. thank you very much for your time this morning. would you like to go through the research you obtained or
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commission and tell us what you found? no problem. what we were looking into was the fire risk assessments that have been carried out on these tower blocks. we sent freedom of information request is to councils and we asked housing associations to provide details as well and we ended up getting back risk assessments for 436 tower blocks up and down england. that allowed us to have a look at what sort of issues fire risk assessors we re sort of issues fire risk assessors were worried about and what sort of things they were telling councillors and housing associations weren't right with their buildings. that showed us there were quite a few issues that were raised and raised quite frequently, the most common being fire doors. in 61% of those 461 blocks there was some kind of an
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issue with fire doors ranging from there being a few leaseholders in there being a few leaseholders in the building who have replaced the door with something non— fire resista nt to door with something non— fire resistant to full—scale problems we re resistant to full—scale problems were communal fire doors aren't quite right and doors are damaged and broken. it showed that there is and broken. it showed that there is a large number of issues that councils and housing associations needed to deal with. is it legal to replace a fire door with a non— fire protective door? the landlord of that building, the owner, has a responsibility under fire regulations to make sure the building is fire safe. if the fire doors aren't replaced and leaseholders have doors replaced with non— fire safe ones then we can ta ke with non— fire safe ones then we can take them to court and make them put a properfire door back in. take them to court and make them put a proper fire door back in. the reason i'm asking is police investigating the grenfell tower fire so they have reasonable grounds to suspect corporate manslaughter
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may have been committed, does that surprise you? i don't know enough about what the police have been looking at to say for certain whether this is anything to do with that. certainly there are issues in lots of tower blocks, issues councils and housing associations have been having to deal with. councils and housing associations have been having to dealwith. i'm sure you're aware that the bbc has learned 60 buildings have failed a whole fire system test were, i'm sure you can explain better than i, involving a nine metre tall wall, which looked at how flammable the panels, insulation and cladding were altogether. yeah. the bbc has got that info. the government's initially looked at these aluminium composite panels, which were found on grenfell. then after appointing
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an expert panel, they looked at what they called a whole system. rather than just the insulation they called a whole system. rather thanjust the insulation behind they called a whole system. rather than just the insulation behind the panel and the way it's put together with the firebreaks and so on, they we re with the firebreaks and so on, they were testing to see if that whole system would resist the spread of flame. what's been reported and what's coming out from councils in the last few days is the first one of those tests, which is the system on grenfell, has failed and despite all the firebreaks put into that building it clearly wasn't able to stop building it clearly wasn't able to sto p fla m es building it clearly wasn't able to stop flames spreading quickly on the outside. peter apps, news editor at inside housing magazine, thanks for your time this morning. our main stories this morning: the bbc understands cladding and insulation used in at least 60 tower blocks in england has failed a new fire safety test following the grenfell tower disaster. people who drink three to four times a week are less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who never
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drink, danish researchers suggest. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. well, quite a lot of cloud on the forecast today. temperatures not doing well for the time of year. we are just about heading into august and it is feeling a little bit more autumnal, with the unsettled weather set to continue. there will be sunshine breaking through the cloud. this is how things are looking in suffolk this morning. some sunshine through the morning in central parts of the country, but equally scattered showers. some of the rain today could be heavy and thundery. low pressure is dominating things, sitting towards the north—west. tightly spaced isobars means a blustery day. the breezy winds coming in from the south—west and
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importing showers into northern ireland and scotland. a few showers in south—west england and wales. showery rain will become heavier as we head into the afternoon. across scotla nd we head into the afternoon. across scotland and northern ireland day of sunny intervals and a few blustery and at times heavy showers. there could be the odd rumble of thunder. sunny skies for a time in northern england this afternoon, but across wales you can see the cloud and rain. persistent rain pushing on here and across the south—west of england this afternoon. the breeze beginner. it should stay dry for much of the day in south—east england and east anglia, although we have a lot of cloud. 0verall england and east anglia, although we have a lot of cloud. overall a cloudy and breezy day. the winds begin later and through the second half of the afternoon there is a chance that we will see some of that we re chance that we will see some of that were in arriving. this rain across wales and the south—west of england pushes eastwards widely across the rest of england's overnight. it will be accompanied by blustery winds. just about clearing the south—east coast by first in tomorrow morning.
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we continue to see showers feeding in the north—western parts of scotla nd in the north—western parts of scotland and northern ireland overnight. low pressure still sticking around into the weekend. sitting out towards the north—west again. saturday we have the westerly breeze coming in. saturday should be not a bad day across the bulk of the country. certainly through the morning. later in the afternoon we have rain heading across southern england, later in the east anglia and we continue to see that theme of showers across scotland and northern ireland. temperatures around about 18- 22. ireland. temperatures around about 18— 22. you might average or a bit cooler than average. but feeling cooler than average. but feeling cooler with the breeze. sunday will bea cooler with the breeze. sunday will be a day of sunny spells and scattered showers, moving through on the breeze. some of them heavy and potentially thundery, especially towards the north—west. fewer showers south—east by the time we get to sunday. to summarise the weekend of weather, it is pretty cool and breezy. a mix of some sunshine and some of those heavy showers. thanks very much and speak to you
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later. we are going to now talk about some figures coming from the banks. especially barclays. generally they are doing all right, but payment protection insurance, ppi, they've put aside for that 700 million, on top of what they put previously, £8.4 billion they already put aside. it has gone up by almost 10%. yes. the reason it has gone up by more, and we heard the same from lloyds yesterday, is because there a deadline for when people can claims for compensation, about being mis—sold insurance over the past few decades for top initially the deadline was thought to be due 2019 at when the regulator came out and made the decision on it, they said august. sofa the past couple of months banks have had to gone back __ go months banks have had to gone back —— go back to the calculator is and work out how much it will cost them.
