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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 14, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. india and pakistan mark 70 years of independence from britain, a moment of freedom that sparked one of the largest mass migrations the world has ever seen. hundreds are feared dead after a mudslide on the outskirts sierra leone's capital, freetown. the south korean president calls on the us to help prevent a war, amid worsening tension over the north's nuclear threat. the us vice president says that there is no place in public life for white supremacist groups after violence and unrest in charlottesville. the number of passengers arrested under suspicion of being drunk at uk airports or on flights sees a 50% rise in the past year.
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also in the next hour, big ben falls silent. the famous chimes will go quiet from next week to allow essential repair works to take place. this week, india and pakistan mark 70 years of independence from britain, a moment of freedom that sparked one of the largest mass migrations the world has ever seen. the muslim—majority state of pakistan was created to both the west and the east of india, with muslims travelling in one direction, hindus and sikhs in the other. around 12 million people are thought to have fled the violence that erupted, with communities targeting each other. a million people are
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thought to have died. let's cross to reeta chakrabarti, who is in the pakistani city of lahore which is celebrating its birthday. certainly is celebrating, i can hear the people behind me, they have been celebrating since last night with fireworks, parades, and now it is a public holiday and people are simply out enjoying themselves. this is the day when pakistan ended the colonial rule that it had been under under the british, and it also marks the day when the state was created, when it split from india, to form the new state of pakistan. india celebrates its independence from britain tomorrow. partition in 1947 brought mass migration and widespread bloodshed, as correspondent james robbins now reports. voiceover: seventy years
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ago, britain pulled out of india, seen as the jewel in its imperial crown. british rule, the british raj, had been unravelling in the 1940s amid increasing sectarian clashes. lord louis mountbatten, india's last viceroy, worked to transfer power as quickly as possible. the british even brought forward the deadline for withdrawal by almost a year. india then was home to almost 400 million people. hindus were in the majority, muslims made up about a quarter of the population. but no way could be agreed to keep them in a single, undivided nation. so independence also meant partition. creating not one but two self—governing countries. at the stroke of the midnight hour when the world sleeps, india will awake to life and freedom. the new borders were drawn up in just five weeks. 0n the 14th of august 1947, british india was heading to its end. over the course of two days, partition was also launched. a new, largely muslim state
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of pakistan was born while the new india was celebrating its independence. but millions of people, muslims, hindus and sikhs, found themselves on what they regarded as the wrong side of the new borders. twelve million or more refugees fled from one newly created country to the other. fleeing from their looted, bloodstained towns comes a new exodus. a million displaced persons. independence has not yet brought peace. rejoicing turned quickly into horror and mourning. the new governments were ill—equipped to deal with such a panicked mass migration, one of the largest in history. there was a wave of massacres, each one sparking a revenge attack. whole villages divided on sectarian lines, tens of thousands of women were abducted, many raped. between half a million and a million people of all communities were killed. bbc correspondent winford vaughan thomas witnessed some of the slaughter.
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what we saw was a town soaked with the stench of death. we came to a row of one—storey houses. i simply shut my eyes. lying on the pathway and over the furniture and in the rooms, there were the dead. cut up, carved up, sprawling. after the optimism of independence, the upheaval and violence that followed cast a long shadow over the next 70 years. borders drawn in haste by the british government have repeatedly been a source of tension between neighbours. relations between india and pakistan have never recovered from the trauma of partition 70 years ago. james robbins, bbc news. as james said there, much optimism in the that followed independence, but the years after that were once of turbulence. i have been to the
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city of karachi, which was originally the capital of the newly independent pakistan, and it was also the birthplace of the country's founding father, mohammed jinnah. it's pakistan's birthday, and at every street corner there are flags and celebration. but its 70 years have been very mixed. it was founded as a democracy but has had military rule and people argue whether its founder mohammed jinnah wanted a secular state or an islamic one. i went to one of karachi's universities to ask students what they think of mohammed jinnah and pakistan today. mohammedjinnah, it is the biggest name for pakistan and even every nation of the world, he is like a father, father of the nation. and he created pakistan. and do you think jinnah would be happy with pakistan as it is today? he would be happy, he would be really happy seeing pakistan today progressing every day, every second. on this 70th anniversary of independence, the country is doing very well and it is flourishing day by day. and i hope it will get more prosperous day by day.
