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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  September 27, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news,and these are the top stories developing at 11. theresa may says she's "bitterly disappointed" the united states has proposed imposing a tax on a jet made by bombardier, one of northern ireland's biggest employers. "we're ready for government." that's whatjeremy corbyn‘s expected to tell delegates as he delivers his speech to the labour conference in brighton later. measles has been eliminated in the uk for the first time, according to the world health organisation. the taxi company uber appeals against a ruling that its drivers are workers, not self—employed, and so entitled to a range of benefits. also — england select their 16—man squad for this winter's ashes series. vice—captain ben stokes is picked, despite his arrest on monday. longer tweets for some twitter users as they double the number of characters available. good morning.
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it's wednesday 27th september. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may is "bitterly disappointed" the united states has proposed imposing a tax on the c—seriesjet made by bombardier, one of northern ireland's biggest employers. bombardier have a contract to sell 125 of the c—series planes to delta airlines. however, rival airline manufacturer boeing complained that bombardier got state subsidies from the uk and canada, which they say unfairly helped win the order. the tariff could could triple the cost of a c—series aircraft sold in the united states. about 1000 jobs in belfast are linked to the c—series, the wings of which are made at a purpose—built factory
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at queen's island. the programme is notjust important to bombardier jobs in northern ireland, but also to smaller aerospace firms across the uk which make components for the wings. 0ur north america business correspondent samira hussain sent us this from new york. this is not the ruling that bombardier was hoping for. in its decision the us commerce department has basically said that bombardier had received subsidies, which is an absolute no—no in international trade. it will now slap a 220% tariff on any c—series planes coming into the united states. the us airline delta had ordered 125 planes from bombardier. in a deal worth around $5.6 billion. but there is no way delta will want to pay an additional 220% on those planes.
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so this decision could really jeopardise that order. but of course this is not the end. bombardier can and will likely appeal this decision. it can do so through the commerce department or look to other international bodies like the world trade organisation. this decision by the commerce department is also an interim one. the final version is not expected until december 12th. if boeing and bombardier come to an agreement that could alljust go away. i'm joined from belfast by our ireland correspondent chris page. talk to us firstly about the potential implications for jobs. talk to us firstly about the potential implications forjobs. we know bombardier is one of northern ireland's biggest employers but there are supply chain jobs also? that's right. bombardier is a
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critical part of the northern ireland economy. the main plan is in east belfast where the wings for that c—series passengerjets are made. just over 4000 people work for bombardier here. the c—series is bombardier‘s flagship programme. there would be knock—on effect for bombardier‘s business here as there are 15 small aerospace firms that this —— supply directly to bombardier and many other firms this —— supply directly to bombardier and many otherfirms in this —— supply directly to bombardier and many other firms in a similar position across the uk. so the health of bombardier is very important in the overall health of the northern ireland economy. how much pressure does the day think it can bring to bear on theresa may in terms of what happens next, given their support of arrangement with her in parliament? i think the dup have brought some
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influence to bear on the government. they are at the parliamentary pivot point at the moment, propping up the minority government in westminster. east belfast is represented by a dup mp gavin robinson. theresa may has raised this issue at the highest level, speaking to the president about this. the government says the ruling is disappointing but they will continue to press as much as they can for a successful outcome to this particular problem. the other message we are getting from business and political leaders here is although this is bad news it is certainly not the end of the process. this is just certainly not the end of the process. this isjust a preliminary findings made by the us department of commerce. the final verdict will, in february. at the centre of that will be a judgment as to whether boeing has been commercially damaged by the country—mac operation and they have already ruled it is unfair
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subsidies. chris, thank you very much for that. let's get more on this now with the general secretary of the gmb union, tim roache, who joins us from the labour party conference in brighton. do you think there is any more the government could have done up to this point with regards to bombardier, given the america first protectionist stance ta ken bombardier, given the america first protectionist stance taken by the donald trump administration?” protectionist stance taken by the donald trump administration? i think there is a lot more the government could have done and a lot more theresa may could have done. words are not enough for the 4500 people in northern ireland whosejobs are affected and as you report said, 14,000 jobs in the wider supply chain. what more do you think she could have done or opt to don? first of all rather than go over to florence and make flowery speeches about brexit she ought to go to northern ireland and speak the
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people at bombardier whose jobs are at risk. she also should speak to canada. this is a canadian company, and try and exert pressure on the usa to get these tariffs was born and support the members doug jobs in northern ireland. it is not a done deal yet. there northern ireland. it is not a done dealyet. there is northern ireland. it is not a done deal yet. there is still a process to go through. what are your members' concerns in belfast with regards to the general potential to diversify so perhaps not so many jobs depend on one contract? that is not the issue, the issue is what stance the government will take. hannah allum went to northern ireland and the dup to save herjob and we demand —— theresa may went to northern ireland. is there any retaliation that the
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government can make against boeing, which is proposing also to employ people in the uk. is that what you want, some sort of retaliation? what i want is the government to stand up for quality manufacturing jobs in britain on in this case in northern ireland, for the workers at bombardier. yet again we see a well paid and highly secure jobs at risk because of the lack of activity from this government. theresa may is asleep at the wheel. is that potentially therefore putting jobs that boeing might bring to the uk at risk? should she put bombardierfirst in to the uk at risk? should she put bombardier first in this instance and use that to show america the uk is not afraid to stand up to it, if america wants to impose tariffs of more than 200%. that is exactly what i'm saying. we need to safeguard our protect these
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jobs. whatever boeing may bring an, this is about today and the uncertainty of 4500 people and 14,000 in the wider supply chain. that cannot continue and theresa may needs to act. i also want to ask you about the birth. they are back in court today and rip —— uber is appealing but their workers are self employed. the ruling from transport for london that they will not renew uber‘s operating licence. there is a certain irony there, as uber returns to court. we are very proud of the decision we secured this time last year in the employment tribunal where the judge said it was ludicrous of uber to claim all of these drivers were self—employed, that is nonsense and
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remains nonsense. let's see what the judgment brings today. we also saw an apology from the new chief executive of uber saying they got it wrong. isn't that interesting the only admit they got it wrong when their bottom line is at risk. transport for london made the right decision. if the appeal is thrown out, how significant will that be for workers in the data economy? out, how significant will that be for workers in the data economy7m is massively significant. gig economy as a model used to avoid responsibilities to workers. of course the drivers for uber our employees and should be treated so and given sick pay and holiday pay just like all other workers. yet companies like uber, massively profitable, choose to abuse them and reduce profitable, choose to abuse them and red u ce costs profitable, choose to abuse them and reduce costs on the back of workers. we will challenge them up and down the uk. thank you very much. labour is "ready for government"
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and "on the threshold of power." that's whatjeremy corbyn's expected to tell delegates later as his party's annual conference comes to an end in brighton. the labour leader will take aim at the conservatives' handling of brexit negotiations, calling on ministers to "pull themselves together or make way". 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. this is the government in waiting. is this britain's next prime minister? is this the country's next set of senior ministers? # 0h jeremy corbyn.# they clearly think so and they want you to believe it too. in his big speech today, the labour leader will say his party is on the threshold of power. the labour leadership spent this conference trying to show it's a government in waiting. jeremy corbyn is clearly widely adored among party members, but if he really is to become the next prime minister,
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his big speech will need to appeal far beyond the conference hall to voters right across the country. what doesjeremy corbyn need to do to appeal to voters beyond labour? he needs to continue doing what he's doing to inspire the members of which there are over 500,000 now to go out and do it on his behalf. i would sayjust keep plugging away at the same message. he has come across really well in the country, we got 40% of the vote in the general election. i thinkjeremy has already done a fantasticjob of getting people who are usually not interested in politics actually interested in politics, especially young people, and we have seen that happen. so i think a little bit more what he is already doing is going to make us in a much better position come the next general election. the party might be united in its desire to get into government, but it is deeply divided on brexit and questions remain about how labour would pay for some of it's big spending promises. jeremy corbyn will need to find the answers if he's to win
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over many more voters. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in brighton and sent us this. welcome to this likely miss the brighton this morning where the big event isjeremy corbyn's speech. whatever he says, it will get a rapturous reception from the room. there has been an extraordinary amount of support for him at this conference but of course he has a task to reach out beyond his supporters in the conference hall today. chris williamson joins supporters in the conference hall today. chris williamsonjoins me, the shadow fire minister. what do you think is his task today with this speech? i think to consolidate the support we have achieved. we saw the biggest increase in labour's vote share in