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they have said how much they think people will claim. we've done the city is many times. when they say they've put this aside, these are staggering amounts of money. does that mean they are paying out that amount of money or the money is sitting to one side waiting to be paid out? it sits there for a bit until it is paid out, but up until now the reason they keep making these provisions is because what they've said in the past isn't covering what they envisage will be the total amount by the end. and if that because it's becoming easier to track down whether or not you are owed ppi? a lot of the banks do wonder how many people are actually thinking they were mis—sold back on the day, but because of all the claims, a huge amount of these claims, a huge amount of these claims are people who got this cold calls or text and actually responded to them, allowing the business to have a look at when they are due compensation. but you had a guest earlier who said to get in touch with your lender? yes. but a product
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you took out in 1992, a store card that you have, did it have ppi attached to it? that's not the easiest thing to find out. if it is more recent you would have more of a chance of finding out quickly. thanks very much. fracking could get under way within a week after the drill that is needed to stop the process arrived ata needed to stop the process arrived at a site in lancashire yesterday. protesters are continuing to try to delay the start of fracking and are holding a carnival by the site later. john maguire is there. we can get a sense behind you. may be the scene. protesters on top of some of the lorries. yes, they are. they've been up there for three days, 24 hours a day, three on lorries, wagons, that were bringing in supplies. we are about a quarter of a mile away from the entrance to the site. we used the word in the
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introduction "controversial". it doesn't do fracking justice, word. it splits communities. for example, police are operating a contraflow, this is the preston new road going along. two cars went past. 0ne beat their corn and wave to support the campaign is on top of the trucks, the very next car shouted some abuse, so that gives you an idea of the division of opinions. this campaign has been here for about a month. there will be a big combination of the demonstrations today and over the next couple of days. meanwhile, the work is still going on to try to make this the very much first commercially successful fracking site in the uk. while the party and protests continue outside the site, inside, behind the thin yellow line, preparations for the next major step
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in uk fracking are taking place. this is a big dealfor all sides. local campaigner barbara richardson has fought this fracking site, known as preston new road, every step of the way and believes if shale gas is extracted here then other sites will follow. imagine these every two to four to five miles across this beautiful, rural place, known for agriculture and tourism. just imagine what it will be like. if you don't stop it now, you're opening the door, so you've got to stop it now. july has seen the local efforts here bolstered by protesters by the group reclaim the power. they've been trying to disrupt access, climbing on top of lorries, sitting in the road and locking themselves to vehicles. how do you justify this? we're not targeting the lorry drivers, we understand they did a job and they need to feed their children and take some money. we're not obviously targeting them, but what they have on the back
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of their lorries is more equipment for them to get into the fracking site and create the fracking, so the more we delay it, the slower the task is going to be, the more it costs the company. but despite their efforts, the drilling rig that will bore as deep as 3,500 metres below the lancashire soil has just been brought in. they will then drill horizontally, fracture the shale rock and release the gas. and this site will be the most monitored gas exploration site ever, i would say. we are monitoring air—quality, water quality, noise, traffic movements, all of that being monitored 24—7 and all of that made publicly available. of course we also have the environment agency that have already visited us six times, and we only started constructing in january, doing their own monitoring and disclosure. so i can say to people that you don't need to take my word for it. the data will be out
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there to demonstrate that this is being done properly. the process remains highly controversial, from the demand for shale gas to the technology of fracking, to the way these demonstrations are policed. environmental catastrophe or energy game changer, the answer is locked deep within ourfeet, game changer, the answer is locked deep within our feet, but not for much longer. i want to introduce you to somebody from lancashire for shale. you have done some work for quadrilla in the past. can you understand why there is such opposition to this industry? acting partly that's due to the experiences in the early days of shale development —— i think partly. there have been mistakes made and i think the fear is those mistakes will be repeated here. i don't
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believe they will be. i spent 20 yea rs now believe they will be. i spent 20 years now managing environmental risk. i've seen nothing that suggest it can't be done safely or in a way that doesn't compromise the environment. citing the fears are broadly unfounded, but i understand why people have them. so lancashire cou nty why people have them. so lancashire county council voted against this, it makes you wonder why.” county council voted against this, it makes you wonder why. i think it voted against the recommendations of planning experts and that's something you have to bear in mind. the people who actually understand the role of planning and the rules behind it and what we can and can't do in terms of safety development, they said we should go ahead. what we've also heard from one of the local campaigners here at is that they fear that if the shale reserves are as people think they might be, then this whole wonderful countryside could be littered with these mine heads. i don't think that's the case at all. if you look
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at north yorkshire, it's already britain's largest onshore gas field. most people wouldn't even know they are there. they are well screened. the timeframe, quadrilla hope this exploit region —— this drilling will produce gas and there will be commercial production in the early pa rt commercial production in the early part of next year. what sort of difference do you think this will make to the industry, to the economy? so farjust to get to this point quadrilla has spent about £1.5 million in the economy. that's what we wa nt million in the economy. that's what we want to see. jobs created, opportunities for local companies and we want to see that grow. i think that we get to the point, and people are seeing it for themselves and seen that drilling is very temporary and the disruption is temporary and the disruption is temporary from a traffic perspective, i think people will
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start to feel more comfortable with it as start to feel more comfortable with itasa start to feel more comfortable with it as a process. all right, thank you very much forjoining us here this morning. as i say, the actual entrance is about a quarter of a mile further along the preston new road and demonstrations taking place will very much buildup. you can see there's a large police presence here. the lancashire force has been supported by other neighbouring forces, although north wales has taken some of its officers back. we've been told by the constabulary that this is costing the police about £500 —— that this is costing the police about £500 -- £500,000 a that this is costing the police about £500 —— £500,000 a month to manage this. so a big issue for this pa rt manage this. so a big issue for this part of the country and uk wide. thanks very much. back to you later. plenty coming up on the programme. we will talk to philip hammond in about 15 minutes. we will also speak to the cycling commission of the greater manchester. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah.
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hundreds of sensitive documents have been stored in an open room on a south london estate. the paperwork related to child protection and rent arrears issues shows names, addresses and other confidential information. it was left at the gardun estate in clapham. the regulator in charge of data protection can fine organisations, including local authorities, up to £500,000 for breaches. lambeth council has secured the site and ordered an urgent review. so the information commissioner's office can impose quite serious fines for this kind of breach. so a council was recently fined £60,000 for misplacing some filing cabinets. a man has beenjailed to life after chasing his victim through a south london estate and stabbing him death. 24—year—old ernest kalawa was killed last december. he was walking on frensham road in peckham when derron campbell drove his car towards him before running after ernest and then stabbing him. campbell will serve a minimum of 26 years. heathrow has announced its passengers will not pay more
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in air fares, despite the cost of building a third runway. the airport says it's confident it can keep landing fees, which are passed on to customers in ticket prices, near existing rates. heathrow currently charges around £22 per passenger. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. except on the tubes this morning. for the dlr, minor delé there. 0n the roads, still issues on brixton hill this morning. it's closed between brixton water lane and upper tulse hill because of that burst water main. eight buses have been diverted. in new cross, one lane closed on the a2 eastbound at pagnell street for gas works. in putney, traffic lights on the high street aren't working at norroy road. just a reminder it's ridelondon this weekend. it means roads around westminster will be closed most of the day tomorrow and sunday. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. sunny spells and heavy showers yesterday, but today
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it's rather different. it should stay dry for most of us until we get to this evening. so much better news for the cricket. it's still quite quite breezy. the south—westerly wind picking up at times. we start off the morning at about 14—15 degrees. the best of the sunshine will probably be this morning and then we start to see the cloud thicken from the west as we head into the afternoon. the breeze is going to pick up, but we should still be dry. top temperatures 21—22 celsius, which is the cooler side of average for this time of year. through this evening's rush—hour is when we will see showery outbreaks of rain spreading from the west. that will clear eastwards through the night, we start off the morning on around 14—15. possibly still some outbreaks of rain in kent and essex first thing. it should be a mostly dry start to the day on saturday. dry for much of the morning. very little in the way of brightness and then we've got some heavy pulses of rain pushing in from the south—west as we head through the afternoon.