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and mansour, do you think that mohammed jinnah would be happy with pakistan as it is today? basically he had seen the basic needs of the people, and they are not being fulfilled right now. much of the problem lies in religion. because people nowadays, they're not tolerant. they are too emotional. crowds come tojinnah‘s mausoleum to pay their respects. the country he founded was rocked again last month when the prime minister was forced to resign over corruption charges. finding political stability remains one of pakistan's many challenges. this is a country that feels it gets a bad press internationally and as i have said, it faces many challenges, security, poverty, political instability and the role of religion
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in the state. but there is optimism here, particularly among younger people, and it is very much on display on the streets of lahore here today. at least 180 people are feared to have been killed after a massive mudslide in sierra leone. a hillside, close to the capital freetown, collapsed early this morning following heavy rain. those updated figures came into us just now. a nearby hospital says it has been "overwhelmed" by those affected. we hope to speak with our correspondent in sierra leone shortly. the us vice president, mike pence, has specifically condemned far—right groups when asked to respond to the violence over the weekend in virginia. a woman was killed and 19 people were injured when a car was driven into a crowd protesting against a far—right rally in the city of charlottesville. president trump has been criticised
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for not identifying any specific group when he condemned the trouble, as our correspondent richard lister reports. voiceover: after the violence, the vigils. across america people showed their support for the young anti—fascism protester killed in charlottesville and they condemn what they saw as the newly confident white supremacy movement. it has not melted away. in seattle group calling itself patriot prayer was quickly surrounded. the violence on saturday in cha rlottesville has become a defining moment in the trump presidency. the gathering of hundreds of white supremacists was for many shocking enough. but then this. a car driven into a group of counter protesters. these new pictures show the terror and chaos that followed. oh, my god, people are badly hurt. nineteen people were injured. thirty—two—year—old heather heyer was killed.
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donald trump condemned what he called the violence on many sides. but did not mention the far right hate groups involved. that was left to the vice president last night. we have no tolerance for hate and violence. white supremacists, neo—nazis, or the kkk. these dangerous fringe groups have no place in american public life and in the american debate and we condemn them in the strongest possible terms. but many in the president's own party are angry at his reluctance to specifically condemn the far right. it is un—american, there are domestic terrorists and we need more from our president on this issue. the media attacking our president... president trump, though, is trying to switch the focus of the nation, his team releasing this at portraying him as the victim. but in charlottesville they're not
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ready to change the conversation. we need to spread love all day and every day and notjust when something like this happens, when a tragedy happened. everyone wants to come together and we will be there for heather. she would want us to be there all the time. that is what we're going to do. richard lister, bbc news. studio: south korea's president says he's confident donald trump will act calmly and responsibly over north korea. moonjae—in has been holding talks in seoul with america's top military official, generaljoseph dunford, who has said that military options are only for if sanctions fail. his comments follow an exchange of threats between the us and north korean leaders last week. today, north korea has said that any war could "only be turned into a nuclear war". yogita limaye has this report from seoul. america's highest ranking general,
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meeting south korea's president. they visit that comes at a difficult time, general dunford has said that the us is ramping up diplomatic and military pressure to stop missile test, and military option would only be used if all else fails. words that could reassure south korean leader. earlier in the day, at a meeting with his advisers, the president urged a peaceful solution. translation: there must be no more war on the korean peninsula, whatever ups and downs we face, the north korean nuclear situation must be resolved peacefully. i am certain the united states will respond to the united states will respond to the current situation calmly, and responsibly, in a is equal to ours. but even as diplomatic routes are explored, military preparations continue. by all of those who could be affected if pyongyang decides to
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act on its threats. these are exercises being conducted byjoint forces from japan and the us. while they are not in response to the current situation, they are even more important in light of it. especially as the tone from pyongyang remains aggressive. today, the state's news agency says the country is watching each and everything in the us. we are approaching the mid—august deadline set by north korea for it to present its plan to attack guam, to its leader, kim jong—un. here its plan to attack guam, to its leader, kimjong—un. here in south korea, they will be starting joint military exercises along the demilitarised zone next week —— along with the us next week. despite those efforts, it is unlikely we will see the tension in the region released soon. studio: twenty people have been killed in a gun attack on a restaurant in the capital of burkina faso, ouagadougou. troops and police surrounded the building and are believed to have killed two attackers.
