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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 28, 2017 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 7pm: ordered to leave their homes as tropical storm harvey continues to lash the us state of texas. thousands have been rescued, including residents in a care home. she said within10—15 minutes, the water went from ankle high to waist high. so, immediately they were under and floating. —— they were underwater. another round of brexit talks get under way in brussels, as britain asks for flexibility and imagination. we want to lock in the points where we agree, unpick the areas where we disagree... in order to do that, we require flexibility and imagination on both sides. a lorry driver is charged with 20 counts of drink—driving and dangerous driving in connection with saturday's minibus crash on the m1. german prosecutors say a nurse who is serving a life sentence for murdering two patients may have killed 84 others. good evening, and
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welcome to bbc news. thousands of people have had to be rescued in and around the us city of houston, as waters continue to rise in the wake of hurricane harvey. the area's expected to have received a year's rainfall within a week. helicopters have plucked victims from rooftops, as roads have been turned into rivers. and the flooding, already described as "catastrophic" in texas, is not only expected to get worse, it's also expected to spread — with concerns now for neighbouring louisiana. let's crossed now to our correspondent, laura trevelyan, he was at the grange, in texas, in houston. welcome to la grange. this isa houston. welcome to la grange. this is a small tax on town of 500 people. many homes have been
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evacuated. there is extensive, catastrophic, devastating flooding. the colorado river, we can land, by the way, has broken its banks and is just about peaking at 55 feet. normally the river level is about eight feet. flooding level is 2a feet. more than double the normal flooding level of the colorado river is what we are seeing here. and the impact has been ruinous on homes, and businesses. people who are selling some of this historic, beautiful homes in this tiny texan town, they are seeing them com pletely town, they are seeing them completely devastated by the flooding. we are seeing businesses submerged. we have spoken to business owners who don't have flood insurance and just don't know how they are going to pick themselves up. the positive aspect of this small texan town is that everybody has rallied around. the baptist church is where people have been evacuated to. there is a strong
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sense of a community that is resilient and determined to do all it can to recover from this. my colleague james cook it can to recover from this. my colleaguejames cook has been in the ha rd est colleaguejames cook has been in the hardest hit area in houston. here is his report. this disaster never seems to end. three days after hurricane harvey smashed into their state, texans are still struggling in its wake. in this suburb of houston, they called for help all night, but no one answered. in the end, it wasn't police or fire fighters who came to the rescue, but some friends with a boat. they say they called 911 and there was no answer. but you've answered their call? well, we just happened to be here, and we had a boat and a truck, so here we are. and that's what's happening all over texas, isn't it? yes, it is. all over houston. texans have formed their own armada, offering a helping hand to friends and strangers alike. you must be grateful to these guys here? 0h, of course. grateful to actually the whole community, seeing houston being together, helping each other out. that's really touching. i was telling my mom yesterday, i wish we had something to go out and help.
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and my mom was like, we all need it. it was extremely scary, we didn't expect this to happen at all. have you ever seen anything like this before? not at all. this neighbourhood really doesn't flood, so this was a first for us. well, there is frenetic activity here as boats buzz up and down the river. this little vessel alone has rescued 30 people so far, and the situation is developing very quickly. even at 75 years old, this is something she has never seen in all her life. for a time, this picture seemed to sum up the desperation. it's la vita bella care home, and the owner's daughter tweeted it to plead for help. she said within 10—15 minutes, the water went from ankle—high to waist—high. so immediately, they were underwater and floating. the national guard saw the photo, and everyone was led to safety. many more are still waiting to be rescued, though.
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in desperation, all they can do is cling on and call for help. we have a two—story home, and on the first floor, it's up to here. and all the furniture's isjust floating. everything. mattresses, all of it. in houston alone, more than 20 helicopters are flying rescue missions. but pulling people from the floods is delicate, and it is dangerous. and the city's troubles may yet get worse. parts of those regions will continue to receive incredibly heavy rain, that will lead to even more flooding, and more dangerfor texans. texas is now saturated, and it is struggling. more than 2000 people have been rescued. 6000 have called for help. this is a disaster on an epic scale. and joining me now is stacey lamb,
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who works with the charity, boy of hope. he is in victoria, texas, which is midway between houston and corpus christi —— convoy of hope. what is your priority in terms of disaster management? our priority is to get food, water, hygiene items and other emergency supplies to those who are affected by the storms. and is the hardest hit area for you at the moment houston, or are you beginning to serve communities in the suburbs as well? well, we've been in the area for a couple of days already. we started at corpus christi. we are in victoria, texas, today, as you said. actually, victoria points out is that here were hit by the eye wall, that here were hit by the eye wall, thatis that here were hit by the eye wall, that is where a lot of the damage is —— point south—east. we are serving
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these areas with food, water, emergencies applies, not only the victoria but places like ingleside and places like that. beyond here, we will start moving into the houston areas in the coming days as the waters recede. stacey, how would you describe, with all of your experience in disaster relief, the impact of the hurricane and the tropical storm harvey the aftermath of harvey? well, it is very, very widespread. the impact of the hurricane itself, with the damage and things like that, when you compound that with all of the rainfall that's been, that's just inundated the area, it isjust devastating to many of those communities. the president is going to visit corpus christi in texas tomorrow. do you think that will have a galvanising impact on the rescue and relief effort, or is it