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so staying quite wet and windy. sunday is a much better looking day. good news for ridelondon. we should see some sunny spells and just a small chance of a couple of showers. thanks. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the headlines this morning: bbc news understands that at least 60 high—rise buildings, which used insulation and cladding similar to grenfell tower, have failed a new fire safety test. the test saw the materials analysed together for the first time. the only buildings identified so far are nine council blocks in salford in greater manchester, where the local council is asking for help from central government to meet the cost of replacements. ministers will publish the full test findings later this morning. people who drink alcohol three to four times a week are 30% less
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likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who never touch it. researchers in denmark studied the drinking habits of more than 70,000 people. but the uk's leading diabetes charity says this isn't a "green light" to drink excessively. there are so many other associations made with higher intake of alcohol. for example, it will increase your blood pressure and your blood pressure in turn is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. it is hard to imagine that alcohol have much of a role in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. donald trump has suffered an embarrassing defeat on one of his key campaign pledges to reform us healthcare. a number of republicans, including former presidential nomineejohn mccain, voted against a bill which would have replaced a law passed by former president barack 0bama. the bill was rejected in a dramatic, late—night vote by 51—49. the republican party's leader in the senate described it as "disappointing."
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defence cuts have left the uk reliant on other countries to protect british waters, according to labour. figures obtained by the party, show nato allies sent nearly 40 planes to the uk last year to help with maritime patrols. the ministry of defence says most of the aircraft were for training and military exercises. two teenagers are in custody in connection with one of the recent wildfires in the south of france. the pair are suspected to have deliberately set fire to scrubland on tuesday, the wildfires which led to thousands of people, including british holidaymakers, being evacuated this week have largely been put out. firefighters have warned people to be vigilant as other blazes could still start. a driver lost control of his new £200,000 ferrari
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and careered off a motorway before it burst into flames after owning it for just an hour. south yorkshire police released these pictures of the wrecked vehicle after it left the m1 near barnsley during wet weather. remarkably, the driver escaped with minor injuries. how long his wallet will be injured for, who knows? coming up on the programme, sarah will be here with the weekend weather in ten minutes, but first here is mike with the sport. success and disappointment in football? in a moment we will get to the bottom of the horse's tale in mistaken identity but first, the football, completely contrasting emotions for england and scotland. scotla nd emotions for england and scotland. scotland so near, doing so well but they are disappointed and england markjohn and they keep their winning momentum going in the european championships in the
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netherlands —— march on. they go into their quarter—final against france as the team with the best record so far after beating portugal 2—1, nikita paris with the winner. and scotland came so clos, in fact this close, had that chance from three yards gone it, they would have been celebrating but a 1—0 win over spain wasn't enough and they go home on goal difference. in the europa league qualifiers, aberdeen hold a 2—1 lead over cyprus side, apollon limassol, after the first leg. and everton's wayne rooney received a hero's welcome at goodison park last night. he played the full 90 minutes against slovakian side rozumberok. it was a scrappy game, settled only by leighton baines‘ deflected second half strike. the second leg takes place next thursday. and it was a rain interrupted first day between england and south africa at the oval. debuta nt davvid malan was bowled as the tourists dominated, but former captain alastair cook is closing in on a century as england ended on 171—4. the series is currently 1—1.
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there was controversy at the races in great yarmouth yesterday after a case of mistaken identity meant the wrong horse won a race at odds of 50—1. two—year—old mandarin princess was declared winner of the 1:40pm, but they later realised it was in fact her stablemate millie's kiss who run and won. she had been due to race later. let's find out more from radio 5 live commentator derek thompson who was there. hello! you were there, how did it u nfold hello! you were there, how did it unfold and how did everyone react? it was incredible because i called the horse on and the redhot favourite finished second we had a 50 to one stunner in the first race and when i came down to the commentary box a lady said a pound each way at 50 to one and all that sort of thing and the crowd was stunned and all that sort of stuff. what happened was the jockeys
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weighed in and after the race it was official, the bookies were paying out on the 50 to one winner, betting shops around the country and around the world, we go live on at the races around the world, it's not just the 1:40pm at great yarmouth, it goes around the world and the stewards said we had better dope test the winner. that happens, they randomly pick two horses after each race, it later transpired that when the vet who did the dope test put the vet who did the dope test put the scanner on the horse's neck, each course has a microchip, he said this isn't mandarin princess, it is millie's kiss, due to run in the fourth race. we had a three—year—old running against two —year—olds, which are much stronger and probably quicker and much faster. that's the reason but it didn't come out for at least two hours. there were rumours going around saying we hear the wrong horse won the first race but nobody knew until about two hours later, by which time all the money
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had been paid out and now what are they going to do? the british horseracing authority are going to look at what happened. the trainer said i'm sorry i put the saddle on the wrong horse. a good trainer at newmarket, he had two horses there, when they got into the stables they have passports like you and i going ona have passports like you and i going on a plane and they have the microchips so they knew the two horses but they must have brought out the wrong horse, put the saddle on the wrong horse and the wrong horse won at 50 to one. may be there needs to be changes, a second scan above for each race. wouldn't the jockeys notice a different horse? they ride so many and some look the same. they ride so many. the jockey that rode the horse, he is 49, one of our top seniorjockeys, he never rode the horse before the track so he wouldn't know, they ride six or seven he wouldn't know, they ride six or seve n ra ces he wouldn't know, they ride six or seven races a day and sometimes more so something needs to be done. i hopeifs so something needs to be done. i hope it's a 1—off, it's like a dick francis novel, all the skulduggery
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and betting coups, it was nothing like that but it shouldn't happen again. tomorrow we have the king george at ascot, one of the biggest races in the world and then glorious goodwood next week. we don't want this again. when we get on planes we have to show our passport and our boarding pass, something like that must now happen in british racing. we will have to leave it there but derek thompson, fascinating, 5 live commentator getting to the bottom of it. racing commentators always tell a great tale! just like a dick francis novel! brilliant! i hope you know how it happened and it's all fully explained! thanks, mike! more than a year after the uk voted to leave the european union and after two rounds of talks in brussels there's still plenty of uncertainty around the brexit process. one of the most important figures in all this is the chancellor philip hammond and he joins us from westminster now. thank you very much for your time
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this morning, chancellor. we'll get to brexit in a second but our lead story this morning you're probably aware of is in connection with g re nfell tower aware of is in connection with grenfell tower and the bbc understands up to 60 tower blocks have failed new tests around safety and local authorities are saying they need tens of millions of powers for the money. will you be prepared to pay directly for any work that needs doing to do with those safety concerns? landlords of these buildings are in most cases either local authorities or housing associations, many of them have reserves. what we have said is that we will insure that any works that need doing it carried out, there should be and will be no case where a lack of funding prevents safety works from being carried out. where landlords have reserves themselves to carry out that work, that's the way they should do it. if there are
