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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 3, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11am. a labour mp is suspended over allegations he harassed a member of staff and was later promoted to the frontbench byjeremy corbyn. were you aware of the allegations against mr hopkins, sir? goodbye. more claims against former defence secretary michael fallon — his cabinet colleague andrea leadsom says he made inappropriate comments. he denies the allegations. the government wants five new life changing drugs to be chosen for the new scheme every year. thousands protest in barcelona as eight catalan politicians are jailed. and president donald trump's twitter
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account is closed for 11 minutes by a member of staff on their last day. hello, a very good morning to you. it's friday the 3rd of november. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the storm over allegations of sexual harassment labour has suspended an mp. he has yet to comment on the claims. his promotion to the shadow cabinet last year after the complaint was first made and he was reprimanded by the
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party has been criticised. labour's leaderjeremy corbyn refused to comment when approach this morning. good morning mr corbyn. goodbye. did you know about mr hopkins‘s behaviour? are you aware of the allegations against him, mr corbyn before you promoted into the shadow cabinet? were you aware of the allegations against mr hopkins, sir? goodbye. meanwhile the former defence secretary michael fallon says he categorically denies the claim he made inappropriate comments to andrea leadsom. she herself is yet to respond. well, we have been speaking to our correspondence in westminster very soon. but a little earlier, ian watson brought my colleague up—to—date with the latest honours allegations against calvin hopkins. first of all it has been alleged
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that after a meeting at the university of essex in 2013, he hoped a rather too intimately for her liking. she met him subsequently in the house of commons and then received this is just a text message. i think the thing about this is a couple of years ago in 2015 she took her concerns to the then chief whip of the labour party rosie winterton. it was discussed and she was told she wanted to make and she was told she wanted to make an official complaint she would have to waive her an imminent seat. she was not prepared to do so. however, he was reprimanded for his behaviour and then subsequently whenjeremy corbyn was getting into a bit of difficulty filling his front bench because so many of his mps have voted no confidence in last year, he temporarily promoted covering hopkins to be to the shadow cabinet. that upset notjust hopkins to be to the shadow cabinet.
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that upset not just activists hopkins to be to the shadow cabinet. that upset notjust activists but also people in the labour party who knew he had been reprimanded for his behaviour and been asking today why he was promoted. i have tried to contact covering hopkins. if you wa nts a contact covering hopkins. if you wants a torch was put his side of the story, please give me a call. but so far he hasn't commented on this but he has been suspended now from the parliamentary labour party and he is being investigated. and let's also talk about these new allegations which are being put against sir michael fallon. 0f course the former defence secretary. this is a rather tricky story because michael fallon has of course already resigned. the delegation effectively as he made rather lewd suggestions to the leader of the commons andrea leadsom some years ago. but he categorically denies doing so and andrea leadsom won't comment on it. again, this is a multifaceted story, a real—life house of cards. because it is also being alleged that andrea leadsom
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use those complaints to try to oust michael fallon from his role as defence secretary, clearing the way of course for gavin williamson. but again, she's not commenting on those allegations and suggestions in some the newspapers. we hope to be speaking to be on again for the very latest. bbc news has learned that the international development secretary, priti patel, held a series of meetings in israel to discuss government business without telling the foreign office. the meetings took place over two days in august, while ms patel was on holiday in israel. no civil servants were present but she was accompanied by a leading pro—israeli conservative lobbyist. downing street has said that ms patel did nothing wrong. plans to speed up the time it takes for life changing medicines to reach patients have been announced by the government. the move follows pressure by the pharmaceutical companies which says that patients
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are missing out. it could say mean that medicines are available for yea rs that medicines are available for years earlier than they currently are. medical research is producing exciting new drugs and treatments but there have been complaints that it takes too long for them to be approved for use by the nhs. the government says it wants to streamline the process in england so that new drugs for diseases like cancer and devices to help manage conditions like diabetes can be made available to patients more rapidly. under what is called the accelerated access pathway, the approval process will be cut from as much as seven years, to three. in april next year, five new drugs and treatments will be selected for fast track treatment. this number could be increased annually in future. at the moment there at various stages that any product, whether it's a drug or a device, whatever it is, has to go through in terms of regulatory approval or cost effectiveness and so on, commercial negotiations with the nhs. the idea is to bring them all together to run in parallel which will make the process operate much more quickly so that those things that really do have life changing impacts on people can be
