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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 12, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. president trump issues a fresh warning to north korea. he calls for tougher sanctions, and says there will be consequences if us bases in guam are targeted. and, if anything happens to guam, there's going to be big, big trouble in north korea. good morning, it is saturday 12 august. also ahead: the finishing line beckons for two legends of the track, usain bolt and mo farah. yes, farah‘s opening—night gold remains britain's only medal here at the london stadium. but, though she missed out on the podium, what a performance from dina asher—smith in the women's 200m. she ran an impressive race and finished fourth. laser danger.
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new restrictions could be on the way to stop pens being shone at planes and helicopters. and tonight could be the best night for years to watch a meteor shower. and philip has the weather. hello, a very good morning to you. not too much to gripe about this particular weekend. a lot of dry weather around, one or two showers in the mix to keep it interesting. more details in just a few minutes. good morning. first, our main story: president trump has issued a fresh warning to north korea, saying it will regret it fast if it continues to make threats against america and its allies. the president also called for tougher sanctions against pyongyang, but he said he would love a peaceful resolution. the chinese leader, xijinping, has phoned mr trump and urged him to avoid words and deeds that could exacerbate the already—tense situation on the korean peninsula. our washington correspondent laura bicker reports. president trump is leaving the north korean leader in no doubt. if he poses a threat to the us, there will be consequences.
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if anything happens to guam, there's going to be big, big trouble in north korea. but then came this note of reassurance. you know what i can say — hopefully it'll all work out. nobody loves a peaceful solution better than president trump, that i can tell you. these us b—i bombers are stationed in guam. their motto is "fight tonight." mr trump is keen to ensure north korea is aware of their presence. pyongyang has threatened to fire missiles at the pacific island, and although holidaymakers appear unfazed, the local government has issued leaflets urging them not to look at fireballs. but donald trump's ramped—up rhetoric is being backed by diplomatic measures. he has placed a call to president xi in beijing. mr trump wined and dined
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the chinese leader injanuary, in the hope that he would do more to rein in his trading partner. the threat us involvement on the korean peninsula mightjust force them to act. and it has emerged the trump administration has been in secret talks with north korea, discussions about americans imprisoned there, and deteriorating relations. donald trump is not stepping back from his war of words with north korea. some feared his statements were off—the—cuff, on impulse. but it appears, for now, to be his strategy, to plant the idea in his enemies‘ mind that he is unpredictable, and not to be tested. two legends of athletics will run their last major competitive track races at the world championships in london tonight. mo farah will be hoping to win his second gold of the games when he runs in the 5,000m. usain bolt will retire after taking part in the relay with the jamaican team. natalie pirks reports.
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goodbyes are always hard, but you don't normally get two in one day. sir mo farah‘s 5,000m final tonight is a big one. not only is it his last track race at a major championship, but he is also going for his fifth straight distance double, an unprecedented accomplishment for a distance runner. he's been tripped before, he survived that one... now, it's up to him. when he surged ahead of the pack in last weekend's 10,000m, he cemented his place as a british sporting legend. it's gold for farah! it remains the nation's solitary gold and solitary medal. jamaica are also experiencing an unexpected lack of success. bolt gets a pretty good start... usain bolt‘s final individual race last weekend in ended in a bronze. tonight represents a chance to go out with the bang he so desires and so deserves. it's gatlin, right at the death! for british athletes,
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yesterday was another day of close calls. dina asher—smith broke herfoot in february, and only started running again injune. it was britain's fifth fourth—place finish at the championships, but this was quite finished. and dina asher—smith fourth. to see that i missed out on a bronze by 0.07, which, 0k, in sprinting is a lot. but i am quite frustrated. but at the same time, on reflection, i'm really happy to have done a 22.2, so yeah. that's surely another foul, is it? it is. elsewhere, lorraine ugen could only manage fifth in the long jump, and nick miller came sixth in the hammer final. there could be british medals in the women's high jump and the relays, but today will no doubt be remembered for the end of the mo—bot, and
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the end of the bolt. have the tissues at the ready. and jessica will have more on the athletics at 7:30am, and we will be speaking to british a00m record—holder, iwan thomas, and former 0lympic heptathlete kelly sotherton, later in the programme. an anti—islam candidate is being allowed to stand in ukip‘s leadership election, despite previous attempts by party members to block her. anne marie waters campaigns against sharia law in the uk, and some party members have said they may resign if she wins. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo joins us from our london newsroom. good to see you. she is a controversial character within the party, isn't she, let alone outside it? she is. there has been a campaign within the party to stop anne marie waters from running in the election but ukip‘s national
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executive committee has allowed her name to be put forward on this ballot paper. she has some very strong views on islam. she is an anti—islamic campaigner, a founder ofa group anti—islamic campaigner, a founder of a group called sharia watch. she has previously described islam is evil and a killing machine and she has been denounced for her views by poor muscle who said that some of her views went way beyond what party policy was, and made him uncomfortable. he himself had been accused of standing on an anti—islam platform at the last election so there is some unease about what her nomination will portray about the party as it chooses its new leader. with new leadership, i think it is at the end of september, is that correct? there is a lot of talk about how ukip is going to emerge from a disappointing period for it. that's right, so the new party leader will be announced at the party conference at the end of september. so there will be hustings across the country until then. you
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are right, the party has struggled to emerge from its post— brexit success , to emerge from its post— brexit success, it struggled to come out of the shadow of nigel farage's leadership. paul muscle didn't last long. the previous leader also resigned after a few days —— paul nuttal. the previous leader tried to ta ke nuttal. the previous leader tried to take the party to the election on a guard dogs of brexit platform. the vote for ukip collapsed at the election, so the new leader will have the challenge of trying to reinvigorate the party and take it into a new direction, hopefully broadening its appeal. always good to talk to you, thank you very much. a 19—year—old british man has died while snorkelling in greece. harry byatt, who was a water sports instructor, was found unconscious on the seabed off the island of za kynthos. an investigation has been launched by the greek authorities. new measures to tackle the dangerous use of laser pens will be considered by the government, amid concerns about their threat to air safety.