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local authority landlords out there or housing associations that really do not have access to the funding then we will insure arrangements are put in place to allow them access to the funding to do the necessary work. the simple answer is yes the government will directly pay for the work that needs doing? what i said is there won't be any work that needs doing that doesn't get done because of lack of funding. all these landlords borrow, they have access to borrowing capacity and in the case of local authorities directly from the government, in the case of housing associations they mostly borrowed from the marketplace. we can podemos place arrangements to ensure that they have access to borrowing capacity in order to do any immediately necessary works “— order to do any immediately necessary works —— borrow —— we can podemos place. there was a meeting you reportedly had with business
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leaders, you can tell us if this is the case, a phrase called standstill transition in relation to brexit. did you use that phrase and what does that mean? i conduct meetings all the time of roundtable meetings, with business leaders from different sectors to talk about the brexit process and other aspects of the economy. it's very important that people in those meetings can speak freely. we have generally free—flowing discussions around the table where i am able to get their ideas about how the government should conduct the processes and they can hear our evolving thoughts about the way things are going. but it's very important those meetings are private meetings so we can exchange views freely. my view on transition is well—known. i believe it would be in britain's interest and in the eu's interest if after we leave the european union, the single
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market and the customs union on the 29th of march 2019, there is then a period, call it transition, interim period, call it transition, interim period, whatever you like, during which we will allow our economies to adjust to the new situation rather than having a cliff edge in march, 2019, which would cause immense disruption for businesses and citizens. did you use the phrase standstill transition? i'm trying to be clear on this one. i don't keep a minute of these meetings so i don't know, they are generally free—flowing discussions around the table and people come up with different thoughts and different ideas. these aren't statements of government policy, they are discussions flowing around the table when we exchange views. that's the way i'd like to carry on conducting business. we've heard from business that they have been concerned in the past about lack of access to government, lack of discussion with government. we've gone to great lengths to ensure that business does
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have access to government, that we do have a free—flowing discussion with them but obviously we can only do that if people are able to speak freely within a private meeting to exchange ideas. i tell you what strikes me and made... what strikes me and might strike other people is why should these things be secret? this is everyone's future, why should you say one thing in a meeting and a different thing to ask? hang on, i'm not saying one thing... can i finish my question. let me finish the answer. on the issue of what you said and what you save should remain secret, how long is the transition period you're talking about? what we're hearing from different government ministers appears to be very contradictory. 0n the one hand we're hearing from brandon lewis, who we spoke to yesterday on the programme, saying free movement of labour ends when we leave the, spring, 2019. you seem to be saying if a transitional
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standstill arrangement happens than that means everything stays the same —— leave the u. that means everything stays the same -- leave the u. i haven't said anything secret and i don't think this is remotely controversial. government needs to have the ability to discuss with business leaders from different sectors in a free—flowing way. their ideas and our thoughts about the way we might ta ke our thoughts about the way we might take things forward need to be discussed. that is helpful and constructive but it won't be if everything everyone says is reported in public. how long is the transition period you would like? you are asking me a question i have a nswered you are asking me a question i have answered many times before, we don't have a fixed idea about the length of that but we know it will need to be for a fixed period but whether that time needs to be a year, two yea rs, that time needs to be a year, two years, three years, that will be determined by the facts, that will be determined by questions like how long it will take us to put in place
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changes at our customs border as we processed goods coming into the uk. how long it will take us to put in place changes at the border in heathrow for example where we processed people. these are matters of fa ct processed people. these are matters of fact about the way we work —— we process. they're not political decisions, they are practical, pragmatic decisions and it's for pragmatic decisions and it's for pragmatic reasons that we increasingly think a transition period will be the right way forward both for the uk economy and for our neighbours in the european union. there's no attempt to keep anything secret, it is simply free—flowing discussion. we need to understand the challenges that business faces as it transitions from eu membership, customs union membership a single market membership, to what happens after march 2019. you understand the challenges from government point of view, around border and customs control, but we
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also need to understand the challenges from business's point of view. for someone who voted in favour of leaving the eu is listening to you now and they remember the phrase brexit means brexit, and then you say it could be two, three, we don't know how long it will remain the same, they might think you are talking about something completely different from what was initially suggested and a p pa re ntly what was initially suggested and apparently this government supported. let me say very simply that we will leave the european union. we believe the customs union and we will leave the single market on the 25 of march, 2019. period. the question of what we do after the protect the british economy, protect britishjobs and protect the british economy, protect british jobs and businesses, protect the british economy, protect britishjobs and businesses, is protect the british economy, protect british jobs and businesses, is this government's dayjob. that's what we are working on and that's what we have to map out in a way that works for business, that will keep the board is operating smoothly, that
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will allow people to get on aeroplanes and travel around in the normal way. nobody in this country wa nts to normal way. nobody in this country wants to see a cliff edge of disruption on the 29th of march, 2019. so we will leave the european union, but we will do it in a sensible and pragmatic way that allows us to get on with our lives andi allows us to get on with our lives and i think that is what the vast majority of people in this country will want us to do. chancellor philip hammond, they give very much for your time this morning. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. a mixed picture had? —— ahead. that's right. our changeable summer holiday weather continues. unsettled weather, but for some of us there sunshine around. this is the view in worcestershire ta ken recently. patchy cloud around, winning showers through the day. so a mix of sunny spells this morning, but plenty of blustery showers as well. low
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pressure dominates the weather and is sitting towards the north—west at the moment. quite tightly spaced isobars, meaning we will have quite a blustery day, especially in north—western areas. windy, with scattered showers. a few showers across northern england and into wales and some of england. some sunshine to be seen through central parts and in the northern england as we move into the afternoon. at 4pm we move into the afternoon. at 4pm we still have plenty of showers across scotland and northern ireland. it could be the odd rumble of thunder and then a drier slot of weather across parts of northern england. cloud increasingly developing across wales, bringing outbreaks of rain through the afternoon. some of the rain pushing across the south—west of england this afternoon. the south—east of england and east anglia, fairly cloudy and mostly dry. if you are heading to the cricket, it will be a cloudy day and the wind will pick up later. through the middle part of the afternoon there's a chance we could have wet weather move again.