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brought forward sooner. 0ne charity said it hoped the scheme would go some way to ending bureaucratic delays and speeding up access to new drugs. the association of the british pharmaceutical industry said the government's policy was very welcome and should benefit thousands of patients, but no extra nhs money is being committed at this stage to spend on medicines — that could hinge on what's decided on the budget. hugh pym, bbc news. joining me now is nic bungay, the director of campaigns, care and information at muscular dystrophy uk. very good to have you with us. and muscular dystrophy uk is one of the charities that has been campaigning for this development so you must be very pleased. how significant could this be for people with muscle wasting conditions? we're giving today's cautious welcome. time
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really is of the essence. in a year waiting for treatment, the ability to walk could be lost or long muscles irreversibly damaged so we hope this new scheme can go some way to end those delays and speed up access to emerging treatments. solicitors about buying time and a better quality of life along the? absolutely. i think that's an important point but we also feel the government could go even further still. we got some concerns that read as these drugs could be overlooked as part of the scheme and we know that the department of health has said that about five trucks can be looked at every year. but we know that there are so many emerging treatments on the horizon. we actually don't think five is going to be enough and we are keen that the government looks a lot again. tell me more about that because there aren't any cures currently for muscle wasting conditions but what sort of treatment have you heard about that are out there that are showing
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promise that could help? well, there are some treatments in clinical trial that we think a bit promising and there are drugs already available in clinics. 0ne drug to treat babies actually took a long time to be approved by the nhs in this country so we hope that this scheme could help speed up access to those kinds of really innovative drugs. with a drug like that for example, the uk was the last country, one of the last countries in europe, to grant access so we hope this new skin can help fast track those kind of products. so reading the detail of the government's planned, if it designates a medicinal treatment as a breakthrough, than that basically unlocks a process whereby it encourages it to be speeded up, accelerated through clinical trials and so on so it can get from lab to patients faster. but i know that you wa nt patients faster. but i know that you want more clarification on how those breakthrough treatments against be defined. absolutely. so any steps that could be used to speed up the
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treatments and get them to patients more quickly should be welcomed but we don't see any clarity yet around how a breakthrough designations can be made and how those decisions can involve patients and families. so we are involve patients and families. so we a re really involve patients and families. so we are really keen that families with spoken to today are relatively hopeful about this news, particularly here about some drugs available in other countries all promis ing clinical trials. so time is of the essence, this is a progressive muscle wasting condition so any steps to help should be welcomed by patients and families. eight catalan government ministers have spent their first night in custody after a spanish judge refused to grant them bail. they're facing charges related to their attempt to make catalonia
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independent from spain. tens of thousands of catalans staged a protest against their detention. a warning for you — this report from our reporter tom burridge contains flashing images from the start. in the police vans are eight men and women who a week ago ran catalonia's government. now, taken to a prison in madrid. they face serious charges, including rebellion against the spanish state. ajudge denied them bail. as the news filtered through, their supporters gathered outside the regional parliament in barcelona. angry... ..and in shock. the government they elected, now behind bars. can you believe it, in a democratic country, that these things happen, again? we don't understand. we are very, very sad, deeply sad, deeply sad, and terrified. madrid argues it has no influence over today's decision
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taken in the courts, but these activists and people across catalonia sympathetic to the pro—independence cause say that claim is absurd. many people across spain and here in catalonia are also outraged, but at catalonia's pro—independence politicians who have pushed things so far. roquelle tells us they have flouted spain's laws. she is worried and says she might move abroad. so a new chapter to this catalan crisis and everyday, under the surface here, divisions more entrenched. tom burridge, bbc news, in barcelona. thank you very the bbc newsroom life. a labour mp is suspended over