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already very competently underway?” think it's very well organised already. a lot of the local state federal officials are doing an excellentjob. a federal officials are doing an excellent job. a lot of organisations like ours and others in the area, along with a lot of volunteers, just doing the best that they can to help out the people who are affected by this flooding and the hurricane. and, stacey, the storm is moving east of houston, now moving even into louisiana, it is forecast to in the next few days, where there is a state of emergency. what provisions are you making to help out louisiana? we continue to be working with local partners, churches, state federal officials, and just wherever we can fill a need, we will do so. stacey lamb with the charity convoy 0f need, we will do so. stacey lamb with the charity convoy of hope and — in victoria, texas, thank you very much forjoining us. i'm laura
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trevelya n much forjoining us. i'm laura trevelyan live in la grange in texas, where they are seeing flooded behind me, the colorado river breaking its banks. they haven't seen breaking its banks. they haven't seen anything like this in 100 yea rs. seen anything like this in 100 years. the river is now at 55 feet, it is cresting, people are beginning the process of cleaning up their ruined homes, their ruined businesses. it is an extraordinarily catastrophic event, and it's not over yet. now back to you in london. laura trevelyan, thank you very much. the brexit secretary and british government officials are arriving in brussels for the latest round of brexit negotiations. david davis has said he'd like the eu to show more "flexibility and imagination" in the talks. we want to lock in the points where we agree, unpick the areas where we disagree, and make further progress on the whole range of issues. but in order to do that will require flexibility and imagination from both sides, something i think the council asked for on some subjects. our goal remains the same:
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we want to agree a deal that works in the best interests of both the european union and the united kingdom. 0ur correspondent gavin lee is outside the european commission, where the talks are being held. gavin, david davis seems to think that they can lock in the points that they can lock in the points that they can lock in the points that they agree on. i was unaware that they agree on. i was unaware that they agree on. i was unaware that they had agreed on anything. that is a very good point. i find it fascinating that we are in round three right now, and garnier is a sort of how do you do, cordial, getting to know each other. now we are into is like almost trash talk, the sense that both sides are unhappy with each other, the full jabs going on. we heard from david davis talking about wanting a flexible and imaginative approach from the eu, basically saying, you are too rigid. michel barnier, the chief brexit negotiated for the eu, they have got three things to discuss right now. the irish border,
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the brexit exit bill, the set back settle m e nt the brexit exit bill, the set back settlement charge, what happens to citizens rights, the 3 million european sets and in the uk and british citizens in europe. who oversees that? will it be the european court of justice oversees that? will it be the european court ofjustice brasanac thatis european court ofjustice brasanac that is not what britain wants. gone is the nicene is not... this was michel barnier talking a short while ago. i'm concerned. time passes quickly. i welcome the uk government's paper, and we have read them very carefully. very carefully. but we need uk positions on all separation issues. this is necessary to make sufficient progress. we must start negotiating seriously. and the sooner we remove the ambiguity, the sooner we will be in a position to discuss the future relationship and a transitional period. let's try to unpick some of the
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issues in round three. given that there are 1a months and were to leave the european union, march 2019, let's bring in steve bullock, pa rt 2019, let's bring in steve bullock, part of the representation for the uk 2010-2014. you did part of the representation for the uk 2010—2014. you did renegotiate some of the deals for around the time of part of the negotiations on a smaller level, some of the issues at play. tell me what you think right now, steve? what's going on pa p5 right now, steve? what's going on pa ps behind—the—scenes? right now, steve? what's going on paps behind-the-scenes? well, i think on the sequencing, that's been really clear from the beginning. it seems it was never really accepted... this is the three issues david davis seems to be saying, let's discuss more than that. he seems to want to discuss anything but that. whereas michel barnier has been very clear. but it griva financial settlement, which is extremely important, obviously something that has to be dealt with. it must be dealt with before we move on to further talks. that of the
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mandate that barnier has, and that has been known. that was effectively agreed to after the great battle of the summer, which never happened. that was effectively agreed to by the uk site. the question is, why would you use up more time, when an agreement is needed to move onto the next stage? now, eitheryou agreement is needed to move onto the next stage? now, either you can use up next stage? now, either you can use up the time because you haven't agreed utterly what you are going to do on the financial side, or if you are playing brinkmanship and you think there will be a break from the other side. but it is weird to play brinkmanship when you that is on the brink. it is not the eu on the brink, it is the uk. the eu are saying, when they asked that is fight with these three things, they can move on. what many would see is david davis coming in and saying, no, we have put position papers out recently, we can discuss more. britain's view view of the future is northern ireland. within that, the irish border, saying that doesn't need to be a hard border or
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infrastructure that, to which the eu has said, that is magical thinking. what do you think about that? no expert that i have talked to has seen that there is any actual solution proposed within the uk is redlined as it stands. the difficulty with the northern ireland issue is that it is hard to see whether the uk is really looking for a solution to it, or whether it is looking to give political commitments and hoping that when a solution isn't found that the other side will be blamed for it. steve, thank you for talking to us. i find it interesting, because a short while ago we saw theresa may's top cabinet team negotiating here, civil serva nts cabinet team negotiating here, civil servants are going through the next few days trying to work out the new a nswe i’s , few days trying to work out the new answers, what to pick. maybe we will have some kind of breakthrough —— the new answers. but it has been rather underplay the. gavin lee, thank you. a lorry driver has appeared in court following a crash on the m1 motorway in which eight people died. two lorries and a minibus were involved in the collision near newport pagnell on saturday. 0ur correspondent andy moore reports.
