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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 28, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. at least 60 buildings fail new fire safety tests, including, the bbc understands, nine buildings owned by salford council. the chancellor philip hammond says any transitional deal after brexit must end by the next general election. the overriding concern is we go through with this process that avoids disruptive cliff edges for business and individual citizens. the us senate has rejected plans to repeal health care reforms enacted under barack obama, delivering a major blow to president trump, who is now facing infighting at the white house as two senior aides fall out. also in this hour, the prime minister of pakistan has resigned. it follows a decision by the country's supreme court do suspend him from office after corruption allegations against his family. aid
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workers in greece and say they are dealing with hundreds of extremely vulnerable refugees held on the island of lesbos. bags of rubbish pile up in birmingham as rubbish collectors step up their industrial action. collection has already been disrupted for weeks. and it's only just bought it. a driver looses control of his new £200,000 ferrari. that was one hour after he picked it up that was one hour after he picked it up from the garage. good morning. it's friday 28th july. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the bbc understands that at least 60 high—rise buildings, which used insulation and cladding similar to grenfell tower, have failed a new fire safety test.
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the test is seen as more thorough than previous ones, as more materials were analysed together for the first time. so farjust nine of the buildings which failed have been identified. they're in salford in greater manchester, where the local council is asking for help from central government to meet the cost of replacements. ministers will publish the full test findings later this morning, as dan johnson reports. while those touched by grenfell wait for a full picture of how this fire spread, other residents in other towers are nervous, wondering if they're safe. these blocks in salford, nine of them, are among the 60 across england we understand will be declared a risk after failing the latest tests. the thought of you not being safe when you're sleeping in bed of a night—time, thinking that that's not safe, do you know? it's bad, isn't it? yeah, really bad. they should take the lot off. i don't care how much money it cost — it's not money,
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it's people's lives at the end of the day. i think we're sitting on a tinderbox. some of the cladding had already come down. now the rest will too. in the first round of tests, panels from every building failed. after criticism that wasn't realistic, experts have now combined cladding and the insulation fitted behind it to show which materials are dangerous when they're put together, like they were on grenfell tower. yesterday, the police said there were reasonable grounds to suspect corporate manslaughter may have been committed by the council or the tenant management organisation. more than six weeks since grenfell burned, the investigation is finding its focus while the reverberations reach right across the country. we had joined by the professor of management crisis at university of
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we st management crisis at university of west scotland. we have heard that these new tests revealed many buildings have failed when a different circumstances are put together. this is quite concerning that the number of buildings now has been stretched to 60. we know nine r.n. local been stretched to 60. we know nine r. n. local authority been stretched to 60. we know nine r.n. local authority control, some are privately owned buildings, and 40 are privately owned buildings, and a0 people living in the buildings, it be extremely concerning because what they have on their building is the same setup as what was on g re nfell tower. the same setup as what was on grenfell tower. what should happen now? should they be evacuated, the cladding be stripped away immediately? decoding should be stripped away immediately, it is a fire risk, it is a serious fire risk because we have seen with grenfell tower, and it is an unacceptable fire risk, so from a social and political point of view, i'm surprised that having identified the
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fa u lty surprised that having identified the faulty cladding that there is even a discussion of who will pay for it, it should be something where central government should take responsibility and say we will argue about the money later, but the cladding must be removed immediately and in the meantime i the people who live in those buildings should be offered alternative accommodation or they should be, something should be done to make the building safe in the interim asked the cladding is removed, and removing the cladding may constitute a fire risk in itself, so there was another ideal and therefore evacuating and meeting people. some people living in the blocks may be astonished that it has come to this, that the experts did not know this kind of thing before and it took the grenfell tower disaster to reveal this.|j and it took the grenfell tower disaster to revealthis. i think and it took the grenfell tower disaster to reveal this. i think you raise an interesting point. this raises questions about the quality of building standards in the uk. i noticed in one of your reports they
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we re noticed in one of your reports they were described as a complete mess by one firm of architects. i think there is also a question of why were these ever passed as acceptable for british standards. if they are, then there are serious questions about there are serious questions about the way british standards are produced and the quality of these standards and other questions about the people whose to sit on the committees that approve these things. it is frequently the case from british standards that they bring in industry experts to commentate. the danger is that the industry experts may well recommend things that would save their industry money. i'm not suggesting thatis industry money. i'm not suggesting that is what happened, but there is a potential for that. that that is what happened, but there is a potentialfor that. that clearly needs to be looked at. also, i think the government needs to take some culpability here because there were warnings to the government, there
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have been mutterings that have been washing around in whitehall and amongst government circles and i suspect the government, if they put their hands on their hearts, would not be able to say they have been com pletely not be able to say they have been completely innocent in this process either. this then raises complex questions about corporate manslaughter and culpability. is it the builders, the people that said it was ok, the government that approve the people but said it was 0k, approve the people but said it was ok, the people that approved... was suddenly becomes a legal nightmare. thank you very much. we will have more on that story later on in this hour. phillip hammond has said there's broad agreement in cabinet that there should be a transition period of up to three years after brexit, but it should be concluded before the next election, due in 2022. the chancellor said a failure to implement a transition deal would sow chaos for business and that it was in the interests of the eu and britain
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to have a transition that allows the economies to adjust. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. the chancellor says there is unanimity in the cabinet. do we think fairies? varies on some issues. what the chancellor has been doing is getty ‘s colleagues and getting those who voted leave in the ee referendum to agree to the concept, the idea of a smooth exit from the eu and that somethings could look extremely similar that new arrangements would be phased in. what he has had to concede in order to get that agreement is that this must be very strictly time—limited. it would be a disaster if this was not completed before the next general latejune, not completed before the next general late june, one league supporter told me. it looks like the
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consensus is supporter told me. it looks like the consensus is over, a supporter told me. it looks like the consensus is over, a time to transitional period of no more than three years. there is a general view that any transitional period would have to be finished by the time we get to the date set for the next general election, june 20 22. it may bea general election, june 20 22. it may be a shorter period. it depends on the technical requirements to put in place customs and immigration arrangements and so an and this is all subject to negotiation with the eu. but the overriding concern, as we leave the eu, and the job will be done on the 29th of may at march 2019, it we want to go through this process that avoids disruptive cliff edges for business and for individual citizens. the chancellor making it clear that he has won the argument on behalf of business that there would be no cliff edge after
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brexit in 2019, but beneath that, varies plenty of potential disagreements about what happens during the transitional period, would there be a role in overseeing that transition for the european court and that sort of issue may be something that yet split the cabinet. thank you very much indeed. let's ta ke cabinet. thank you very much indeed. let's take you back to the tests after the grenfell tower disaster. we have heard salford council is asking the woman for tens of millions of pounds to replace cladding on nine tower blocks. that was after they failed more safety tests. judith, what are the council saying? they are saying that they did not wait to hear today that these tests have been failed, they pre—empted it by already bringing work on these blocks to take away the cladding that was up there. you can probably see behind me that on the tower
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blocks was behind me, one of the lower rise blocks, but there ran nine buildings that are high—rise blocks. there is the silver installation you can see which has been revealed when the cladding has been revealed when the cladding has been taken away. alongside it to the right, varies that concrete covered temporary cladding. that is there to keep the insulation covered as a temporary measure. that is not how this is going to end up looking permanently, but what the council has decided to do is take of the cladding straightaway, they have been doing that for some weeks, starting the process some weeks ago. they are going through the work to cover it up with the concrete because they know that is safe, they say, but they know that the residents here will want a permanent solution because they are very concerned about the combustibility and safety office, but they had also
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seen the benefits of the original cladding in terms of the affected was making an insulating the building, keeping the heating bills down. they want eventually had to end up with a solution that gives them cladding on these buildings thatis them cladding on these buildings that is completely safe. they said it could have taken it all away, taking the buildings back to how they were originally, that would not have been written but might be in the best decision, so what they will do is go through this process of working on that, putting the concrete on, and then cheering august, the middle of august also, the council will conduct their own tests to look into the safety of possible replacements. so they are not prepared, they say, anything back on the buildings for the long—term until they assure themselves, rather than resting on themselves, rather than resting on the assurances of organisations and guidelines telling them it is safe, they going to make their own tests to look at a permanent solution. the
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cost of that will be considerable. they say would will run into tens of millions of pounds. the council say they will cover it for the moment, they will cover it for the moment, the safety of residents is paramount, but in the long—term they will look to recover the costs from central government because this will be very costly. thank you very much. the us senate has delivered a major blow to president trump by rejecting plans to repeal president 0bama's health care reforms. three republicans, including the veteran senatorjohn mccain, voted against the bill, which would have resulted in an estimated 16 million people losing their health insurance by 2026. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the ayes are a9, the nays are 51. the motion is not agreed to. it is a moment of high drama, a last—ditch attempt by the republicans to repeal 0bamacare — another promise made by president trump to give america great health care. the so—called "skinny repeal" plan was a pared—down version of previous
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attempts to change the system. it would have eliminated parts of the affordable care act including the individual mandate requiring all americans to have health insurance coverage, as well as a tax on medical devices. it lost by one vote. senatorjohn mccain, who was recently diagnosed with a brain tumour, voted against the bill. i believe that one of the major problems with 0bamaca re was that it was rammed through congress by democrats without a single republican vote. i believe we shouldn't make that same mistake again. we've got to have republicans and democrats sit down together and come up with a bill that gets a majority in both houses, otherwise we're going to see this continuous gridlock. he said afterwards, "it was the right thing to do." we thought they deserve better. mitch mcconnell, the republican leader, said it was