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1945. not quite enough to get over the line but looking at the opinion polls since the election labour is now about 40% and there is huge support for the policy programme we have set out. it is about consolidation, explaining what a labour government would do to make the economy work for ordinary people, improve our public services and give hope to young people. it is sort of more of the same, but let me put it to you you have a huge electoral mountain to climb. it's more of the same enough to get their? it is. i believe it is because it is not just it is. i believe it is because it is notjust more of the same because what we are putting forward is quite a vertical programme but the common—sense social programme. the —— radical programme. there is huge support for these policies, up to 70% for bringing the utilities back into public ownership of the ra i lwa ys into public ownership of the railways back into public ownership, getting rid of tuition fees and not
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penalising people for getting an education and making sure our nhs and public services are fit for purpose. public services define a decent society. the zeitgeist has shifted and people are wanting a radical alternative to the past 40 yea rs. thejeremy yea rs. the jeremy corbyn yea rs. thejeremy corbyn review is politics has now changed because the counter view is it is business as usual and maybe you need to tailor your message to so—called middle england, if you like. i think people are sick to death of this sort of triangulation approach to policy—making. tony benn once said politicians fall into two categories, whether cox and signposts. and politics should be about offering a choice and we are offering a clear alternative to the neoliberal consensus that has been in place for almost 40 years and i
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think that is real appetite for it. i believe the recent turnout was dropping in elections because the parties became too similar and people could not see a distinct difference. that is why we have gone back to the 2—party system because labour is offering a traditional socialist alternative to make the work for normal people and that is what people want. give people back hope we can actually build a better world. we are the first and biggest economy in the world and we should not have the situation with people sleeping on the streets —— fifth biggest. there is a huge personalfalling for jeremy corbyn here. isn't there a danger, and you will know her british attitudes work, is you raise some on top and then cut them down. there is a danger he will not be able to deliver. i think you will deliver but it is not just about jeremy corbyn. i think you will deliver but it is not just aboutjeremy corbyn. this isa not just aboutjeremy corbyn. this is a movement. he never got in terms
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of eye and me, it is always us and we. it is a mass movement, the membership of almost 600,000 members. i think we could realistically look at a party with 1 million members in the not too distant future. we have tripled our membership since jerry became the leader. it is not just aboutjeremy jerry became the leader. it is not just about jeremy corbyn, jerry became the leader. it is not just aboutjeremy corbyn, it is about the policy agenda thatjeremy is articulating and leading this campaign at the moment but as long as we have got someone else who followed in his footsteps i am certain they would get the same level of support that jeremy certain they would get the same level of support thatjeremy has. jeremy corbyn should be speaking about 12:30pm, speaking for around 45 minutes. and we believe it will end with a rendition of the read flag followed byjerusalem. some
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breaking news, from west yorkshire police saying 11 people have been arrested across england and wales as pa rt arrested across england and wales as part of a national investigation into the extreme right—wing group national action. they were prescribed in the uk at the end of 2016. this was a co—ordinated investigation with officers from counterterrorism police supported by wales counterterrorism unit and also wiltshire police. the arrests, six men from the north—west area, two men from the north—west area, two men from the north—west area, two men from south wales, two men from west yorkshire and one man from the wiltshire area as well as 11 properties being searched across a number of areas. these arrests or in connection with an investigation into the right bring extreme group national action. we submit to serving soldiers were charged with membership of that group. —— recently two serving soldiers.
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the headlines, theresa may says she is disappointed the usa wants to impose tariffs on aircraft made by bombardier, one of belfast‘s biggest employers. jeremy corbyn will tell supporters and labour is on the threshold of power when he makes his speech on the final day of the labour conference in brighton. and measles has been eliminated in the uk for the first time. according to the world health 0rganisation. another piece of breaking news from the bristol area, there are reports that a person has been shot by police. these are pictures we are getting from the scene, these reports coming from the witness who has been speaking to our colleagues in local radio. this was on the a369 just off the m5 towards portishead.
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we witnessed the script of his officers fighting between six and ten shots —— described officers firing. a man being pulled from the vehicle at attempts being made to resuscitate him on the road. the witness reported uniformed and plainclothes officers being involved. we understand an air ambulance has attended the scene. that is the information as we currently have it. these reports coming from the witness. we will bring you any more details on that. a high courtjudge has approved a £37 million compensation plan for hundreds of victims of disgraced breast surgeon ian paterson. paterson, who carried out unnecessary breast operations, was convicted of 17 counts of wounding with intent and three counts of unlawful wounding against 10 private patients. he was originallyjailed for 15 years but that term was increased to 20 years by court of appeal judges in august. a blood test that could diagnose
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heart attacks within 20 minutes could be rolled out on the nhs within five years. researchers say it could save the health service millions of pounds and free up thousands of beds. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. spotting a major heart attack is relatively straightforward. an electrocardiogram or ecg can detect unusual electrical activity in the heart, but telling the difference between a smaller heart attack which can also prove fatal and simple chest pain is sometimes trickier. currently doctors carry out a blood test for a protein called troponin which is released if the heart is damaged. a busy accident and emergency department may carry out more than 7,000 of these tests each year. as many as two—thirds of patients admitted with chest pain turn out not to have suffered a heart attack, but researchers say up to 85% of people's stay in hospital while further tests are carried out to rule out a heart attack.
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now, a new test, designed to detect a different protein, called cardiac myosin binding protein c, delivers faster, more accurate results with benefits for patients and the hospitals. it might allow the accident and emergency doctors to rule out a heart attack and be able to send more patients home who are actually not having a heart attack without exposing them to unnecessary treatments and perhaps further invasive tests. researchers say this new, more accurate test could save money and free up scarce hospital beds, but more work is needed before this new technique replaces existing treatments so it will be some years before we see it in our hospitals. measles has been eliminated in the uk for the first time,
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say global health leaders. the disease was nearly eradicated in the 1990s but the mmr scandal saw vaccination rates plunge. health officials said rates have now reached the recommended 95 per cent coverage level in five—year—olds. let's talk to our health and science reporter. the world health organisation says elimination of measles can be verified once a country has sustained interruption of endemic transmission for at least 36 months. translate that into plain english. even the elimination is not what you might think. there are still measles cases, just under 90 this year. the key thing is measles is a very contagious and runs right through communities. in wales three years ago 1200 people caught measles. what elimination means is it is no longer
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spreading in communities, no longer a co nsta nt spreading in communities, no longer a constant presence is passing from person to person. all the cases we now see our cases coming in from abroad and maybe on spread in a small group unlock throughout the country. that is what has happened. —— not throughout the country. is this dependent on a certain percentage of children being vaccinated. it is called herd immunity and makes us it is called herd immunity and makes us all feel slightly like cattle but the idea is if you protect 95% of people in the uk then if one person becomes infected it is very difficult for the infection to spread to others. if 95% of people are protected that everyone should be protected. but with that movement of people, no room for complacency, i suppose. in europe there are massive outbreaks in romania and italy with 35 people buying. there is a real danger of
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vaccination rates fall those cases could come over here and we could continue to see measles cases in the future. the taxi company uber is appealing a ruling a the taxi company uber is appealing a ruling that its drivers are workers, not self—employed, and are therefore entitled to a range of benefits including paid holidays and the national minimum wage. it comes less than a week after the firm was told its london licence will not be renewed for failing to report serious criminal offences and carry out background checks on drivers. the company has also announced that it's seeking a new uk chairman. our legal affairs correspondent clive coleman reports. last year, uber driverjames farrar won a landmark legal case when an employment tribunal ruled that he was a worker and not, as uber had argued, running his own business. i don't control the fare. if i take a different route other than the one i've been given i'll be penalised. i'm performance managed through a rating system, if i hit 4.4 then i'm out of a job. the ruling threatens to hit the operating costs of companies like private hire and delivery firms using people who work on demand and uber has appealed it,
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claiming that it was wrong in law. with over one million people now working in the so—called gig economy, the uber appeal is seen as critical in determining whether they're classified as owning their own small business or as workers who are entitled to rights such as the national minimum wage and paid holidays. but uber is adamant that its drivers are independent contractors and not workers. drivers tell us overwhelmingly they want to be independent contractors. we did a recent poll of all uber partner drivers and 80% told us they would rather be an independent contractor than a worker. james farrar no longer drives for uber, but he's eagerly awaiting the outcome of the day's appeal, which should make the rights of those working in the gig economy a lot clearer. clive coleman, bbc news. let's take a look at some dramatic
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pictures now from ukraine. you can see here in the distance the first sign something is going on, and then suddenly this huge explosion at a military arms depot in vinnytsya region in central ukraine. it happened on tuesday evening and it's understood more than a thousand military and rescue workers are still fighting to put it out. local tv reports that two people have been hurt. the site contained 188,000 tonnes of munitions over an area spanning 60 hectares. jeremy corbyn is making his speech at the labour conference in brighton this afternoon, at lunchtime, the closing day of the conference. we will have special coverage of that from 12:15pm on the bbc news channel with his speech expected at 12:30pm. the headlines next on the bbc news channel. we say goodbye to viewers
