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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 13, 2017 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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you this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 10pm: president trump is accused of being too soft on the far—right, after violence at at a rally in virginia left one person dead and many more injured. the white house defends the president response to the attack, saying his condemnation had been of all extremists, including white supremacists. here, the chancellor and the international trade secretary, say the government will seek a transition period to help businesses adjust after brexit. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the white house has defended president trump's response to the attack on anti—racism protestors in the state of virginia, saying his condemnation included white nationalist groups, even though he did not
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specifically mention them. people have been laying flowers in the town of charlottesville, where 32—year—old year heather heyer died after being hit by a car whilst taking part in the anti—fascism demonstration yesterday. a 20—year—old man has been charged with murder. 19 other people were injured. our correspondent laura bicker is in cha rlottesville. amidst the condolences and many floral tributes being brought here, there is anger, as you have just heard. many feel that mr trump's condemnation of the violence here yesterday did not go far enough. he did not explicitly name the alt—right groups. in fact, the criticism has even come from within his own party. one republican senator said that the president must call evil by its name. this was the work, he said, of white supremacists, and this was domestic terrorism. the white house has come back with a statement. they said that of course
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the president wanted to condemn all terrorists, including the kkk, neo—nazis and white supremacists. and general mcmaster has described this as terrorism. but when it comes to how this city recovers, many people told me that this is supposed to be one of the most picturesque in the south, and now, particularly this street, where heather heyer was killed, will never be the same. after weeks of public divisions between members of the cabinet over brexit, the chancellor, philip hammond, and the international trade secretary, liam fox, have made a joint pledge that any transition period will not be a back door to remaining in the eu. the two have previously put forward opposing views on brexit. earlier, our political correspondent, ben wright, said that some mps would be viewing mr hammond's joint statement as caving in. their hope was that philip hammond
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would resist and they hoped that britain could still stay in the customs union and remain members of the single market and by signing this letter today, philip hammond is confirming that is not something the government are seeking, so they will wa nt government are seeking, so they will want a new customs arrangements with the eu, even if only a temporary one ahead of a new customs agreement down the line, ditto on the single market, but people who hope that philip hammond would make the case for remain tight priorities will look at this and think he has capitulated to liam fox but liam fox was always nervous about any transition period, he has had to concede that is something the government has to pursue, so it is a trade—off. it is the critical question when talking about is we
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saw two important ministers setting out a position, something they hope will happen down the lights in negotiations but the rules of article 50 are clear, the timetable for these talks are largely in the eu's court, and michel barnier, the eu's court, and michel barnier, the eu negotiator, has been clear there can be no talk about the future relationship between britain and the eu until substantial progress has been made on the rights of eu citizen is here, the rights of uk citizens in eu countries, the northern ireland border and the settlement, how much money britain owes in terms of liabilities. the kenyan opposition leader raila odinga has given a defiant response to international calls for him to respect the results of last week's presidential election. at a rally in the capital nairobi, he urged his supporters to boycott work tomorrow. he said he would announce his full course of action on tuesday. our correspondent alistair leithead has more. they believe the election was stolen
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and have taken to the streets. opposition presidential candidate raila odinga toured his strongholds in the capital, the first time he has appeared in public since losing the election. he urged his supporters not to accept the result. they knew they would be defeated and would have to steal, he told the crowd, that is why they had come to kill innocent people, shoot them, put them in body bags and take them away. dozens have been injured and some people killed this weekend in clashes with police. the question was whether the opposition would accept the results of the election. it is clear now that they are not. they are calling for mass action and for people to reject this result. but it won't be national.