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that rain across wales and the south—west of england initially through the afternoon moves northwards and eastwards through much of england and wales, clearing to the south—east overnight. so clear skies for many parts of the country into the early hours the morning, but we continue to see showers in the far north—west. 12— 50 degrees. those are the overnight lows. —— 15. low pressure sticks around tomorrow in the northern half. more showers. this weather front in the south looks like it should be sitting in the english channel through saturday morning. so wet weather for the channel isles. through the day it will drift further northwards. some rain across southern england and in the east anglia through the afternoon, but not a bad day further north. some sunshine here and still some blustery and scattered showers. david northern ireland. 22 degrees or so on saturday. 0n david northern ireland. 22 degrees or so on saturday. on sunday, sunny spells again, and plenty more blustery and possibly thunder we showers. temperatures around 16— 21
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degrees, to feeling cool. saturday staying dry for quite a good part of the day. so cool and breezy through the weekend. a mixture of some sunny and dry weather and also plenty of blustery showers. it's like all seasons throughout the weekend! thank you. in the last hour, the company that owns british airways has revealed a rise in profits. sean has more on this. it has been a rough summerfor british airways, but profits are still up on last year. good morning. it's not been a few easy months for british airways. you'll probably remember the chaos at heathrow back in may, when thousands of people were stranded because of a big computer failure at ba. they've also had several walkouts from cabin crew staff over pay. but this morning, the company that owns ba, iag, reported it's made a profit of about £900 million in the first half of this year.
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most of that is from british airways. let's speak to their chief executive now, willie walsh. good morning. what went wrong in may? well, we disclosed that previously. this was a problem caused by the disconnection of power at the datacentre and there be unauthorised and incorrect reapplication of the power, which caused a power surge and damaged the physical infrastructure in the datacentre. so we have addressed the issue and clearly apologised to all of our customers who were disrupted asa of our customers who were disrupted as a result of that, but i think the results we've released today show that the underlying performance of the airline is excellent and passenger numbers continue to grow well in excess of the capacity that well in excess of the capacity that we are adding to our business. have you now managed to compensate all of those passengers who struggled in may? because there have been a lot of reports that people still haven't seen anything from british airways. we are dealing with the compensation as the claims come in. we are processing them as quickly as we
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can. i think we've done a good job in doing this. some individual customers may have experienced issues and may relate to the complexity of their claim or the need for us to clarify some issues. at the vast majority of customers' claims have been processed and processed colour —— correctly. claims have been processed and processed colour -- correctly. when you look back at british airways, 11 yea rs you look back at british airways, 11 years ago it was voted the number one airline in the world, around the time you join. more recently it was number40. time you join. more recently it was number 40. are you happy with the change in british airways over the yea rs ? change in british airways over the years? i am. i am change in british airways over the years? i am. lam very change in british airways over the years? i am. i am very pleased. i think it shows its competitive performance. ijoined think it shows its competitive performance. i joined 13 think it shows its competitive performance. ijoined 13 years ago and we've made a lot of changes in them. we've moved on to iag six yea rs them. we've moved on to iag six years ago and the group has grown significantly and it is one of the strongest groups. but the reputation... our customer numbers continue to grow. but you've gone
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from being voted number one to number40. from being voted number one to number 40. our reputation clearly has taken a hit because of some individual issues. we've also seen strong competition. we are looking at the future and there are issues we need to address and some of these i think have been handled well and some of them we could have handled better. we will get better going forward and i think the measure of the success of any company is how it can sustain an increasing competition and the challenges of career long period, not measured over one year. five years from now i would expect british airways to be in the top ten of airlines worldwide andi in the top ten of airlines worldwide and i expect that because of... it is always a challenge being number one when some of our competitors don't have financial constraints and don't have financial constraints and don't need to demonstrate a bottom—line profit, because they are supported in a different way. i've got no problem with that. but we are good airline that does respond well to changing environments and ten yea rs to changing environments and ten years from now... who knows? it is a
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long way away. i think we can be confident based on a performance that we will be one of the leading airlines. before you go, iberia as well, why was it until recently you required femalejob well, why was it until recently you required female job candidates to ta ke required female job candidates to take a pregnancy test? that was done bya take a pregnancy test? that was done by a company that acted on behalf of iberia and it has been stopped. to be honest i don't think the management was aware that was happening and as soon as they found out it was a stopped it. it wasn't something that was used to discriminate against people being employed. what was it used for? it was actually done because of health and safety requirements, because of the training and the fact that cabin crew can't fly when they are pregnant. we did recruit a number of people, despite the fact that they showed they were pregnant, they were still recruited. practice has been stopped. it isn't something that was consciously done by the management at iberia and as soon as they found
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out about it they stopped it. thank you very much. that was the chief executive of iag that owns british airways and iberia. it has been a rough ten years when you look at the reputation of change, but he seems happy with it. he is optimistic that the company will get out into the top ten in five years. it would be good if we can talk to him then. there is something exciting about a disused railway track. combine that with it being underground. and then paid one red and one green. the perfect picture. tim muffett can explain all. good morning. iam explain all. good morning. i am deep below london this morning in tunnels which were first constructed 100 years ago and you will see this mysterious train next to me as well. these were used to transport mail underneath the capital. it transformed the way post was moved around the country and
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sorted as well. it is a fascinating pa rt sorted as well. it is a fascinating part of our history. these are about to be reopened to the public in september, as part of the postal museum. the rest of it is opening today. ray used to work on mail rail. what was it like to work on? it was a very busy place. noisy, a train coming in every six minutes and it was a key part of the rail network. what impact did it have? it was very important. it carries mail from the east to the west of london, it connected the districts in central london to two of the rail hubs. it was abandoned in 2003 and is about to be reopened as a visitor attraction. how does that feel? it feels good. it would have been a change if it just feels good. it would have been a change if itjust passed into history and had been forgotten, but now it will take on a whole new lease of life as an educational public attraction. it is a part of london which few people have seen. we will talk a little bit later and
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have a bit more of a tour around this incredible network, 6.5 miles below london and most people have not been aware of it. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. hundreds of sensitive documents have been stored in an open room on a south london estate. the paperwork related to child protection and rent arrears issues shows names, addresses and other confidential information. it was left at the gardun estate in clapham. the regulator in charge of data protection can fine organisations, including local authorities, up to £500,000 for breaches. lambeth council has secured the site and ordered an urgent review. so the information commissioner's office can impose quite serious fines for this kind of breach. so a council was recently fined £60,000 for misplacing some filing cabinets. a man has beenjailed to life after chasing his victim through a peckham estate and stabbing him death.