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on bbc two, but first the weather. still quite cloudy and mistake and thatis still quite cloudy and mistake and that is the case for many. things are starting to brighten up and this photo from cambridgeshire shows some blue sky coming through the cloud. in eastern areas there will be some brighter skies into the afternoon but in the west we have cloudy skies with rain in northern ireland, wales, south—west england and by this evening it moves into the west midlands. feeling quite pleasant in the sunshine across eastern areas. tonight the rain spread eastwards and many are seeing some wet weather in the early hours of thursday. behind it turning slightly chillier than last night. during thursday we will see a slow start in eastern areas which persists in the far north—east of scotland but elsewhere in the right afternoon with sunny
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spells and feeling quite pleasant. goodbye. good morning, this is bbc news room live. theresa may says she's bitterly disappointed by an american decision to charge the aerospace company, bombardier huge taxes on exports to the us, putting 4000 jobs in northern ireland at risk. there are reports of a shooting in portishead in bristol. jeremy corbyn is set to tell the labour party conference that his party is ready to be in government. the world health organisation says that measles has been eliminated for the first time in the uk. the taxi company uber is appealing against a ruling that its drivers are workers, not self—employed, therefore entitled to a range of benefits. it's time for the sport now. let's
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join holly. we are going to be talking about the cricket first. ben stokes has been included in a 16 man squad for the winter ashes tour to australia. 0lly foster is with me. first reaction to the squad? it's as expected because a few names will get to some of the uncapped players ina get to some of the uncapped players in a moment, they've been floating around all week. this is one of the most ‘ingerly anticipated, every 18 months to two years, an ashes squad, but because of the events in the last 48—hours and the arrest of ben stokes, so much interest in this, but the selectors, andrew strauss yesterday said that jade but the selectors, andrew strauss yesterday said thatjade would be chosen on form and fitness so we a lwa ys chosen on form and fitness so we always presumed that ben stokes would be in it. we have also learnt
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that in that altercation, he damaged his right hand. they've said he'll be fit for the first test. his availability for the first test is so much in doubt, as and when and if the police to bring charges against him. wejust don't the police to bring charges against him. we just don't know whether he will be able to travel with the rest of the squad at the end of next month to australia. if you have a look at the squad again. seven of the touring party have never been in an ashes series before. there are three uncapped players. 24—year—old surrey wicketkeeper ben foakes will feature for the first time alongside somerset fast bowler craig 0verton. massive questions over who opens with alastair cook. it's an u nsettled with alastair cook. it's an unsettled batting order there. he's been through 12 opening partners since andrew strauss retired five yea rs since andrew strauss retired five years ago, the man in possession at the moment is mark stoneman who came
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through the west indies test series and he should keep hold of his place but the likes of james vince have been brought back into the side after over a year out, david molan's kept his place as well. it's u nsettled, kept his place as well. it's unsettled, unproven, the batting order. let's get more reaction now to that squad. full of gambles, not least ben stokes, nobody knows what is going to happen with that, and if ben stokes goes on the tour he's not ghoul to return to the uk until april 4th —— due to return to the uk. what england have done is taken huge gambles. james vince, given seven test matches last year, averaged only 19. he didn't score a single 50, and is due to bat at number three against australia. gary balla nce number three against australia. gary ballance averaging 19 from the last 12 could be batting at number five. mark stoneman, three tests, only 150
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this summer, i could go on. basely the pressure on alastair cook and joe root in this series will be immense. that is the crux of it. unproven batting order. if they lose ben stokes for matters away from cricket, that looks like a thin england squad heading to australia at the end of next month for the start of that series in november and the australians will be loving this. i'm sure they're watching right now 0lly, more investigations to continue internally as well. thanks, 0lly. football and tottenham manager mauricio pochettino has labelled harry kane as one of the best strikers in the world following his hat trick in the champions league last night. mauricio pochettino labelled harry
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kane one of the best in the world. spurs beat the cypriot side 3—0. kane has more than made up for not scoring in august, netting 11 goals so far, five for spurs in europe. jurgen klopp said his side needed to be more clinical. they were the better side but went behind before coutinho equalised. two draws from their first two games. de bruyne scored a terrific goal for manchester city in their 2—0 win at home. chelsea manchester united and celtic are all in action tonight as well. that's all the sport, more
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later. more on the reports of a police shooting at a vehicle near portishead near bristol. david ellison witnessed the incident and hejoins me on the line now. thank you very much. tell us what you saw then this morning? hi, there. yes, i came up to officers stopped at the dual carriageway. i didn't think much of it at first, then i saw them step back from a vehicle and they aimed at shot maybe five to six times into a smallish vehicle. they removed the guy from the vehicle. someone came with a crash kit and that was about where it ended
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really, we got turned round. yes... you were just a few cars behind this vehicle where the shooting happened, is that correct? yes, i was maybe one car back from the front so i could see it. at first i thought it was just someone getting turned around or something in the road so i looked down then looked up as five or six shots were fired and the officers were standing there through the window, it was all smashed and then they dragged him from the vehicle. incredibly shocking i'm sure, it must seem surreal that this unfolded in front of you this morning as you were going about your business? yes, correct, yes, it was quite surreal. quite a shock, yes. i still don't really know anything about the story behind it all. so the police didn't say anything to people in other vehicles, apart from turning you around, is that right? we just turning you around, is that right? wejust got turning you around, is that right? we just got turned round, the front of the queue turned round and
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eve ryo ne of the queue turned round and everyone else started following, so that was all. as i drove, because i had to do a diversion, as i drove back later i could see a helicopter had landed and the road was com pletely had landed and the road was completely closed off by then. could you tell if there was anybody else this the car? no, i couldn't really see. the vehicle had been squashed between two police cars i guess to stop him so i couldn't really see. so when you say squashed, you mean the two police cars pulled up alongside the vehicle or perhaps at the front and at the rear of it perhaps? one pinned it behind after one braked at the front so they could trap him. this was a mixture of plain clothes and uniformed officer, i understand, of plain clothes and uniformed officer, iunderstand, is of plain clothes and uniformed officer, i understand, is that right? there was a plain clothed woman stopping the traffic and a plain clothed unmarked vehicle and
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unmarked officers as far as i could see. thank you very much for telling us about what you saw this morning. we are endeavouring to find out some more information about what this incident was and waiting on the police to say some more about it. the us department of commerce upheld a complaint by bombardier‘s rival boeing that the firm unfairly benefitted from state aid. simon jack reportles. jobs at northern ireland's biggest manufacturing employer are under threat as the us
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government agreed with boeing that bombardier used government subsidies to sell planes to delta airlines at less tha n to sell planes to delta airlines at less than it costs to make them. the next phase of the row cesc is to examine the facts and determine whether or not boeing has been harmed. we know boeing didn't participate on the delta order, they abandoned that market years ago so it's hard to see how there could be any harm. if upheld, sanctions could ultimately inclaude heavy tariffs on planes sold in the us. that could jeopardise the future of a plant that makes a massive contribution to northern ireland's economy. last year, it paid £150 million in wages, it accounts for over 8% of all northern ireland's exports and it sources parts and services from 800 companies in the uk and ireland. the whole future of this plant here in belfast is designed around the success of the plane on to which these wings will be attached. so any threat to the c series plane
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programme is a direct threat to potentially thousands of jobs programme is a direct threat to potentially thousands ofjobs here in belfast. aerospacejobs are precious and political. boeing's complaint‘s been cheered on by president trump, meanwhile theresa may relies on northern ireland mps for her slender commons majority which helped push the subject up the agenda on her recent trip to canada and the us. thisjust round one of this fight, a further ruling is due in february of next year. this preliminary victory for boeing will cast a shod doe over international trade relations and northern ireland's biggest manufacturing plant. simon jack, ireland's biggest manufacturing plant. simonjack, bbc news, belfast. 0ur correspondent is in westminster. good morning. huge implications this, the economic implications, of course, and also the political implications vis—a—vis theresa may's relationship with the dup and also any future trade deals that the government's talking about
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with the us post—brexit? that the government's talking about with the us post-brexit? that is right. i think this does put theresa may under some pressure. she promises to work with the company to try to protect the jobs in promises to work with the company to try to protect thejobs in northern ireland, but there are a number of reasons why this situation is so tricky for her. she relies on the support of northern ireland's ten dup mps to give her a working majority in parliament and this is a huge issue for them. 4,000 jobs at risk is a huge number. the dup have said the consequences for northern ireland's economy if those jobs were at risk would be devastating and we have heard from arlene foster the leader saying she'll use her influence to try to make sure the jobs are not lost. theresa may needs to keep the dup on side. they've already put pressure on her to raise theissue already put pressure on her to raise the issue with donald trump so she's already discussed this issue before