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12 people were in the minibus heading down towards london in the early hours of saturday morning. the driver was a man from nottingham. his passengers were a group of people from india, about to start a tour of europe. lorry driver ryszard masierak, who lives in worcestershire, but comes from poland, blinked back tears and was given a tissue as a total of 20 charges were put to him through an interpreter. that process took some time. court proceedings lasted about half an hour. mr masierak was denied bail. he will appear before a crown court in aylesbury next month. afterwards, thames valley police gave a short statement. we've had full cooperation from the two freight companies involved, and they are fully supporting us with our enquiries. our thoughts remain very much with those affected by this tragedy. mr masierak was the driver of this lorry. he's been charged with 12 counts of causing death or serious injury by dangerous driving, and eight counts of causing death
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by drink—driving. it was alleged he was about 1.5 times over the legal limit. of the four people seriously injured, three of them are said to be fighting for their lives. one is a five—year—old girl. the driver of this lorry, david wagstaff, who's 53 and from stoke—on—trent, has been bailed to appear before magistrates next month. he's charged with 12 counts of causing death or serious injury by dangerous driving. andy moore, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: the authorities in houston have warned that the severe flooding that has forced thousands of people from their homes is likely to worsen. the brexit secretary and british government officials are in brussels for the latest round of negotiations. david davis says that he wants the eu to show more flexibility and imagination. a lorry driver has been remanded in custody
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in connection with saturday's minibus crash on the m1. he was charged with 20 counts of dangerous driving and drink—driving. experts are still trying to work out what caused around 150 people to be treated in hospital after been affected by a chemical haze that drifted in off the sea on the south coast late yesterday afternoon. amanda akass sent this report from birling gap — the area near beachy head in east sussex, which was worst affected. we all panicked. everyone, you know, anxiety was high, and we were all shaking and getting really nervous and everything. like, just didn't really know what to do. we had itchy eyes, sore throat, throbbing head, and nausea. they come to the beach for a bank holiday day out by the sea. but around 5pm, they were engulfed by a chemical cloud which led to hundreds of people being evacuated. the toxic fumes even affected lifeboat crews sent out to help with the rescue effort. we actually went straight into this
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cloud, which we weren't aware about at the time. and we could feel our eyes burning straightaway. so we advised the coastguards, and we were told to stay inside the lifeboat, close all the doors, and conduct our search from inside. but it hasn't stopped people coming back to the beach today. we'd planned to come down yesterday. so, no, it didn't put us off. no, it's such lovely beach. as soon as we heard that it was fine and that the beach was open, we came. we'd looked at other beaches that hadn't been affected, but this is a favourite spot for us. as to what caused the haze, well, the coastguard say that the english channel was particularly busy with shipping at the time, and they are currently looking into all the vessels that were in the area yesterday. while investigations continue, though, people on the beach today didn't want to let anything stop them getting their dose of august sunshine. amanda akass, bbc news, birling gap. german prosecutors say a nurse who is serving a life sentence for murdering two patients may have killed as many as 90 people.
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niels hoegel was convicted and jailed two years ago for giving lethal drug injections to intensive care patients. investigators have since exhumed more than 100 bodies of patients who died in clinics where he worked. from berlin, damien mcguinness reports. this man could turn out to be the deadliest serial killer post—war germany has ever seen. in 2015, former nurse niels hogel was sent to jail for murdering two patients. but police now say they've found evidence that he murdered around 90 other patients, and that there are dozens of other suspected murders that can't be proven. translation: if the clues had been duly investigated at the time, even in delmenhorst hospital, then the deaths of many patients, in our opinion, could have been prevented. the nurse injected patients at this hospital with drugs to cause heart failure.