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the incident took place just 200 metres from a similar attack in january last year. here, a man has been remanded in custody charged with the murder of a grandfather who was attacked as he walked his dogs in norfolk. our correspondent, kim riley, was outside norwich magistrates‘ court with this update. 23—year—old alexander palmer appeared via video link from police custody suite at wyndham, some miles away from here, his first court appearance, after being charged in the early hours of this morning with the early hours of this morning with the murder of peter writing, 83—year—old, out walking his dog, on saturday, 5th of august, when he was attacked, a retired bt engineer, from a local village and his body was found in heathland, very close toa was found in heathland, very close to a path. —— peter wrighton. was found in heathland, very close to a path. —— peterwrighton. in was found in heathland, very close to a path. —— peter wrighton. in a very brief hearing, no more than two minutes, alexander palmer, wearing what appeared to be a blue sweatshirt and grey trousers, he seems to have some stubble,
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unshaven, he spoke quite clearly to confirm his name, his age, and his address, he gave his address as being in the village of pringle third, near norwich. there was no application for bail, he did not enter a plea, and the districtjudge remanded him in custody to appear tomorrow morning at 9am, at norwich crown court, just a few yards away from the magistrates‘ court. —— cringleford. there will be a hearing them. today‘s hearing followed quite a lot of police activity over the weekend, on saturday, a week on from the body being discovered, more than 700 people were questioned by police, roadblocks set up close to the scene and 700 people, also 170 calls from the public. they have said all this help them find possibly key witnesses to mike have happened on saturday. alexander palmer is expected to appear next in the crown court, if you yards away from me here. the headlines: india and pakistan
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marks 70 years of independence from britain, a moment of freedom sparked one of the largest mass migrations the world has ever seen. south korean president moon jae—in the world has ever seen. south korean president moonjae—in has called on his us allies to help prevent a war, amid worsening tension over the north‘s nuclear threat. hundreds are feared dead after a mudslide on the outskirts sierra leone‘s capital, freetown. in sport, cristiano ronaldo could face a ban of up to 12 games after shoving a referee in the spanish super cup first leg. philippe coutinho left out of liverpool‘s squad for the champions league qualifier in germany against hoffenheim one tomorrow night, the brazilian submitted a transfer request last week with barcelona hoping to sign him. rory mcilroy says he may not play again this year because of a rib injury plaguing him all year, he finished tied for 22nd
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at the us pga. returning to the news that the us vice president, mike pence, has specifically condemned far right groups when asked to respond to the violence over the weekend in virginia. richard cohen is the president of the southern poverty law centre, which has been compiling figures on hate incidents across the us, hejoins me from alabama, thank you forjoining us. mike pence has specifically condemned white supremacists, the attorney general jeff sessions has also been speaking on the media there are, in the us, saying too much has been read into donald trump‘s initial statement about the violence, are we getting mixed messages from the administration? the statement of the vice president, the statement of the
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speaker, paul ryan, stand in stark contrast to what the president said. quite frankly, at this point, it is not enough for the president to simply condemn white supremacy, near is the reason: he is the one, his campaign, has energised the radical right. we saw it during his campaign, we saw it, when white supremacists were celebrating his victory in november and now we see it in charlotte will. he has to move beyond this point of condemning white supremacy, good start, but he must go beyond it, he must take responsibility for energising the movement, apologise for the incendiary racist xenophobic rhetoric. during his campaign. he needs to signal that he will change direction, by firing steve bannon, his chief strategist, he is the man who, created the platform for the albright, with breitba rt
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who, created the platform for the albright, with breitbart news, and lastly he must take concrete action to undo the damage he has done the damage she has done to federal agencies, and take white supremacy seriously. —— platform for the alt—right. seriously. —— platform for the alt-right. do you think he is going to do any of that? i see no indication that mr trump will apologise for anything nor take responsibility for the harm he has caused, the country needs him to step up. ivanka trump is not the person who has the pulpit, it is the president of the united states, donald trump. if he wants to show that he is a president for all people, he needs to speak up forcefully a nd ta ke people, he needs to speak up forcefully and take responsibility forcefully and take responsibility for what he has done and make amends for what he has done and make amends for what he has done and make amends for what he has done. if he doesn't do those things you suggest, do you think the far right will become emboldened and encouraged by the
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lack of specific condemnation from the mouth of the president. they already have been emboldened, one of the leading white supremacists, the publisher of the daily storm, a website, exalted in the fact that the president did not condemn them. that has already happened, it is already happening. in the introduction, we mention jordan already happening. in the introduction, we mentionjordan is a sin has been governing —— gathering information on hate incidents across the us, do you have evidence that these incidents are on the up since these incidents are on the up since the election of president trump? look, there is not a good system for monitoring hate crimes and hate incidents in our country, u nfortu nately, incidents in our country, unfortunately, one thing we did see was a tremendous explosion of eight incidents after the election. we counted almost 900 hate incidents in the first ten days after the election, many bearing the signature
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of donald trump, by which i mean, people using his name, people using his slogans, in hate incidentss around the country. there has been an uptick in anti—semitic incidents, any police departments in big cities have noticed an increase in hate incidents in the beginning of 2017. so, while the figures, while the system for collecting data is not what it should be, i think all indications are that hate is up and it is because of the trump administration. a final thought, if you would, do you feel like following what happened in charlottesville, following what happened in cha rlottesville, that following what happened in charlottesville, that you could see more incidents of this type in the us? that is always a great concern to us. college campuses have been a flash point in our country for the last six months, school is just beginning. i worry that it will happen again, with many college campuses, as it happened in birtley,
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last semester. —— berkely. the number of arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights has risen by 50% in the past year, that‘s according to an investigation carried out by the bbc‘s panorama programme. critics of the airline industry say a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn‘t working, and want the government to amend licensing laws. tina daheeley reports. voiceover: where in the uk can you buy alcohol at 4am seven days a week? available 2a hours a day in every airport across the uk. and it seems that it‘s leaving passengers and crew with a hangover. an investigation by bbc panorama has revealed that arrests of those suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year. half of the 4,000 cabin crew who took part in a survey carried out by panorama and unite, the union, said they had either experienced or witnessed verbal,
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physical, or sexual abuse by drunk passengers onboard a uk flight. people just see us as barmaids in the sky. they would touch your breasts, or they‘d touch your bum or your legs. i mean, i‘ve had hands going up my skirt before. people just see us as barmaids in the sky. they would touch your breasts, or they‘d touch your bum or your legs. i mean, i‘ve had hands going up my skirt before. phil ward, the managing director of low—cost airline, jet2, has already banned alcohol sales on flights before 8am, and wants the industry to take tougher measures. do you think airports are doing enough? i think they could do more. i think the retailers could do more as well. two litres of beer in bars, mixers and miniatures in duty—free shops, which can only be there for one reason. but the airport operators association insists that their code of practice does works.