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allegations he on bbc newsroom life. a labourmp is allegations he on bbc newsroom life. a labour mp is suspended over allegations byjeremy corbyn. more claims against the former defence secretary michael fallon on the edge. he is said to have a member of staff and was later promoted to the front bench by the jeremy staff and was later promoted to the front bench by thejeremy corbyn. more claims against the former defence secretary michael fallon and edge. he is said to have comments to andrea leadsom. he denies the comments. unlike changing drugs to be prescribed faster. the government wa nts be prescribed faster. the government wants five medicines each year to be fast tea m wants five medicines each year to be fast team marseille before the match last night. he was sent off before kick—off. marseille say they will investigate internally. manchester united boss jose investigate internally. manchester united bossjose mourinho has appeared ina united bossjose mourinho has appeared in a spanish court today facing tax fraud allegations relating to his time as manager of rail madrid. it is claimed he owes over three and a half million pounds. he denies any wrongdoing. and england captain joe
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pounds. he denies any wrongdoing. and england captainjoe root say the ashes isn't and in sport, patrice ever at the former manchester united defender has been charged by uefa after appearing to aim a kick at a supporter of this current team marseille before the match last night. he was sent off before kick—off. marseille say they will investigate internally. manchester united boss jose investigate internally. manchester united bossjose mourinho has appeared ina united bossjose mourinho has appeared in a spanish court today facing tax fraud allegations relating to his time as manager of rail madrid. it is claimed he owes over three and a half million pounds. he denies any wrongdoing. and england captain joe pounds. he denies any wrongdoing. and england captainjoe root say the ashes isn't about going out and getting drunk but maintaining balance between enjoying australia and focusing on the cricket. and i'll be back with more on those stories just after the us president donald trump's twitter account briefly vanished from the internet last night. it has since been restored and the social media giant say his page is unaffected. twitter says it's investigating how donald trump's account came to be deactivated for a total of 11 minutes. those searching for the page were informed "that page doesn't exist". twitter soon issued an explanation saying the president's account "was inadvertently deactivated due to human error by a twitter employee." it later clarified that it was their last day in the job. many people took to the internet last night to voice their praise about what happened, with most trump supporters keeping relatively quiet about the 11 minute outage. a number of gifs and memes were posted including... abc news used a character from the tv show mad men strutting
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out of the office as their way of announcing the news of what happened. and raising a glass... here's leonardo dicaprio in the great gatsby with the words ‘i owe twitter a drink for taking trump offline'. 11:30 as you well know donald trump as being using the platform to attack his political opponents during both the presidential campaign last yearand during both the presidential campaign last year and since taking office in january. but many of his tweets have been controversial. in september, twitter was forced to justify a tweet he had sent in which he appeared, as you can see a new screen out to directly threaten north korea with destruction. and another tweet saw him falsely link a new screen out to directly threaten north korea with destruction. and another tweet saw him falsely linked arise in the uk crime rate to radical islamic lets get more on this. i'm joined now via the internet by katy howell from the social media agency immediate future.
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well as you well know donald trump as being using the platform to attack his political opponents during both the presidential campaign last yearand during both the presidential campaign last year and since taking office in january. campaign last year and since taking office injanuary. but many of his tweets have been controversial. in september, twitter was forced to justify a tweet he had sent in which he appeared, as you can see on your screen out to directly threaten north korea with destruction. and another tweet saw him falsely link arise in the uk crime rate to radical islamic katie, thank you for joining us. donald trump silenced for 11 minutes on twitter last night, which of course is in contrast to his prolific use of twitter. just compare how he uses it to that of president i gift for had a gifta to that of president i gift for had a gift a little more personality. he rounded his style of presidency using the doors to a little more personality. he rounded his style of presidency you look at donald trump, we have someone who is keen to get his opinions out to develop his personality a little bit more. where is if you look at donald trump, we have someone who is keen to get his opinions uses a very divisive tactics such as harsh words and often really quite violent imagery.