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his aim was to then resuscitate them and win recognition from colleagues. there are now allegations that some in the hospital knew what was happening. translation: the current circumstances lead to the conclusion that the former management was aware that niels h had an awful and deadly impact on patients. that means that german authorities are asking questions about whether hospital staff turned a blind eye, and about why it took so long for the murders to be uncovered. damian mcguinness, bbc news, berlin. a 17—year—old boy has died at the reading festival. emergency services were called to a tent in the campsite shortly before 2am this morning. thames valley police say the death is being treated as unexplained. the teenager has not been formally identified, but his family have been informed. there's been a second arrest following the death of a baby boy
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in wythenshawe in greater manchester. a 30—year—old woman, who's being treated in hospital, was arrested this morning on suspicion of murder. a 31—year—old man remains in custody. yunus mulla reports. a team of forensic officers have continued to go in and out of this house today as part of this murder investigation. officers from greater manchester police were called here on sunday. that's when they discovered the body of a two—year—old boy. a man and woman had already left the property for hospital. detectives say they have now made a second arrest — a 30—year—old woman, who is receiving treatment in hospital. a 31—year—old man who was previously arrested remains in police custody, again under suspicion of murder. but it has emerged that sunday wasn't the first time police had been called here. they'd previously been called on friday under similar circumstances — reports of a domestic disturbance. and because of that earlier involvement, gmp has referred itself to the police watchdog.
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there was one previous domestic—related incident reported to us on the 25th. we've had an investigation ongoing in relation to that, but we have referred that through professional standards, and we will be making a referral to the ipcc. so unfortunately i can't comment on that further, but that was the only incident reported. understandably, a number of residents here have expressed their shock at what has happened. tributes have also been placed inside a cordon, which remains in place. house—to—house enquiries continue to be carried out by officers from greater manchester police. a controversial guru in india has been jailed for 20 years for raping two of his followers. gurmeet ram rahim singh‘s conviction last week triggered large—scale riots by his devotees in which 38 people were killed. thousands of police have been deployed to the region where his movement is based amid fears of further unrest. from there, justin rowlatt reports.
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the town where the controversial self—styled guru is being held was under strict lockdown today. the normally flamboyant god man was subdued as the 20—year—old sentence was read out —— is the 20 year sentence was was read out —— is the 20 year sentence was read was read out —— is the 20 year sentence was read out. the normally flamboyant god man was subdued as the 20—year sentence was read out. the victims said that was too light and they will appeal. after the explosion of violence that followed his conviction, the indian authorities say they are taking no chances. 16,000 paramilitary police and troops have been deployed. this town is the focus of concern today. the is where the vast temple complex that serves as the guru's headquarters is based. are your troops ready to besiege the temple complex, if necessary? we are fully equipped, fully ready and fully trained. whatever directions are given, we'll implement it. guru ram rahim is a charasmatic and controversialfigure, who stars in his own movies and has millions of followers. many devotees say, despite the rape
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convictions, they have not lost faith in the man they regard as a living saint. translation: he is a true guru. the accusations are all false. i was deeply hurt by the verdict. his blessings will always be us. it doesn't matter if he is in jail. a guru is always a guru. tonight, the guru's temple complex is effectively under siege, surrounded by heavily armed police and troops. inside, there are reckoned to be 15,000 hard—core disciples. the fear is what happens when the authorities try to get them out. justin rowlatt, bbc news. well, it's been the hottest august late bank holiday for 50 years in parts of the uk, which means hundreds of thousands of revellers have been enjoying the sunshine at the notting hill carnival. elaine dunkley reports. music. everyone can be a king or queen at carnival.
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it's flamboyant, eccentric, extravagant. a spectacle of imagination. and, there is the soundtrack. i want to say roots reggae music is earth music. the heroes of the sound system, playing to crowds in their thousands. there was fierce competition amongst the djs. through this sound system, we're giving a message, yeah? a message of love, hope and unity for everybody. but, as i hear the music, and that baseline resonates through my body, like i say, it's a spirit that wakes up, and it's just higher, higher, higher. until you just go, boom! and then i'm alive again. carnival is the caribbean, with its culture and music.
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a celebration born out of the struggle of the west indian immigrants living in london in the 1960s. they refused to be beaten, and so, with colour and pride, they marched proudly through the streets of notting hill. today, it's the biggest street party in europe. in terms of visitor numbers, notting hill is ten times bigger than glastonbury. there are 70 performing stages, and a0 sound systems. i'm from rio dejaneiro. i'm from rio. there, we celebrate carnival in february. but, yeah, i really enjoy carnival here. i recommend them to come over here. people plan it in advance. we've been doing it for 2h years now, it's part of our life. we wouldn't ever miss it. we live for it. literally, we live for carnival. once this is done, we start planning next year. it's a year thing. and so, as the sun sets on another notting hill carnival, preparations start all over again. elaine dunkley, bbc news. it looks fabulous.