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24—year—old ernest kalawa was killed last december. he was walking on frensham road when derron campbell drove his car towards him before running after ernest and then stabbing him. campbell will serve a minimum of 26 years. heathrow has announced its passengers will not pay more in air fares, despite the cost of building a third runway. the airport says it's confident it can keep landing fees, which are passed on to customers in ticket prices, near existing rates. heathrow currently charges around £22 per passenger. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, still issues on brixton hill this morning. it's closed between brixton water lane and upper tulse hill because of that burst water main. eight buses have been diverted. in new cross, one lane closed on the a2 eastbound at pagnell street for gas works. in putney, traffic lights on the high street aren't working at norroy road. just a reminder it's
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ridelondon this weekend. it means roads around westminster will be closed most of the day tomorrow and sunday. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. sunny spells and heavy showers yesterday, but today it's rather different. it should stay dry for most of us until we get to this evening. so much better news for the cricket. it's still quite quite breezy. the south—westerly wind picking up at times. we start off the morning at about 14—15 degrees. the best of the sunshine will probably be this morning and then we start to see the cloud thicken from the west as we head into the afternoon. the breeze is going to pick up, but we should still be dry. top temperatures 21—22 celsius, which is the cooler side of average for this time of year. through this evening's rush—hour is when we will see showery outbreaks of rain spreading from the west. that will clear eastwards through the night, we start off the morning on around 14—15. possibly still some outbreaks of rain in kent and essex first thing.
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it should be a mostly dry start to the day on saturday. dry for much of the morning. very little in the way of brightness and then we've got some heavy pulses of rain pushing in from the south—west as we head through the afternoon. so staying quite wet and windy. sunday is a much better looking day. good news for ridelondon. we should see some sunny spells and just a small chance of a couple of showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. increased safety concerns following the grenfell tower fire. dozens of tower blocks fail a new, more thorough fire safety test. the bbc understands at least 60 buildings will be declared a risk later today. councils warn that the cost of making them safe will run into the tens of millions of pounds. good morning. it's friday 28th july.
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also this morning. the chancellor tells us there could bea the chancellor tells us there could be a transition period of up to three years after brexit. it will need to be for a fixed period of time. but whether that time needs to bea time. but whether that time needs to be a year, two years, three years, that will be determined by the fa cts . there have been protests against the fracking there, we will be back with him shortly. in sport, england's women ease
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into the quarter—finals of the european championship with victory over portugal but for scotland it's a case of so near, yet so far. there are calls for more micro chipping testing at race courses as a winner turns out to be the wrong horse. an investigation is under way. this will be reopening to the public, it's all about mail rail, we will be explaining later. above ground, sarah will keep us up to date with the weather. good morning. expect everything thrown in today, some heavy showers, breezy conditions and equally sunshine too. i will bring you all the details in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. bbc news understands that at least 60 high—rise buildings, which used insulation and cladding similar to grenfell tower,
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have failed a new fire safety test. the test is seen as more thorough than previous ones, as more materials were analysed together for the first time. so far, just nine of the buildings which failed have been identified. they're in salford in greater manchester — where the local council is asking for help from central government to meet the cost of replacements. ministers will publish the full test findings later this morning. it comes as police say they may pursue corporate manslaughter charges. dan johnson reports. while those touched by grenfell wait for a full picture of how this fire spread, other residents in other towers are nervous, wondering if they're safe. these blocks in salford, nine of them, are among the 60 across england we understand will be declared a risk after failing the latest tests. the thought of you not being safe when you're sleeping in bed of a night—time, thinking that that's not safe, do you know? it's bad, isn't it? yeah, really bad. they should take the lot off.
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i don't care how much money it cost — it's not money, it's people's lives at the end of the day. i think we're sitting on a tinderbox when you look at all the flats. some of the cladding had already come down. now the rest will too. in the first round of tests, panels from every building failed. after criticism that wasn't realistic, experts have now combined cladding and the installation fitted behind it to show which materials are dangerous when they're put together, like they were on grenfell tower. yesterday, the police said there were reasonable grounds to suspect corporate manslaughter may have been committed by the council or the tenant management organisation. more than six weeks since grenfell burned, the investigation is finding its focus while the reverberations reach right across the country. we are going to be speaking to one of the survivors from grenfell tower
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and also marcus mumford from the band, they're and also marcus mumford from the band, they‘ re putting and also marcus mumford from the band, they're putting together a football match. the chancellor has admitted there could be a long transition period after brexit and before the uk formally cuts all ties with the eu. 0ur correspondent is in westminster. it seemed philip hammond was frustrated with not only having to be pinned down on exact time frames and methods of process through brexit, but also through the fact that this appears to be little clarity, is that fair? i think it is fair ina clarity, is that fair? i think it is fair in a sense that the government is still evolving its position, if you like. it knows britain is leaving the european union in march 2019t leaving the european union in march 2019 t can't do anything else because it has triggered article 50 and that's what it says, the question is what happens immediately
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afterwards and what the chancellor is keen to avoid is what he calls a disastrous cliff—edge for business where they immediately go into new rules and regulations. what he believes he has got from colleagues isa believes he has got from colleagues is a commitment to a transitional period, in which new arrangements are phased in. where there seems to be disagreement in cabinet is exactly how long that would last. those who voted leave would rather it lasted a short amount of time, such as two years. 0thers it lasted a short amount of time, such as two years. others might want to see it lasting longer. certainly there is pressure on him to say clearly that any transitional period, if you like, half—in, half—out, still some of the arrangements in the european union would be over by the next general election, but speaking on this programme he wouldn't commit to that. he said it should be driven by pragmatic decisions. we don't have a fixed idea about how long that should be. what we do know is it will need to be for a fixed period of time. whether that time needs to
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bea of time. whether that time needs to be a year, two years, three years, that will be determined by the facts. that will be determined by questions like how long is will take us to put in place changes at our customs border as we process goods coming into the uk, how long it will ta ke coming into the uk, how long it will take us to put in place changes at the border in hereto rowe, for example, where we pose, people —— heathrow. he didn't commit to getting that transitional phase over by the next general election, but also i think what is very interesting as well from the chancellor is stressing the practical difficulties that are going to be facing britain post—brexit in march 2019. although we technic cline leave the european union in 2019, a lot of the arrangements may look very, very similarto arrangements may look very, very similar to what we have now in terms of migration, business, single market access and may not look very