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soa often really quite violent imagery. so a completely different style between the two of and certainly doesn't appear to be a filter does seems to be quite spontaneous. yes, andi seems to be quite spontaneous. yes, and i think that's part of his urgency to get his point across quickly. he wants to get, without fa ct quickly. he wants to get, without fact checking, his opinions out there and uses a lot of negative wording. i kind of mrtrump in there and uses a lot of negative wording. i kind of mr trump in terms of what he is saying. it seems to be quite spontaneous. yes, and i think that's part of his urgency to get his point across quickly. he wants to get, without fact checking, his opinions out there and uses a lot of negative wording. a kind of tactic he's not good at he's not good at something wants. an example being so—and—so is really ugly but i shouldn't say that because it's politically incorrect, so he gets his opinion out in a very kind of strange way that is not a normal weight or acceptable way by other people. and you see any sign that anyone is trying to rein this in or if they are that they're he can say what he wants. an example being so—and—so is really ugly but i shouldn't say that because it's politically incorrect, so he gets his opinion out in a very kind of strange way that is not a normal weight or acceptable way by other people. and you see any sign that anyone is trying to rein this in or if they are that they're having no.
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because he uses a rather clever tactic at the moment which is being seenin tactic at the moment which is being seen in court tactic at the moment which is being seen in court cases tactic at the moment which is being seen in court cases which is that he blocks people who really call them out. so anybody with a really high profile who calls him out, he blocks and from his account. that means that they can no longer see what on his in itself is an insight into the man behind the account that in itself is an insight into the man behind the accountisn't it? itself is an insight into the man behind the accountisn't mm itself is an insight into the man behind the accountisn't it? it is indeed. i was also thinking about the people around him in his administration and any attempt they might be making to intervene and to rein him in somehow. you see any sign of that is happening?m rein him in somehow. you see any sign of that is happening? it is interesting because i think the white house itself is claiming that the at potus account is the official one and that donald trump account is his personal once they are somewhat standing away from this. as i understand it, there were only one 01’ understand it, there were only one or two people that have access to potus to poets out for him and he's treating this like a personal account. however, of course, we all know that he is also publishing
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policy statements, ideas and values on his own account. non-others should be surprised though other way uses twitter because it fits with his mission statement if you like right from when he said he was running to the presidency his claim that he was going to be different from the typical politician. yes. although we didn't start on twitter like that. back in 2009 he was much more benign, promotional posts and began to get teeth basically as he moved through his apprentice role. he resisted for his presidency it became quite magnificent movement into the profile we now see today. katie, thank you. it's emerged that the ashes of the moors murderer ian brady have been buried at sea after his body was cremated last week. the moors murderer died in may at the age of 79, at ashworth high security hospital in merseyside. court documents show that the cremation took place
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in southport without any ceremony. brady's ashes were then placed in a weighted, biodegradable urn, driven to liverpool marina, and dispatched at sea on thursday last week. if you can marry at the age of 16, should you be able to vote in parliamentary elections? the voting age will be debated later today by mps — labour want to see young people given the vote across the uk.graham graham satchell has been to cardiff, where a similar consultation has already taken place. how old is old enough to vote in an election? 18 is probably about right. 16 is too young. 18, i'm happy with. i just don't think they've got that experience with politics at 16. the argument for lowering the age people can vote to 16 is well—rehearsed and goes like this. if you can get married at 16, join the armed forces
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and work and pay taxes at 16, why can't you vote at 16? many younger people like lizzie and hannah are frustrated. it's unbelievable how much we've been ignored. jobs, for example, many organisations won't employ somebody with no experience. how can you expect young people to get experience when you won't give them a job? that is where the young people need to come in and make that change and make that vote. do 16—year—olds really have enough life experience to vote? it doesn't come down to that, it comes down to your opinions, what do you need out of life and the government? they are responsible enough to become young carers, they are responsible enough to take care of themselves. then why not have the choice to vote for their future and for everybody else ? joel, how old were you when you were first elected? i was 18 and that was as a community councillor. joel williams is one of the youngest councillors in wales, but he doesn't support lowering the voting age. 16, in my view, is too young.