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i don‘t accept that the airports don‘t sell alcohol responsibly. the sale of alcohol per se is not a problem. it‘s the misuse of it and drinking to excess and then behaving badly. earlier this year, a house of lords committee called for airport licensing to be brought into line with pubs and bars. a government decision on whether to call time on early—morning drinking at airports is now expected in the autumn. tina daheley, bbc news. studio: and you can see the full panorama investigation, plane drunk, this evening on bbc one at 8:30pm. the world health organisation says the number of suspected cases of cholera in yemen has reached half—a—million. nearly two—thousand people are known to have died since the end of april — but the actual figure may be much higher. —— 2000. the director of humanitarian policy, at save the children, george graham, joins me now. many of our viewers will know that
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yemen has been affected by warfor some time now, and by famine and by disease like this is the inevitable consequence of a situation like that. and everyone has been taken by surprise at quite how quickly this cholera outbreak is growing, as you say, half a million people affected by it, of those, at least a quarter, many more, our children, the death rate, 2000 deaths that have been registered so far, could be more than that, operating in yemen is a tough place to be, very hard to reach all the different places. the health system is in tatters. people are doing everything ‘s possible to respond to the outbreak and good work is being done but it is very difficult. this is a man-made disaster. yes, entirely man-made problem, yemen, frankly, you have cholera, malnutrition, save the children did analysis recently that showed there is more than 1
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children did analysis recently that showed there is more than1 million children affected by malnutrition, another stark statistic, and children and others are being killed by bombs, airstrikes, children and others are being killed by bombs, air strikes, artillery, none of this needs to happen. cholera is a waterborne disease, presumably, the impact of war on infrastructure, sanitation and hygiene, that has had a huge impact. combination of damage, sewage systems that are not functioning, water systems not working because they have been hit by munitions, and then you have population, civil service not being paid, for months on end, not able to work. people displaced all around the country. all the usual systems that would keep water clean and prevent children from catching these preve nta ble children from catching these preventable diseases are in —— not in place. what is being done in the face of this? we are mobilising, as are other aid organisations, delivering tonnes of stuff to treat cholera, but also focusing on
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malnutrition, and the trauma that many of the children, millions of children, are suffering in yemen. there is more that needs to be done, more work needs to be done politically, we need to get the impediment, the blockade, east, frankie, got rid of entirely so we can get the aid in, air access into the capital city. we need the perpetrators of crimes, the people doing the bombing, to be held to account, named and shamed. a lot more of the countries —— a lot more that the countries, including the uk, could be done. this disease progressing much faster than solutions to many of those things can be found, must be immensely frustrating for the aid agencies who know that in the right circumstances they could do much more? it is hugely frustrating, i don‘t want to painta hugely frustrating, i don‘t want to paint a picture that implies we are unable to do anything, we are able to do unable to do anything, we are able todoa unable to do anything, we are able to do a huge amount, we have really good life—saving work happening and treatment centres around the country but it is so frustrating, the impediments we face on a day—to—day
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basis but also, overall context, the fa ct basis but also, overall context, the fact this man—made situation, this war over politics is devastating so many lives of so many children. war over politics is devastating so many lives of so many childrenlj have many lives of so many children.” have read that the world health organisation said that the speed at cholera is spreading in yemen has slowed over the course of the summer, these have any idea where this may be brought under control? very ha rd to this may be brought under control? very hard tojudge, we are hopeful that that announcement is correct, that that announcement is correct, that we will see a decline in the outbreak, but of course, so many variables, depends what happens with the rain, that is one of the big factors, we are hoping for the best but planning for the worst, as we a lwa ys but planning for the worst, as we always have to do in situations like this. thank you very much for joining us. here, plans for a garden bridge across the thames have been officially scrapped.