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"a disappointing moment". he said the american people would "regret that they could not find a better way forward." we can work together. the democratic leader, chuck schumer, said his party was relieved that millions of people would retain their health care, but he added that both parties needed to work together to improve the law. 0bamacare was hardly perfect. it did a lot of good things, but it needs improvement. the act, which became president 0bama's signature legislation, remains in place. following the result president trump took to twitter to make clear what he made of it all... that was donald trump's verdict on
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that. the health care vote was not the only challenge for the president. donald trump's new communications director has launched a foul—mouthed attack against two of his senior colleagues. anthony scaramucci used obscene language to describe the white house chief of staff, reince preibus, and the chief strategist, steve bannon. it's the latest drama to hit mr trump's west wing, as our washington correspondent laura bicker reports. president trump's west wing is at war with itself. the appointment of the flashy financier anthony scaramucci as the new director of communications has prompted a bitter battle to win the ear of the president. anthony scaramucci has indirectly accused his colleague, white house chief of staff reince priebus, of leaking information about the administration. he called a us network show to say that only mr trump could judge whether the tense relationship between the two was repairable. we have had differences. when i said we were brothers from
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the podium, that is because we are. but some brothers are like cain and abel. 0ther brothers can fight with each other and get along. i don't know whether this is repairable or not, that will be up to the president. tonight, in an extraordinary phone call with a reporter from the new yorker, anthony scaramucci described reince priebus as a paranoid schizophrenic. he also talked personally about mr trump's chief strategist, steve bannon. on twitter he said he would refrain from using "colourful language" but would not give up the passionate fight for donald trump's agenda. mr scaramucci has been in the west wing just one week, and appears to have spent more time launching personal attacks than pushing the president's policies. he may also be forcing the chief of staff, and a key republican establishment figure, out the door. let's discuss this now. i'm joined from our 0xford studio by visiting professor mallory factor. let's start off with those
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extraordinary comments from anthony scaramucci. really a foul—mouthed ra nt scaramucci. really a foul—mouthed rant against two of donald trump's top aides. it is not great for the dignity of the white house. no, it is not, but a lot of this type of ranting went on within white houses in the past. they did weren't made public. what is happening is the media is at war with the trump administration as well as the trump administration as well as the trump administration being at war with the media and you are seeing this continuously, is the way they actually hit the trump administration and its people with anything they can. surely the media are always having a go at what ever administration is in power. no, they tend to sometimes quite great a little more and take some of the
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passions, shall we say, out of what is being said. they also have a way of agreeing with the people who give that information and holding them in high regard. this is totally not the case here. this is really a war going on, not only within the white house, but with the white house and its people with the media. let's talk about the latest setback for donald trump and his attempts to reverse 0bamaca re, the donald trump and his attempts to reverse 0bamacare, the house care reform under president 0bama. this is one of the key campaign promises and it cannot seem to get it through comic and he? this is one of the key republican promises since 0bama, over six years republican promises since 0bama, over six years ago, republican promises since 0bama, over six years ago, began this. the republicans have said, get us someone republicans have said, get us someone in the white house who will signa someone in the white house who will sign a bill and we will pass something. it is a republican
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pa rty‘s something. it is a republican party's failure. also, again, we hear one side of this whole debate. yes it is going to be bad for a lot of people to potentially lose health care. the number from of people to potentially lose health care. the numberfrom the congressional budget office is about 10 million, some people say 16 million. but the congressional budget office says the tax payer will be saving much money over ten yea rs will be saving much money over ten years with a 20 trillion deficit in the united states government, we have to do, in the us, start saving some money. 0nly have to do, in the us, start saving some money. only one side of the stories being told by the media, but you are right that this is not being gotten rid of. it is almost impossible to get rid of the entitlement once it is given. is that not a problem for donald trump? you tasted all on being a man who would keep his promises in office, make his promises to the american
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people happen, and that is not happening. that is not totally true. i was not a trump supporter, but he has come through with a lot of things already, and it is the republican party, not him, who left the american people down with 0bamacare, the the american people down with 0bamaca re, the affordable the american people down with 0bamacare, the affordable care act by not repealing it. he has already come through in terms of loosening a lot of regulations, things i know you all here don't like, like getting rid of, it was leaving the paris climate accord, but he has come out with many things that he has come through with, and he's trying to come through with the affordable care racks. he still has more than three years to go, so it is not his first term over yet. he may get there eventually. thank you so much for being with us. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. at least 60 buildings fail new fire
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safety tests, including nine buildings owned by salford council. the chancellor filmed badge buildings owned by salford council. the chancellorfilmed badge philip hammond says broker negotiations must happen by the time of the next general election. the us senate repeals plans to repeal 0bamacare. it isa repeals plans to repeal 0bamacare. it is a major blow to donald trump. and in sports, alastair cook begins day two of the third test against south africa heading towards his first centuries since giving up the captaincy. lewis hamilton isjust a third fastest in first practice ahead of the hungarian grand prix ahead of the hungarian grand prix ahead of... england coach is mark samson says his french counterpart is wet behind the years as their coach against the mind games ahead of the european championship. a0 people have been injured —
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one seriously — after a commuter train crashed in barcelona. the incident happened during the morning rush hour at the francia station, in the city centre. reports said the train did not brake when entering the station, hitting the buffers at the platform. pakistan's prime minister nawaz sharif has resigned after the country's supreme court unanimously ruled that he should be disqualified over corruption allegations. the ruling follows accusations relating to the panama papers published two years ago, in which mr sharif‘s three children were implicated. he and his family deny any wrongdoing. with me is secunder kermani. is this a surprise? after the unanimous court decision against him saying, recommending he is disqualified from office, i think
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the prime minister had little choice other than to go. ev had not, we wouldn't have likely seen mass protests on the streets. the panama papers lea ks case protests on the streets. the panama papers leaks case has been really dominating pakistani politics for well over the last year and we have seen well over the last year and we have seen allegations made against the prime minister you and his family according to official enquiry accumulated more wealth over the yea rs accumulated more wealth over the years than their declared sources of income could account for. they were damning comments made by the official enquiry, so having said that, in some ways, this was not a totally unexpected, however this is unprecedented in pakistan. it is unprecedented in pakistan. it is unprecedented that a sitting prime minister faces unprecedented that a sitting prime ministerfaces this unprecedented that a sitting prime minister faces this level of scrutiny and is then removed from office. his party, they are still in power, they will have the
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opportunity to nominate a new leader next week. it is not clear who that will be on top there has been some suggestion it could be his brother, there are objections to him as there are also allegations against him related to corruption. pakistan is ina related to corruption. pakistan is in a situation of uncertainty over what will happen next. he has resigned, what will happen? will he face prosecution? the supreme court has said a trial should take place under the auspices of under the main corruption body and that will look into the allegations that both he and his children at him related money through corrupt practices quite crucially, this trial that will take place will take the burden of the proof on the defendant, so it will place the burden of proving they had acquired this money legitimately on the prime minister and his children, and until now, the essence of why he's being
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disqualified is because thejudges say he has not been able to account for how he got the money. they say in effect there is no smoking gun of exactly what kind of practices were used or weren't used to in this money, but he has not been able to account for it properly so has not been honest, and that he is why he has been disqualified. thank you. aid workers in greece have told bbc news they're dealing with hundreds of extremely vulnerable refugees being held on the island of lesbos. many have suffered torture and sexual abuse at the hands of so called islamic state in syria and iraq. the european commission has said such refugees should be moved to athens for specialist treatment, but charities say that's not happening. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee is in lesbos. life inside moria migrant camp, lesbos. rare footage from a place journalists are banned. it shows tents have been replaced by containers, a reflection of europe's waiting
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room being made that little bit more long—term for the a,000 being held on the island. most are destined to return to turkey to apply for asylum from there as part of the eu migration plan but as they wait for a legal decision, violence, rioting and fires are becoming routine. the camps are full and migrants, though smaller in number, are still making it here by boat. the people arriving here in lesbos are different now because of the ripple effect from the conflicts in iraq and syria since so—called islamic state started to lose ground. many who've arrived in greece have escaped attention. men tortured by is fighters, women used as sex slaves, some are pregnant here, there's little support and it's worsening the problem on an already volatile island. we're very worried, we think we need to improve the healthcare given to these people. if they're vulnerable they need to be recognised as such and many to move somewhere where they can get care. the reality is there isn't this care here on the island and they need to move to the mainland
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to receive it. scars from years of torture, 0sama was once a syrian policeman that was caught by rebel groups and sold to is. he said he was regularly beaten and sexually abused by his captors. "i have so many marks of torture on my body," he tells me, "i've been in captivity for three years, two years locked in one room. "i lost my family, i lost my wife, i haven't seen anything about them. "all this and now i'm here in this humiliation for one year." the greek refugee policy is clear that extremely vulnerable migrants should be taken off the island quickly for specialist treatment in athens. so why are they still here? greek authorities claim they've been overwhelmed by cases and they say some have slipped through the net. i would like at this point to remind that 30,000 people have come through the island since march 2016, so there can be individual cases, some individual cases, where they may not have been
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processed as quickly. for the moment those needing the most help are still waiting and with more migrants arriving and the camp increasing, the vulnerable are left to cope in volatile, deteriorating conditions. gavin lee, bbc news, lesbos. four men have been arrested after they tried to make an explosive device at cardiff prison. it came to light when a prison worker contacted a welsh assembly member, bethan jenkins, with the owner of a £200,000 ferrari has written it off, just an hour after buying it. south yorkshire police say the super—car left the mi near barnsley in wet conditions, flew into the air and burst into flames. the driver suffered only cuts and bruises. let's get the weather now.