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i questioned myself when i was 16 and i was too young to vote at 16. you can be wise and young, and you can be ignorant and old? absolutely, but 18 is the right age. we are notjust voting for me and i, we are voting for our communities our country, and our place in the world. we need to take that seriously. mps in westminster are debating whether to lower the voting age for general elections. in wales, they have already had that consultation. next week, the welsh assembly here in cardiff is likely to say the voting age will be lowered to 16 for local elections. it is already 16 in the isle of man and jersey and the channel islands and, of course, the voting age has been reduced to 16 in scotland. 16 and 17—year—olds turned out in huge numbers at the scottish referendum, and they can vote in local elections and scottish parliament elections. who votes really does matter.
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if the electorate is dominated by over—65s, then parties are going to cater for the over—65s. that is rational self—interest on their behalf, so you could argue that finding ways to get parties to engage with younger people, getting younger people to engage with the political process, will actually rebalance british politics. the conservative government in westminster is opposed to lowering the voting age, but is the tide turning? in scotland and soon in wales, 16 and 17—year—olds will be able to vote. two children die every minute from pneumonia according to the world health organisation. it is the world's biggest killer of under fives and many of those who die are in africa. the charity says in a
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report out today that lives can be saved with investment in treatment but it is a huge challenge. kenya has had success however and pneumonia is still a leading killer. here's our report from nairobi. this woman is relieved to see her baby recover from the deadliest of baby diseases. initially, he was treated for the common cold. so we came home but his temperature was increasing more. in fact it came into more because the baby began to vomit and have a higher figure than before. because the baby began to vomit and have a higherfigure than before. no matter how much i tried to give him the medicine to subside the fever, it didn't respond. she he is now responding well to treatment. he caught pneumonia even though he had
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been immunised. kenny was among the first countries in africa to include the vaccine in its heavily subsidised national inoculation programme. many children are but around the world around a children under the age of two do not get immunised. when they get ill, up to 40 immunised. when they get ill, up to a0 million of those cannot get treatment. it is simply too expensive. but even with vaccination, some children will still get the pneumonia infection. not all strains are covered. and at the country's top hospital, there have been five new admissions overnight. almost half of the children we admit in our paediatric unitare children we admit in our paediatric unit are admitted because of pneumonia. after the introduction of the vaccine, we did see some reduction in the number of cases
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admitted with pneumonia. one baby is malnourished, another has diarrhoea. both conditions exacerbate severe pneumonia infection. they should be in the paediatric intensive care unit but there is no space there. eight—month—old baby girl was luckier. she is being the icu for two months now. the national hospital is where they discovered the pneumonia was out of control. and reggie came here she was almost dying, she was almost dead. the treatment that has kept beckyjoy ally is too expensive for many children across africa and the developing world. for children who have died during the telling of this
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story and yet pneumonia is preve nta ble story and yet pneumonia is preventable and treatable. bbc news, nairobi. two pieces of breaking news to bring you. the first about the contaminated blood scandal and the investigation into that will be a full statutory enquiry and will come under the responsibility of the cabinet office after victims and families expressed strong views over the potential involvement of the department of health. so that news coming from downing street that the probe into the contaminated blood scandal will be a full statutory enquiry. and this from the metropolitan police, who are investigating to acid attacks in london yesterday evening. in both insta nces, london yesterday evening. in both instances, the victims, there were attem pts instances, the victims, there were attempts made to steal mopeds or scooters from both victims. the first one happened around 6pm in waltha mstow yesterday. first one happened around 6pm in walthamstow yesterday. a fast food
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delivery driver was approached by two men who are on a scooter and the men attempted to steal his mopeds during the course of this, please say a corrosive substance was repeatedly thrown on the victim's face and it is understood that the victim of this attack is likely to be left blind in both eyes. and then the second attacked happened a short time afterwards at waltham forest about 6:30pm, saw about half an hour later on yarmouth crescent in totte n ha m later on yarmouth crescent in tottenham won a second man was also attacked with a corrosive substance by two men on a scooter who tried to steal his mopeds. he has been treated in hospital but his injuries are not believed to be life—threatening or life changing. so detectives from the met police are appealing for anyone who can help them with information about either of those two horrific attacks. bbc news has learned that