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it follows a decision in april by the mayor, to withdraw support for the project, after a damning report concluded it was better value to write off the money already spent than continue with the project. almost £50 million of taxpayer money has already been spent on the garden bridge. tom edwards has this report. this is where it was due to be built, stretching from temple tube station right across the thames, to the southbank. today, the garden bridge trust announced it is abandoning the project, the garden bridge is dead, and they were very clear, they blamed the mail. they said they were not getting support from him and they were not getting enough financial guarantees, so taxpayers in the end will have to pay £46.4 million, that‘ll be com pletely lost. pay £46.4 million, that‘ll be completely lost. campaigners are happy, they have always said, it was going to be built in the wrong place. it is a treasured view, protected view of london from
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waterloo bridge and other parts of the river, we are glad it has been preserved for now, we hope another project has not come along to try to ruin it. it is a world treasured view. all this money going on... what? not a shovel in the ground. we need a full itemised breakdown of the cost. this project was supported by the then mayor borisjohnson and then chancellor george osborne, both committed public money to it, and the current mayor, sadiq khan, initially also support the project but changed his mind. the garden bridge trust say that cost an extra £9 million, something the mayor refuse. in a statement today the mayor says, there were systemic failings in the procurement process, and he could not permit a single penny more of london taxpayer money being spent on it. he also says londoners like me will be very angry that taxpayers have lost tens of means of pounds committed by the previous mayor. there are bound to
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be further questions, and further scrutiny, about this huge waste of money. time for a look at the weather. terrace some dry weather to come at times this week, but it isn‘t as simple as that this week because although we will see sunshine at times, generally there will be a cool filter the weather and we will see outbreaks of rape. —— outbreaks of rain. another area of wet weather across the midlands and the south—west, and then further positive heavy rain later. all the while, east anglia and the south—east are seeing some brightness in temperatures. pulses of heavier thundery rain will drift northwards and eastwards as we go through the night. further thundery downpours later in the night. clear spells elsewhere, and it will be a bit chilly towards the far
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north—west. tomorrow, somewhat weather early on but that will clear way to the east to leave day of and showers. if you do catch a downpour, it could be heavy and thundery. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: 70 years on, pakistan celebrates its birthday as many remember the violence and mass migration sparked by the country‘s partition from india at the end of british colonial rule. nearly 200 people are feared dead after a mudslide on the outskirts sierra leone‘s capital, freetown. a hillside collapsed after heavy rain. the south korean president calls on the us to help prevent a war amid worsening tension over the north‘s nuclear threat. there‘s been strong condemnation of white supremacists
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from both the us vice president and the attorney general after the violence in virginia. it comes as calls grow louder for president donald trump to directly denounce violent far right activists. time for a check on the sport. we are beginning with a petulant ronaldo, i believe? we begin with a petula nt ronaldo, i believe? we begin with a petulant footballer, who would have thought? far be it from me to say that of all footballers. we‘ll start with the moment that could mean big trouble for the world player of the year. despite helping his side beat barcelona 3—1 in the first leg of the spanish super cup, cristiano ronaldo was sent off and pushed the referee. officials will make a decision on his punishment on wednesday, but it could be as much as a 12 game ban. cristiano ronaldo has had a taxing summer. given extended time off by real madrid due to footballing and legal commitments, this is the moment that might give him even more
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ofa moment that might give him even more of a break. any other classic has its fair share of drama, especially when there is a trophy at stake, but this one had an inauspicious start to gerard pique a. having only returned to training recently, ronaldo was just returned to training recently, ronaldo wasjust a returned to training recently, ronaldo was just a substitute, but half an hour is more than enough for a cristiano cameo. five minutes would have done. first, lives so are tumbled over after the slightest of touches. penalty given, and converted by lionel messi. and there is nothing like a goalfrom his rival to inspire ronaldo. this sublime effort gave real the lead again and prompted a typically understated but illegal celebration. a yellow card for that, and for this, just two minutes later. diving was the referee pulls my decision and ronaldo was sent off. translation: as usual, i am and ronaldo was sent off. translation: as usual, iam not going to criticise the referee. we played a great game, but i am a bit annoyed by the sending—off of cristiano. i am annoyed by the sending—off of cristiano. iam not annoyed by the sending—off of cristiano. i am not sure it was a penalty, but i think the red card
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was a bit too much. but we can‘t change it. should the spanish football authorities punish the push? they have the power to ban ronaldo forfour to 12 push? they have the power to ban ronaldo for four to 12 games. we have something of a barcelona theme running through this bulletin. liverpool midfielder phillipe countinho is not in the squad for tomorrow‘s champions league qualifier against hoffenheim in germany. he has been struggling with a back injury that kept him out of saturday‘s opening premier league fixture at watford. but his absence will do little to dampen speculation that he‘s set tojoin barcelona. the brazilian handed in a transfer request last week, following a £90 million bid from the spanish side. that was rejected by liverpool, as was the transfer request. another brazilian does appear to be on his way to barcelona. after cashing in on neymar‘s £200 million transfer to paris saint germain, barcelona have spent some of it on paulinho. the former tottenham midfielder is set to join them from chinese club guangzhou evergrande in a deal worth £36 million. it will be their first signing since neymar‘s departure. paulinho played a significant role in evergrande winning last season‘s
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chinese super league, and has established himself as a regular in the brazil side. he‘ll have a medical in spain on thursday. police have received complaints over neil lennon‘s conduct during hibernian‘s victory over rangers at the weekend. the complaints relate to his goal celebrations. lennon cupped his ears and appeared to raise a fist towards the rangers supporters. police are also investigating "offensive and threatening comments" made to lennon on social media. rory mcilroy says he might not play again this year because of a rib injury that‘s been plaguing him all season. he‘ll go for a third year without a major after trailing in tied for 22nd at the us pga behind justin thomas, who won by two shots. at one point in the final round, five players had a share of the lead but thomas just might have felt it was his moment when this happened at the tenth hole. a decent putt failed to drop, and thomas actually walked away. wait for it, though...in it went... eventually. he‘s the eighth first time winner in the last nine majors.