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no sign of summery weather in the near future. there will be plenty of showers and this feature moving to the south—west will bring substantial rain and strong winds this afternoon, initially pushing to the south—west of england and wales and gradually moving east. before that, good spells of sunshine, but plenty of showers in scotland and northern ireland. it will feel cool when showers arrived. in the sunshine, 20—2i. showers in scotland, northern ireland and england, england and wales the showers moved east. it turns dry by the end of the night. but showers continue in scotland and northern ireland. towards the weekend, plenty
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of showers around, particularly on sunday when they could be heavy with some thunder. but there could be some thunder. but there could be some sunshine in between as well. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines... at least 60 high—rise buildings in england which have similar insulation to the cladding used on grenfell tower have failed new fire safety tests. more than 80 people died in the tragedy injune. the chancellor, philip hammond, has said a transitional deal after britain leaves the eu could take up to three years, but it would be completed before the next election injune 2022. a significant setback for president trump, as his bid to scrap the health care laws set up by president 0bama are rejected by the senate. at least three republicans voted against the bill, which needed a simple majority to pass. nawaz sharif has resigned as prime minister of pakistan following a decision by the country's supreme court to disqualify him from office. the ruling came after a probe
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into his family's wealth following the 2015 panama papers. let's take a look at the sport now. england have lost the key wicket of alastair cook in the first half hour of play on day two of the third test against south africa at the 0val. former captain cook resumed his watchful innings on 82 but could add just six more runs before being trapped lbw by morne morkel. ben stokes is still there. he is on 28. he isjoined byjonny bairstow. daniel ricciardo finished fastest in first practice ahead of ferrari's kimi raikkonenen for this weekend's hungarian grand prix. lewis hamilton was third quickest. the mercedes driver comes into the weekend just one point behind sebastian vettel
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in the drivers' standings, having won last time out at silverstone. the build up to this weekend's race has been dominated by drivers' comments concerning the new protective halo which is due to be introduced into cars' cockpits next season. there is no question, i am happy to implement head protection for next year if the fia study and develop the halo, and this is the most effective way to protect the head of the drivers. it is more than welcome in my opinion. i don't like it but you have to respect the decision of the fia. since we introduced the virtual safety car, that produced a lot of risk when you're speeding under the yellow flag in the race, and also the wheels are quite strong at the moment, the wheel tethers, so you will not lose our wheel. parts flying around the car, it won't
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really protect you so i don't really understand why we should need it. more success for british swimmers at the world championships in budapest. james guy has broken the british record in the heats for the 100m butterfly. guy is the olympic champion in the 200 metres but failed to win a medal earlier in the week. ben proud also came through his 50m freestyle heat. the mind games have begun ahead of england's quarterfinal against france in the women's european championship. coach mark sampson says his french counterpart 0livier echouafni is "wet behind the ears" and says his record in tournaments is much better. even though france have beaten england in the last three tournaments, with echouafni claiming they wouldn't be happy to face his team in the last eight. we go into this knockout round with whatever is coming our way, we have the answers. france are a great team so we the answers. france are a great team so we have to get ready but we will enjoy tonight first.
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scotland's departing coach says they didn't deserve to go out after coming just one goal short of the quarterfinals. they beat spain i—0 and were close to getting the second. it would have sent them through. but anna signeul said, "the players were spot on with their performance and with the biggest heart i've seen." in the europa league qualifiers, aberdeen hold a 2—1 lead over cyprus side apollon limassol, after the first leg. and everton's wayne rooney received a hero's welcome in his first competitive game back at the club last night. he played the full 90 minutes at goodison park against slovakian side rozumberok. it was a scrappy game, settled only by leighton baines' deflected second half strike. the second leg takes place next thursday. finally to an incredible mix up at yarmouth race. the winner of the first on yesterday's card "mandarin princess" turned out to be a different horse completely after they did a routine microchip test following her victory in the iao. everyone thought this was mandarin princess, in blue, winning at 50—1. but it was actually her
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stable—mate, millie's kiss. both were trained by charlie mcbride, who called it an ‘honest error‘. the result stood for betting purposes. radio five live commentator derek thompson was at the course it was a mistake which should not happen again. we have the king george at ascot tomorrow, one of the biggest in the world, and then next week it is glorious goodwood. we do not need this to happen again. when we get on planes we have to show our passport and boarding pass. something like that must happen in british racing. that's all the sport for now. cladding and insulation used in at least 60 tower blocks has failed a new fire safety test. the test was more thorough than previous checks after the grenfell tower fire, which just examined cladding from high—rise buildings. 0ur correspondent tom burridge is in west london. the government has carried out the
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first of six sets of tests on combinations, combinations of both types of cladding and insulation. the reason the first set of results, which we will get officially from the government shortly, are significant is because the type of cladding in the first test, and insulation, are exactly the same as g re nfell tower. insulation, are exactly the same as grenfell tower. aluminium on either side with polyethylene plastic cord. we took a sample of that up to scotla nd we took a sample of that up to scotland and did some tests. it will be across bbc news in the next few hours. it was significant. when we put a hint of around 1000 degrees celsius to the cladding it was very
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flammable. so there are huge imprecations for other buildings around the country with this same combination. clearly. firstly we have from the first set of tests, we believe 60 towers have been identified, mainly in the private sector, but nine publicly owned. all of those will have to be reviewed and in some cases already the materials are being removed. the government has another five sets of tests on different combinations, other types of cladding and insulation. if you talk about cladding, you talk about the polyethylene core, but you can add otherfire the polyethylene core, but you can add other fire retardant substances into the court to make it less combustible and you can use a mineral —based material, and those are the sorts of materials the government will be using in the
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other tests, along with other types of insulation with variable degrees of insulation with variable degrees of combustibility. this is changing the landscape of building regulations and standards. back to g re nfell tower, regulations and standards. back to grenfell tower, the key thing is whether or not a proper test was carried out on the building on the combination of insulation and cladding used. the bbc has still not found any evidence that the test was carried out. of course the public inquiry and police investigation will be looking into that as well. council bin workers in birmingham are stepping up their industrial action in a dispute that has left rubbish piling up in the streets. members of the unite union have been refusing to do overtime and have been carrying out daily two—hour stoppages. from today that will rise to three hours. the dispute is over planned changes to working practices, which unite says would lead to some workers losing up to 20% of their pay.