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different to what we are seeing now. maybe half—in, half—out for a few yea rs maybe half—in, half—out for a few years beyond 2019. thank you very much. in the last hour, barclays bank has announced its set aside an extra £700 million to cover payouts for mis—sold ppi. it brings the total amount set aside by barclays to over £9 billion. ppi policies were mis—sold to cover loan repayments if people fell ill or lost theirjob. more than £27 billion has now been repaid by the banking industry. donald trump has suffered an embarrassing defeat on one of his key campaign pledges, which was to reform us healthcare. 0ur correspondentjoins us from los angeles. this is such a mantra for donald trump in the election campaign and subsequently to get rid of this policy. yeah, this is a huge defeat for donald trump. he talked about it a lot at all of those
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campaign rallies that he held during his election campaign that he would overturn what had become known as 0bamacare and replace it with something, just in the last few hours, before the vote in senate, he was urging republicans to give america great healthcare again. well, that hasn't happened. it's a defeat for donald trump. it's the defeat for donald trump. it's the defeat for donald trump. it's the defeat for the republicans in the senate. they had produced a bill, they called it a skinny bill, because it was a peared down version, taking out controversial elements they had previously proposed. but it wasn't at the end of the day accepted. donald trump has been tweeting about itjust within the last hour. he said they let the american people down, let 0bamacare implode, then deal. watch. thank you very much. people who drink alcohol three to four times a week are 30% less
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likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who never touch it. researchers in denmark studied the drinking habits of more than 70,000 people. but the uk's leading diabetes charity says this isn't a green light to drink excessively. there is so many other associations with high intake of alcohol. for example, it will increase your blood pressure and your blood pressure in turn is also a risk factor for developing type two diabetes. it's interesting to see what is coming up. ican't interesting to see what is coming up. i can't envisage alcohol ever having a fantastic role in reducing risk of type two diabetes. defence cuts have left the uk reliant on other countries to protect british waters, according to labour. figures obtained by the party, show nato allies sent nearly 40 planes to the uk last year to help with maritime patrols. the ministry of defence says most of the aircraft were for training and military exercises. the fires have largely been put out.
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firefighters have warned people to be vigilant as other blazes could still start. there's a north/south divide when it comes to what sauce we choose to put on our food. new research claims that people in north—west england, scotland and northern ireland, are more than twice as likely to have brown sauce in their kitchens than those in london. do you have brown sauce in your kitchen, charlie? no, i suspect that's what we thought was the case,
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brown sauce was more prevalent. three quarters of us apparently can't eat a meal without a bit of sauce on the side, and half of us have even had to make a dash to the shops to buy some sauce before sitting down to eat. what about both on the same plate? makes me feel slightly uncomfortable. if there is tabasco that's ok. not sure. sarah will have the weather in a few minutes. fracking, the controversial process of drilling into shale rock to extract gas, could get underway within weeks — after the drill needed to start the process arrived at a site in lancashire yesterday. 0ur reporter is there. our reporter is there. we were
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saying earlier in the last hour it's an incredibly divisive issue this, i described before we came on air last time all these cars as they're coming past, one car beeped their support and waved at the protesters on top of the lorries and they've been up there for three days so far. the next car shouted abuse at them. that's what many of the local people think. some of this campaign is very much spearheaded by local people. 0ver much spearheaded by local people. over the last month another group has come in, reclaimed power to bolster the campaign, if you like and to intensify it. it's really going to reach a peak over the next couple of days. meanwhile, the work has been progressing at the site which is around a quarter of a mile further down the road there. this is the furtherest the uk has gone yet really in exploiting shale gas, fracking it from the earth, thousands of feet below. the party
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and protests continue outside, inside, behind the thin yellow line, preparations for the next major step in ukfracking are taking place, this isa in ukfracking are taking place, this is a big dealfor all sides. local campaigner barbara richardson has fought this fracking site every step of the way and believes if shale gas is extracted here, other sites will follow. imagine these every two to four to five miles across this beautiful rural place known for agriculture and tourism, just imagine what it's going to be like, if you don't stop it now, you are opening the door. you have to stop it now. july has seen the local effo rts stop it now. july has seen the local efforts here bolstered by protesters from the group reclaim the power. they've been trying to disrupt access, climbing on top of lorries, sitting in the road, and locking themselves to vehicles. how do you justify this sort... we are not targeting lorry drivers, we understand that they need a job and they need to feed their children and
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ta ke they need to feed their children and take money, we are not purposely targeting them. but what they have on the back of the lorries is more equipment for them to get into the site and create the fracking, so the more we delay it, the slower the task is going to be, the more it costs the company. but despite their efforts, the drilling rig that will bore as deep as 3,000 metres below the lancashire soil has been brought in. engineers will then drill horizontally, fracture the shale rock and release the gas. and this site will be the most monitored gas exploration site ever, i would say. we are monitoring air—quality, water quality, noise, traffic movements, all of that being monitored 24—7 and all of that made publicly available. of course we also have the environment agency that have already visited us six times, and we only started constructing in january, doing their own monitoring and disclosure. so i can say to people that you don't need to take my
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word for it. the data will be out there to demonstrate that this is being done properly. the process remains highly controversial, from the demand for shale gas to the technology of fracking, to the way these demonstrations are policed. environmental catastrophe or energy game changer, the answer is locked deep within ourfeet, but not for much longer. let me introduce you to some of the local residents will they have only just arrived. a little bit rushed for that you are living almost on top of all of this. what has it been like chris rock we have lived here six years now. a lovely area, a lovely place to live. we did not expect to have the biggest shale
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frack on our site. we were not expecting all of this. all the contamination it will bring, people where we live on elderly and retired. a lot of concerns if there is contamination, which there will be, because we have seen films about it and everything. personally, for my side, watching people on here, they cannot do anything about it. thank goodness these protesters do things for us. they are helping our need really. you are in support of the protesters and the campaign. we have heard from the company behind it, saying there are a lot of checks and balances and the environment agency will be monitoring the site carefully. what about living with some of the protests? police have
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been causing problems at the traffic lights. i have an elderly lady who has had a stroke and relies on ca re rs has had a stroke and relies on carers to get her up in the morning. they sent them down and the diversion would not let them on. the policeman did come to see as afterwards. they refused them. they would not let the carers through to my husband, who is a sick man. we moved here two years ago for the clea n moved here two years ago for the clean airand moved here two years ago for the clean air and fresh airfor his health. quadrilla said whatever they we re health. quadrilla said whatever they were doing with not tarnish my husband's health and i have letters to that effect. moving all this fracking has not been good for us.” am against it. thank you very much