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for me, the pga had a special place in my heart and maybe a special drive. i want to win every tournament i play in and i want to win every major, but at the end of the day, this was really cool, for this to be my first one and have my dad here. and i know grandpa was watching at home i was able to talk to him, and that was pretty cool. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more in the next hour. a rise in crime committed in the countryside has been described as worrying. claims have risen by a fifth. the insurer says these are targeting items such as land rovers, tractors and quad bikes despite increased security on farms. farming nearly 800 acres of arable
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land in north yorkshire means tim rogers is all too aware of rural crime. we‘ve had items such as these parts here stolen in recent days. less than two weeks ago, thieves broke into his barn and stole thousands of pounds‘ worth of machinery. it puts an enormous amount of stress on the farming community. i know of farmers who are terrified about the current situation, fearful for reprisals, retribution. it is the down time and the stress it is causing. it will no doubt in time put some people out of business. figures from insurer nfu mutual suggest the cost of rural theft was over £39 million last year, but they also point to a 20% rise in the first six months of this year compared to last. these figures show an alarming rise of over 20% in the cost of claims in the countryside in the first half of this year, and we are very concerned there‘s a new wave of brazen and very determined
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thieves attacking farms and rural properties, and as a result farmers are having to turn their farmyards into fortresses to prevent themselves from becoming a victim. some of the security measures farmers like roger have had to install include cctv cameras. there are six covert ones covering this farm to help try to gather evidence. concrete blocks, tree trunks and ditches to try to stop people from getting access to the land. tracker devices on tractors, and of course the big steel gates at main entrances. north yorkshire police says its dedicated task force is proactive in tackling rural crime, and that it works closely with farmers and residents to gather intelligence to disrupt criminals. dan whitworth, bbc news. around 140,000 vulnerable children in england have potentially dangerous home lives, but are not receiving the help they need because they‘re not deemed to be at "crisis point". that‘s the warning from the charity action for children, which says
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the youngsters are stuck in what it calls a "revolving door" of children‘s services. marc ashdown reports. debbie has been working in children‘s services for 16 years and helps families with anything from behavioural problems to domestic and substance abuse. but she says it‘s become harder to provide the support they need. across the sites i run, i‘ve got just under 2,500 under fives and three members of staff. so, as much as we do, there‘s a lot that we cannot possibly do because we can‘t be everywhere at once. so you know, we‘re already aware of families that we are not picking up in the same way. and it is only going to get worse. a freedom of information request to local authorities found that last year 184,500 assessments of children‘s needs were closed because they fell short of the criteria for support. the charity action for children says only around one in four families were referred for early help services such as children centres or domestic violence programmes.
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we know from too many cases that if we‘re not able to help children early, that there are strong likelihoods that things will get worse for them. for example, in serious case reviews, 70% of the time we know there had been early warning signs of the outcomes. but we also know that if we give children and families the tools to help themselves much earlier, they‘re much more likely to not need help later on in any case. another issue highlighted is the differing thresholds from council to council. depending on a child‘s situation, help might be provided in one area but in a neighbouring borough, might be deemed unnecessary. we‘ve been hit by a double whammy of major government cuts to funding. at the same time as we are seeing a big increase in demand for these services. what reports show like this is the real human cost of the massive funding pressures facing local government at the moment. the department for education says it‘s taking action to support vulnerable children by reforming social care services
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and better protecting victims of domestic violence and abuse. it says councils spent almost £8 billion last year on children‘s social care, but it wants to help them do more. marc ashdown, bbc news. the american space agency‘s cassini probe has begun the final phase of its mission to saturn. the satellite has begun a series of "ultra—close" passes through the planet‘s upper atmosphere. scientists are hoping it will reveal more about the chemical make—up and internal structure of the planet. let‘s speak now to dr caitriona jackman, who is a cassini project worker at the university of southampton. i know you have been involved in this fifth 3013 years, so it is coming towards its conclusion, but nonetheless, you hope cassini will reveal much more about saturn as it gets really close? it's been a pleasure and a privilege to work on
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cassini for as long as i have, but i am relatively new to the project compared to some. cassini was launched in 1997, but it was first thought about and planned in the early 1980s. so people have invested a huge amount of time and of course money, but also emotion in this project. we went to saturn with a lot of questions, and we have a nswered lot of questions, and we have answered many of those questions. we have also discovered things that we never expected. but we leave with a new set of questions, and that is what space exploration is about, defining what‘s important, understanding where we are in the solar system and what that means more widely. before we talk about what you hope these ultra—close passes will reveal, give us a potted history to remind us of what cassini has revealed about saturn so far. cassini has been there for 13 years. it has a suite of instruments on board. it has cameras, it has
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magnetic field instruments. it has studied the aurora at the northern and southern poles. it has studied the cloud tops. it has discovered new moons. it has discovered that one of those moons spits out these geysers of water vapour, which forms a ring of itself. we have been able to land the probe on the moon titan. we have been able to observe weather and climate on titan over the changing years. andy is close passes open upa changing years. andy is close passes open up a new realm of science questions. there are a couple of things we are looking at them at the moment. one is the rings, looking at how old the rings are. another is the magnetic field of the planet and using that to tell us how long a day is on saturn. surprisingly, that is quite a complicated thing to calculate. and looking at this amazing atmosphere and flying where we have never flown before. so those
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are some of the questions. what else are some of the questions. what else are you going to try to do once cassini ends its mission? what is the next logical step in terms of research into saturn? we would love to go back. it takes a lot of time to go back. it takes a lot of time to plan, but it also takes a while to plan, but it also takes a while to get there. certainly, the moon and tells us is one obvious target to explore because it is the source of these geysers of water vapour. and that may be an interesting habitable environment. the moon titan is another fascinating environment. but my area of expertise is studying saturn‘s magnetic field, and that is linked into this question of how long a day is. we want to know the answers to those questions. if we don‘t answer them all now, we need to go back with another spacecraft and more targeted studies. and when is the end for cassini? i know it is soon.