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the lasers, which can temporarily blind people, have been used to target aircraft and pilots, as our business correspondent jonty bloom reports. laser pens or pointers are designed to be used to highlight something of interest. but they can be dangerous, and dazzle or blind people if shone directly at their eyes. last year alone there were 1,258 laser attacks on aircraft, even though it is already an offence with a maximum fine of £2,500. helicopters, which fly lower than many aircraft and typically have only one pilot, are thought to be especially vulnerable to laser pens. the government is now going to consult on new measures to restrict the dangerous use of laser pens, and boost safety, such as introducing a licensing scheme for retailers, limits on the advertising of laser pens, and potential restrictions on their ownership, as well as a possible awareness—raising campaign to educate people about the dangers of laser pens. interested parties,
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including businesses, retailers and consumers, now have eight weeks to submit their evidence and proposals. the american singer taylor swift has won a key victory in a two—part court battle with former radio dj. a judge in the us state of colorado has dismissed david mueller‘s claim that she got him fired. however, the court is still considering ms swift's counter—claim that he reached under her skirt and groped her during a pre—concert reception in 2013. mr mueller has denied the accusation, though admits he may have inadvertently touched her skirt. stargazers will be hoping to get a great view of the perseid meteor shower tonight. astronomers say hundreds of meteors will streak across the sky, in a display that may be visible around the world. the display should peak at around 11:00pm this evening. clear skies permitting, it will be seen in most parts of the uk. police in texas have released dramatic footage of a most unlikely car crash.
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a vehicle fell seven storeys from a car park, hitting another one in the alley below. the accident happened when the car drove through a set of safety barriers. the driver was treated at hospital, but is expected to be ok. the other motorist was unhurt. amazing that no one was hurt. world leaders are calling for calm after president trump issued a fresh warning to north korea. 0ur correspondentjoins us from the south korean capital, seoul. so we are getting more information about diplomacy going on between the white house and other places around the world. ring us right up to date.
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yes, lets give you a bounce of what is happening in three countries. we learn from chinese state media about the phone call between xi jinping and donald trump in the last couple of hours. president xijinping and donald trump in the last couple of hours. president xi jinping told donald trump that all relevant parties, that does include the us, i thinkfairto parties, that does include the us, i think fair to assume, should be showing restraint in their words and actions, not trying to exacerbate the very tense situation here. the white house also saying that they acknowledged that china's role is very important in trying to bring about a lasting, peaceful solution here. the us and china also agreeing that north korea should stop what it describes as its provocative actions. interestingly the white house saying the relationship tween these two men, who met in florida a few months ago, is an extremely close one. as for north korea, there are reports that 3.5 million people they are, youths and older men as well, have requested to be enlisted and re— enlisted in the army. as for
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south korea, just very briefly, people here have lived for a long time with the potential for a conflict and frankly many of them ignore much of the language coming out of their northern neighbours, andindeed out of their northern neighbours, and indeed washington, dc, but there are some reports about people buying more gold, people buying more ready meals, there is a civil defence exercise in seoul, where i am talking to you now from, going ahead, and every district in the city is going to take part in that. last year that did not happen. so there is some evidence perhaps of a change in preparedness. thank you. 11 people from one family in lincolnshire have been convicted of involvement with a modern—day slavery ring. their victims, aged between 18 and 63, worked long hours and lived in caravans without running water or access to toilet facilities. earlier this week, the national crime agency warned modern slavery and human trafficking was in every uk town and city. so what can be done to combat the problem? carole murphy is from the centre for the study of modern slavery. very good morning to you. it feels
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like just recently, because of this recent court case, and because of that investigation which took place before, there is a new focus on what is emerging as a really big problem. give us 0ne one of the first things to say is that the estimates of the numbers of people enslaved in the uk, which has been put at around 13,000, is probably an underestimate. i think the national crime agency would agree. because there is more focus on itand agree. because there is more focus on it and because of the modern slavery act being introduced into the uk in 2015, more cases are being uncovered all the time in lots of different industries, including farming, factories, hotels, nail bars, et cetera, as was the more traditional ones like sexual exploitation and domestic servitude.