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let's find out how the weather is looking. he is darren bett. hanno dirksen we have seen soaring temperatures today, close to the record for late august bank holiday monday. swan at in dorset, lovely blue skies. highest temperatures inland in the sun sign, about 28 degrees towards the wash. contrast that with mere 18 in scotland, northern ireland. in between, this band of the kodacloud producing rain and drizzle. sinking its way very slowly southwards. warm air, behind it, clearer skies and cooler and fresher. not much rain with the band of club. a significant difference north— south. much warmer towards the south—east. extreme was 17 after the south—east. extreme was 17 after the heat of today. a band of cloud continues to trickle southwards on thursday. not much rain, but a fair bit of cloud beginning to arrive in the south—west, towards the
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midlands, across yorkshire and lincolnshire. still some sunshine across the south—east, showers in kent moving away. sunshine in the far north, northern ireland and scotland. a few showers around coastal areas, western isles and northern isles in particular, drifting further inland across scotla nd drifting further inland across scotland and northern ireland through the day. probably going to be dry at headingley, a different look to the weather compared with today's blue skies. much more cloud around, breaking during the evening session if we get that far. a band of cloud moving slowly south—eastwards, not much rain on it at all, but a cloudier bitter all the way from the south—west of england towards lincolnshire, where we have had the heat of today. to the north of that, sunshine, showers in the north—west, temperatures 16-17d. in the north—west, temperatures 16—17d. still some warm towards the south—east and east anglia, 26 or 27. heat and dry weather coming to an end on wednesday. we have two areas of low pressure, two weather
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systems converging upon england and wales. we still have the showers. and on northern ireland. this band of rain tending to peter and through the day. the wettest weather arriving across east anglia and the south—east, dropping the temperature quite significantly on wednesday. the wetter weather getting pushed out of the way towards the end of the week. broadly, thursday and friday, a mixture of sunshine, is gathering of showers, temperatures a bit below par for this time of year. —— a scattering of showers. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: thousands of people have been ordered to leave their homes as tropical storm harvey continues to lash the us state of texas. many have been rescued, including residents in a care home. she said within ten to 15 minutes of the water went from ankle high to waist high. immediately, they were under water. the brexit secretary and british government officials are in brussels for the latest round of negotiations. david davis says wants the eu to show more
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flexibility and imagination. a lorry driver has been remanded in custody in connection with saturday's minibus crash on the m1 — he was charged 20 counts of drink—driving and dangerous driving. german prosecutors say a nurse who is serving a life sentence for murdering two patients, may have killed 84 others. indian legal officials confirm a self—styled guru in northern india has been sent to jail for a total of 20 years, for raping two of his women followers. let's return now to texas where rising floodwater has forced thousands from their homes. officials have been holding a news conference on the emergency response effort so far.
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speaking in washington, the acting secretary of homeland security warned that although the hurricane force winds had diminished, storm harvey continues to pose a serious threat. everyone in this room and on the president's team has been moved by the images and stories of people who are suffering in texas. we want to make sure you all know that we are working right now to provide assistance as quickly as we can. right now, we are focused on our rescue operations and we will move on to recovery operations later in the week. today, we are deeply concerned that those in houston and surrounding areas are stranded and in need of immediate assistance. people need help and we are working to provide it. hurricane force winds have diminished, but i want to stress we are not out of the woods yet, not by a long shot harvey is
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still a dangerous and historic storm. according to the weather service who you will hear from shortly, rain fall up to two feet has occurred and life—threatening flooding has occurred over a large portion of self and south east —— central and south—east texas. portion of self and south east —— central and south-east texas. on the line is dan wells. he is the chief operating at a radio station in texas. regularjoining us. first, the mayor of dallas, he has been speaking. he described hewson as being in effect trapped. describe it to us, please. there is flooding on every side. roads are closed and frankly it is dangerous. we see cars flooded on every side and tow trucks, people in boats trying to
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haul the vehicles and the occupant out of the situation. it is bad and houston is surrounded by rivers in the gulf of mexico. what about emergency shelters that people are being directed to? are there enough in the city of houston?” being directed to? are there enough in the city of houston? i don't know how many are at capacity or how many are lacking space, but a huge amount of churches, a substantial number of schools have opened their doors to people in need. there is a big relief effort going on and there is a lot of people who are staying at the homes of friends, strangers, neighbours, others. what are you hearing from people in houston about the lack of directive in terms of the lack of directive in terms of the evacuation order? do they think they should have been given that earlier? some people do. a hurricane
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is such a unpredictable thing. i have not heard anyone so far who is truly upset feeling that they were left out of an evacuation order. i see a lot of people who are remaining behind, even when evacuation orders are being issued as streams, creeks rise and begin to overflow their banks. we understand there is water management that has been put in place now, what has been released from the dams. is this something that you have ever experienced in houston?” something that you have ever experienced in houston? i have lived here since 1970 and i have seen quite a bit of flooding. there were floods in recent memory that were pretty bad, but they were much more localised. i have not been all these years seen flooding this extensive and widespread. our people worried that there is going to be all this extra water being released from the dams and reservoirs? is there concerned? a great deal of concern. if the water is not released, then
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the dams and reservoirs themselves would be in danger of bursting and so there is not an easy solution to that particular problem. it simply means that it is likely to have more water heading to downtown houston. that is a big problem in and of itself. i see no way around it given that the dams are basically at capacity. dan, houston is a key area when it comes to those oil refineries and we are now hearing to hear from the iaea saying that they are monitoring the situation and are not worried at the moment. how much concern is that in the oil industry within houston? oil is one of several key components to the houston economy and i know many people personally who work in oil refineries and petrochemical plants. there is a concern and the concern is ready to do with the flooding. the wee finery 's and other facilities along the gulf coast are designed to withstand hurricanes.