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these are small pockets of protest. much of the country has accepted the result. i wish to declare for uhuru kenyatta. president kenyatta was declared winner on friday night, beating his rival by a wide margin, and has a second term in office. international observers declared the process broadly free and fair and the electoral commission dismissed claims the ballot was hacked or rigged. in a place with a history of ethnic post—election violence, tensions have been raised again. the opposition leader has done little to urge peace and is now taking his election challenge to the streets. in nepal, the number of people killed in the floods and landslides caused by the torrential rain over the past two days has reached 49. elephants and rafts have been sent to rescue nearly 500 tourists trapped in lodges near the chitwan national park area. transport networks and power supplies are also thought
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to have been disrupted in the worst—affected areas. navin khadka, who is the environment correspondent for the bbc world service, gave this update from the capital kathmandu. several rivers have broken their embankments. several of them have joined together. as a result, several settlements, villages, farmlands, they're submerged. highways cut off, roads and bridges washed off. it's a very grim situation. the home minister was on the record just now saying there aren't even adequate boats to rescue people. so basic things are missing. and the government has admitted that they're overwhelmed. there's a lack of resources. it's a huge issue, also not to forget that are many remote areas where there had been no proper roads, and it's very difficult to find out where these people actually are. because of the severe weather,
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there is no telephone, electricity gone, therefore there is a massive challenge now. the so—called islamic state group has claimed responsibility for an attack on us forces in northern iraq in which two americans died. the violence occurred east of tal afar, west of mosul, a town still under the control of is. the us military said five other people were injured during the fighting. 17 former army instructors will come before a court martial next month charged with assaults on recruits. the group from the army foundation college in harrogate are due to appear at bulford court martial centre. they face a0 charges, including actual bodily harm and battery. learner drivers are to be allowed on motorways in england,
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scotland and wales for the first time next year. a change in the law will mean drivers can take lessons with an approved instructor, and in a dual—controlled car. the department for transport believes it will be better preparation for independent driving after learners have passed their test. daniela relph reports. they can be daunting for young motorists, driving at speed, surrounded by bigger vehicles. from next year, learners will get motorway lessons. sean curley passed his driving test six weeks ago. it took him a further two weeks to brave a motorway on his own. you're going up the slip road, you can see all the cars, you're going to have to merge over onto the right, and there are cars going 70 mph, sometimes faster. and you've not experienced anything like it, you're on your own, it's terrifying. the change is about making the roads safer. young drivers are seven times more likely to be killed, or seriously injured. if you are a motorist, like me, i would much rather have somebody next to me on the motorway who has been taught how to drive on the motorway than someone who has just left the test centre and driven straight down onto the motorway for the first time.
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i think this is something that will mean a safer environment for all motorists. there will be strict rules for learner drivers on motorways. they will have to have an approved driving instructor with them, and they must be in a dual—controlled car, where the instructor can take over, if necessary. some road safety groups believe the motorways lesson should be compulsory, but only once you pass your test. there is, though, widespread support for this change to the rules. this is all about making a controlled environment, making sure nothing can go wrong, or if it does, there is a fully qualified and trained professional next to them to help guide them through the situation. not the type of thing i would recommend for mum and dad to help outwith. motorway driving won't be tested — it is additional training to make new motorists drive safely with confidence. earlier i spoke to the head of driving advice at iam road smart, peter roger.
quote
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he told me that he supports the government's plans. we have mean pressing for this for a long time, this is a good idea. at the moment, learners aren't allowed on the motorway at all. that has the effect that young, new drivers are discouraged from being there. and when they do get there, they just learn from what they see going on around them. and i've sat in studios like this on many occasions talking about the bad behaviour on motorways. what they're doing is learning by seeing that bad behaviour. so let's change that, let's teach them the right way, right from the outset. it's a much better way to go on. what is the kind of bad behaviour you're talking about? we all talk commonly about middle lane hogging, tailgating, i could go on, but let's not. let's get our young people learning how to use the motorways properly. if you actually look around you as you drive along the motorway, you'll see the age range of drivers is missing the younger generation.
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motorways are our safest roads by a long way. so young people are therefore being discouraged and pushed onto less safe roads, and they're already our least safe drivers. so it's a perfect storm we're pushing them into. it's unfair, let's teach them properly. when i learned and passed my test, and suddenly ended up on a motorway for the first time on my own, the sheer speed of everyone travelling was really quite frightening. so to not have to go through that would surely be a good idea? absolutely. you went through it that way, i went through it that way. why on earth do we make our young people go through the same experience that we know wasn't good for us? the white house clarifies president trump's response to the charlottesville attack, saying he does condemn far—right violence.