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that is it, isn't it? that recognition of what modern slavery is. lots of people would be confused as to how one is dragged into modern slavery. what happens?” as to how one is dragged into modern slavery. what happens? i think there are different methods used by different perpetrators, surfer example, there is the loverboy techniques, where people will pretend to be in love with a young woman, men will pretend to be in love with a young woman. they will say, i can get you a job in the uk. come with me. they bring them over and the first thing they do is hand them over to another member of slavery ring. is it always foreigners, mostly foreigners, who are found in modern slavery?‘ foreigners, mostly foreigners, who are found in modern slavery? a lot of the victims are foreigners but it is also something that happens to uk nationals within the country, being exploited. there have been a number of cases recently, but also, for example, gangs in london going across county lines to cell drugs,
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they were also exploiting young women. you mentioned a link with more day—to—day employment, if you like. people involved in farming, that has been a problem in the past, hasn't it? fishing industry and various other industries. in terms of breaking the silence, which is one of the real issues about getting to these people, how do you go about that? it is quite difficult, because it is very hard to know when someone is being enslaved or has been trafficked. victims are often scared to come forward to the police because sometimes they are in the country illegally, for example. so they are scared. but there are certain signs, one of the things, for example, car washes was a big thing. check how the people look. do they look malnourished? thing. check how the people look. do they look malnourished ? who thing. check how the people look. do they look malnourished? who are you paying? are they getting the money 01’ paying? are they getting the money or is there one person the money
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goes to? who would be making that judgement? does that sound... is that police work, to look at employment and say, does that person look right? that does not sound like a point where the police would be involved. perhaps not. that could be for everyday people, people going about their normal business. if they see any signs, if they are suspicious about anything, they can ring the modern slavery helpline. the police do have proactive investigations where they target certain industries, such as car washes, farms, factories. you touched upon one of the issues, which is that if these people are in the country illegally, what choice do they have in terms of reporting being mistreated, by an employer or an enslaver, what choice do they have? if they reported they would be deported. there does not seem to be a situation that would work for somebody in that situation. that is
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one of the difficult things. it is one of the difficult things. it is one of the reasons why people do not come forward. there is a national referral mechanism, and if people agree to the reported through that, their case can be considered, considered for asylum, if they want to claim asylum. but not everybody is successful. so that is a problem. it doesn't seem to deter those who are determined to get those vulnerable people. it is so unlikely that they would you reported. yes, i think that's there are a lot of campaigns at the moment to try to change the way in which those people from abroad are treated within the system, and to give them a longer, safer period, to try to remain, while the investigation is ongoing. thank you for your time this morning. it's 07:19 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. president trump warns north korea's leader,
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kim jong—un, he'll "regret it fast" if he continues to threaten america or its allies. and it's goodbye to two world champions, mo farah and usain bolt as they prepare for their final major athletic events. also coming up in the programme, 70 years after independence, the travel show team set out on an indian 0dyssey to explore the country's diverse culture and traditions. we were speaking about that meatier shower earlier on. it is summertime, so shower earlier on. it is summertime, so hopefully you'll get clear shire —— skies. what picture can you paint? a suitably summery picture. somebody is getting artistic with these park ridge is and their shadows. if there isa ridge is and their shadows. if there is a match to be played here near gateshead, i am is a match to be played here near gateshead, iam not
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is a match to be played here near gateshead, i am not ruling out the chance that those covers will be needed at some point, because we have not one but two weather fronts close to the british isles at the moment. that said, the weekend is shaping up, as you can see, to be half decent compatible with have seen half decent compatible with have seen lately. the more southerly feature has some cloud about it, the odd spot of rain. that clears the way slowly from kent and sussex. the more northerly feature drags showers out of the north—east of scotland and pushes them into the north—east of england during the course of the afternoon. as you can see from the bigger picture here, these are few and far between. any of you will sail on through the day with your plans an interop by the weather. there could well be one or two sharp ones as that weather fronts drags its way through the eastern side of the pennines. northern ireland and a good site —— a good part of scotland will see sunshine this afternoon. a scattering of showers in northern scotland. temperatures where they should be for this time of year. if you are going to see the world championship athletics coverage on the bbc, you are in free drive