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for the most part, hurricanes blow through, they drop their rain, we have encountered that many times. it is very uncommon to have tropical storms or hurricane keep dropping water on top of water. we heard that the consequences of this could be worse than ike. how do they can pair to katrina? -- compare. i wasn't in new orleans during katrina, so i don't know. i have spoken to people who do and did some ways this is similar. during katrina, new orleans suffered by the rain and the wind simultaneously. in our case, we have not had a great deal of wind, but the flooding is as bad or worse because like new orleans, is houston isa very because like new orleans, is houston is a very low lying city, very much ona is a very low lying city, very much on a coastal plain of texas. how
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easyis on a coastal plain of texas. how easy is it for the emergency services to get to people who are trapped? services to get to people who are trapped ? have you services to get to people who are trapped? have you got people bringing in at the radio station? what are you hearing? it is very difficult to reach a lot of people and honestly, there is a lot more response from neighbours, friends, local volunteer services, than there is from the civil authorities. the civil authorities are doing all they can andl civil authorities are doing all they can and i think doing well with the resources that they have, but a lot of people are getting boats, rafts, canoes, denny 's, anything they can, to go out and rescue people who are stranded. we have at least three personal friends, family members who we know of, who have been rescued in canoes or other boats. thank you so much for your time. a year ago today bhs, closed its doors for the last time after going into administration.
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12 months on, only 25 of the compa ny‘s 159 stores have new owners. including the likes of primark and morleys, as our business correspondent, emma simpson, has been finding out. bhs, one of the best—known names on the high street. it had its heyday, but this time last year, nearly 90 years of trading were coming to an end. and the question, who would fill this gap? at bexleyheath‘s shopping centre, a shiny new department store. and new jobs for these two former bhs workers. we couldn't get people in to fix anything for bhs. but now we've got brand—new fixtures, brand—new walls, everything's decorated. it is like moving out of a house, having it refurbished and moving back in. moving straight back in. it's like a home from home. for us, it's like a home from home. so whatever was going on in this building, we'd clearly be interested in, and the fact that we both work here... yeah, brilliant.
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it's amazing. it's a good outcome here, but what has happened to the other 159 bhs stores around the uk? more than half are still sitting empty. 35 properties have deals or plans in place. four stores have been demolished. only 25 of the former bhs stores have so far been reoccupied. that is about one in six shops. i am not surprised to see that a vast majority of these stores are unoccupied, because many of them are very large and very costly to reoccu py. and secondly, they are in quite marginal towns where there is a lot of out—of—town competition from other locations. therefore those retailers who would normally have been there in the past have moved elsewhere. i have lived in stockport all my life. i remember being dragged, i might use that word, dragged around stockport on a saturday morning with my mum. it would never be complete a visit without coming to bhs. so, yes, i do remember
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what it was like. but there is a big, gaping hole now. the council is spending millions on improving stockport town centre. its leader is convinced a solution can be found. what makes it a real shame, because this is actually a successful shopping centre. about 95% of units here are let. footfall is very high. we feel there is a lot of potential interest in this building. i think there is an incredible opportunity here. i genuinely believe it can be relatively easy let. but he and the owners may need to come up with something more creative than just another shop. the same goes for many of the other former bhs stores sitting empty as well. emma simpson, bbc news, stockport. well, as we've been hearing, it's been the hottest august late bank holiday for 50 years in parts of the uk, and hundreds of thousands of revellers have been enjoying the sunshine at the notting hill carnival. dan freedman from bbc london has
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been speaking to andy wopling from the stjohn ambulance. he began by asking him if party—goers had heeded the advice to be sensible about how much they drank. people are being reasonably sensible with the advice, alternating water without coal to keep your fluid levels up. we aren't not —— water with alcohol. i am surprised we thought we would get more. people are being sensible. what are you seeing in terms of the bulk of the injuries or reasons that you are being called in to use? at the moment, by far the biggest is alcohol or substance related. also, trips on the ground, ankles, feats, by most is alcohol related. we have to be careful with those, make sure
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they are not masking anything underlying with conditions. some of those will need to go to hospital because we are worried about other conditions, but on the whole, it is alcohol—related. do you feel like your staff are being well received by revellers? they are not being abused or assaulted or anything like that? they are generally being friendly? absolutely. that is why we enjoy this event so much. we get treated so well. we have a connection with the crowd, we do not get seen as a threat, we get many people thanking us. well received, well respected by all the people here. the police were talking about a grand felt perfect —— grenfell. one effect. i don't know. we have
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seen one effect. i don't know. we have seen calm years in the past. we have noticed the connection with people. there is a respect for the ambulance service. that has been felt by the community. the headlines on bbc news: the authorities in houston have warned that the severe flooding that's forced thousands of people from their homes is likely to worsen. the brexit secretary and british government officials are in brussels for the latest round of negotiations. david davis says he wants the eu to show more 'flexibility and imagination'. a lorry driver has been remanded in custody in connection with saturday's minibus crash on the m1 — he was charged with 20 counts of causing deaths by drink—driving and dangerous driving. now on bbc news, the film review. hello, and welcome to
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the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? a splendidly mixed bag. we have detroit, which is the new movie by kathryn bigelow. we have logan lucky, which i keep wanting to call lucky logan because it looks like the look words should be round that way. and tom cruise is back doing what he does best in american made. i'm glad you've got a logan lucky issue because i have as well. i keep wanting to say lucky logan. detroit, i've seen many rave reviews already. i'm a big fan of kathryn bigelow who won an oscar for the hurt locker and directed zero dark thirty. the film is set in 1967 in the detroit riots, it begins with a broad canvas
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and the film slowly focuses in on a particular event. at the beginning, a speak easy is raided, rioting breaks out, the state troopers and national guardsmen are sent in, the rioting continues. we then follow a particular character played by a musician who is denied his moment in the spotlight because the riot is breaking out. he takes refuge in the algiers motel. the police then discend on the motel where they believe there is a sniper. the police are led by a character called krause played by will poulter. who is described by writer mark boal as a character who is inspired by the recorded deeds of a detroit policeman, although he is a fictional character. meanwhile john boyega who is such a brilliant actor, is a security guard who finds himself in the middle of an impossible situation. he's somebody who is distrusted by both sides and attempts to make peace with both sides. here is a clip withjohn boyega.