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a man's been charged with murder after a car was driven into anti—racism protestors, killing one woman and injuring 19 others. one day on from the violence surrounding the white nationalist rally — the governor of virginia questions the wider climate. the political rhetoric in this country has bred bigotry and hatred. we'll be live in washington with the latest reaction. also tonight... a joint pledge from the trade secretary and the chancellor — a brexit transition period will not be a back door to staying in the eu. painful memories of the violence that surrounded the partition of india and pakistan — 70 years ago. and two late medals mean britain's athletes reach their target at the world championships... good evening.
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the white house has defended president trump's response to the violence in charlottesville virginia — after the biggest gathering of white nationalist groups in america for decades. a 20—year old man has now been charged with murder after a car was driven into a woman who was part of a demonstration against the far—right rally. 19 other people were injured. after president trump spoke of violence ‘on many sides' — a spokesman clarified today that his condemnation included white supremacists and neo—nazis. 0ur correspondent laura bicker sent this report from charlottesville. after a violent day of division, cha rlottesville has after a violent day of division, charlottesville has come together to
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pray, to show that this city condemns the hate brought here by neo—nazis and white supremacists. the virginia governor went from roll to roll, hugging worshippers in this baptist church, promising to keep policy —— michael politics out of the pulpit but there was a message you felt he had to give. the political rhetoric in this country today has bred bigotry. hundreds of white supremacists gathered in the city yesterday for a planned rally. rolling broke out as far right groups including the ku klux klan we re groups including the ku klux klan were challenged by civil rights activist. the police dispersed the crowd but the day would not end peacefully. a car, at speed, rammed into protesters. the crash killed 32—year—old heather hier who had fought racism all her life. police
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have charged 20—year—old james feels with second—degree murder. 0ne have charged 20—year—old james feels with second—degree murder. one of the organisers of the far right rally try to hold a press conference but he was heckled, almost. rally try to hold a press conference but he was heckled, almostlj rally try to hold a press conference but he was heckled, almost. i would like to condemn any of the violence that yesterday. i disavow anything that yesterday. i disavow anything that led to folks getting hurt. shame! shame! as the crowd shouted him down, he tried to leave. but instead he was forced to flee. police moved in to keep the protesters back. these people felt that bigotry has no place in the streets of charlottesville, but this could be any town, any city across america. an example of the simmering racial tension and that has become heightened under president trump. the president stopped short of explicitly condemning these violent scenes and some fear that having
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donald trump in the white house has emboldened white supremacists. donald trump in the white house has emboldened white supremacistsm donald trump in the white house has emboldened white supremacists. it is important for us to call these people what they are, white supremacist. i don't understand why thatis supremacist. i don't understand why that is difficult. that is what they are. they are not hiding this behind the statue, they did not come here because of a statue, they came here to fulfil the promise of president trump and take their country back. calm has been restored for now, giving the city time to remember those who lost their lives while challenging hate and trying to keep the peace. laura bicker, charlottesville. jon sopel our north america editor is in washington... what do you make of the political reaction to all of this not least from president trump himself?m reaction to all of this not least from president trump himself? it is interesting. all throughout the presidential election campaign donald trump as fears in his criticism of hillary clinton and barack 0bama for not saying the word radical islamic terrorism after a terrorist attack in europe or in the
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usa and is argument was unless you identified it you cannot solve the problem. 0n identified it you cannot solve the problem. on this he has chosen not to say those words and that has brought condemnation across the political spectrum and across the republican party. the only voice i have heard in support of what he said was from the former head of the ku klux klan. today we have had some clarification, a banker trump has tweeted, there should be no place in society for racism, white supremacy oi’ society for racism, white supremacy or neo—nazis and the white house itself issued a statement saying of course the president meant to include white supremacist, the kkk and neo—nazis. it is hard to avoid the conclusion that donald trump did not say those words when he is so good as social media himself, that he is choosing not to disavow the far right which played such a big pa rt far right which played such a big part in his election victory. thank you. after weeks of public divisions between members of the cabinet over brexit, the chancellor philip hammond and the international trade secretary liam fox have made a joint pledge, saying that a transition period will not be a back door to remaining in the eu.