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evening. —— dry. that was not the case for my family when they went to see mo farah on wednesday. if you are looking for the perseids, this should be a good evening. quite a swathe of clear skies which will allow the temperatures to dip away. you will need a few layers if you are upforany you will need a few layers if you are up for any length of time tonight but it will be quite a good night. you are in with a chancejust about everywhere, but south of scotland, northern ireland, the north—west of england and northern wales, then down into the midlands, that will be prime territory. these quys that will be prime territory. these guys should stay clear. they will be cloudier in the west if you are delaying into sunday evening. sunday, again, a decent sort of day. a cool start. chow was still there to be head across parts of scotland. —— showers. that cloud of filling in and tempering the sunshine later in the day but i no means a write—off by any means at all, or widely across the british isles. the cloud is filling in for a reason, and that comes in the shape of what i will
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call naga's front, lots of cloud and rain across the south—western part of the british isles. i call it naga's front because she would be peeved if she was anywhere near it, as you may well have been shocked just half an hour ago.|j as you may well have been shocked just half an hour ago. i don't understand why you are shocked by the word peeved. it is quite strong for half past whatever it was on a saturday morning. i know, you could have been more forceful. i was under something similar a couple of weeks ago when i was camping in pembrokeshire. we battled on through it, rather than sort of enjoying it. i bet you didn't say you are peeved with the weather then, when it was pouring down on you, i'm sure. thank you very much. imagine that when philip is camping, and the weather is bad, how many people must come up to him and say it is his fault. a small village in the cotswolds has been taking part in a landmark dna study to trace their family histories, with some surprising results. more than 100 villagers from bledington were tested as part of the genetics experiment, asjeremy stern reports. everyone seems to know each other in
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bledington, but it turns out that people in this tiny cotswolds village are even more close—knit than they thought. brenda found out herfriend than they thought. brenda found out her friend graham is than they thought. brenda found out herfriend graham is also herfourth cousin. definitely a surprise to me as. i mean, i had no idea. all of them were surprises because we have only been here 12 years. and they saidi only been here 12 years. and they said i was the most related person in the village. the link was made through dna taken by a company which maps family histories. saliva samples were provided by 120 residents. that is about one quarter of the village's population. bledington looks like the quintessential english village. we we re quintessential english village. we were keen to see what diversity we could find within bledington, just as an example of what you can find all over britain. we explored a few villages like bledington nearby and around the country, and once we
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started talking to the people within the village and met with the parish council, they were so excited about the project that for us, it was the obvious choice. yet the results were anything but obvious. it turns out that as a whole, the residence in this most english of villagers are less tha n this most english of villagers are less than 50% english. very interesting, because it tells you the percentage of britishness, how much of you is from europe or ireland. we are not completely british. via links stretch across the globe, from the cotswolds to the caucasus, the middle east back to middle england. the time is now 7:25am. the world athletics championships draws to a close this weekend, after 10 dramatic days of action at the london stadium. and while we may not have seen britain's athletes on the podium as much as we'd like, there is one particular star who has taken the crowds by storm.
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tonight will be seeing mo farah run his last major competitive race, 5000 metres. and also usain bolt for the last time, taking to the track inside the stadium. he will be part of the ax100m relay team for jamaica. they are the favourites. and with all the dramatics around usain bolt it will be a night to remember. yes, a rather special evening. jessica is inside the stadium for us this morning. jessica, it will be a special night tonight. the crowds have been brilliant or weeks, haven't they? absolutely fantastic atmosphere here. one reason in particular, if you watch the coverage you would have seen the official mascot, the hedgehog, getting into all kinds of mischief. usually the hedgehog is with you, isn't he? i am not sure what he is but he is brilliant and he scares me. as much as i love spending time with him i never know what is coming next. he throws me and water and sprays me with stuff,
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but the cloud love him. my goodness! this is what i put up with every day. this is what the hedgehog has been doing for the past few days that the championships. stealing the limelight and stealing the show. if you haven't seen it, we can show you be highlights. music. brilliant. 0k, brilliant. ok, so we are with hero the hedgehog, the official mascot, and his best friend, ewan thomas. as that story was playing, typical hedgehog, playing pranks on me, covers m e hedgehog, playing pranks on me, covers me in silly string. up to his usual antics. i have been thinking. it is the last few days of the world championships and i would love to
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come and watch the action tonight, and maybe go for a meal afterwards with one of you, but only one of you. i thought of a few challengers maybe both of you could do and we will see who is the winner, basically. who can escort me to dinner. sounds good. one question to start with. if we were on a desert island, what one thing would you bring that would keep us safe? i've got knowledge here. ijust finished being on the the island with bear g rylls. i being on the the island with bear grylls. i would say what you need the most is a massive fishing net. loads of food, we would source water, but we would need nutrients and protein, so i would bring a fishing net. beat that. hero doesn't talk much. and mascot of few words. helicopter! he has done me. clever, clever. 0k, second challenge, let me think. i like to have fun. maybe after dinner we could go dancing. what is your favourite party trick?