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this decision was made with donald trump. clearly that hasn't had much impact on the decision today. we have heard already from themselveses who're saying she needs to stand up to donald trump's protectionist bullying as they call it. it has implications for post—brexit trade because theresa may and the government have put emphasis on get ago trade deal with the us done after brexit. they started laying the ground work for that already. we have heard from the open britain group, the pro—eu open britain group who're saying this shows we cannot rely on trade with the usa after brexit because it shows that they are prepared to take decisions that go directly against britain's interests. so i think a lot of political problems raised for theresa may by this. thank you very much. the prime minister has welcomed saudi arabia's decision to allow women to drive for the first time as an important step towards gender equality. in a statement this morning theresa may said the empowerment of women around the world is not only an issue i care deeply about, it is also key to nations'
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economic development. the law in saudi arabia will be changed byjune, ending longstanding limits on women taking to the roads. my my guestjoins me now on bbc news. the women we have seen interviewed on bbc news so far have been thrilled, absolutely delighted that they will legally be allowed to drive. do you see this as a fairly straightforward process to that moment now, or could there be any complications? i'm sure there will be voices in the kingdom. i'm delighted for saudi women, it's a human rights issue, an economic issue, the social cohesion issue. but to answer your question, i'm sure there'll be voices. already we have seen hashtags do going around saying women don't drive in my home, or whatever. i think there is no going back. ithink or whatever. i think there is no going back. i think the kingdom had this coming for a long time. i actually heard senior princesses from the royal family calling for it
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asa from the royal family calling for it as a show of human rights, for example, the daughter of king hallid, the daughter of king abdullah, and many, many other people. this is not a luxury any more for saudi arabia. there is at least 1.4 drivers in the kingdom that costs one third of the family budget. this can't be allowed to two on. this has very much been a push from the saudi royals hasn't it against the religious conservatives in the country? you can say that, but also from the kingdom as a whole. i've seen many, many women in the kingdom, especially in the big cities calling for women to drive because they need to drive. but i must say, that i went to remote areas in the kingdom where they think it's evilfor the areas in the kingdom where they think it's evil for the woman to drive and that women will have accidents, they cannot drive like the man drives. there is this issue and the people will be calling for
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it to stop but for me, i think there is no going back on that, this will happen in june. it's is no going back on that, this will happen injune. it's interesting to say that the kingdom's said any woman that has driving licences from the other countries can drive without a saudi licence and many do which means it will happen quickly. just finally, do you think this will lead to greater gender equality? is this a tipping point that will see other changes brought into law in saudi? i think this is one of the vehicles for sure. we have seen that the government's got 25% of its budget for education, graduates now, a lot of them are women. women are now working as entrepreneurs, they're engineers, they're working underground, i've seen them myself. asi
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underground, i've seen them myself. as i said, the social cohesion will be affected by this because many people will be fighting who is going to ta ke people will be fighting who is going to take the driver, who is going to drive me, i think this is good for the economy and human rites and good for the development of women in saudi arabia and around the kingdom. thank you very much. the headlines: theresa may says she's bitter didisappointed the us wa nts to she's bitter didisappointed the us wants to impose tariffs on aircraft made by bombardier, one of belfast‘s biggest employers. there are reports police have shot at a vehicle close to portishead near bristol. jeremy corbyn will tell supporters labour is on the threshold of power when he makes his speech on the final day of the labour conference in brighton. in the business news. more on the troubles of the planemaker bombardier. the firm says the ruling by the us department of commerce in favour of its american rival
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boeing is absurd. boeing has accused bombardier illegally selling planes at below cost price. now america is imposing a tariff on 220% on the bombardier jets in question. that could threaten thousands of jobs here in the uk and in canada. easyjet is backing plans to develop commercial passenger planes powered the airline says the planes could fly short haul routes, possibly within the next 10—20 years. the prototype will be developed by a us firm. uber is in the employment appeal tribunal today to argue that their drivers are self employed rather than employed by the company. if the company loses the appeal drivers could be entitled to benefits like paid leave. 0nline fashion is really taking off these days and nowhere more so than with the company boohoo. it's revenues have more than doubled
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in the past six months, compared to the same period last year. profits are also up, coming in at more than £20 million, a rise of 40%. so what's behind all this growth. kirsty mcgregor, news editor, drapers. hi, kirsty, whatare hi, kirsty, what are they doing right? online shopping is booming anyway, so they're naturally benefitting from that growth, particularly the younger shopper that shops at boohoo, more and more are shopping online, but we are also seeing they've got strong international sales, that's really helped them ride the fluctuations and the value of the pound in the uk. we have seen them acquire a couple of other businesses as well, so the american retailers, they've provided that in the uk, so all of that combined to boost the sales in the last six months. they're also anticipating full—year profits of
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about 80%, but interestingly the share price fell today. what's behind that? i suspect that is because their profit margin took a hit and that's because they've invested very heavily in things like marketing, so with pretty little thing part of the reason why the sales have gone up so much is because they've marketed it heavily in the uk, which has dented their profits. they are using a lot of social media, rather than traditional ways of advertising? for that younger shopper, that is where you need to find your customer now so that is where all of these younger fast—fashion e—tellers are concentrating their spend. let's look at what this means for the high street. can the high street really fight back against this kind of trend? i think for those high street retailers that have a lot of stores, it's becoming increasingly challenging but they need to make sure they concentrate on their online offer, making sure it's as slick as the likes of boohoo, that
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they are spending on marketing, looking at social media channels. if you can get that right, it's not like the high street is dead, people do still shop in stores. thank you very much. in other business news, profits have more than doubled at hotel chocolat. it made a pre—tax profit of £11 million in the year ending injuly. it opened 12 new stores over the year, taking its total to 94 stores. the company behind peppa pig says the release of its first movie is boosting its brand around the world. entertainment 0ne, says the cartoon character's first big screen appearance raked in more than £3.5 million in the uk alone. it also said revenues had been better—than—expected in china. twitter has launched a trial of longer messages. the limit of 140 characters has now been doubled for some users. the company is struggling increase the number of people using the service. a quick look at the markets now. and here they are. a lot of progress in
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europe, especially here on the ftse and those operating in the us ahead ofa and those operating in the us ahead of a big announcement on tax reforms in the us. the pound has eased against the euro. that is it from me, back to you. breaking news from scotland yard which is saying that a 65—year—old woman contracted to carry out work for a government department has been arrested by counterterror police on suspicion of an offence under the 0fficial secrets act. thatjust coming to us from scotland yard. they don't say which department the woman works for. but let me repeat that for you. a 65—year—old woman contracted to carry out work for a government department has been arrested in north london by
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counterterror police on suspicion of an offence under the official secrets act. that is all that scotla nd secrets act. that is all that scotland yard is saying at the moment. any more on that, we will bring it to you. the social media site twitter is looking at doubling its 140—character limit with some people taking part in a trial allowing longer tweets of up to 280. 0ur correspondent chris foxx is here. this has prompted lots of tweets in itself hasn't it, by people saying we have to stick to 140 characters. there is a beauty in keeping it short and being forced to think of how you want to express yourself in that short number of characters and those who think, you know, a bit more is the way to go? some are saying the new tweets are too long and look like big paragraphs of text and look like big paragraphs of text and that's not what twitter was about, its unique selling point was short and sweet. you had to think carefully about what you were
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writing to fit it in which led to some arguments because you couldn't get yourfull point some arguments because you couldn't get your full point across and it might look like you are attacking someone and being short so perhaps we'll see fewer arguments. some said the character limit was frustrating. injapan you can express a word with one character, they could fit a huge tweet in so they are saying japan have had this for a long time. how many people are involved in this tweeting of 280 characters? it's supposed to be a small number of people. the chief executive is on the trial and tweeted out a long message saying it's a small change but a big move for us, 140 was a choice based on the 160 character limit... some saying that statement itself was very, some saying that statement itself was very, very long. 0ne first reaction to it was by a journalist kate caitlin kelly who subbed it
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down. i saw that one earlier, yes! 140 was arbitrary based on the sms limits. a few say twitter has bigger problems: that brings me on to my next question. how much of this is actually driven by a need to do something different, you know, against its competitors, or to distract from other issues?” against its competitors, or to distract from other issues? i don't think it's a distraction. they're also working at the same time on tackling bullying and harassment which is something that puts a lot of people off from using by thor, it has a reputation for that. as you start on twitter, it can be confusing, the messages are so short, there are tags mixed in there, if you are not familiar with how it works, it can look strange. hopefully providing a bit more space and text for people to express
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themselves may make twitter read more like humans read text and make it more accessible to everyone. thank you very much. doctors have removed a tiny toy traffic cone from a patient‘s lung, 40 years after he accidentally inhaled it. and medics suspected he had a tumour. but luckily it wasn't that sinister, instead it was his long lost playmobil traffic cone he received on his 7th birthday. a fascinating story. time now for the weather forecast and simon king is on the balcony. good morning. a misty murky start today across many parts of today just like yesterday. things are brightening up.