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0ur correspondent, phil mackie is in birmingham. i gather a lot of residents are complaining about the smell. it is not too bad today, partly because it is cold and wet and windy but you can see that this is a fairly typical scene in birmingham. iamon fairly typical scene in birmingham. i am on warwick road. bins are piling high. you can see one of the other problems also. there are now getting into the bags. something has been nibbling away. —— foxes and rats are getting into the bags. you can see the recycling bins are also out across the road at the moment. we are hearing today that in order to clear the backlog, bin lorries are mixing recycling and general
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waste together to try to get it off the streets. it is all going to landfill and that means the council will be fined if that is in fact what is happening. the main roads tend to be cleared more quickly. this clearly isn't 56 weeks' worth of rubbish. another lady has said she has seen people leaving the rubbish here because it is more likely to get cleared. if you haven't got a car then you can't ta ke haven't got a car then you can't take your own rubbish to the tip and in some places it is becoming a problem. the dispute is over pay and conditions. what the councils trying to do is change the greed of bin workers —— grade of bin workers. the dispute has been going on for one month. it has escalated today, a three hour stoppage cheering shifts, and that will carry on until
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september. things are just getting worse. streets are getting cleaned, ona ward worse. streets are getting cleaned, on a ward by ward basis, but things are getting this worse. fracking, the controversial process of drilling into shale rock to extract gas, could get under way within weeks, after the drill needed to start the process arrived at a site in lancashire yesterday. protesters are continuing to try to delay the start of the fracking, and are holding a carnival by the site later. 0ur reporterjohn maguire is in little plumpton, lancashire. while the party and the protests continue outside the site, inside, behind the thin yellow line, preparations for the next major step in uk fracking are taking place. this is a big dealfor all sides. local campaigner barbara richardson has fought this fracking site, known as preston new road, every step of the way and believes if shale gas is extracted here then other sites will follow. imagine these every two
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to four to five miles across this beautiful, rural place, known for agriculture and tourism. just imagine what it will be like. if you don't stop it now, you're opening the door, so you've got to stop it now. july has seen the local efforts here bolstered by protesters by the group reclaim the power. they've been trying to disrupt access, climbing on top of lorries, sitting in the road and locking themselves to vehicles. how do you justify this? we're not targeting the lorry drivers, we understand they need a job and they need to feed their children and take some money. we're not purposely targeting them, but what they have on the back of their lorries is more equipment for them to get into the fracking site and create the fracking, so the more we delay it, the slower the task is going to be, the more it costs the company. but despite their efforts, the drilling rig that will bore
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as deep as 3,500 metres beneath the lancashire soil has just been brought in. engineers will then drill horizontally, fracture the shale rock and release the gas. and this site will be the most monitored gas exploration site ever, i would say. we are monitoring air quality, water quality, noise, traffic movements, all of that being monitored 2a—7 and all of that being made publicly available. of course we also have seperately the environment agency that have already visited us six times, and we only started constructing the site injanuary, doing their own monitoring and disclosure. so i can say to people that you don't need to take my word for it. the data will be out there to demonstrate that this is being done properly. the process remains highly controversial, from the demand for shale gas to the technology of fracking, to the way these demonstrations are policed. environmental catastrophe or energy supply game changer — the answer is locked deep
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within our feet, but not for much longer. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour, but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live... at least 60 buildings fail new fire safety tests, including nine buildings owned by salford council. the chancellor philip hammond says any "tra nsitional deal" after brexit must end by the time of the next general election. the us senate rejects plans to repeal president 0bama's health care reforms — a major blow to president trump who now also faces public infighting at the white house as two of his senior aides fall out. in the business news... barclays has set aside an extra £700 million to meet compensation claims for mis—selling payment protection insurance. the news came as the bank said costs
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related to the sale of part of its africa unit had pushed it into a £1.2 billion loss in the first half of the year. but stripping out the losses from the africa sale, barclays posted a 13% rise in group pre—tax profits to £2.3a billion. airline group iag, which owns ba and iberia, has reported an operating profit of £975 million up from £635 million during the same six months last year — that's a rise of 37.3%. iag said the it meltdown which grounded ba flights in may had cost it £58 million. amazon has seen its shares fall sharply after its latest figures disappointed wall street. its sales rose in the second quarter but profits plunged. the seattle firm earned £151 million in profit in the three months to the end ofjune, down 77%.
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the it failure at british airways in may, that left thousands unable to check in baggage, cost it £58 million. that's according to the airline's owner iag. about 75,000 passengers faced severe disruption when ba's system failed over the second bank holiday weekend in may. despite the extra cost though, iag still managed to report a 13.8% increase in half—year operating profits to £803 million. 0perating profits at british airways rose to £663 million. i'm joined by jasper lawler, head of research at lcg. despite the many problems for
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british airways in recent times, how come it and its parent company company2—mac come it and its parent company compa ny2—mac have come it and its parent company company2—mac have done so well? —— iag have done so well? the main boost has been low fuel prices. we have seen a debt in oil prices —— eight dip in oil prices. 0ver have seen a debt in oil prices —— eight dip in oil prices. over the next year or two, it is quite a good time for airlines because they're able to charge lower fares and that increases demand from passengers so you have increased demand from passengers for flights, economies are doing quite well at the moment, and fuel prices are lower. is it all down to these external factors? 0il—price? 0r down to these external factors? 0il—price? or as part of iag's
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strategy on flights playing a part? an interesting development in the industry at the moment, which goes some way to explain the initial spike in the share price but a slight dip at the moment, there is increasing worry about a price war but it is mainly taking place within the budget airlines which are typically short haul and so the focus on long haul that british airways and iberia have protect them somewhat. the pricing in long—haul flights is a bit more protected. the risk owing forward is that we have new entrants like norwegian air which could bring down the long haul prices. we heard from the boss of british airways willie walsh this morning, defending the company. even
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on the numbers specifically, it actually seems to cost the company less tha n actually seems to cost the company less than anticipated, so the compensation they are giving the passengers affected is less than forecast. i think we are not seeing the financial damage of this just yet. it is almost too early to tell. for me, the main problem from this power outage the reputation damage. this adds to a general sense with british airways specifically at the moment that after a series of cost—cutting, including short—haul meals no longer being available, there is a gradual scent that the british airways brand is not what it once was. if that takes place in a negative fashion over the next few quarters, maybe we'll see the 75,000 passengers less keen on their ba
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flights in the next summer booking season. in other business news... bt‘s first quarter profits plummeted by a2% to £ai8 million as a result of a £225 million payment to shareholders following its italian accounting scandal, in which earnings were overstated. the money will go to deutsche telekom and orange to avert legal action after bt‘s share price collapsed. uk pre—tax profits at high street lender santander were flat at £1 billion in the first six months of the year. but the firm said that it sees "greater uncertainty" and risks in the outlook for the end of this year and the beginning of 2018. it took a £69 million charge to cover claims for payment protection insurance compensation. and apple has announced plans to kill off the ipod nano and shuffle. they were the company's last two music players without the ability
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to run streaming service apple music and hadn't been upgraded for ages. the move is part what's been described as a "simplification" of the ipod range to leave just the itouch model. europe's main stock markets dropped at the start of trading on friday as investors reacted to a batch of mixed earnings updates. don't forget you can get in touch with me and some of the team on twitter — i'm @bbcbaxter. that's all the business news. for 75 years, an underground network of railways used by royal mail ran under the streets of london, but in 2003 the system was abandoned. tim muffett has been underground to find out more. throughout its 500—year history,
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the royal mail's mission has remained pretty much unchanged. newsreel: now down the chute into the vans... to harness technology of the day to deliver letters and parcels as quickly and accurately as possible. this new postal museum shows how deliveries have evolved. but by the early 20th century, the mail system in london faced two big problems — heavy fog caused by smoke billowing from chimneys, and heavy traffic. the answer lay below ground. in 1927, this underground rail network opened. newsreel: on the post office tube railway, 25,000 mails bags travel through 6.5 miles of tunnels below crowded city pavements... for 75 years, unmanned trains shuttled mail between six sorting offices and two railway stations, liverpool street and paddington. a bit of a squeeze. i guess it was designed
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for letters, not people. exactly right. the service was stopped in 2003 but passengers will soon be able to ride specially—adapted trains through the tunnels. it was a really important part of moving the mail and speeding up the process. it was essential to allowing that communication to happen quickly and to get that mail delivered as quickly as people needed it. newsreel: switch cabins keep everything under control, bringing trains to a stop on loading platforms. about 220 people were working on the railways in a shift pattern, it was a 2a—hour operation, and there was a huge team of people with differentjobs and responsibilities. in 2003, the service stopped. its running costs were deemed too high. transporting mail above ground was considered more cost effective, even though some disagreed. this is one of the mail platforms, where the trains would have stopped
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and the mail would have been loaded into containers. the suddenness of the system's closure also surprised many. it almost looks like it was abandoned. it pretty much was. the equipment was all left down here, newspapers and things like that still laying around, all the trolleys, the trains were still down here. soon to become a quirky visitor attraction, for some the mail rail has been underappreciated. the postal service is really the first social network, keeping people in touch, allowing people to stay in touch over distance and quickly, and it was important, the speed was important, and that's what mail rail was about, speeding the system up. tim muffet, bbc news, 70 feet below london. the headlines are coming up in a moment. first let's take a look at the weather. that is probably better to the
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underground with the weather at the moment. it doesn't look like it is going to warm up any time soon. but it shouldn't feel too bad in the sunshine. low pressure as the dominant feature. we have this feature running into the south—west of the country this afternoon. it brings prolonged rain into south—west england and wales. then it moves east across england. further north of the country, not about afternoon, quite a few showers on the south—west breeze which could be strong at times but some good spells of sunshine in between. it will feel fairly cool when the showers arrived. england and wales, the cloud continues to thicken even across eastern areas. central and eastern areas started on a nice note this morning. the rain becomes heavier in wales. for the cricket,
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the winds will strengthen as we approach the evening. this area of rain will reach the east early this evening. pretty atrocious evening commute for many. clearer skies, drier weather to end the night. dealing fairly cool as the winds drop. 0n dealing fairly cool as the winds drop. on saturday, low pressure still with us across the north of the uk with sunshine and showers. this weather front looks like it may move north in the south, so it could be very wet across southern counties in the south—east of england into the afternoon. further north, good spells of sunshine, feeling fairly warm in the sunshine, but continuing blustery showers for scotland and northern ireland. 0n blustery showers for scotland and northern ireland. on sunday we'll lose the weather front from the south so a better day in southern
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areas. elsewhere, sunshine and showers, some of these heady and sundry in the north and west. for the weekend, truly unsettled. feeling generally cool and breezy for the time of year, particularly in the showers, but not too bad in the sunshine. the showers will be heavy particularly on sunday. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. the bbc understands at least 60 tower blocks have failed
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new fire safety tests. these were carried out in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster. the overriding concern is to make sure that we go through this process in a way that avoids disruptive cliff edges for business and individual citizens. in a blow to president trump, the us senate has failed for a third time to repeal 0bama's health care reforms. the president also faces major infighting amongst his senior aides. aid workers in greece say they're dealing with hundreds of extremely vulnerable refugees held on the island of lesbos. bags of rubbish pile up on the streets of birmingham birmingham as workers step up their industrial action. collections have already been disrupted for weeks.
