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tv   Newswatch  BBC News  September 15, 2017 7:45pm-8:01pm BST

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go to europe, nasa are planning to go to europe, and moon ofjupiter which has similar conditions, we believe. that will take another 20 years, really by the time it gets created and sent tojupiter by the time it gets created and sent to jupiter and the findings by the time it gets created and sent tojupiter and the findings come back. what we really want to do is send a drill to the moon and measure that water and see exactly what is in that ocean and that will be not in my lifetime. that was a shame, i was going to suggest you get that organise now. that will be my retirement. thank you for talking to us. retirement. thank you for talking to us. now it is time for new swatch. welcome to new swatch. with bbc reporters putting themselves in the eye of the hurricane. i will be
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taking unnecessary risks and focusing attention on themselves rather than on the tragedies they are sent to cover. the eyes to the right... did bbc news failed to give the right to vote in parliament the it deserved? but first, the launch of the new iphone. it has become an annual fixture of the new iphone. it has become an annualfixture in of the new iphone. it has become an annual fixture in the diary of anyone obsessed with technology or who wants to keep up with the latest digital fashion. who wants to keep up with the latest digitalfashion. the aim is to who wants to keep up with the latest digital fashion. the aim is to cell phones and make profits. here is the bbc helping beaks with its marketing. the new models included the iphone ten and it took the form ofa the iphone ten and it took the form of a massive media jamboree. although the face recognition technology did not seem to work too well and there were plenty of pensions of the £1000 price tag. doesn't really warrant for articles
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for videos, classic meanwhile it is a case of another week, another storm over whether coverage by bbc news. hurricane verma has followed other hurricane sun floods in prompting considerable reaction from viewers. here are some exa m ples of reaction from viewers. here are some examples of how the hurricane has been reported on and what some of you thought of that reporting. been reported on and what some of you thought of that reportinge million homes and businesses in florida are without power tonight with central miami deserted. there is barely a soul on the streets anywhere in the south florida and thatis anywhere in the south florida and that is because of the risk of flying debris. you said the streets
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of miami were deserted because it was too dangerous to be out. so why was too dangerous to be out. so why was he standing outside and was blown down tree behind him? i spent my time during this report wondering about that and the risk not just to him but also to the team around him. we get a sense of what it is like from the scene behind you but what are people being advised? certainly to stay out of this. that is our reporter braving the elements. he was just one of the number of bbc correspondent ‘s reporting on hurricane irma. meanwhile, a bbc weatherman was also in the region. so wasn't worth it and were they at risk?|j in the region. so wasn't worth it and were they at risk? i thought the bbc update of hurricane irma was informative and well covered,
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however, the evacuation of 6 million people was there for a reason. the national guard and the sheriffs telling people to stay inside and stay stay was there for reasons why did we have the bbc sending their correspondence out into the hurricane area to stand on the street and get thoroughly radon. was this a case of sensationalism over safety? there may have been safety measures in place which the audience could not see. i once hung on to correspond's ankles out of shot at the edge of a cliff. reporters are often sheltered by a building that cannot be seen on often sheltered by a building that cannot be seen on screen. often sheltered by a building that cannot be seen on screen. they say coverage like this is a good way of safely showing the audience the strength of the wind, but is it? for me, it is not and if that were the case, then why didn't the newsreader in the studio not tell viewers that before the outside broadcast was given? it would have saved giving
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countless people like me palpitations, worrying about the risk to the bbc reporter and the team. another viewer who contacted us team. another viewer who contacted us about the coverage was peter towers and he is in our newcastle studio. peter, is it the danger to reporters and presenters that most concern shoe? yes. the actual presenters concern shoe? yes. the actual p rese nte i’s we re concern shoe? yes. the actual presenters were at risk, if anyone was watching the news channel in the united states, they might have concluded that it was actually safe for them to do with the reporters we re for them to do with the reporters were doing because they would not have had a safety team hanging on to their ankles or any other part of them to stop them from being affected by the weather. sam taylor, how dangerous is it? are the people making sure that the presenters are secure? yes, we have clear training plans and we do risk assessment and
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you do that particularly intensively ona you do that particularly intensively on a story like this. where people ask why do reporters go to places at all, that is ourjob, to get close up all, that is ourjob, to get close up to things and tell people what is going on. it is theirjob to find out what is going on but here we know what is going on and we can see it, whether there is a presenter in front of it or not. there is a challenge about how to convey the strength of the storm and people talking and reporting up close doors visually convey more than the distant shot of palm trees blowing in the wind. i would stress it is risk assessed, people are trained and we have trading that members of the public do not have. the principles are the same about going to war zone or an accident, you would expectjournalists to get closer. does that reassure you? not at all, reporters going to war zone have body armour and helmets and