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it's not going to be try for us all. in the west we have rain moving in. it's heavy rain across northern ireland, through the west of wales and south—west england. that rain will continue to move east. it's a slow process. eventually moving further east. meanwhile, across the east, it should brighten up. with the sunshine across east anglia, the south—east of england, it will feel pleasant. temperatures about 17—21. the rain will continue across south—west england into the west country through much of wales. you will notice a strong breeze from the south as well. we might see some rain into merseyside and greater manchester but for much of northern england into scotland it's looking dry and bright. good sunshine in the north—east of scotland. but in northern ireland, that rain will continue to be persistent during the afternoon. tonight, the rain he spread east. all of us tonight at
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some point seeing a spell of heavy rain. in the west with some clearer skies, it could turn chillier, compared to last night. this is how thursday is shaping up. quite cloudy and damp in the morning across eastern parts. rain will continue in the far north—east of scotla nd continue in the far north—east of scotland into the afternoon. elsewhere, there should be brighter skies. for the bulk of the uk, thursday afternoon is looking quite pleasa nt thursday afternoon is looking quite pleasant really, again temperatures above where they should be for the time of year with that sunshine. it's sure not to last. by friday, we've got a big area of low pressure moving in. a weatherfront we've got a big area of low pressure moving in. a weather front moves we've got a big area of low pressure moving in. a weatherfront moves in as well. the isobars are tightly packed in the north—west so breezy conditions in the north—west. rain spreads east. some of that could be heavy. as the rain clears, things brighten up into the afternoon with the odd shower or two. temperatures 15-19. the odd shower or two. temperatures 15—19. saturday will continue the
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theme of sunshine and showers. by sunday, there are some uncertainties as we go through into sunday so stay tuned to the forecast. it's likely to turn wet and windy. 0f tuned to the forecast. it's likely to turn wet and windy. of course we'll keep you up—to—date with that on the website. that is it from me. have a good afternoon. bye. this is bbc news,and these are the top stories developing at 12. police fire shots at a vehicle just off the m5 in portishead near bristol, eyewitness report — they say they saw between six and ten shots fired into a car. this is the scene where the incident happened. we will speak to a correspondent who is on the scene in a moment. this is the scene live in brighton wherejeremy this is the scene live in brighton where jeremy corbyn this is the scene live in brighton wherejeremy corbyn is just this is the scene live in brighton where jeremy corbyn is just arriving ahead of his keynote speech on the final day of the labour conference. theresa may says she's "bitterly disappointed" the us wants to impose tariffs on aircraft made
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by bombardier, one of belfast biggest employers. measles has been eliminated in the uk for the first time, according to the world health 0rganisation. good morning. it's wednesday 27th september. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. police have shot at a vehicle on an a—road in somerset. an witness said he saw a group of marked and unmarked police cars stopped a single vehicle and open fire at it. police are yet confirmed the incident as a shooting.
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0ur correspondentjon kay is in portishead and we can speak to him now. what can you tell us about the incident? this is understood to have happened at 9:30am, portishead is only three miles down there, it is a satellite town leading into bristol. just off the m5 at this road comes from the motorway and it was 9:30am a car was surrounded here, a red saloon car in that huddle of vehicles. it was boxed in by both marked police car and unmarked vehicle, it was surrounded and one eyewitness told us surrounded and one eyewitness told us officers fired between six and ten shots into the car before dragging the occupant out of the car and beginning some sort of resuscitation attempt. beyond that we know very little. the police have
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confirmed the road is closed due to some kind of incident and we expect a statement from avon and somerset police soon. this is not farfrom their headquarters, around three or four mac miles away on the other side of porter said. you can see where the white man in the forensic suit taking pictures, the car that is the focus, the driver's door is open, the window is smashed, there is glass on the road surface and that car seems to be the intense focus of police activity. the air ambulance is also here. it rushed here very quickly with in a moment of this carping southerners and the road could be shot for several hours, maybe even the rest of the day —— within moments of this happening.
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mersey police say they are searching for a gunman who walked into the children's and acidic in liverpool this morning. teachers and children —— who walk into a children's messily. he walked into inner—city with what appeared to be a firearm. —— necessary. no one was injured. this individual post another man at the time and the offender then left with a second man on a motorbike. no one is reported to have been injured and there is no suggestion the firearm was used. police hunting a gunman who walked into a children's nursery earlier this morning. children and teachers in the building but no one was harmed. they are appealing for public help. in the next half hour, jeremy corbyn will tell delegates at his party conference that labour
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is ‘ready for government‘ and ‘on the threshold of power‘. the labour leader will also take aim at the conservatives‘ handling of brexit negotiations, calling on ministers to "pull themselves together or make way". 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. this is the government in waiting. is this britain‘s next prime minister? is this the country‘s next set of senior ministers? # 0h jeremy corbyn.# they clearly think so and they want you to believe it too. in his big speech today, the labour leader will say his party is on the threshold of power. the labour leadership spent this conference trying to show it‘s a government in waiting. jeremy corbyn is clearly widely adored among party members, but if he really is to become the next prime minister, his big speech will need to appeal far beyond the conference hall
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to voters right across the country. what doesjeremy corbyn need to do to appeal to voters beyond labour? he needs to continue doing what he‘s doing to inspire the members of which there are over 500,000 now to go out and do it on his behalf. i would sayjust keep plugging away at the same message. he has come across really well in the country, we got 40% of the vote in the general election. i thinkjeremy has already done a fantasticjob of getting people who are usually not interested in politics actually interested in politics, especially young people, and we have seen that happen. so i think a little bit more what he is already doing is going to make us in a much better position come the next general election. the party might be united in its desire to get into government, but it is deeply divided on brexit and questions remain about how labour would pay for some of it‘s big spending promises. jeremy corbyn will need to find the answers if he‘s to win over many more voters. i‘m joined from brighton by our assistant political
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editor norman smith. some might say it is surprising jeremy corbyn is declaring labour is ready for governmentjust a jeremy corbyn is declaring labour is ready for government just a few months after losing in general election but then his leadership has been characterised by surprising moments. i think the view of humanjeremy corbyn is they have momentum, they have unity here whereas the look at the conservative party and the cd and fighting over brexit and they believe they are setting the political mood of anti—austerity, over trying to ease the pressure on stu d e nts over trying to ease the pressure on students with tuition fees, or ending the pay cap, all things the government is now having to pursue. they believe they are on course and speaking to one shadow cabinet member earlier and she said to me we just need one more heave. they do believe they are on the cusp of
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power. that said, there is no getting away from the hard arithmetic, they are more than 50 seats behind theresa may and they have not got much further forward last election than 2010. what i find interesting is how farjeremy corbyn today will seek to reach out to those voters who did not vote labour and who are worried about the possibility of higher taxes under labour, more borrowing. 0thers possibility of higher taxes under labour, more borrowing. others who might be wary of the radical change jeremy corbyn is suggesting. the interesting thing is talking to people around him, they are not going to moderate their language or tone down the pitch and try and tailor their message to reach those of autos, maybe all the reporters or maybe more affluent voters, they believe the electorate is coming to them. the world has changed and that what once were regarded as lara —— radical policies they think are now
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mainstream. the message we will get today from jeremy corbyn i suspect will bejeremy corbyn and varnish, an unflinching message setting out his basic left—wing agenda on nationalising some of the key utilities, higher taxes for the wealthy, curbs on the freedom of the business and how they manage themselves with significant extensions in the public sector. that is what i think we will hear from jeremy corbyn. moving away from conference for the moment, we know theresa may has expressed their displeasure with the strong america for a stance taken by the us administration in support of boeing in this trade dispute with bombardier. now a very strong response to that from the defence secretary michael fallon. very interesting. michael fallon it seems to me sending a clear warning
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slash threat to boeing and the us, saying in effect that the british government may have to rethink the contracts it gives to boeing, in other words, the defence contracts. you get a sense ofjust how high the sta kes a re you get a sense ofjust how high the stakes are here and for theresa may, of course they are very high. in pa rt of course they are very high. in part very obviously because of brexit and people will read across and say if this is how the us will play in terms of trade negotiations then what is good to happen down the line what we are outside the eu and having to punch through and get a deal on our own. is this a sign of the hardball tactics the us is likely to play? at the same time theresa may finds herself any pincer movement because she has the dup on her shoulder and she needs to maintain their support. she absolutely cannot afford to back off
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an already arlene foster has said they will be using their influence to protect what is happening or potential happening to bombardier in northern ireland. norman, thank you very much. norman, thank you very much. norman smith in brighton. jeremy corbyn is to close the labour party conference by saying the party is ready for government. we can now join the daily politics team for full coverage ofjeremy corbyn‘s speech. now welcome to viewers who join us on the bbc news channel. with meet to discuss everything in this speech is rachel shabi and laura kuenssberg willjoin us shortly. jeremy corbyn has entered the conference centre and we will show you some pictures from inside the hall as we‘re talking, delegates have gathered, difficult to get a seat inside the hall. rachel shabi, there‘s been a level of excitement not seen at a labour party conference for a number of years, particularly around the personality