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the two have previously put forward opposing views on brexit. here's our political correspondent ben wright. he's the brexit—loving trade secretary itching to do deals, but liam fox, seen here in the us last month, has been in a dispute with the man in charge of the economy, philip hammond, over what should happen after britain leaves the eu in march 2019. today, though, a united front. writing a joint piece in the sunday telegraph, they say there must not be a cliff edge break when britain leaves the eu in march 2019. they will seek a time—limited transition period with the eu — a victory for philip hammond. but during this period, britain will leave the eu single market and the customs union — a win for mr fox. i think it is actually very encouraging because over the last three or four weeks we have seen conflicting signals sent out by various numbers of the cabinet, and now it does look as if someone has said to mr fox and mr hammond,
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we need to see unity. the customs union sets eu—wide import tariffs. the single market allows free trade and the movement of people. ministers say the uk can leave both while still giving business confidence during our departure from the eu. it sounds worryingly to me as if the price philip hammond has had to pay for a transitional arrangement has been to sign up to us leaving the single market and the customs union. i think that is a dreadful mistake for the future of our economy, forjobs, and prosperity in britain. it's in brussels all this will have to be hammered out. the eu insists progress must be made on sorting out the terms of the divorce before the uk's future relationship can be discussed. and one issue the eu wants clarity on is how the border between northern ireland and the republic will work after brexit. this week the government will publish its formal position paper on the issue, expected to include plans to give irish citizens the right to move freely into the uk after brexit.
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this week, ministers will also set out their thinking on how a new customs arrangement with the eu could work, and more position papers will follow in a clear effort to scotch criticism that ministers are divided and lack a brexit strategy. it is also intended to put pressure on brussels to crack on with talking about britain's future relationship with the eu sooner rather than later. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. kenya's defeated opposition leader, raila odinga, has urged his supporters to boycott work tomorrow following the disputed results of the presidential election. mr 0dinga made his first appearance in public since the ballot at a rally in the country's capital. at least sixteen people are said to have been killed since the result was declared — international observers have described the poll as free and fair. learner drivers are to be allowed onto motorways in england, scotland and wales for the first time next year. they'll need to be accompanied by an approved instructor and in a dual—control vehicle.
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the government hopes the change of rules will mean drivers will be better prepared to drive on motorways on their own, as daniela relph reports. they can be daunting for young motorists. driving at speed, surrounded by bigger vehicles. from next year, learners will get motorway lessons. sean curley passed his driving test six weeks ago. it took him a further two weeks to brave a motorway on his own. you're going up the slip road. you can see all the cars. you're going to have to move over to the right, and there's cars going 70 miles an hour, sometimes faster, and you've not experienced anything like it. you're on your own. it's terrifying. young drivers are much more likely to crash than older motorists. 1.5% of uk licence holders are under 19, but that age group is involved in 9% of fatal or serious crashes. in general, young drivers are seven times more likely
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to have an accident. if you're a motorist like me, i'd much rather have somebody next to me on a motorway who's been taught how to drive on a motorway than somebody who's just left the test centre and driven straight down onto a motorway for the first time. i think this is something that will mean a safer environment for all motorists. there will be strict rules for learner drivers on motorways. they will have to have an approved driving instructor with them, and they must be in a dual controlled car, where the instructor can take over if necessary. some road safety groups believe the motorway lesson should be compulsory, but only once you've passed your test. there is, though, widespread support for this change to the rules. this is all about making it a controlled environment, making sure that nothing can go wrong, or if anything does go wrong, there is a fully qualified and fully trained professional next to them that can help guide them through those situations. not the type of thing i would maybe recommend for mum and dad to help outwith. motorway driving won't be tested.