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indeed. sorry. we have run out of time. we really appreciate your comments. local people have been thinking about this issue. as we have reflected throughout the morning, very different opinions on various sides, notjust about morning, very different opinions on various sides, not just about the overall benefits but also the impact is harassed on a local site like this. back to you in the studio. you are watching breakfast. the bbc understands cladding and insulation used in at least 60 tower blocks in england has failed a new fire safety test following the grenfell tower disaster. people who drink alcohol three to four times a week are less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who never drink, according to a danish health survey. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. many people are on summer holidays
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at the moment. most of the schools have broken up. the weather is looking changeable over the next couple of days. rather than settle with low pressure dominating. some blue sky and sunshine. this is more burnt in worcestershire. despite the sunny start there will be plenty of blustery showers. —— mount vernon in worcestershire. some fairly tightly spaced isobars around. we're in for a breezy feel and over the course of the weekend as well. the winds are south—westerly bringing heavy showers. also further south across the uk we will see more cloud and further heavy showers rolling into in the afternoon. for scotland and northern ireland today of sunny spells and get a chance. there could
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be the odd rumble of thunder. a dry speu be the odd rumble of thunder. a dry spell of weather likely in the afternoon. heading south across wales, cloud increasing and bringing heavy spells of rain. rain persistent in the south—west in the afternoon. it should stay mostly dry in the south of england and east anglia. a similar story for the cricket at the oval. a cloudy picture. the breeze picking up. from mid afternoon onwards we could see a few spots of rain. quite windy in the south—west. the wind and rain pushed their way eastwards across the rest of england overnight. slowly clearing. for many of us, we will start the day on saturday on a dry note. still showers in the north—west. still no pressure sitting in the north—west. feeding in plenty of showers on saturday. further south and improved sort of
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day. for england and wales will have a large, dry and sunny field to the day. this rain will push its way into seven parts of england and towards east anglia in the afternoon. in the north relatively dry and sunny. heavy blustery showers for scotland and northern ireland. temperatures around 18 to 22 degrees. a bit of deja vu. we have heavy showers rattling in. there could be the odd under storm in the north and west. fewer showers reaching the south—east on sunday. a mixed picture. if you're heading off camping, rather cool and breezy. there will be sunshine on offer and a few showers interrupting the sunshine as well. willie boss of the parent company of british airways, the reputation of
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the company has come under some scrutiny, i think it is fair to say. if you were one of the passengers in may, chaos after british airways had the it failure. this morning we have heard they are still making money. £900 million, most of it from ba. the problems in may cost them about £60 million. the ongoing process of paying compensation back to passengers, willie walsh said. i also asked him, if over the last ten yea rs, ba years, ba has changed a lot. they are now number40 years, ba has changed a lot. they are now number 40 in the world. i asked him if he thought there would bea asked him if he thought there would be a reputational hit. reputation has takena be a reputational hit. reputation has taken a hit because of individual issues. we have seen strong competition. we're looking at the future. there are issues we need to address. some have been handled well and some we could have handled much better. we will get better
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going forward. the measure of success is how it can sustain increase in competition and challenges. not measured over one year. five years from now i would expect british airways to be in the top ten of airlines worldwide. that is quite an ambition to have when they have fallen to number 40. it is so competitive at the minute. 0ne reason they have had to change quickly hear about norwegian airlines providing flights for people for a couple of hundred quid to new york. they have had to stop giving people free food. people thought for a long time that is why igo thought for a long time that is why i go british airways, for that extra bit of something but not so much anymore. the problem is that ba have been rumbling for a while. you have been rumbling for a while. you have been looking at ppi. this is about the numbers set aside and paid out to people, which seemed to be increasing all the time. yesterday
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we heard lloyds have put aside £700 million. morning, berkeley is surprised a few people with £700 million more of provision as well for customers. these are people who we re for customers. these are people who were mis—sold payment protection insurance over recent decades, still putting in the claims. the deadline is august, 2019. the banks, they have been recalculating how much they think it will cost them to pay out until that date. barkley say £700 million. that means more than £9 billion from barclays bank alone. £30 billion has already been paid out over recent years. these are huge amounts of money. the banks could have been lending out that money to businesses and keeping the economy going. 0n the flip side there has been £30 billion ball cash for people to spend in recent years they would not have taken into account before. we talk about
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economic growth. people think that might have helped to prop up the economy a bit. the banks are anticipating more people claiming ppi. it is almost like the adverts, you'll most become numb to them, do you? the calls and texts, you sort of think, i'm not going to do it now. every time we talk about it, you mention to somebody there is another £700 million put aside. lloyds think there will be dealing with 9000 cases every week up until the end of august, 2019. a lot of people still thinking making claimants still going through the process. on another subject, sean, brown or red sauce? brown. i am put on the spot. always brown. are you a northerner? i am from the west midlands. still no signs of hot summary
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weather on the way. low pressure dominating today and into the weekend. it's going to bring a few showers across the north and west of the uk. then this feature will run into the south—west of the uk this afternoon to bring wet and windy weather. a little bit of sunshine through the morning. showers across scotla nd through the morning. showers across scotland and northern ireland. cloud will continue to thicken across the south—west and into wales. some persistent rain and strong winds, maybe even gale force in exposure. temperatures in the best of sunshine
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across the east before the rain arrives, 22, otherwise high teens where we have the showers. into the evening and overnight it turns wet and windy across much of wales and the rest of england, eventually that clears and becomes confined to the far south—east by the end of the night leaving clear skies following on behind, lighter winds too. further showers across the north—west and a few chilly spots, as well through central areas. the weekend, we still have low pressure nearby, that weather front also lingering across southern areas. looks like the rain will clear the south—east eventually through the morning but it could turn northwards again bringing heavy rain to southern counties of england through saturday afternoon. to the north, some sunshine. a decent day for some. plenty of showers for scotland and northern ireland, these will continue to be blustery. very wet by the end of the day across southern areas. towards sunday, a better picture for the far south as that weather front clears. should picture for the far south as that weatherfront clears. should be sunshine, but also showers and these
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will be heavy across northern and western areas, maybe with thunder. again on the cool side, so the weekend is looking unsettled thanks to low pressure and feeling cool for the time of year. there will be some good spells of sunshine but also showers that could turn out to be heavy on sunday. this is business live from bbc news with rachel home and alice baxter. king for a day! amazon founderjeff bezos briefly becomes the world's richest person. but wall street nerves about the company's massive spending push him back down to number two. live from london, that's our top story on friday the 28th ofjuly. sales at amazon rise — but profits plunge —
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as the e—commerce giant spends big on expansion overseas. also in the programme. making america grow again. will the latest figures on the us economy bring president trump

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