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ofjeremy corbyn but do you think it has reached its peak and it‘s going to be difficult to sustain if there isn‘t an election for a number of yea rs ? isn‘t an election for a number of years? i think you're right that there has been a buoyancy and vibrancy around conference this year which we have not seen in the last few years. it has become a place where people want to be and i think it is not just where people want to be and i think it is notjust aboutjeremy corbyn although of course that is important and his leadership is important but it is also the political platform they have brought to the labour party which has revived its fortunes by engaging with people in an unprecedented way. you are right to question whether that can be taken forward and that is of course very much what people have been discussing in the last few days, how we can push this into victory so the labour party gets into power. that path to victory, welcoming laura kuenssberg. .. slightly out of breath. i will ask you a long question which will give you time to get your breath back! some people would say i always do that so it won‘t be a problem but in terms of
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how they do that, the path to victory, it is not yet clear how that happens, this one more push? it's not an people in the party this week, i've talked to a lot of them, who understand it may not be one more heave, this could be, and we don't know, it might well be five years until another general election. so how do they carry all that hope, expectation, ambition, that hope, expectation, ambition, that a lot of people this week feel, how do they carry that for five years or maybe three or four? that isa years or maybe three or four? that is a huge ask. this has been a real phenomenon, something that has swept through the labour movement in the la st through the labour movement in the last couple of years, it has only taken last couple of years, it has only ta ke n two last couple of years, it has only ta ken two years last couple of years, it has only taken two years for things to change so taken two years for things to change so much, another two years, goodness knows what happens. now i think people at the top of the party are aware of the pressure of expectation and what was really interesting, a close ally ofjeremy corbyn said to me yesterday that they are still not quite sure if this is more than a fad. they think it is they are starting to believe it but they are
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not really quite sure yet if this is a permanent, structural change to british politics that is really digging in and of course, that is what they are trying to do now, get roots down, make this permanent. but they can't be sure whether they are going to make it permanent. they can't be sure whether they are going to make it permanentm they can't be sure whether they are going to make it permanent. it has entered a lot around going around the country and gathering support, lots of new, young members. in some way, it bypasses the normal, established structures of how you might plot a path to victory at the next election and we have heard of the policy announcements this week, pfi , the policy announcements this week, pfi, big nationalisation programme but if you are going to have two of the something more every year or every few months, how much more radical or transformative every few months, how much more radical or tra nsformative can it every few months, how much more radical or transformative can it be? yeah, ithink radical or transformative can it be? yeah, i think you are right, this is something jeremy corbyn is likely to mention in his speech today that they are doing politics very differently, a lot of people don‘t like that but they are going to carry on doing politics very differently. i think one of the
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things we are missing about, when we look at the shopping list, the retail politics of labour‘s offer, yes, it‘s got a lot of things that will alleviate a lot of hardship and painful lots of people, it is not just that, they‘re the symbolic effort that people are picking up, a vision of a different kind of society, that society does not have to be like this, that something else is possible and that is what people are picking up on as much as the retail politics. isn't that preaching to the converted in some way and perhaps a bit beyond? we‘ve had this report from john healey, the senior labour member, saying that if we don‘t reach beyond the call, some of its young and idealistic and metropolitan, we won‘t win an election? by by christmas the labour party is hoping to have selected 70 parliamentary candidates in current tory seats. they want them to be in place working on the ground for the it sounds like what the tories did
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pre—20 15. that was dependent on getting money from lord ashcroft. they were expected to move into the constituency and get dug in several yea rs before constituency and get dug in several years before the next election. that is the kind of concrete thing labour is the kind of concrete thing labour is starting to put into place. it is beyond preaching to the converted. no question that tension is also demonstrated inside the shadow cabinet. there are people who are not truejeremy cabinet. there are people who are not true jeremy corbyn believers who sit round the table who want to stop them getting carried away on this surge of enthusiasm. there are people who say it is a huge moment and it ought to be more radical. that tension exists. there is no question. it has been so striking. this is his party. for now, in this moment, he can do not what ever he wa nts moment, he can do not what ever he wants but the feeling here is a man many delegates is almost they would
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follow him to the ends of the earth. —— among many delegates. even if the policies are not what they feel would be good for the economy or good for the country? was it wise to announce ul war gaming? including a possibility of a run on the pound or a flight of capital? i would like to ta ke a flight of capital? i would like to take issue with the idea of preaching to the converted. 4 million tory voters, it is not preaching to the converted. it is ordinary people, people empowered nicolai. the people who have been cast as diehards. 0n the issue of war—gaming, it is reasonable for a party who is going to put into place transformative policies. they are not radical, all the way back to raising taxes to the huge levels the conservatives had it in 2011. there
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will be pushed back. we will need to look at how we will manage that and bring people on board. laura, you are going to go into the hall. it is all. well, the anticipation is building ahead ofjeremy corbyn‘s speech and ellie price is outside the conference hall taking the mood. excitement is rippling through the conference hall. in that, very shortly, jeremy corbyn will be making his speech for the 1200 people who got in for that there we re people who got in for that there were 13,000 people at this conference. not everyone gets in to see the speech. you‘re still looking forward to it. i did not get in but thatis forward to it. i did not get in but that is slightly irrelevant. people in this country deserve better. we have been led up the garden path for nearly seven years. the whole country is suffering and with brexit it will get worse. i hope the proposals byjohn mcdonnell and by jeremy corbyn to radically change this country towards a socialist
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direction is what i would like to hear this afternoon. we will be on a big screen up the road.|j hear this afternoon. we will be on a big screen up the road. i do not care. you are not downhearted. that is marvellous. what do you want to hear? we want to hearjeremy corbyn setting out his plans for the uk. for a really good manifesto. for the many and not the few. so that we can actually take on the tories and win. do you think it has been a good conference? it has been a great conference. the party is democratised and in the hands of the members, essentially. it has been a great conference. that has been brilliant. 0ne mp said it felt more like a victory rally are not a conference. are you losing sight of the fact there is still more to do? this is my first conference. it is
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the most democratic and engaging conference ever, from what i have heard. the members having power over the party and controlling the shaping of policy. it has been a fantastic conference. we are getting ready to govern and to change the world. jeremy corbyn's beach will be inafew world. jeremy corbyn's beach will be in a few minutes‘ time does you don‘t even mind if you don‘t get in to see because you will watch it on the big screen. the hall has pretty well filled up. we can only be moments away from jeremy corbyn‘s conference speech. you‘ll be talking about how the labour party is the pairing for government. it will set out its policies to the nation at large. with me is rachel shabi. she is a supporter ofjeremy corbyn. with me is rachel shabi. she is a supporter of jeremy corbyn. what with me is rachel shabi. she is a supporter ofjeremy corbyn. what has been your highlight this week? supporter ofjeremy corbyn. what has been your highlight this week7m has been really great to see the labour party sewed together and so
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united and so buoyant. there has been so much energy, whether in the conference hall itself or in the fringe event or events organised through momentum. so much energy and dynamism. it has brought 70 people into politics. people were very disengaged and disempowered by politics for a long time. to see the revival of the left and the hope, buoyancy and energy has been a real delight. there have been controversies. senior labour mps, some members of the shadow cabinet said they would have liked to have seen a debate and binding vote on the single market membership. labour party members say party policy should change to that effect. we have had the spectre of anti—semitism dogging the conference. why? well, there are two things to say about anti—semitism. as you know, i have spoken about it a lot. i have tried to raise the
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issue of anti—semitism on the left and suggested there is a tone deafness about it. at the same time it has been disproportionate. the focus has been disproportionate. we have to remember the jewish focus has been disproportionate. we have to remember thejewish labour movement did implement the rule change for the labour party. that was supported by jeremy change for the labour party. that was supported byjeremy corbyn. it is to be welcomed, it is a move in the right direction. we spoke to them and they said it is only a start, a move in the right direction. it has been focused on quite a lot this week. we spoke about the single market and brexit. has there been a feeling it has been too much of a victory conference when labour did not actually win? do think that will be addressed in the hall? people have been saying that. i have not got a sense of that. i have a sense there is no complacency, there is a focus of, we did not win but we nearly did. 0ur
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platform is on the right lines. what do we need to do? how‘d we get enough people so we do get into power? jeremy corbyn will be talking about that today. he will say the labour party is ready to be in government. he will say to the government if you cannot get your act together, please stand aside because this is damaging for the country. government will not stand will it? it won't. it is also true the situation is not sustainable. ma nifestly they the situation is not sustainable. manifestly they are not able to govern at the moment. in terms of brexit, the big topic at the moment, do you think labour will come unstuck basing both ways, as its critics would say? attracting leaders on the one hand and on the other saying we do back staying in the single market and the transition of up to five years? that is