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it's additional training to make new motorists drive safely with confidence. daniela relph, bbc news. after the final day of the world athletics championships — so with news of that and all the sport — let's join 0lly foster at the london stadium. for a thanks, mishal. ten days of competition is now over here at these championships, great britain won two more relay medals tonight, and they have finished sixth in the medal table. here's our sports correspondent, natalie pirks. the smiles of britain's young relay quartet were infectious. it might not be the anthem everyone expected to hear, but on a balmy summer's evening, it sounded just perfect. the future queen of british athletics is touted as laura muir. tonight, she was in the 5,000 metre final — an unfamiliar distance for her — along with eilish mccolgan.
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a stunning sprint finish by kenya's hellen 0biri was enough for gold. muir came sixth, and mccolgan tenth. well, that was always going to be a big ask for laura and eilish, but there are more medal opportunities for britain tonight. could they be about to hit a target that before yesterday had looked completely out of their reach? britain took 0lympic bronze in the 4x400 metres relay in rio last year. the usa, though, would take some beating here. but when jamaica's injury curse struck yet again... commentator: and jamaica have pulled up. she's got a hamstring or something. ..silver was in their sights. the usa won by a country mile, but emily diamond brought it home. and, hanging on for silver, emily diamond takes it. it was britain's seventh successive world medal in the event, and look what it meant to them. one more medal was all it would take to ensure that britain would hit their target of six. the men's 4x400 relay was the final
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event of the championships. "r—o—o—o—ney" goes up the cry from the crowd! martyn rooney ensured the bronze would be theirs. talk about leaving it till late. great britain the bronze! in the end, though, it doesn't matter how it comes. success always tastes sweet. natalie pirks, bbc news, at the london stadium. with record ticket sales, these championships have been hailed a huge success, and will help repair athletics‘ image after a series of doping scandals. but the sport also moves on without two of its greatest stars. here's out sports editor, dan roan. he may not have been competing, but this evening, usain bolt was still the centre of attention. the legendary sprinter afforded a lap of honour, as athletics said goodbye to its greatest star. last night, however, the jamaican had been upstaged by a remarkable performance from the british men's 100 metres relay team. it's going to be gold!
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a victory that is still not sinking in. we've all dreamt of this, since we came to the sport we want to be the best at and we are and it'sjust very surreal and ijust have to pinch myself that this is the reality and it's brilliant. watching on, the women's sprint relay team whose silver also helped transform the hosts' championships after days of near misses. the head of british athletics says the sport has new—found belief. the real issue is have we got the underlying talent to take us into the next age of british athletics? i think what people have seen this week is we absolutely have. mo farah has provided many enduring images. this morning no exception, despite a silver in his final major track race. his links with coach alberto salazar, who is under investigation by us anti—doping authorities, means farah‘s legacy is not without controversy and today he reacted angrily to media scrutiny. if i have crossed the line or alberto has crossed the line and something is done,
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then why can't it be done? why do we keep bringing year after year in the headlines? i achieved what i have achieved and then you try to destroy it. controversy was never far away at these championships. with athletics trying to recover from a doping scandal, superstar usain bolt was beaten in his farewell 100 metres by drugs cheatjustin gatlin. an outbreak of illness at the team hotel saw sprinter isaac kuala then dramatically prevented from racing before being allowed to compete via an individual time trial, but the saddest sight was that of the legendary bolt in his final appearance, the relay, denied cruelly once again, this time through injury. i remember after losing the 100 metres someone said to me, don't worry, muhammad ali lost his last fight also, so don't be stressed about that, and for me i've proven myself year in year out. this has looked and felt like london 2012 and as with the olympics here five years ago, there have been sell—out crowds,
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proof once again that when it comes to major sports events british enthusiasm remains undimmed and at a time when athletics is facing a challenge to remain as relevant as it once was, that has been a huge boost. london has come to the rescue of the sport. the sport has got to be on its bended knees saying thank you, you have done something no other city could have done. as athletics tries to look forward, london 2017 marks the end of an era, the changing of the guard, the championships that refused to follow the script. dan roan, bbc news. the world championships are over here; in ireland, the women's rugby world cup continues. the hosts came from 14—nil down to beat japan 24—14 so they can still make the semi—finals. wales can't, after losing to canada and defending champions england had another 10—try victory, beating italy 56 points to 13. they top their pool with one round of games to go before the semi—finals which will be held in belfast.
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