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the international development secretary priti patel held a series of meetings in israel without telling the foreign office. no civil servants were present but she was accompanied by a leading pro—israeli conservative lobbyist. downing street has said that ms patel did nothing wrong. jones, tell me about the concerns around the somewhat the normal sort of protocol around this would be for visits of this sort. when a minister goes overseas that office were told foreign office so everything can be automated. the committee dramatic support on the grounds that minister, they can have people help them go to meetings. everything civil servants do in uk butjust do it on the trip. everything from note—taking to help him in the security further summary strips. what is unusual therefore is for
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ministers to engage in meetings overseas without the foreign office or local diplomats knowing. that is what happened here. she was on holiday and took time out from a holiday and took time out from a holiday to take meetings over two days were reportedly official business was discussed. now, the response to that when you talk to mps and ministers, some of them so, look, it isjust in mps and ministers, some of them so, look, it is just in their view bad form. it is not the way ministers should behave, things should be done above the radar. but other concerns are different. some mps say this is not political, this is priti patel try to win the support of conservative donors. i have to say her friends strongly reject that suggestion. but then other mps say look there is a technical problem here that they believe that potentially she may have breached the ministerial code of conduct, which basically says very clearly that ministers should make sure that there is not a perceived what has
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there is not a perceived what has the response been from the government? i put a lot of questions to them over this and they chose not to them over this and they chose not to respond in any detail, but a source said this was a private holiday that priti patel was on and that she paid for this holiday. i have spoken to a senior source in downing street who says that in their view priti patel has done nothing wrong. ok, james. thank you for that. the time isjust for that. the time is just after half past 11. let's take a look at the weather forecast. good morning. we have had lots of fog around in southern england and wales. a lot of that is clearing away, but there are still some patches which may have bought into the early afternoon. still very foggy here in gloucestershire at the moment, but when that clears there will be sunny spells across england and south wales. further north, a
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mostly cloudy picture this afternoon. rain in the far north—west of scotland. green in wales and north—west england. 11-15dc. if wales and north—west england. 11—15dc. if you are going to see fireworks this evening, you are running the gauntlet because we will see rain across wales, southern england, north of england and been to scotland. that becomes more extensive as the night goes on. heavy rain for a time in central and eastern areas through saturday morning, but that clears away towards the east and then we have sunny spells across many areas into saturday afternoon. we will then have showers and a brisk wind. 8-10dc. have showers and a brisk wind. 8—10dc. goodbye. hello, good morning. this is bbc newsroom live.
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our latest headlines: labour suspends luton mp kelvin hopkins as part of the sexual harassment scandal engulfing westminster. it comes as former defence secretary sir michael fallon is forced to deny further allegations, about his conductjust two days after losing hisjob. new medicines and treatments for some serious conditions could be fast—tracked in england with the government wanting multiple new drugs or devices introduced every year. thousands protest against the jailing of eight catalan ministers sacked over the region's push for independence from spain. they are accused of rebellion, sedition and misuse of public funds. it is time for the sport. let's catch up with the latest. tell us more about patrice evra. former manchester united defender patrice evra has been charged by uefa after appearing to kick
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a supporter of his current team marseille before their game last night. our sports correspondent katie gornall spoke to me earlier. it is unclear at the moment what exactly prompt all of this, but the trouble flared up ahead of their warm up against the portuguese side and as we are about to see the marseille fans jumped the barrier. patrice evra goes over to confront them. at first comedy is pulled away and his team—mates intervene, but then later he goes back and appears to aim a kick at the head of one of the marseille fans. he is sent off and forced to watch the game from the stands. he is the first player in europa league
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history to be sent off before the game began. we have had a statement from marseille giving their take on all of this. they say an internal investigation will be carried out and a professional player must keep his cool in the face of provocation and insults, as hard and unjustified as they are. the club can only condemn any behaviour by studio supporters who insult their own players when everyone else supports their team. so that is the stands that marseille are taking. usually on a friday morning, manchester united bossjose mourinho would be holding his weekly press conference — but he did that early, yesterday and has moved training to this afternoon. that's because he's appeared in a spanish court today to face tax fraud allegations relating to his time as manager of the spanish giants real madrid. it's claimed he owes almost £3.5 million in undeclared image rights revenue. he's said he was told to pay the money, which he did, and he denies any wrongdoing. the judge will now decide if the case should go to trial. everton caretaker manager david unsworth is searching for answers — all on the field after they lost their 5th straight match in all competitions. a 3—0 defeat in lyon last night means they are out of the europa league.