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and he'd onlyjust bought it — a driver writes off his brand new £200,000 ferrari, an hour after picking it up from the garage. the bbc understands that at least 60 high—rise buildings, which used insulation and cladding similar to grenfell tower, have failed a new fire safety test. the test is seen as more thorough than previous ones, as more materials were analysed together for the first time. so far, just nine of the buildings which failed have been identified. they're in salford in greater manchester,
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where the local council is asking for help from central government to meet the cost of replacements. ministers will publish the full test findings shortly, as dan johnson reports. while those touched by grenfell wait for a full picture of how this fire spread, other residents in other towers are nervous, wondering if they're safe. these blocks in salford, nine of them, are among the 60 across england we understand will be declared a risk after failing the latest tests. the thought of you not being safe when you're sleeping in bed of a night—time, thinking that that's not safe, do you know? it's bad, isn't it? yeah, really bad. they should take the lot off. i don't care how much money it cost — it's not money, it's people's lives at the end of the day. i think we're sitting on a tinderbox. some of the cladding had already come down. now the rest will too. in the first round of tests, panels from every building failed. after criticism that wasn't
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realistic, experts have now combined cladding and the insulation fitted behind it to show which materials are dangerous when they're put together, like they were on g re nfell tower. yesterday, the police said there were reasonable grounds to suspect corporate manslaughter may have been committed by the council or the tenant management organisation. more than six weeks since grenfell burned, the investigation is finding its focus while the reverberations reach right across the country. 0ur correspondent tom burridge is in west london. he's cursed grenfell tower right now. we have seen tests before. why are these different? people will understandably can be confused. after the grenfell tower fire, they commissioned tests on cladding, smaller tests, and that declared
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that cladding used on around 200 towers around the country was u nsafe. towers around the country was unsafe. what we now see is a larger scale test that the government has been carrying out unaccompanied behalf of the government, it is larger scale, more sophisticated, and it is involving not only cladding, but also insulation. crucially, in the first set of tests, the government is going to carry out six sets of tests with six different combinations of cladding in insulation, in the first set, they're using the same type of cladding as of grenfell tower. the insulation is a con dust bowl type, the cladding has the polyethylene plastic which is combustible, and therefore is significant in this first set of tests, if it fails, perhaps unexpectedly big, because it points to the fact that the buildings used on grenfell tower we re buildings used on grenfell tower were not appropriate. what happens next? we have had the tests and what
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are the indications? , the government will carry out the other five sets of tests on different combinations of less flammable types of cladding the core of the cladding, and less flammable types of insulation. it will carry out all of insulation. it will carry out all of those sets of tests and publish the results. we will get the official results of the first set shortly. it has huge and locations for building work around the country. we're already seeing that salford council are saying they need help from the government to remove the cladding from those nine tower blocks have been identified under the first set of tests, but if there are further failures the first set of tests, but if there are furtherfailures in the first set of tests, but if there are further failures in terms of the combination of types of insulation in cladding, then it will not only have implications for cost, in terms of replacing, money needed at local levels, possibly government money needed to, but it will shape the regulations going forward, what standards need to be brought, the
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type of thing that happened grenfell tower ca n type of thing that happened grenfell tower can not happen again, that combinations of building materials going forward are deemed be safe. thank you very much indeed. as we've been hearing, salford council is asking the government for tens of millions of pounds to replace cladding on nine tower blocks after they failed new more rigorous rigorous safety checks. judith moritz is in salford for us. close to one of the blocks where they are taking the cladding off right now. that is because salford council say this is not news to them. they have been looking at the safety of the cladding since the moment grenfell tower happened. they conducted their own review straightaway, they had to look whether they had to take cladding off and they began the process back injune. i off and they began the process back in june. i will stand off and they began the process back injune. i will stand out of the way and we will show you the process of
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how it is working. you can see on this building, as we go to the top, you will see the grey and the red cladding which is still on. that is the unsafe cladding, the cladding that was put on these buildings, similarto that was put on these buildings, similar to grenfell tower and am told it took to use to clad all of the buildings. . if we move downwards, you will see they have started to begin the process of taken it away. you can see the silver insulation which lies behind the cladding. it is now exposed, you can see it is there, they do not wa nt to ta ke can see it is there, they do not want to take the installation. the council say they are mindful it is keeping the houses warm, lowering heating bills for people, but they cannot leave it exposed, so if we move across, you will see there is another kind of cladding which has got a lettering across it. but is new cladding that is going up that
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is temporarily, it consists of concrete boarding which we are told is safe, but it is not a permanent thing, it will be up there to cover the installation until the council can work out what they want to do permanently. every something here thatis permanently. every something here that is going to take a long time and a lot of money. salford council are asking for help with it, but they cannot wait until they know they cannot wait until they know they have that financial backing, they have that financial backing, they are already going to begin the process , they are already going to begin the process, they have began, they know it will take a long time, so they are getting on with it. they will put the money and now, but they will look to recoup the costs because nine buildings, all the cladding involved, taking a tough, but in a temporary concrete boarding on and finding a permanent solution will cost millions. thank you very much indeed. just to bring you some news, contractors working on the crossrail project have fined more than £i
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million will stop this is after the death of a worker and two other incidents. that is according to the health and safety executive. the health and safety executive on the crossrail project have been fined more than £i the crossrail project have been fined more than £1 million over the death of one of their workers that. we will bring you more on that as we get it. the us senate has delivered a major blow to president trump by rejecting plans to repeal president 0bama's health care reforms. three republicans, including the veteran senatorjohn mccain, voted against the bill, which would have resulted in an estimated 16 million people losing their health insurance by 2026. richard lister reports. 0utside richard lister reports. outside the us congress last night, people gathered to send a message to the senate— do not take away the health ca re we senate— do not take away the health care we have. the affordable care act, signed by president obama, was his defining legacy. americans would
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be required to buy health insurance, insurers would have two cover everybody. republicans condemned what they called 0bamacare, as giving government too much control over health care. for seven years, they vowed to repeal and replace it. but republican senators cannot agree on how, and with a single vote margin on last night's repeal bill, all eyes were on one man. mr mccain. the self—styled maverick republican cast his vote with the thumbs down to gasps in the chamber. and that killed the bill. for the 0bamacare supporters outside, this was a real victory. the republican chance to change health care provision has now all but ended away. this is clearly all but ended away. this is clearly a disappointing moment, from skyrocketing costs to plummeting choices and collapsing markets our constituents suffered through an
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awful lot under 0bamacare. the repeal bill was highly controversial, it would have abolished the legal requirement for health insurance, increasing the numbers of uninsured people by 15 million and increasing some premiums by 20%. democrats said it was time for a new approach. every place in every corner of the world, of the country where we go, the number one thing we asked cops, and i know this because i have taught my colleagues from the other side of the aisle, is can't you guys work together? let's give it a shot. but no hint of compromise from the president who tweeted. .. senator mccain was hailed as a hero when he left congress, but he has also left his party in chaos and his presidency milly did. unable to
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overturn president 0bama's health ca re overturn president 0bama's health care and legacy. that health care vote was not the only challenge for mrtrump. anthony scaramucci used obscene language to describe the chief of staff at white house and also the chief strategist. it is the latest drama to hit donald trump's white house. president trump's west wing is at war with itself. the appointment of the flashy financier anthony scaramucci as the new director of communications has prompted a bitter battle to win the ear of the president. mr scaramucci has indirectly accused his colleague, white house chief of staff reince priebus, of leaking information about the administration. he called a us network show to say that only mr trump could judge
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whether the tense relationship between the two was repairable. we have had differences. when i said we were brothers from the podium, that is because... but some brothers are like cain and abel. 0ther brothers can fight with each other and get along. i don't know whether this is repairable or not, that will be up to the president. tonight, in an extraordinary phone call with a reporter from the new yorker, anthony scaramucci described reince priebus as a paranoid schizophrenic. he also took personally about mr trump's chief strategist, steve bannon. on twitter he said he would refrain from using "colourful language", but would not give up the passionate fight for donald trump's agenda. mr scaramucci has been in the west wing just one week, and appears to have spent more time launching personal attacks than pushing the president's policies. he may also be forcing the chief of staff, and a key republican establishment figure, out the door. with me is dr brian klaas,
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an expert on the united states from the london school of economics. some of the language from anthony scaramucci about his colleagues at the white house is frankly a broadcaster bull. what is going on? it is complete dysfunction. when you zoom it is complete dysfunction. when you zoom out from this scandal, the never—ending stories, every single day there is another period of disarray in the white house. we need competency in the white house, not just the america, but the world does. what we have seen is they have gotten away with this with no major crisis coming up that. what is going to happen if this is the type of turmoil that happens in peace time? what happens when a real crisis occurs? that's why i think between scaramucci and reince priebus, it is a distraction from the fundamental co re a distraction from the fundamental core issue that the white house is
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not prepared for governing and they're showing that on a daily basis. i think this is a really alarming thing beyond the jockeying for power and influence within trump's administration. but did trump's administration. but did trump's supporters, the people that got him into office, do they care? serve this is the reality show presidency that everyone loves watching and clicking on articles about, but other aspects of trump at starting to turn. 0ne about, but other aspects of trump at starting to turn. one of the site shows this week that is quite serious is trump turning onjeff sessions. he embodies his base, he was supposed to deliver what they wa nt was supposed to deliver what they wantan immigration was supposed to deliver what they want an immigration policy, and when drum's conflicts with his agenda,... this is where the basis and the supporters trump. they‘ re this is where the basis and the supporters trump. they're not seeing in delivering. the health care vote is another aspect is where the base wa nted is another aspect is where the base wanted this for seven years and they are not going to get it done. trump's whole thing on the campaign is that he will get things done
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better and faster, and in fact he is achieving nothing in legislative terms and it is a much slower progress than any of his base would have expected. on health care and reversing 0bamacare, he would say he is trying, he could not try harder, it is his fellow republicans that are letting him down. that is a disingenuous argument because what trump was doing this week, this was the final push for his single agenda item that has come to a vote. yesterday he was tripped tweeting about tv shows, though the he was telling boy scouts about a hot cocktail party in new york. when we had a bamako there was much more the campaign and an explanation of why they needed that bill. trump did not try to do that. you just tried to bully people on twitter and attacking members of his owners ministration and his acting fbi director and attorney general. the fa ct director and attorney general. the fact that this should was not pushed
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of the feline should not be surprised. very entertaining to look at some of this stuff going on. thank you forjoining us. russia's foreign ministry has announced a number of measures in response to tough new sanctions proposed by the united states. the russian government says the us government should reduce its diplomatic staff to a55 people — the same number of russians serving in the united states. the russian government says it is seizing a dacha compound and warehouse used by us diplomats. the headlines on bbc newsroom live... the bbc understands at least 60 tower blocks have failed new fire safety tests,carried out in the wake of the grenfell tower fire. the chancellor, philip hammond, says any transitional deal in the immediate period after brexit must end before the next general election in 2022. in a major blow to president trump, the us senate fails for a third time to repeal 0bama's health care reforms.