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as people in strictly would know, i am nota as people in strictly would know, i am not a great dancer, but they can do the worm, i still have that. yeah! good technique. impressive. not bad for an old man. hero has big plans you, big plans. have you got? 0h! look at that. breakdancing. oh! look at that. breakdancing. i've got to give him an art. he is going to show me up on the dance floor. 0k, one last final challenge. let's settle this on the track. if you quys settle this on the track. if you guys could have a race, and whoever wins... we could go and watch the athletics tonight and have that lovely meal. how about that?|j athletics tonight and have that lovely meal. how about that? i don't mind, ican lovely meal. how about that? i don't mind, i can get past him. no
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cheating, please. no cheating. hands behind the line. on your marks, get set, go! un! no, idon't think this was... this was not in the plan. well, that has decided who is going out to dinner with jess well, that has decided who is going out to dinner withjess tonight. we we re out to dinner withjess tonight. we were going to chat tojess at the end ofair, were going to chat tojess at the end of air, but she is gone. hero has other plans. i am desperate to know who is inside that costume. not allowed to know. ewan is going to talk to us later, he didn't get much ofa talk to us later, he didn't get much of a chance then, but we will be crossing to him late in the programme in the next hour. we will be back with the headlines injust programme in the next hour. we will be back with the headlines in just a moment. hello, this is breakfast,
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with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up before 8:00am, philip will have the weather. but first, at 7:30am, a summary of this morning's main news: president trump has issued a fresh warning to north korea, saying it will regret it fast if it continues to make threats against america and its allies. he also spoke to the chinese leader, xijinping. the white house said that they had agreed that north korea must stop its provocative behaviour. the president called for tougher sanctions against pyongyang, but he said he would love a peaceful resolution. if anything happens to guam, there's going to be big, big trouble in north korea. hopefully it'll all work out, 0k? nobody loves a peaceful solution better than president trump, that i can tell you.
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an anti—islam candidate is being allowed to stand in ukip's leadership election, despite previous attempts by party members to block her. anne marie waters campaigns against sharia law in the uk, and some party members have said they may resign if she wins. the contest is likely to decide the future direction of the party, which has 20 members of the european parliament and nearly 350 local councillors, but no mps. a 19—year—old british man has died while snorkelling in greece. harry byatt, who was a water sports instructor, was found unconscious on the seabed off the island of za kynthos. an investigation has been launched by the greek authorities. new measures to tackle the dangerous use of laser pens will be considered by the government, amid concerns about their threat to air safety. the lasers, which can temporarily blind people, have been used to target aircraft and pilots. proposals include licensing retailers and restricting advertising.
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currently, shining lasers at a plane can incur a fine of up to £2,500. the american singer taylor swift has won a key victory in a two—part court battle with former radio dj. a judge in the us state of colorado has dismissed david mueller‘s claim that she got him fired. however, the court is still considering ms swift's counter—claim that he reached under her skirt and groped her during a pre—concert reception in 2013. mr mueller has denied the accusation, though admits he may have inadvertently touched her skirt. stargazers will be hoping to get a great view of the perseid meteor shower tonight. astronomers say hundreds of meteors will streak across the sky, in a display that may be visible around the world. the display should peak at around 11:00pm this evening. clear skies permitting, it will be seen in most parts of the uk. those are the main stories this morning.