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hey, fellas, melvin dismukes. i'm with united security, i'm guarding that grocery store across the street. i come bearing gifts. oh, thank you. ain't this nice, boys? hey, all things considered, this is pretty good. thank you. i don't have my usual appliances. got any sugar? don't push it, man. you can see from the clip the film is shot with that very, sort of, distinctive documentary—like style. barry ackroyd is a brilliant cinematographer. he's done what bigelow has done before. turning fact and fiction, working with mark boal, turning something into a drama based on real life but there's dramatic contrivance. the film narrows its focus down until it gets to a single corridor of the algiers motel where this terrifying interrogation and worse takes place under the auspices of this cop played by will poulter. the thing i like about this is that
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kathryn bigelow is extremely dextrous and the movie seems to move through different genres. it starts off as a social document then moves into something almost a musical at one point, when it is in the hotel it becomes a horror movie. some people have taken issue with this but you remember kathryn bigelow directed near dark, which is a vampire western. i think it's a brilliant horror movie. and later it becomes a courtroom drama. i think those shifts are its strength. its greatest strength, beyond the way it's put together, the brilliant editing job which leads you through it... it's like jostling through a crowd of people, different stories, different genres, until we're finally focusing on one central event. but it's the performances that carry it. john boyega is brilliant, he has a way of telegraphing really strong emotions through the tiniest of facial expressions. will poulter is fantastic. he plays a character which has a malevolence hidden under a facade of innocence.
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it's a tightrope that could easily fall over into caricature but it never does. the experience was thoroughly immersive. it's very, very gripping. it's often terrifying and kathryn bigelow is a fine film—maker. it's an urgent film, despite it having a period setting, it feels urgent and contemporary. that's definitely on the list. what of logan lucky? neither urgent nor contemporary. steven soderbergh is back and it's a heist movie. it's described in one moment of dialogue as ocean's 7—11. channing tatum is the mastermind behind this plan to rob the charlotte motor speedway during the coca cola 600. it's a nascar racetrack. he was going to carry out this heist with his brother adam driver. it's a heist caper movie, so it's an impossible job, it can't be done. but they have figured out a way to do it with tunnels under the track. and getting this guy, joe bang,
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who is an explosives expert played by daniel craig. looking for all the world like a beenyean—paul gauthier. getting him out of prison to do thejob, then getting him back into prison. it's written by rebecca blunt who nobody has heard of before, and some people have taken it to be a nom de plume for the director. but they say no, it's a real person. there is a certain amount of satire, some american flag—waving for memorial day, and there's a line in it one person says, "nascar is like america, you're making us harm america". but the fact is all that satire is very much like nascar, it goes past you and then we're back. i enjoyed it, it's fun, it's flippant and flimsy. it doesn't really stand up. i have a sense you thought about it deeply since you saw it. i have to say, after i finished smiling my way through the movie, i moved to the next thing pretty swiftly. the fact is, it's not easy to make a film that is fun and flippant. there are enough bad movies out there trying to do that.
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this does it rather well. take us to tom cruise and american made. the thing that tom cruise does best is flying, wearing aviator shades and smiling in a way that says, "trust me, i'm tom cruise". this is directed by doug liman. it's inspired by a real life story and some is true and not true. a twa pilot, who became a drugs and arms smuggler claimed to work for the cia. ended up providing evidence for the dea. he is recruited by a mysterious shadowy figure played by donald gleeson, who never puts a foot wrong. ever. he says i know you are smuggling cigars, and you need to work for us now. we will give you this airline. here is a clip. cia owns this? no, no. independent aviation consultants. iac. yeah.