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probably the best case scenario for labour while it is in opposition. it must challenge the government and hold it to account with getting the transition period into government policy. will it become unravelled? i don‘t know. there is a very good holding pattern in the sense it has persuaded leave voters that labour will not go back on the referendum and it has persuaded remainers and a lot of the business community that it will be more responsible and not damaging to the economy, which is the labour priority. the leadership should ignore calls to stay in the single market in perpetuity? the leadership is not ignoring those calls. i do not get the sense they are being blocked out. this is an ongoing conversation. no one is sure what this will look like. the
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position is, we will have an ending goal. we want a brexit that guarantees jobs and environmental protections, that will not jeopardise the economy because of a random arbitrary figure over immigration is not achievable and, if it were, would be dangerous will stop we have spoken ready about the fa ct stop we have spoken ready about the fact that you have to manage expectations quit if you like. when you are promising a big, large—scale ambitious plan, like john you are promising a big, large—scale ambitious plan, likejohn mcdonnell, four incidents. 0ne ambitious plan, likejohn mcdonnell, four incidents. one of the dangers forjeremy corbyn when saying we are going to deal with student debt and not being out a back up the rhetoric with policy, that is a danger going forward ? with policy, that is a danger going forward? he mentioned they would deal with tuition fees and look at student debt. they are two separate things. scrap tuition fees and deal with student debt. the indication was something would be done in terms of paying it off. the invitation was they would look at it in terms of
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having a solution. if they did have they would suggest that and put it into the manifesto, which they did not. they are showing the video which is always shown about the party leader, jeremy corbyn, today. it is about a minute long to warm them up forjeremy corbyn‘s prince speech which we now expect to be in the next minute or so. people are gathered waiting for him to take to the stage for a speech that will probably last about 45 minutes. what sort of tone will he strike? he wa nts to sort of tone will he strike? he wants to consolidate the successes of the election and congratulate everybody for the achievement that was completely unexpected. as you say, also manage expectations and say, also manage expectations and say thejob is not say, also manage expectations and say the job is not done. say, also manage expectations and say thejob is not done. we say, also manage expectations and say the job is not done. we are say, also manage expectations and say thejob is not done. we are not yet in government. we want to be. let‘s keep going until we get there. will he reach out to mps who have
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not supported in the past? i will stop. here is jeremy not supported in the past? i will stop. here isjeremy corbyn, rapturous applause. senior figures greeting him as he comes in. he has had a hero‘s welcome from the party, hence the energy around him. he is meeting all the people, hugging, kissing, shaking hands with the party. they are chancing, oh, jeremy corbyn. —— chancing. we have even had scarves with it emblazoned on the front. john prescott, we had him on earlier in the week. he said people have to givejeremy corbyn chance and listen to what he had to say. let‘s do exactly that and listen to jeremy say. let‘s do exactly that and listen tojeremy corbyn, the leader of the labour party. cheering and applause continues
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if we could bring the conference to order. we will bring the conference to order, do you think? #jeremy oh, # jeremy oh, corbyn. # 0h, jeremy corbyn.
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thank you. thank you. if i‘ve always secretly wanted to become conference chair! conference, thank you very much for that! thank you so much for that wonderful welcome and this incredible feeling and spirit and unity and love and affection we have here this week in brighton. thank you for all of that. cheering and applause. because do you know what, it‘s quite
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infectious and let‘s make sure the whole country‘s infected with the same thing. so we meet here this week as a united party, advancing in every pa rt united party, advancing in every part of britain. winning the confidence of millions of our fellow citizen, setting out ourideas of our fellow citizen, setting out our ideas and plans for our country‘s future that have already inspired people of all ages and all backgrounds united in this party. and it‘s a real privilege to be speaking here in brighton. a city that not only has a long history of hosting labour conferences, but also of inspirational labour activists. it was over a century ago here in brighton that a teenage shop worker
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had had enough of the terrible conditions facing her and her work mates. she risked the sack, risked losing herjob, losing everything, tojoin the shop losing herjob, losing everything, to join the shop workers‘ union. after, she‘d learn about the existence of the union from a newspaper that had been used to wrap fish and chips. and she was so effective at standing up for women shop workers, she became the assistant general secretary of that union before the age of 30. applause. young women paving the way. in that role, she seconded the historic resolution at the trades union congress in 1899 to set up the
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labour representation committee so that working people would finally have representation in parliament. the labour representation committee became the labour party and it was this woman, margaret bonfield who later became a labour mp. applause. and in 1929, the first ever woman to join the british about. from a brighton drapery to downing street. margaret bonfield‘s story is a reminder of the decisive role women have always played in the labour party from its foundation and our party and government will take action to close the gender pay gap. applause. we will introduce mandatory equal
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pay auditing for large employers and give the equality and human rights commission the funding it needs to drive through the change. applause. labour has always been about making change by working together and standing upfor change by working together and standing up for all. that is what we are in the labour party. applause. conference, against all predictions injune, we won the largest increase in the labour vote since 1945. applause. and achieved labour‘s best vote for
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a generation. its result put the tories on notice and labour on the threshold of power. applause. yes, we didn‘t quite do well enough and remain in opposition. for now. but we‘ve become a government in waiting. 0ur outstanding shadow cabinet team here today — thank you for all you do, thank you for the work you do and thank you for the leadership you give to our party and our movement, thank you all of you. you can wave, it‘s ok! great collea g u es you can wave, it‘s ok! great colleagues around the table taking our party and country forward. and our party and country forward. and our message to the whole country could not be clearer — labour is
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ready. ready to tackle inequality. read write to rebuild our national health service. ready to give opportunity. applause. ready to give opportunity to young people, dignity and security to all older people. applause. ready to meet the challenges of climate change and of automation. ready to put peace and justice at the heart of our foreign policy. applause. and ready to build a new,
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progressive relationship with europe. we are ready and the tories are clearly not. they‘ re we are ready and the tories are clearly not. they‘re certainly not strong and they‘re definitely not stable. applause. and they‘re hanging on by their finger tips. but this tory government does have one thing we lack — they have tracked down the magic money tree. it's it‘s been found and it‘s been put to use — i‘m not going to say good use
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— president been put to use. when it was needed to keep theresa may in downing street, it was given a good old shake. and lo and behold, we now know the price of power. it‘s approximately £100 million for each democratic unionist mp. applause. during the election campaign, theresa may told voters they faced the threat of a coalition of chaos. do you remember that? ! well, now they‘re showing us just exactly how that works. applause. i don‘tjust applause. i don‘t just mean applause. i don‘tjust mean the prime minister‘s desperate deal with the dup. she‘s got a coalition of chaos all around her cabinet table. philip
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hammond and liam fox, borisjohnson and david davis. at each other‘s throats, squabbling and plotting, manoeuvering to bundle the pm out of number ten and take her place at the first opportunity. instead of getting to grips with the momentous issues facing this country. applause. but this coalition of chaos is no joke. just look at the record since the conservatives have been in office. the longest fall in people‘s pay since records began. homelessness doubled. look around the streets of brighton and every other city and you see the effects of it. nhs waiting lists lengthening, school class sizes growing and teachers leaving. 0ver four million children now living in poverty. 20,000 police officers and 11,000 firefighters lost theirjobs because of this government. more
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people in work and in poverty than ever before. and condemned by the united nations for violating the rights of disabled people. that‘s not strong and stable, it‘s callous and it‘s calculating. applause. because the tories calculated that making life worse for millions in the name of austerity would pay for hefty tax handouts for the rich and powerful. conference, your efforts in the election campaign stopped the tories in their tracks. 0ne tory
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u—turn after another. the rule, dementia tax was scrapped within three days of it being announced because we challenged it. plans to bring back grammar schools have been ditched. the threat to pensions, triple lock abandoned. withdrawal of winter fuel payments dumped. the pledge, the tory pledge to bring back foxhunting, was evint chillily dropped was elle. —— eventually dropped was elle. —— eventually dropped as well. and their plan to end the free school meals that exist in primary
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schools has been problem with sound. has been binned. the reality is this. that barely three months since the election, this coalition conservative chaos is tearing up its manifesto and tearing itself apart. they‘re bereft of ideas and they‘re bereft of energy. we‘ve got plenty of energy, i assure you of that. applause. indeed they seem to be cherry—picking labour policies instead, including on brexit. so i say to the prime minister, we are very say to the prime minister, we are very generous, say to the prime minister, we are very generous, you‘re welcome. but, go the whole hog. end austerity, abolish tuition fees, scrap the public sector pay cap. applause.