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the formal end is the 15th of september, which will be exciting because cassini is going to take a death dive, or a very dramatic plunge through the atmosphere. there are two reasons for that. one is for planetary protection, because we wa nt to planetary protection, because we want to make sure cassini is disposed of in a safe and protected the way. the other reason is to explore the atmosphere as the spacecraft goes in. so that is the formal end, but we hope cassini will leave a long legacy and other data will be analysed for many years to come. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has denounced president trump‘s comments in the wake of the charlottesville violence is not enough. the president has drawn criticism for condemning violence on many sites and not explicitly condemning far right groups. here‘s what the labour leader had to say when asked about president trump‘s response during a campaign day in reading. no, it‘s not enough. what happened
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in cha rlottesville no, it‘s not enough. what happened in charlottesville was that the kkk and its supporters, white supremacists, arrived in cha rlottesville supremacists, arrived in charlottesville to cause trouble. one person died. many more have been injured. surely every president of every country in the world, when we represent everybody, should be able to condemn that. but people will say you condemned both sides in venezuela when there was a clear disparity there. there is no equivalence between white supremacists tried to kill somebody in cha rlottesville. supremacists tried to kill somebody in charlottesville. and yes, there are problems in venezuela. i have called for the same as present macron. i have called for calm, peace and negotiations. and a constitutional way forward. just an update on sierra leone,
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where there has been a mudslide. we we re where there has been a mudslide. we were told earlier that the death toll was at 180, but now we are seeing reports via the red cross in sierra leone that that death toll in the mudslide and flooding has risen to 320. hospitals are talking about being overwhelmed by the number of dead and injured are being brought to them. you can see the ferocity of the water in these images. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc news: india and pakistan mark 70 years of independence from britain — a moment of freedom that sparked one of the largest mass migrations the world has ever seen. south korean president moonjae—in has called on his us allies to help prevent a war,
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amid worsening tension over the north‘s nuclear threat. hundreds are feared dead after a mudslide on the outskirts sierra leone‘s capital, freetown. in the business news... there seems to be little hope that pay is going to rise anywhere near the rate of inflation. the latest forecast is for an average 1% rise over the next year. it‘s from the chartered institute of personnel and development. even though unemployment is still falling, there seems, it says, to be a constant supply of labour — particularly for low to medium skilled jobs. this afternoon, uber announced a series of new ideas which, it says, will help drivers "make the most out of the app". these include changes to tipping, waiting times, and its ratings system.
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the announcement follows a government review of the gig economy published last month, which called for digital platforms to empower gig workers such as uber drivers. the cost of rural crime in the uk has hit £39 million. an insurance firms has some farmers are turning their backs on farming altogether due to crime. more on that in a second. hackers have continued to plague hbo by leaking unaired episodes of curb your enthusiasm over the weekend. according to variety. it has now emerged that the television network offered a "bounty payment"of $250,000 to the hackers on the 27th ofjuly. michelle fleury joins michelle fleuryjoins me from the new york stock exchange. give us a bit of background to what hbo‘s problem is? earlier this month, we
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discovered that about 1.5 tb worth of data were stolen from hbo. this came from the hackers themselves, who got in touch with several media in the us. they contacted them to say, this is what we have done. to put that in context, that is about seven and a half times the size of the sony hack, and we saw the damage that caused. we are starting to see some of what the information that was stolen contained, whether that is scripts from some people‘s favourite tv shows. as you mentioned, episodes of curb your enthusiasm. the series was not due to begin in the us until october, so it is quite damaging to have that released online in advance. it is also understood that they may have personal information relating to seniorfigures within personal information relating to senior figures within the company. whether or not there is a ransom being asked, that seems unclear at the moment, although very likely. lots of speculation as to who is behind this and why they are doing this. but hbo is so far say they are
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not willing to negotiate or engage with the hackers. how big a problem is this for hbo? you say seven and a half times the size of the sony hack. but in terms of lost revenue, are they really suffering?m hack. but in terms of lost revenue, are they really suffering? if you assume that this is some kind of ransom situation where money is being asked for an exchange of information not to be released, that would suggest we are just at the beginning, that you are starting to see some key shows being released. but you have not got some of the damaging things, whether it is personal information about staff, salary figures, contract negotiations, all of the things we saw with sony, the ramifications of which lasted for months. how this will resolve itself is not clear, but based on hbo‘s statement today, at least publicly, they are presumably suggesting they are not open to negotiate with these hackers. but the potentialfor financial damage is there. what is