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unsworth says the premier league meeting with watford on sunday is ‘huge' for both him and the club. it is disappointing and all of the ha rd it is disappointing and all of the hard work that we have shown that throughout nearly 70 minutes just goes out the window, doesn't it? so it is disappointing, but we have got to pick ourselves up and pick ourselves up and really, really quickly. by contrast, arsenal are already through with two games to spare. they drew 0—0 at home with red star belgrade last night — jack wilshere had their best chance in a game, without very many. a point though is still enough to see arsene wenger‘s side into the last 32. wade graham was the star of the match as australia thrashed france 52—6 at the rugby league world cup. in only his second appearance for australia, the 27—year—old ran in four tries, equalling the record for the number in one match in the tournament. cameron munster marked his debut with two tries and valentine holmes completed the rout. ahead of their first tour match in australia tomorrow morning, england cricket captainjoe root
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says it's important to get the balance right for his players, regarding what they can do off of the field between games. there has been criticism about players' conduct after an incident involving alex hales and ben stokes at a nightclub in september. it is fairly safe to say that what happened in the summer is not acceptable. i think we've got to make sure that we don't go too far either way and sort of sick in our rooms and not experience being in australia. of course, it is not about going out and getting drunk. it is about making sure we are in the best possible place to win cricket and the ashes tour. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. see you then. thank you very much. allegations of sexual harassment in westminster. labour has suspended one of its mps former shadow culture
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minister, kelvin hopkins, after it was alleged he sexually harassed a member three years ago. he has yet to comment. his promotion to the shadow cabinet last year after the allegation was made and he had been reprimanded by the party has been criticised. jeremy corbyn refused to comment when approached this morning. good morning. nice to see you. thank you very much. goodbye. we re you. thank you very much. goodbye. were you aware of the allegations against him, mr corbyn? thanks. were you aware of the allegations? goodbye. the prominent labour backbencherjess phillips had
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criticised the shadow government last year. i know it is part of an investigation, but i don't think i would have promoted him, having known that this had taken place and it was evident because there was a text message evidence, sol it was evident because there was a text message evidence, so i don't think i would have promoted him and i know that the victim felt a little bit left by his promotion. i think the key is to make sure that this is transparent and open, whatever the processes, that they don't feel like they are discouraged from coming forward with a particular complaint or allegation. the exact mechanisms around that are very important and i think it's got to feed into that culture of open nests and transparency that we
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should all operate on. let's get a little more of the action now. twitter has launched an investigation after donald trump's personal account was taken briefly offline by one of the social media compa ny‘s own employees. the social media giant said it was done by someone on their last day of work. 0ur washington reporter laura bicker told us how much president trump relied on twitter to help get his message across. for a living whole minutes, we got to see what a twitter world would be like without donald trump. he was out for 11 minutes at around eight o'clock. and when it came to the page, when you went on to it, the message was simply, "sorry. this page does not exist." twitter said it was investigating and initially said it was human error, but gave a statement saying that what they have learnt is that was done by a customer service employee on their last day. a number of people are asking the question of how one employee can take down one of the
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most prolific twitter accounts and oneindeed most prolific twitter accounts and one indeed involving the us president. something certainly that twitter will have to answer for. meanwhile, donald trump has continued with his prolific twitter habits. it doesn't seem to have held him back. he has already talked about the fbi and whether or not it is still great, and also he is calling on the department ofjustice to investigate hillary clinton. state television in syria has announced that the syrian army has taken full control of the eastern city of deir al—zour. it was the last, large city under is control and considered as vital to the group because of its proximity to the border with iraq. is seized deir al—zour in 201a, but had recently held on only to a few pockets in deir al—zour province. let's get more from our middle east correspondent, martin patience. tell us more about why the wii taking of deir al—zour is so important. well, because it marks