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i think we can find a commons majority for that. that commons majority for that. that commons majority is over there, thank you. this is a weak and divided government with no purpose beyond clea n to government with no purpose beyond clean to power. it‘s labour that‘s now setting the agenda, winning the arguments for a new common—sense about the direction our country should take. applause. my my principles come from my mum and dad and the way they brought me up and the principles they gave me, they come from my family, they come from the community i live in and am very proud to represent in finsbury park. applause. they‘re my roots and they ground everything that i do. but, conference, there were two stars of our election campaign. the
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first was our manifesto that drew on the ideas... applause. that drew on the ideas of our members and trade unionists and the hopes and the aspirations of communities and work places all over the country. and, we were clear about how we would pay for it by asking the richest and the largest corporations to start paying their fair share. applause. not simply to redistribute within a system that isn‘t delivering for most people, but to transform that system so we set out, not only how we‘d protect public service, howay we‘d protect public service, howay we‘d rebuild and invest in our
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economy, with a publicly owned engine of sustainable growth driven by national and regional investment banks to generate good jobs and real prosperity in every region and nation of this country. cheering and applause. our manifesto is the programme of a modern, progressive, socialist party, that‘s rediscovered its roots and purpose, bucking the trend all across europe. and conference, the other star of the campaign was you. all of you. our members, our supporters and the trade unions, our doorstep and social media campaigners, young
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people sharing messages and stories on social media, hundreds of thousands organising online and on the ground to outplay the tories‘ big money machine. applause. is it any wonder that here today in brightonyou represent the largest political party in western europe? with nearly 600,000 members alongside three million afilliated trade unionists, brimming with enthusiasm and confidence in the potential of all of our people, the real potential that is there. you are the future. let me say straightaway, i‘m awed and humbled by everything that you‘ve done.
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along with hundreds of thousands of others across the country to take us to where we are today, and i‘ve never been more proud to be your elected leader of this party. cheering and applause. our election campaign gave people strength. it brought millions to the electoral register and inspired millions to go to vote for the first time. and labour was the party of unity, bringing generations and communities together, rather than pitting young and old against each other which is what the tories did. we will never seek to squeeze one generation to support another. under
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labour, people win together! applause. the result of our campaign confounded every single sceptic and expert. i see john confounded every single sceptic and expert. i seejohn mcdonnell said... applause. john mcdonnell said at a meeting i was at the other day — the grey beards got it wrong. john, i‘m really not sure that is fair! we wiped out the tory majority, winning support in every social and age group. and gaining seats in every region and nation of the country. so, please, theresa may,
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ta ke country. so, please, theresa may, take another walking holiday and make another impetuous decision. applause. the labourcampaign the labour campaign machine is primed and ready to roll. but, of course there were some people that didn‘t come out of the election too well. i‘m thinking of some of our more traditional media friends. no, come on, we have been kind and gentle here. they ran the campaign they always do under orders from their tax exile owners to trash labour at every turn. cheering and applause.
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the day before the election, i remember it well, i was on trains all day long doing six rallies — one paper devoted 14 pages to attacking the labour party. and the following day, our vote went up nearly 10%. applause. never have so many trees died in vein. the british people saw right through it. so this is a message to the daily mail‘s editor — next time, please make it 28 pages.
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cheering and applause. but there is a serious message too. the campaign by the tories and their loyal media was nasty and personal and it fuelled abuse online. and no—one was the target of that more than diane abbott. applause. # happy birthday to you, happy
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birthday to you, happy birthday dear diane, happy birthday to you! # applause. very good, you stole my line! diane has a decades—long record of campaigning for social justice and she‘s suffered intolerable, misogynist and racist abuse. faced with such an overwhelmingly hostile press and an army of media and social trolls, it‘s even more
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important that we stand together. yes, there will be applause. yes, there will be times when we disagree, but there can never ever be any excuse for any abuse of anybody by anybody. we are not having it, not tolerated it, not accepting it and not allowing it. applause. thank you, thank you for that, because it‘s very clear we settle our differences with democratic votes a nd our differences with democratic votes and then unite around the decisions and go forward. that the the labour party here this week and out in communities every week — diverse, welcoming, democratic and ready to serve our country. applause. there‘s no bigger test in politics
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right now than brexit, an incredibly important and complex process that cannot be reduesed to repeating fairy stories from the side of a bus or waiting 15 months to state the obvious. as democratic socialists, we a cce pt obvious. as democratic socialists, we accept and respect the results. accept and respect does not mean giving a green light to recklessness. applause. tory brexit agenda that would plunge britain into a trump—style race to the bottom in rights and corporate taxes. we are not going to be passive spectators to a hopelessly inept negotiating team, putting at risk people‘s jobs, rights and living standards. applause. a team more interested in posturing
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for personal add advantage than in getting the best deal for the country. to be fair, theresa may‘s speech in florence last week did unite the cabinet... for a few hours, until her plane touched down at heathrow. before the divisions broke out again. never was the national interest so ill—served on such a vital issue. applause. if there was no other reason for the tories to two, their self—interested brexit bungling would be reason enough. so i have a simple message to the cabinet — for britain‘s sake pull yourself together or make way. applause.
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one thing needs to be made clear straightaway. three million european union citizens currently living and working in britain are welcome here. cheering and applause. they have been left under a cloud of insecurity by this government when their future could have insecurity by this government when theirfuture could have been insecurity by this government when their future could have been settled months ago. so theresa may, please, if you are watching, and i‘m sure
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you are, give them the full guarantees they deserve today because if you don‘t, we will, when we are in government! applause. since the referendum results, our brexit team‘s focussed above all on our economic future. that future is now under real threat. a powerful faction in the conservative leadership sees brexit as their chance to create a tax haven on the shores of europe. a low—wage, low—tax, deregulated playground for hedge funds and speculators. a few at the top would do very, very nicely out of this, no question at all. but manufacturing industries would go to the wall, taking skilled jobs with them, our tax—base would crumble, public services would be slashed still further. we are now
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less tha n slashed still further. we are now less than 18 months away from leaving the european union and so far the tory trio leading the talks have got nowhere and agreed next to nothing. this rag—tag cabinet spends more time negotiating with each other than they do with the european union. a cliff edge brexit is at risk of becoming a reality. that‘s why labour has made clear that britain should stay within the basic terms of the single market and customs union for a limited transition period. it is welcome — at least theresa may‘s belatedly accepted that. but beyond that transition, our task is a different one. it‘s to unite eve ryo ne a different one. it‘s to unite everyone in our country around a progressive vision of what britain could be. but with a government that
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stands for the many, not the few. labour is the only party that can bring together those who voted leave and those who backed remain and unite the country for a future beyond brexit. applause. what matters in the negotiations is to achieve a settlement that deliversjobs, rights to achieve a settlement that delivers jobs, rights and to achieve a settlement that deliversjobs, rights and decent living standards. conference, the real divide could not be clearer — a shambolic tory brexit driving down standards or ours that puts jobs first and works for the, many one that guarantees unimpeded access to the single markets, establishes a new cooperative relationship with europe, a brexit that uses powers, return from brussels to support a new industrial strategy. to upgrade our economy in every region and
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nation, one that puts our economy first. not fake immigration targets that fan the flames of fear. we will never follow the tories into the gutter of blaming migrants for the ills of our society. cheering and applause. it is not migrants who drive down wages and conditions but the worst bossesin wages and conditions but the worst bosses in collusion with the conservative government. they never miss a chance to attack trade unions
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and we can people‘s rights of work. labour will take action to stop employers driving down pay and conditions. not pander to scapegoating or racism. applause this whole issue is too important to be left to the conservatives and their internal battles and their identity crises. labour will hold the government‘s squabbling ministers to account every step of the way and with our team, keir
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