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they have protective vehicles out of mines that have been described up to 180 mph with rain coming down, sufficient to flood areas like miami, it puts them in the height of danger, it would seem to me and i think it is highly irresponsible. we had a small number of reporters who did some limited reporting, they we re did some limited reporting, they were not doing it at the very height of the storm, they were usually doing that before or after. it is interesting in the introduction about people slapping the precautions are telling people what is going on in a way we might warn people about flash photography that is something we could give consideration to. we were not trying to present all of the news from the location all day long and in our coverage , location all day long and in our cove rage , we location all day long and in our coverage, we put location all day long and in our coverage, we put more location all day long and in our coverage, we put more of location all day long and in our coverage, we put more of our emphasis on reporting the devastation afterwards with a big team out in the caribbean. setting aside the danger, the argument often made for this is that gives you a greater sense of drama. do you think thatis greater sense of drama. do you think that is true? i am not convinced. i think that the pictures of the crashing seas and street furniture
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being damaged by the winds would have been quite dramatic enough without putting people into the picture as well. what is the added value? we are not in the business of adding drama in this coverage, we wa nt adding drama in this coverage, we want to give people an accurate betrayal. presenters including myself and reporters want to make a name for themselves and do things dramatically. you must be aware that all of us are exhibitionists a little bit and you must control us in some way. if you look at our cove rage , in some way. if you look at our coverage, what we have done here is try to give people a clear sense of a major story. there is a high interest in the story and concern about what is going on, we sent specialist people who know the story well and have the right training. the coverage they have done has been limited and well—controlled. there is that bit of view, if i can get a great shot of myself looking particularly brave and it is something that people remember, they
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might remember me as well as the story. there is always that element. that is why we have a clear risk assessment process. i think we have developed our approach. i covered floods for a couple of decades and our approach to that has changed a lot in line with safety guidance. the whole business of i am in the water quite deep, we do not do some of those things that we might have donein of those things that we might have done in the past. 0ur of those things that we might have done in the past. our understanding of how to do this correctly and safely has evolved over time stop there will always be a discussion, you work with the producer, people like me saying what we should and should not do. we want to make sure that the coverage is engaging and that the coverage is engaging and that people get a real sense of the story on the ground, but we do not wa nt story on the ground, but we do not want to put people in danger at all and we do not want to create unnecessary drama. what advice have you got for sam taylor the next time there is a hurricane? send fewer
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reporters or ensure their on—screen fallers amount of time? make use of unmanned cameras. thank you very much. do let us know your thoughts on that or on any aspect of bbc news. details of how to contact us at the end of the programme. now, the battle over brexit. late on monday night the government's bid to extra ct monday night the government's bid to extract the uk from eu law passed its first parliamentary test. the eu withdrawal bill which will end the supremacy of eu law in the uk passed its second reading stage after midnight. when if you are elizabeth davidson was fast asleep. the next day she was keen to catch up on the news but she was disappointed. airy many of us will have tuned into the news that one is the first obvious opportunity for news coverage of this historic and politically controversial vote. however bbc news failed to mention it. this omission is extraordinary and can only be
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explained as a deliberate decision to avoid reporting a victory for the government and leave thus fuelling the perception that bbc news has a persistent editorial bias towards remain. will we put that point to bbc news and they told us... victorjones though is another viewer who thinks that the bbc is anti—brexit and te meals asked this week with a touch of sarcasm... —— and he he nield us... thank you for all your comments. if
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you want to share your opinions or even appear on the programme, you can call us... even appear on the programme, you can callus... 0re—mail even appear on the programme, you can call us... 0r e—mail us... you can call us... 0r e—mail us... you can find us on twitter... and do have a look at our website... that is all from us, we will be back next week. goodbye. how low. the week has ended on a
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cool and sherry note and that is how the weekend is going to begin. as we go the weekend is going to begin. as we go through the next couple of days, the showers should slowly but surely begin to ease, there will be spells of sunshine, the knights will be decidedly chilly. turning cool out there tonight, many of the showers will fade away but some will continue in north—east scotland and england, moving into wales and the far south west and temperatures in towns and cities, eight or 9 degrees, lower in the countryside. tomorrow, the showers will be at coastal areas exposed to the breeze, north—east scotland, england wales and the south west, where you start trying with spells of sunshine, you will see with spells of sunshine, you will see cloud bubbling up through the day and showers breaking out quite widely by the afternoon, some of them showery towards the south—east and temperatures struggling, between 12 and 17 degrees at best. sunday will have a chilly start but fewer showers and more in the way of
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sunshine. this is bbc news. i'm julian worricker. the headlines at 8.00pm: terror on the tube in london — 29 people are injured after a device partially explodes on a packed commuter train. police say it was an improvised explosive device — the bbc understands it had a timer. there was panic as passengers tried to flee the scene. massive bang occurred. i didn't know what happened, i looked around the first thing i saw was an orange fireball circumference and the whole tube coming toward you. it was: overview of your head, everybody was screaming and you just ran out of tube. screaming and you just ran out of tube. whoever planted the device is still on the run — hundreds of detectives are involved in the manhunt. this is the scene live in parsons green as the area remains on lock—down tonight. sirens in japan after north korea fires another
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