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let's take a look at the sport now. england are counterattacking on day two of the third test against south africa having lost the key wicket of of alastair cook in the first half hour of play at the 0val. former captain cook was trapped lbw for 88, falling 12 runs short of his first test century since stepping down as captain. but since then ben stokes and jonny bairstow have enjoyed ben stokes has got his half—century this morning. daniel ricciardo finished fastest in first practice ahead of ferrari's kimi raikkonenen for this weekend's hungarian grand prix. lewis hamilton was third quickest. the mercedes driver comes into the weekend just one point
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behind sebastian vettel in the drivers' standings, having won last time out at silverstone. the build—up to this weekend's race has been dominated by drivers' comments concerning the new protective halo which is due to be introduced into cars' cockpits next season. there is no question, i am happy to implement head protection for next year, if the fia study and develop the halo, and this is the most effective way to protect the head of the drivers, it is more than welcome, in my opinion. i don't like it but you have to respect the decision of the fia. since we introduced the virtual safety car, that reduced a lot of risk when you're speeding under the yellow flag in the race, and also the wheels thethers are quite strong at the moment, so you will not lose a wheel. when there are parts flying around the car,
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it won't really protect you so i don't really understand why we should need it. more success for british swimmers at the world championships in budapest. james guy has broken the british record in the heats for the 100m butterfly. guy is the olympic champion in the 200 metres but failed to win a medal earlier in the week. ben proud also came through his 50m freestyle heat. the mind games have begun ahead of england's quarterfinal against france in the women's european championship. coach mark sampson says his french counterpart 0livier echouafni is "wet behind the ears" and says his record in tournaments is much better. even though france have beaten england in the last three tournaments, with echouafni claiming they wouldn't be happy to face his team in the last eight. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. the chancellor philip hammond has told the bbc there's broad acceptance in the cabinet that there would need to be a transition period while the new relationship with the eu was negotiated.
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that could take up to three years after brexit but it should be concluded before the next election, due in 2022. the chancellor said a failure to implement a transition deal would sow chaos for business. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. is that unanimity in the s on this idea of a transitional deal which could last up to three years? varies at that level. what philip hammond hasn't succeeded in getting his collea g u es hasn't succeeded in getting his colleagues to do is to buy into the idea that like what he has succeeded in. so they do not suffer a cliff edge, new arrangements would be phased in. in return, he has had to make sure this is not some open—ended arrangement, certainly brexit supporting ministers were
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sing it would be a disaster if this would last beyond the next general election. the chancellor makes it clear that to announce cabinet unanimity, he is making it clear that a maximum period that this could last beyond brexit would be three years. there is a general view that any transitional period would have to be finished by the time we get to the date set for the next general election, june 2022. it may be a shorter period. it depends on the technical requirements to put in place customs and immigration arrangements and so on, and this is all subject to negotiation with the eu. but the overriding concern, as we leave the eu, and the job will be done on the 29th march 2019, the overriding concern is to make that we go through this process in a way that avoids disruptive cliff edges for business and for individual citizens. what is interesting is that although
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he is saying the cabinet has agreed on this, i think they need the service there will be tensions, what is the transitional period of up to three years look like? with the european court of justice three years look like? with the european court ofjustice be involved in settling any trade disputes jarring that time between witton and the eu? if that would be the case, some of the cabinet collea g u es the case, some of the cabinet colleagues would not buy that. he has also stressed that he wanted post brexit for british people to look like things were business as usual, not much had changed, and some of the cabinet colleagues want to see the pace of change at the march 2019 pick—up so people get a sense of direction and we will be out of the eu and not in some ways trying to stay in. i think there may be some disputes over whether we can or cannot negotiate separate trade dealsjoin the tread or cannot negotiate separate trade deals join the tread of transition. adding the chancellor has got to the foothills, perhaps the base camp of
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agreement with the cabinet of how to approach, what happens in britain after brexit has managed to reassure businesses to an extent, but i think some of the real arguments, never mind with the eu, will be what happens between brexit and the eventual withdrawal from everything associated with the eu. thank you very much indeed. another challenge for theresa may. a further complication in the brexit process was reported by the times this morning. the paper said that the new taoisesach leo varadkar wanted controls at ports and airports, effectively putting the border at the irish sea. an mep from the main party in ireland's ruling coalition has said the story is "entirely speculative and not helpful". to find out more i'm joined by our correspondent chris page in belfast. is emerging about the question of
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the border? this is one of the trickiest issues in the brexit in negotiations, you can drive across the border in barely notice it is there, there are no custom checks passport checks, no barriers of any description. it is pretty much invisible. everyone involved in the brexit presses have said they want it the body to stay that way. b stormont parties have agreed amount, and brussels are basically agreed two. legally, how can you have no customs checks on that order in future situation where in one state britain will be outside the eu and the customs union, and ireland will be inside that? there has been some work on some sort of technological solution, and where there will be an electronic system. a newspaper reported that the new premise to leo
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varadkardid reported that the new premise to leo varadkar did not think that solution would solve all the problems and a preference perhaps maybe there are border controls effectively at ports and airports. so that would mean body trucks potentially between northern ireland and the rest of the uk in orderto northern ireland and the rest of the uk in order to keep the land border in ireland a soft border. the dup who are popping up have not reacted well to that suggestion, saying that would be completely unacceptable. the irish foreign minister said at a eu summit that the technological solutions alone would not solve the border issues and the department of foreign affairs in dublin have tried to pour cold water on any ideas that their decision is hardened on this. ina their decision is hardened on this. in a statement, they said the irish government has consistently said that the border issue is a political, not a technical matter and it will require flexible and imaginative solutions. that phrase has also been used i british
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government ministers when looking at this particular concern. the irish government grant to say that i'll‘s unique concerns and priorities for the negotiations have been acknowledged by both the uk and our eu partners. the irish government think the general message has got across the early phase of the negotiations, but they know that the issue will become more prominent as the talks unfold. thank you very much. more than 50 people have been injured — one seriously — after a commuter train crashed in barcelona. the incident happened during the morning rush hour at the francia station, in the city centre. reports said the train did not brake when entering the station, hitting the buffers at the platform. four men have been arrested on suspicion of making an explosive device at cardiff prison. they came to light when a prison officer contacted a welsh assembly member. bin workers in birmingham
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are stepping up their industrial action in a dispute that has left rubbish piling up in the streets. members of the unite union have been refusing to do overtime and have been carrying out daily two—hour stoppages — from today that will rise to three hours. the dispute is over planned changes to working practices, which unite says would lead to some workers losing up to 0ur correspondent phil mackie is in birmingham. how bad is it that? this is a typical scene, i think. how bad is it that? this is a typicalscene, ithink. i have how bad is it that? this is a typical scene, ithink. i have been driving around this area and the main roads, the side streets show a similar picture. the black bags are piled up hoping a bin lorry will come. you can see part of the problem is after a while you get these vermin coming in and attacking, and there are lots of bags that have been ripped open by rats or mice or foxes, which bags that have been ripped open by rats or mice orfoxes, which is bags that have been ripped open by rats or mice or foxes, which is a real concern for people forced up across the road you can see the
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recycling bins which have been put out because the advice to put your bins out. what we have been hearing is that in order to clear the backlog, lorries are putting the recycling and general waste away to landfill, meaning a fine for the city council. birmingham is a city of1.1 city council. birmingham is a city of 1.1 million people and lots of them have not had their recycling collected a6—8 weeks was doubly tragic it is a rope round and clear the waste, but people are waking wheats that far happen to stop it is becoming a health issue was that the hat is the dispute between the council and binmen. the council has tried to recreate the binmen, meaning they drop down, meaning less money. they have offered to bring them otherjobs at the same way, such as grave—diggers. the union is not happy with that, so the dispute thatis not happy with that, so the dispute that is a —month—old is escalating bradley. —— escalating gradually. there is no prospect of an early
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finish, the strike plan is to grant to september, and the language here from discussions on both sides does not sound like there are any closer to reaching a conclusion are a solution to the problem that is causing was problems. thank you. in the owner of a £200,000 ferrari has written it off just an hour after buying it. south yorkshire police say the super—car left the m1 near barnsley in wet conditions, flew into the air and burst into flames. the driver suffered only cuts and bruises — police described it as a "miracle escape". let's get the weather. the search for summer goes on. some of us have seen rain or showers today. scotland, northern ireland,
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northern england, sunshine and showers. perhaps heavy, gusty winds and hail possibly. a lot of cloud in self england and wales. patchy outbreaks of rain but most persistent in wales is that women goes on. it turns heavier going into the evening and across the midlands and northern england, it clears south—east from everywhere but kent overnight. showers affect scotland and northern ireland overnight. for many of us, saturday has a fine start with sunshine, still very breezy, showers and north—west scotland. for many others in england and wales, more dry weather until this rain close to the south coast moves north during saturday afternoon and into the evening for a wet end to the day. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines... the bbc understand that at least 60
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high—rise buildings in england which have similar insulation to the cladding used on grenfell tower have failed new fire safety tests. more than 80 people died in the tragedy injune. contractors working on the crossrail project have been fined more than £1 million over the death of a worker and two other incidents. the chancellor, philip hammond, has said a transitional deal after britain leaves the eu could take up to three years, but it would be completed before the next election injune 2022. nawaz sharif has resigned as prime minister of pakistan following a decision by the country's supreme court to disqualify him from office. the ruling came after a probe into his family's wealth following the 2015 panama papers. a significant setback for president trump, as his bid to scrap the health care laws set up by president 0bama are rejected by the senate.