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this talk about a bounty payment that hbo were saying they would offer? much like you expect with the phrase a bounty hunter, a bounty payment is money that would be paid if it can identify who is behind this or how it happened. the little we do know about this hack is that it is perhaps more sophisticated than some of the previous ransomware events we have seen than some of the previous ransomware events we have seen in the past. there were several points of entry, not just there were several points of entry, notjust one. in some cases, it is often someone in a big organisation clicking on a link in an e—mail that gives hackers the opportunity to infiltrate the system. in this case, there may have been multiple points. once they were in, they could roam around, look around the computer system of a company and then figure out what they want to take, almost
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shopping around the data. early on, people are assuming that this is perhaps less damaging for hbo consumers, who have subscription information with the company, and more damaging for hbo executives. rural crime costs the uk economy £39 million a year. it‘s seldom that we think of crime having a such a psychological effect on an entire industry — but many farmers now feeling "under siege" from thieves. nfu mutual, the insurance group, has researched the problem and says the worst hit county is lincolnshire, where the cost of rural crime has now hit £2.5 million. earlier, tim price, ruralaffairs specialist at nfu mutual, told us what is being stolen. it's it‘s just about everything that can be moved from a farm, from tractors that are worth £60,000 to £100,000, livestock, tools and equipment and the gold dust for rural thieves at the gold dust for rural thieves at
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the moment, the quad bikes that farmers used to get around. every year, and mutual produces its annual crime report. the 2016, we were delighted to see a slight fall, but just as we were about to publish the report, we have seen new figures for the first half of 2017 which indicate a 20% rise. so we have quickly changed our headings on our reporter just quickly changed our headings on our reporterjust one quickly changed our headings on our reporter just one farmers quickly changed our headings on our reporterjust one farmers that quickly changed our headings on our reporter just one farmers that there appears to be a new wave of thieves operating in the countryside. there are also somejapanese growth figures, all of which were surprisingly strong. that has put a lot of heart and the markets.
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that‘s all the business news the chimes of big ben will be heard for a final time next week, before major conservation work begins on the westminster tower which houses the bell. the clock won‘t resume its regular time—keeping duties until 2021 , although specialist clock makers will ensure that big ben can still bong for important national events such as new year‘s eve and remembrance sunday. our political correspondent leila natthoo has the story. we are right at the top of the elizabeth tower, above the clock face. and here it is, big ben, all 14 tonnes of the great bell that rings out every hour. and here are the four smaller quarter bells too. it‘s absolutely deafening at this close range. they‘ve given us protective headphones to be this close to it, but from next monday the bells will fall silent to allow for renovations to take place. it‘s not actually the bells themselves that need repairing, it‘s the mechanism that causes the clocks to tick and the hammers to hit the bells that need to work.
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and there‘s also a wider programme of renovation under way already on the tower itself, dealing with issues like damp and condensation, putting a lift in so the silence is really for the workmen too. so, in the coming weeks and months, scaffolding will be going up right to the top of the tower. but it‘s hoped that at least one clock face will be visible and working at all times, and the bells will still ring out on special occasions like new year‘s eve and remembrance sunday. but next monday afternoon at noon will be the last time for some time to gather to hear those regular sounds. and for us here in westminster, a strange silence will descend in the absence of such familiar and reassuring sounds. time for a look at the weather... there is some dry weather to come at times this week, but it isn‘t as simple as that because while we will see some sunshine at times,
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generally there will be a cool feel to the weather and we will see some outbreaks of rain. some rain through the rest of this afternoon moving across scotland. some heavy and thundery downpours into northern ireland. another area of rain in the south—west and further pulses of heavy rain swing into the far south—west later. all the while, east anglia and the south—east are seeing temperatures up to 2425 degrees. pulses of heavy and thundery rain will drift northwards and eastwards through the night. further thundery downpours in the south—east later in the night. clear spells elsewhere, and it will be a bit chilly towards the far north—west. tomorrow, wet weather will clear away to leave day of sunshine and showers. many places stay dry. if you do catch a downpour, it could be heavy and thundery. this is bbc news. i‘m annita mcveigh. the headlines at 3pm. south korea‘s president calls on the us to help prevent a war, amid worsening tension over the north‘s nuclear threat. the red cross say more
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than 300 people have died after a mudslide on the outskirts sierra leone‘s capital, freetown. the us vice president condemns right—wing extermists following the violence in charlottesville. we have no tolerance for hate and violence. for white supremacists, neo—nazis or the kkk. the number of passengers arrested under suspicion of being drunk at uk airports or on flights sees a 50% rise in the past year. also in the next hour — 70 years since the partition. india and pakistan mark 70 years of independence from britain —
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