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let's go back to the world athletics championships. jessica is at the sta championships. dium for us. just a moment, talk about usain bolt, because this will be the last ever time on the track that you are standing that he competes. it is going to be an extraordinary moment in the history of athletics. it is going to be a legendary moment. usain bolt is a man that has really transcended the sport of athletics. this is someone who has wowed audiences around the world for more than a decade. he has won pretty much everything there is to win and as you say he will be on this track today at a later in the four x 100m. it will be such an exciting night,
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and also mo farah to look forward to in the 5000 metres. can he get the double gold? the british team have not had many medals so far and it was so not had many medals so far and it was so close for dina asher—smith. she broke herfoot six months ago, and couldn't even walk, let alone run. she made the 200m final, but couldn't quite make the podium, and dina asher—smith became the latest briton to have to settle for fourth place. she ran a season's—best time, and was just 0.07 seconds away from securing a medal. dafne schippers, from the netherlands, won gold. it means britain's medal tally still stands atjust one, but asher—smith says the team is staying positive. honestly, i'm over the moon. we have had a lot of fourth places. at the same time, loads of those fourth places have been by people that were so young, they probably have another decade in them. so they might not have got a medal here today, but they will definitely be ones to watch in champs to come. britain's lorraine ugen also missed out on a medal,
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in the long jump final. she finished fifth, with a jump of 6.72m. gold went to the american brittney reese, who won her fourth world title. we seem to be all doing well. we're focusing on just trying to see what we can do. a lot of our team are still quite young, so it is kind of a changeover from the older guys retiring, and stuff like that. so it's guys like us getting more experience, and getting used to being closer to the medals. in the hammer final, the british record holder, nick miller, was in the silver medal position at one stage. but he couldn't better his throw in the early rounds, of 77.31m, and he finished sixth. there was drama in the women's 800m semi—finals. britain's lynsey sharp finished fourth in her race, but was then disqualified, as she was believed to have impeded another athlete close to the finish line. british athletics appealed the decision, and she was later reinstated. she will be the only briton in sunday's race, after adelle tracey and shelayna 0skan—clarke failed to make it through. it was more straightforward for britain's chris 0'hare
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in the semi—finals of the men's1,500m. he comfortably qualified for sunday's final. he finished fourth. jake wightman missed out. let's catch up on some of the day's other sport then, and just a few miles from here, there were goals galore, as the new premier league season announced itself in style. arsenal beat leicester 11—3 at the emirates stadium, on a dramatic opening night. after going a goal down early on, leicester came back to twice take the lead, with jamie vardy scoring twice. but arsenal drew level, before 0livier giroud headed the winner with just five minutes left. arsene wenger‘s side started the new season having won just one of their previous five opening—day matches. i felt that they have shown fantastic spirit. never gave up, and came back and won the game. i must congratulate the players. defensively, we can do better. but overall, i believe we have produced a top—quality game. liverpool's preparations have been hit by their star player,
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philippe coutinho, handing in a transfer request after the club rejected a £90 million bid from barcelona. the brazilian is injured and will miss their season—opening trip to watford, one of seven premier league fixtures today. scottish champions celtic maintained their 100% start to the season with a 1—0 win over partick thistle. brendan rodgers's side have now gone 51 domestic games unbeaten. bad weather in north carolina hampered play at golf‘s final major of the year, the pga championship at quail hollow, but not before japan's hideki matsuyama shot a brilliant second—round 64, to give him a share of the lead. the best—placed briton is paul casey, who is five shots adrift. but storms delayed play, meaning several players will have to return to finish their rounds later today.
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i mention, obviously, usain bolt on the track tonight, and mo farah. i have already done the mo—bot, so it is time for a usain bolt lightning strike. and imagine the scene tonight when that is packed full of people. what a final night it will be. can't wait. so if those lucky people in the stadium and all the people in the stadium and all the people are watching on tv, there is lots of action. let's have a round—up of the key moments. there are six gold medals up for grabs today. the british women's ax100m relay team hope to repeat their bronze medal success at last year's 0lympics. they will be chasing jamaica, who are looking for their third straight title. the final takes place at 9:30pm. katarina johnson—thompson is up again in the women's high jump final. it is a chance for her to make amends after coming seventh in the same event in the heptathlon. it is one of the
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night's star events. mo farah goes for the double gold, in the final major championship track act of his career. a victory here would see him leave as double world champion, after winning the 10,000m last weekend. and usain bolt goes for gold, in his last appearance before retiring. jamaica won the last three ax100m world titles. this is how you can watch today's coverage. lots to watch tonight. england winning the world cup, red rum crossing the line first in a third grand national, virginia wade at wimbledon — moments of sporting history
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can be hard to forget. now, a charity is using memories of sporting events like these to help people living with dementia, and they have just received an archive of 90,000 photographs. the hope is that they will encourage people to socialise and make the connections between their long and short—term memory. breakfast‘s john maguire has been along to one of the groups in scotland. remember at the time of stanley matthews there was another english quy: matthews there was another english guy, another player trying to be a wee bit different player, but they we re wee bit different player, but they were vying for the top dog, weren't they? what was his name? you would be hard pressed to beat this team in a football couriers. the depth and breadth of their knowledge is extraordinary. —— football quiz. but the difficulty comes in bringing that knowledge to the surface, as they all have dementia. 0nce that knowledge to the surface, as they all have dementia. once a week, they all have dementia. once a week, the charity sporting memories runs