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at least three republicans voted against the bill, which needed a simple majority to pass. israel has banned all men under 50 yea rs old israel has banned all men under 50 years old from attending friday's muslim prayers at a sensitive holy site injerusalem, muslim prayers at a sensitive holy site in jerusalem, the muslim prayers at a sensitive holy site injerusalem, the horror al sharif
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—— the haram al sharif. -- the haram al sharif. men under 50 we re -- the haram al sharif. men under 50 were prevented from praying at the al aqsa mosque. in the last few minutes there are reports of further clashes, isolated clashes in parts of eastern jerusalem clashes, isolated clashes in parts of easternjerusalem and in the west bank, with the palestinian red crescent saying around a dozen or so people have been injured in disturbances in bethlehem in the west bank. authorities are concerned about what they said was the prospect of other disturbances. that was after yesterday when the israeli authorities finally removed the last re m na nts of authorities finally removed the last remnants of those controversial security measures put in place which we re security measures put in place which were objected to by palestinians, at a site known as temple mount to jewish people and haram al sharif to
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muslims. that went on for two weeks until they went yesterday. palestinians were euphoric. but there were clashes at the holy site themselves. lee said they put in place restrictions meaning men under 50 would not be able to enter the site. despite hopes the situation could have been resolved this week, tensions remain high. and the tensions remain high. and the tensions have been rising the last fortnight or so. yes, it was two weeks ago today that two is really a lease officers were shot dead at an entrance to the compound. they were killed by three arab israelis. after that attack, the israeli authorities said they would put in place metal detectors and other security measures to try and secure the site, and they said it was necessary and not unreasonable. palestinians objected furiously and were concerned this could be an attempt
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to reassert further control at the site by the israelis and they began a boycott of the site, refusing to pass through the metal detectors, which brought us to this week where there was further international pressure for a resolution and over a series of days we saw the security measures being withdrawn. there were hopes things would come down but today people are still rather wary of what the rest of the day will bring. let's go back to our top story and the news that the bbc understands... actually we will talk about it workers in greece. aid workers in greece have told bbc news they're dealing with hundreds of extremely vulnerable refugees being held on the island of lesbos. many have suffered torture
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and sexual abuse at the hands of so called islamic state in syria and iraq. the european commission has said such refugees should be moved to athens for specialist treatment, but charities say that's not happening. 0ur europe reporter, gavin lee, reports from lesbos. life inside moria migrant camp, lesbos. rare footage from a place journalists are banned. it shows tents have been replaced by containers, a reflection of europe's waiting room being made that little bit more long—term for the a,000 being held on the island. most are destined to return to turkey to apply for asylum from there as part of the eu migration plan but as they wait for a legal decision, violence, rioting and fires are becoming routine. the camps are full and migrants, though smaller in number, are still making it here by boat. the people arriving here
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in lesbos are different now because of the ripple effect from the conflicts in iraq and syria since so—called islamic state started to lose ground. many who've arrived in greece have escaped attention. men tortured by is fighters, women used as sex slaves, some are pregnant here, there's little support and it's worsening the problem on an already volatile island. we're very worried, we think we need to improve the healthcare given to these people. if they're vulnerable they need to be recognised as such and may need to move somewhere where they can get care. the reality is there isn't this care here on the island and they need to move to the mainland to receive it. scars from years of torture, 0sama was once a syrian policeman but was caught by rebel groups and sold to is. he said he was regularly beaten and sexually abused by his captors. "i have so many marks of torture on my body," he tells me, "i've been in captivity for three years, two years locked in one room. i lost my family, i lost my wife, i haven't seen anything about them. all this and now i'm here in this
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humiliation for one year." the greek refugee policy is clear that extremely vulnerable migrants should be taken off the island quickly for specialist treatment in athens. so why are they still here? greek authorities claim they've been overwhelmed by cases and they say some have slipped through the net. i would like at this point to remind that 30,000 people have come through the island since march, 2016, so there can be individual cases, some individual cases, where they may not have been processed as quickly. for the moment those needing the most help are still waiting and with more migrants arriving and the camp increasing, the vulnerable are left to cope in volatile, deteriorating conditions. gavin lee, bbc news, lesbos. let's go back to our main news that
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the bbc understands cladding and insulation used in at least 60 tower blocks has failed a new fire safety test. i spoke to the professor of risk and management crisis at the university of the west of scotland who told me that if the buildings have appealed to the safety test thenit have appealed to the safety test then it is worrying news. —— failed then it is worrying news. —— failed the safety test. this is worrying news that it is 60 buildings, nine are publicly owned, and it must be concerning for those living there because they have the same set up as g re nfell tower. because they have the same set up as grenfell tower. should these buildings be evacuated or the cladding stripped immediately?m should be stripped immediately, it isa should be stripped immediately, it is a very serious fire risk as we had seen the grenfell tower, and it is an unacceptable fire risk. from a
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social and political point of view, iam social and political point of view, i am surprised that having identified the faulty cladding there is even a discussion about who will pay for it. this is something central government should take responsibility for and say they will argue about the money later but the cladding must be removed immediately and in the meantime either people who live in those buildings should be offered alternative accommodation or they should do something to make the buildings safe in the interim while the cladding is removed. removing the cladding in itself may actually constitute a fire risk in itself so there is another argument for perhaps evacuating. some people in these blocks might the astonished that it has come to this, that the experts didn't know this kind of thing before and it took the g re nfell tower thing before and it took the grenfell tower disaster to reveal this. you raise an interesting point
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which raises questions about the quality of building standards in the uk. in one of your reports they were described as a complete mess by one firm of architects. there is also a question of why were these ever passed as acceptable for british standards. if they are then there are serious questions about the way british standards are produced, and the quality of these standards. 0ther the quality of these standards. other questions about the people who sit on the standards committees who approve these things? it is frequently the case from my own experience of british standards that they bring in industry experts to commentate. the danger is that those industry experts may well recommend things that would save their industry money. i am not suggesting thatis industry money. i am not suggesting that is what happened but there is potential for that to happen. that is what happened but there is potentialfor that to happen. that should be looked at. the government
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also needs to take some culpability here because there were warnings to the government, there have been mutterings washing around in whitehall and amongst government circles and i suspect the government if they put their hands on their hearts would not be able to say they have been completely innocent in this process either. and it raises complex questions about corporate manslaughter and culpability. is it the builders, the people who said it was ok, the government to approved those people, the people who approve the standards? it becomes a legal nightmare. pakistan's prime minister nawaz sharif has resigned after the country's supreme court unanimously ruled that he should be disqualified over corruption allegations. the ruling follows accusations relating to the panama papers published two years ago, in which mr sharif‘s three children were implicated. he and his family deny any wrongdoing. 0ur pakistan correspondent,
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secunder kermani, has been following developments. he told me a short time ago mr sharif‘s resignation was inevitable. after the unanimous court decision against him, saying, recommending he is disqualified from office, i think the prime minister had little choice other than to go. if he had not, we would have likely seen mass protests on the streets. the panama papers leaks case has been really dominating pakistani politics for well over the last year and we have seen allegations made against the prime minister and his children that they according to an official enquiry accumulated more wealth over the years than their declared sources of income could account for. there were damning comments made by the official enquiry, so having said that, in some ways, this was not totally unexpected, however this
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is unprecedented in pakistan. it is unprecedented that a sitting prime minister faces this level of scrutiny and is then removed from office. his party are still in power, they will have the opportunity to nominate a new leader next week. it is not clear who that will be. there has been some suggestion it could be his brother, although there are objections to him as there are also allegations against him related to corruption. pakistan is in a situation of uncertainty over what will happen next. he has resigned, what will happen? will he face prosecution? the supreme court has said a trial should take place under the auspices of the country's main anti—corruption body and that will look into the allegations that both he and his children made money through corrupt practices.