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you'd run the company but after hours you can work for us. takes pictures? the work is covert. cove rt. so anyone finds out about it, family, friends, even lucy. it's lucy, right? yeah, that's right. that'll be a problem. all this is legal? if you're doing it for the good guys, yeah. just don't get caught. i'm backing tom already. but there's a lovely moment of threat there when donal gleeson says it's lucy isn't it? suddenly you see the harder edge. what then happens is, he starts off allegedly working for the cia filming the communist insurgents, then gets mixed up with pablo escobar, flying cocaine to the us, then has to run drugs. the whole thing has a chaotic momentum. meanwhile, money is piling up everywhere.
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so much so they don't have anywhere to put it anymore. it reminded me of a lot of films, things like air america, war dogs, catch me if you can. the latter is a much more substantial movie which bears up to much greater scrutiny. it has that accelerating pace of something like goodfellas, but none of the depth. if you think of things like the mummy and think, was i ever bored? no. did i think a character was ever properly three—dimensional? no. was it fun while it was on screen? yes, it was. it's a movie that seems to be based around an understanding of, there is a thing that tom cruise does. you can like or dislike tom cruise, but there is a thing he does which is he can do that... that big slightly crazy smile and you buy into it. again, i thought it was enjoyable fun. detroit is a movie with such substance and so much going for it, and in the case of american made and logan lucky, not lucky logan, they are fun but they won't stick in the mind like detroit will. one that will stick
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in the mind is the one you will pick as the best one. dunkirk, have you seen it? i haven't, and it's high on my list. you need to see it in imax if possible. it is an overwhelming experience, it's christopher nolan. he is such a great champion of film. i saw this in imax 70 millimetre. the interesting thing is, it's very complex. it is three time structures, one week, one day, one hour. all intertwined. if you have been a fan of nolan since memento, you know he's interested in travelling time. but it's a straightforward story. it's the story of dunkirk. as a piece of cinema, it's terrific. i've seen it twice now and both times, the end of the screening, everyone has been silent. people have literally been like that. that's a testament to how powerful it is. but see it on the biggest screen possible. a brief word about your dvd pick? lady macbeth.
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florence pugh is brilliant in this adaptation of the story. the script is by alice birch. the tale of a woman who refuses to confirm, refuses to be down—trodden, is vilified by society as a result of it. really powerful. fantastic sound design. that sounds like something only a film critic would say but believe me, it's the film you watch with your ears and it's a fine piece of work. good stuff. a quick reminder before we go that you'll find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/markkermode. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. that's it for this week though. thanks for watching. goodbye. time for a look at the weather. hello there. we've seen some soaring temperatures today. close to the record for the late august bank holiday monday. a good day to be on the beach
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across a good part of england. swanage in dorset, for example, lovely blue skies here. the highest temperatures were inland in the sunshine. round about 28 degrees towards the wash. contrast that with nearly 18 in scotland and northern ireland. and in between, this band of the cloud, which is still producing a little rain and drizzle. and that is sinking its way very slowly southwards overnight. ahead of it, warm air. behind it, clearer skies and some cooler and fresher air. not much rain with that band of cloud, but a significant difference between north and south. so, 10—11d in scotland and northern ireland. much warmer towards the south east. 16 or 17 after that heat of today. that band of cloud continues to trickle southwards on thursday. not much rain on there, but a fair bit of cloud beginning to arrive in the south west of england, across wales, towards the midlands, across yorkshire and lincolnshire. still some sunshine across east anglia and the south east. any showers in kent moving away. and we get some sunshine arriving in the far north of england. also across northern ireland and scotland. a few showers around coastal areas, western isles
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and northern isles in particular. those showers will drift their way further inland across scotland and northern ireland through the day. probably going to be dry at headingley. a very different look to the weather compared with today's blue skies. much more cloud around. the cloud should probably break during the evening session, if we can get that far. this band of cloud moving very slowly south—eastwards. not much rain on it at all. a cloudier picture all the way from the south west of england towards lincolnshire, where we have had the heat of the day. to the north of that, sunshine and showers in the north west. temperatures 16—17, quite a drop for many areas. we've still got some warmth towards the south east of east anglia, perhaps 26—27 degrees. but even that heat or that dry weather will come to an end on wednesday, because we have two areas of low pressure, two weather systems, verging upon england and wales. we've still got the showers. and on northern ireland. this band of rain probably tending to peter out through the day. the wettest weather arriving across east anglia and the south east of england. that certainly is going to drop temperatures quite
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significantly on wednesday. and then bad weather weather should get pushed out of the way towards the end of the week. and broadly thursday and friday is a mixture of sunshine and a scattering of showers, and temperatures a bit below par for this time of year. this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at eight. ordered to leave their homes as tropical storm harvey continues to lash the us state of texas, thousands have been rescued, including residents in a care home. she said within ten to 15 minutes the water went from ankle high to waist height. so, immediately they we re waist height. so, immediately they were underwater and floating. another round of brexit talks get under way in brussels — as britain asks for 'flexibility and imagination'. we want to lock in the points where we agree, on pick the areas where we
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disagree... to do that we require flexibility and imagination from both sides. german prosecutors say a nurse who is serving a life sentence for murdering 2 patients, may have killed 84 others. and sizzling sun and sensational sounds — it can only be
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