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this group in motherwell. there are others across the uk. for many, it is the highlight of the week. for many people watching this, this is the place to come. this is one of the place to come. this is one of the sporting memories places, for these are second dinner. and the ca re rs these are second dinner. and the carers and these people are first class. often, dementia patients find distant memories more vivid than recent ones. chat to jim distant memories more vivid than recent ones. chat tojim about football and the years just fall away. the scottish cup final, with mcneill, going for a corner kick, and all ofa mcneill, going for a corner kick, and all of a sudden acy mcneill booting through the halfway line and
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running and making the score —— i see mcneill. it is one of the best moments that i can remember, you no? jessica. did anyone see her on the telly over the weekend? he also leads the group to talk about current events such as the world athletics championships, making those connections between yesterday and today. the group enjoys the chance to compete again, and most importantly, to socialise. sport, like music, seems to help connections, start conversations, and photographs offer a powerful window to the past. you just don't know what might resonate and what might trigger memory, and that is what is so fascinating about what we do, as well, it is you just never know what is going to trigger that particular memory. but then you just hear a spontaneous story from somewhere and it is just fascinating, and everybody in the group enjoys that. the international
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press agency reuters has just given sporting memories and incredible archive of 90,000 images. and now the charity is recruiting help. we are going to bring people together, but most of all we are going to hear from volunteers who want to enjoy delving through these boxes of incredible images, and helping us to scan them and digitise them. incredible images, and helping us to scan them and digitise themm incredible images, and helping us to scan them and digitise them. it is likely this huge collection would have been locked away in an archive, never to be seen again. but now, these historic images will have a new life, and will help people to forge links between their own past, present and future. what an interesting project. isn't it intriguing. you can remember everything about the little sequence of play in a football match, and people are struggling with other things. and what you can do for building up your confidence, knowing you are remembering that. such a simple idea, but so effective. and we will be speaking to the football commentator guy mowbray, who is a patron of the sporting memories foundation, about these photographs
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in about an hour. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: president trump warns north korea's leader, kim jong—un, he will regret it fast if he continues to threaten america or its allies. and it is goodbye to two world champions, mo farah and usain bolt, as they prepare for their final major athletic events. they have struggled once or twice with the rain down of the world championships. philip can tell us what will happen this evening. good morning. iam hopeful about this evening, compare it to last wednesday, when the rain absolutely kept coming. —— compared to. is it too early for some satellite interpretation? of course not! you can see there, there is something about the cloud being more organised
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on the eastern side of scotland at the moment, and buried in the midst of all of this is a spec level cloud to the south. there is another weather front as well. some of you will wake up to cloudy skies this morning. generally speaking there is lots of dry weather. i want to be optimistic and stop you talking about france at the moment. if you come out towards the west, once these fronts work their way through these fronts work their way through the british isles, this ridge of high pressure will settle the conditions down relative to some of the stuff we have put up with recently. things will be cheerier this for many of us. i would be selling you sure if i didn't say that say that yes, that more northerly feature has enough about it to produce some showers at the moment and on into this afternoon as well. away from that, the southern counties will buck up quite nicely this afternoon. 0nce counties will buck up quite nicely this afternoon. once that avail of cloud this afternoon. once that avail of clou d m oves this afternoon. once that avail of cloud moves away. but it might linger across kent and sussex, but even here some brightness will get through. 0ne even here some brightness will get through. one or two showers dotted away from that mean in area of cloud, which will spend most of the
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afternoon just to the eastern side of the pennines. northern ireland, after a fairly cloudy start, will brighten up as well. scotland, extra sunny showers brighten up as well. scotland, extra sunny showers as brighten up as well. scotland, extra sunny showers as well, once we get that front across the border. as charlie was asking, i think the conditions are rare for the swansong of mo farah, and also usain bolt. and all those other spectators going to watch them. as we get into the evening there will be a clear slot developing across the north—western diagonal here, down towards the midlands. that will make it quite a cool night for perseid spotting, and it should be a clear night. i have highlighted one specific area but i think most areas will be in with a shout, certainly better than some western spots if we get into sunday night, if you want to delay your meteor spotting as long as that. the reason for that is that although we have this ridge of high pressure at the moment, and it is there again on sunday, which will be a decent day,