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quite crucially, this trial that will take place will take the burden of proof on the defendant, so it will place the burden of proving they had acquired this money legitimately on the prime minister and his children, and until now, the essence of why he's being disqualified is because the judges say he has not been able to account for how he got the money. they say in effect there is no smoking gun of exactly what kind of practices were used or weren't used to earn this money, but he has not been able to account for it properly so has not been honest, and that he is why he has been disqualified. the headlines on bbc newsroom live... the bbc understands at least 60 buildings have failed new fire safety tests, carried out in the wake of the grenfell tower fire. the chancellor, philip hammond, says any transitional deal in the immediate period after brexit must end before the next
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general election in 2022. the us senate rejects plans to repeal president 0bama's health care reforms — a major blow to president trump who now also faces public infighting at the white house as two of his senior aides fall out. the duke of cambridge was called to a serious crash involving a marked police van and a pedestrian on his final shift as an air ambulance pilot. prince william and his east anglian air ambulance crew took a woman to addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge, where she remains in a critical condition. 0ur reporter kim riley is hethel in south norfolk and has more details. what do we know about what happened? the road is still closed behind me and investigations are continuing. a marked police van had been
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responding to a 999 call last night. there were concerns for the safety ofa there were concerns for the safety of a woman in her 50s who had been reported missing. it was around 10:20pm that that same van collided with a pedestrian three or a00 yards up with a pedestrian three or a00 yards up the road from me. it turned out to be the woman they had been looking for. the east of england ambulance service told us she was treated at the scene for severe head and leg injuries and then airlifted to addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge in life—threatening condition. the pilot on his final shift after two years was prince william. he was much praised yesterday for all he had done. he said it was a privilege to serve the people of east anglia and he had a very active final shift. barclays has set aside an extra £700 million to meet compensation claims for mis—selling
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payment protection insurance. the total amount is over £9 billion. ppi policies were missal to cover loa n ppi policies were missal to cover loan repayments if people fell ill or lost theirjobs. more than £27 million has been repaid altogether by the banking industry. fracking, the controversial process of drilling into shale rock to extract gas, could get under way within weeks, after the drill needed to start the process arrived at a site in lancashire yesterday. protesters are continuing to try to delay the start of the fracking, and are holding a carnival by the site later. 0ur reporterjohn maguire has this report. while the party and the protests continue outside the site, inside, behind the thin yellow line, preparations for the next major step in uk fracking are taking place. this is a big dealfor all sides. local campaigner barbara richardson has fought this fracking site, known as preston new road, every step of the way and believes if shale gas is extracted here then other sites will follow.
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imagine these every two to four to five miles across this beautiful, rural place, known for agriculture and tourism. just imagine what it will be like. if you don't stop it now, you're opening the door, so you've got to stop it now. july has seen the local efforts here bolstered by protesters by the group reclaim the power. they've been trying to disrupt access, climbing on top of lorries, sitting in the road and locking themselves to vehicles. how do you justify this? we're not targeting the lorry drivers, we understand they need a job and they need to feed their children and take some money. we're not purposely targeting them, but what they have on the back of their lorries is more equipment for them to get into the fracking site and create the fracking, so the more we delay it, the slower the task is going to be, the more it costs the company. but despite their efforts, the drilling rig that will bore
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as deep as 3,500 metres beneath the lancashire soil has just been brought in. engineers will then drill horizontally, fracture the shale rock and release the gas. and this site will be the most monitored gas exploration site ever, i would say. we are monitoring air quality, water quality, noise, traffic movements, all of that being monitored 2a—7 and all of that being made publicly available. of course we also have seperately the environment agency that have already visited us six times, and we only started constructing the site injanuary, doing their own monitoring and disclosure. so i can say to people that you don't need to take my word for it. the data will be out there to demonstrate that this is being done properly. the process remains highly controversial, from the demand for shale gas to the technology of fracking, to the way these demonstrations are policed. environmental catastrophe or energy supply game changer — the answer is locked deep
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beneath our feet, but not for much longer. for 75 years, an underground network of railways used by royal mail ran under the streets of london, but in 2003 the system was abandoned. tim muffett has been underground to find out more. throughout its 500—year history, the royal mail's mission has remained pretty much unchanged. newsreel: now down the chute into the vans... to harness technology of the day to deliver letters and parcels as quickly and accurately as possible. this new postal museum shows how deliveries have evolved. but by the early 20th century, the mail system in london faced two big problems — heavy fog caused by smoke billowing from chimneys, and heavy traffic. the answer lay below ground.
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in 1927, this underground rail network opened. newsreel: on the post office tube railway, 25,000 mails bags travel through 6.5 miles of tunnels below crowded city pavements... for 75 years, unmanned trains shuttled mail between six sorting offices and two railway stations, liverpool street and paddington. a bit of a squeeze. i guess it was designed for letters, not people. exactly right. the service was stopped in 2003 but passengers will soon be able to ride specially—adapted trains through the tunnels. it was a really important part of moving the mail and speeding up the process. it was essential to allowing that communication to happen quickly and to get that mail delivered as quickly as people needed it. newsreel: switch cabins keep everything under control,
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bringing trains to a stop on loading platforms. about 220 people were working on the railways in a shift pattern, it was a 2a—hour operation, and there was a huge team of people with differentjobs and responsibilities. in 2003, the service stopped. its running costs were deemed too high. transporting mail above ground was considered more cost effective, even though some disagreed. this is one of the mail platforms, where the trains would have stopped and the mail would have been loaded into containers. the suddenness of the system's closure also surprised many. it almost looks like it was abandoned. it pretty much was. the equipment was all left down here, newspapers and things like that still laying around, all the trolleys, the trains were still down here. soon to become a quirky visitor attraction, for some the mail rail has been underappreciated. the postal service is really the first social network, keeping people in touch, allowing people to stay in touch over distance and quickly,
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and it was important, the speed was important, and that's what mail rail was about, speeding the system up. tim muffett, bbc news, 70 feet below london. people who drink alcohol three to four times a week are 30% less likely to develop type two diabetes than those who never drink. more than 70,000 people took part in a large danish health study that measured drinking habits. the uk's leading diabetes charity warns this isn't a "green light" to drink excessively. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two, and coming up is the news at one with jane hill. first the weather. not much evidence of summer across the uk. here in the north of wales
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there has been some sunshine whereas elsewhere it has been cloudy and wet. rain will continue here in the afternoon, more patchy in south—east england full —— south—west england. a lot of cloud moving across england replacing early sunshine and the rain moving further north across wales as well. sunny spells and scattered showers for northern ireland northern england, showers in scotland. maybe the rumble of thunder and some hail. a cool and breezy picture across the uk. putting south—east across england through the night. that takes us on to the weekend. a lot of us. they drive. sunny spells. furthershowers in the west of scotland and western northern ireland and a few elsewhere
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through northern ireland, scotland, north wales, england, one or two in the midlands. then this rain in the south coast moves north through the afternoon and into the evening. before it gets in, some sunshine across parts of england, temperatures in the low 20s. but in the afternoon at the test match thicker cloud will be arriving and it looks like there will be wet weather on the way. this weather system weather on the way. this weather syste m ta kes weather on the way. this weather system takes the rain further north, with heavy bursts particularly in the northern flank through parts of south—east wales and the midlands, through to the wash. this weather system clears into sunday but low pressure is close by and around that spiralling part, showers moving through, so even if you start the day fine on sunday, many places will seek the cloud build and showers pushing from west to east across the uk although some parts of east and south—east england may not get those showers and delete into the
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afternoon or evening. the weekend looks cool and breezy, showers for some of us, spells of rain, but also a bit sunshine if you are lucky. the bbc understands at least 60 high—rise buildings failed a fire safety test, where insulation and cladding were tested together for the first time. the buildings identified so far are nine council blocks in salford. work to remove the cladding is already under way. we will have the latest about the new safety tests. also this lunchtime. the chancellor says any transitional deal after britain leaves the eu must end before the next general election. another blow for donald trump, as the us senate fails, for a third time, to overturn president 0bama's health care initiatives. pakistan is thrown into political uncertainty, after prime minister nawaz sharif
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is forced to resign in the light of corruption allegations.
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