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one of two speckled showers further north, well, here comes that weather front, which will be a wet old do for many parts of the british isles on towards monday. could i ask me told us earlier that you go camping? yes indeed. there is the monday lurking behind me, nota yes indeed. there is the monday lurking behind me, not a day for campers. we invested a few pounds in peat gives the balsa can hand tent, and we have joined peat gives the balsa can hand tent, and we havejoined him for the peat gives the balsa can hand tent, and we have joined him for the last three orfour years. and we have joined him for the last three or four years. —— and we have joined him for the last three orfour years. —— peat and we have joined him for the last three or four years. —— peat gives' second—hand tent. pete gibbs' second—hand tent. pete gibbs' second—hand tent. pete gibbs' second—hand tent. nothing too grand. i was not sure my wife and child would really buy into the whole concept of striking out and getting across these wonderful isles of hours. so i went completely berserk and offered pete gibbs a few pounds for his second—hand tent, with one of those foldout benches and chairs, which i spectacularly forgot to take a couple of weeks ago when we went off towards pembroke show. i am happy to say that most of the family
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are upfor happy to say that most of the family are up for it these days. we are getting out and about and i think we are going to yorkshire later in the year. weather or not my wife will put up with camping in october, i'm not sure. negotiations are ongoing. i love this! such an insight. thank you so much. there we go, we know it all now. he is a great advocate for camping. he has most inspired me to do it. we will return with the headlines at eight o'clock. it is time for the travel show. we area we are a few hundred kilometres from india's border with china, and the jumping off point for our next adventure. i am about to go to a very spiritual place, an island which is one of the biggest river islands in the world. there are 150,000 people in that island and
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only six ferries every day, so it is really cramped. just looking at the list of prices for all the different categories. down past the vehicles, animals have to pay. a buffalo has to pay 45 rupees! a bull, a cow, 30 rupees. the poor elephant has to fork out 907 rupees. perhaps fortunately, none of these creatures were travelling with us today. incredibly, after a few last—minute panics, we are set to go. i climb onto the corrugated aluminium roof tojoin men who do onto the corrugated aluminium roof to join men who do this trip day in, day out. starting in to bat, the brahmaputra river is nearly 2000 miles long. —— tibet stop it is
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second only to the is on in the volume of water that goes through it. we arrive at majuli and it is turmoil trying to get off the boat. to avoid the queue, there is a sneaky way out, which involves climbing onto another boat and going down the steps that way. i think i will go with them. majuli is home to 22 monasteries, and initially established in the 16th century iv assamese guru sanka deva. boys are instructed from a very young age in the religion he preached. the monks are celibate, and according to their beliefs they worship only one god, follow a vegetarian diet, and reject the caste system. the doctrine here includes this
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special artform. this form of classical dance is now recognised by the authorities as a chandra in its own right. many of these monks have formed around the world. that was amazing. thank you indeed. i know that you spend a lifetime learning the skills of this. can i have a go? yes, like this. there are 64 positions in this
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classical dance. i'm having trouble with the first two. without the grace. no grace whatsoever here. he makes it look so easy. it is incredibly difficult. i am just going to leave it to the experts. you know, sometimes you just have to give up and let them do it. an exquisite performance. but there is
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one problem, one very big problem. that is that this island may simply not exist in just a few decades. hard to believe at the moment, but there is a genuine worry that majuli will be submerged and destroyed within 20 years. in the last 70 yea rs, within 20 years. in the last 70 years, it has shrunk in size by two thirds. a majority of the original 65 monasteries have gone. every monsoon, the brahmaputra river swells, eroding the terrain around it. bit by bit, land is
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disappearing. but there is hope. for the last 36 years, this man has taken on an extraordinary challenge, to save this land from vanishing. and so his lifelong calling began. he is known today as the forest man of india. he began planting trees so that the brits would bind the soil, soak up excess water and prevent the land from being eroded by flooding. —— the roots. from a barren landscape he has created a forest the size of new‘s central park, and he thinks this will be more effective in saving you buy majuli and following government flood prevention schemes. so, we are now going to do the
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ritual that every guest that comes here is asked to do. which is to plant a tree. what kind of tree is this? jadav has spoken at environment and summits all over the world and his rollcall of gas is equally international. —— guests. i know that everybody who plans a tree, when it grows, they protect back down with their name on it. so i have that privilege. fantastic. thank you. and so to my final day in
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assa m thank you. and so to my final day in assam and a different kind of a ritualistic celebration of nature. if there is one recurring theme throughout my trip in the north—east it is the sense of community. there is nothing better to illustrate that then this. a local village going down to the river to celebrate the harvest. this community began in 1939, started a young woman who came from the mountains in search of food. this place was better for her because it was closer to the water, so because it was closer to the water, so civilisation could grow up. she
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brings herfamily so civilisation could grow up. she brings her family here followed by her brother and witnesses the entire family of her own clan. they all came from that one woman! fascinating. this is a much loved annual celebration and people of all ages gather, using fishing methods passed down through generations. and look! you can see this! it's full of fish, it full of fish. this is today's catch... wow! that is pretty good. and this, you will cook, now? excellent. so my trek across india from border to border is almost over, and it's been a realjourney of discovery for me off the beaten track.
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this isn't india "on tap", instant gratification, which some people are accustomed to, but the rewards, if you make the effort, are immense. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. president trump issues a fresh warning to north korea. he calls for tougher sanctions and says there will be consequences if us bases in guam are targeted. and, if anything happens to guam, there's going to be big, big trouble in north korea.
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