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the end of the islamic state's caliphate. its last major stronghold. what we have seen in the past few months is a push and the rolling back of islamic state gains in both iraq and syria over the summer. most will fail and then we saw the capital of the self styled caliphate raqqa fall, and deir al—zour was the last prize, and now according to syrian tv it has fallen. in terms of holding territory, the militant group no longer has any more strongholds. that is not to say it is defeated. it still has fighters, many of them are believed to be in the iraq and syria border area. of course, it's ideology still has appealed, but there is no question this is a major setback for islamic state. the kind of setback we have seen in the past
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few months. so, martin, as you say, there are still some bobbins of resista nce there are still some bobbins of resistance from islamic state fighters. there is the question of defeating ideology, a complex one. what does this mean on the ground in syria? what does this mean on the ground in syria ? 0bviously, what does this mean on the ground in syria? obviously, a very complicated situation there. it is very complicated. you have multiple militias, multiple people backing those militias. what is significant is last month we saw the fall of raqqa. now, that was taken largely by kurdish troops, backed up by americans. in this case, we have syrian forces backed up by russians and the danger, the flash point, is when these militias start to collide, when they start fighting against one another, because i think significantly what islamic state did was it united previously warring parties in syria and iraq. they put aside their differences and they
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fought to defeat islamic state. now it looks like islamic state is largely defeated, so i am now wondering if they will roll back three years again, these warring parties. they may go head to head. that is the danger and a potential flash point in this conflict. 0k, thank you very much. 0ur correspondent in beirut. one of south africa's highest courts has started hearing arguments by prosecutors hoping to extend the jail term of disgraced athlete 0scar pistorius. the former paralympic champion is currently serving six years for the murder of his girlfriend reeva steenkamp, but prosecutors say the sentence is too lenient. pistorius, who is now 30 years old, is not in court for the hearing. let's speak to our correspondent pumza fihlani, who isjohannesburg. tell us more about what has been happening there in court today. the proceedings have just wrapped happening there in court today. the proceedings havejust wrapped in happening there in court today. the proceedings have just wrapped in the supreme court of appeal, but the mpa
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who had petitioned the court trying to get a harsher sentence for oscar pistorius, they say that six years for a murder sentence is far too lenient. 0ne for a murder sentence is far too lenient. one of the reasons for this is that in a country where there is a high murder rate, this sends the wrong message and communicates to people that the courts will be lenient when it comes to being sentenced. the defence team has argued, are tried to remind the judges who are listening to the petition, that 0scar pistorius had no intention to kill reeva steenkamp, that what led to him shooting was that he believed she was an intruder and because of his disability but he was trying to defend himself and reeva steenkamp at the time. so this is a one day hearing. when will be year the decision? that is not clear at this stage. it took an entire day of them to listen to the merits of both sides, and what we expect now is that over the next few weeks, they will can indicate their decision to the public. the national prosecution authority has been
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saying that it is addressing a principle here, that it is not personal, that they are not pursuing 0scar pistorius because of his fame, but it is very hard to separate out the ones star athlete from all of this. some people have even argued that because of his fame, the court needs to be thorough, that there is no sense in the public that people can get away with murder. thank you very much. 0ur correspondent in johannesburg for us. in a moment, a summary of the business news but first: the headlines on bbc newsroom live— a labour mp a labour mp is suspended over allegations he harassed a member of staff and was later promoted to the front bench byjeremy corbyn. more claims against the former defence secretary michael fallon — his cabinet colleague andrea leadsom says he made inappropriate comments to her. he denies the allegations. life—changing drugs to be prescribed faster — the government wants five medicines each year to be fast—tracked.
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in the business news: twitter is investigating how president trump's account was deactivated for 11 minutes — it's blaming an employee who was on their last day at their company. the downtime doesn't seem to have phased him — he was back online tweeting about tax cuts to his more than a1 million followers soon after. shoppers have been queueing up at apple stores in dozens of countries as the new iphone x went on sale. the tenth anniversary photo abandons the home button and can be unlocked with face scanning technology among other new features. strong results for the tech firm. sales increasing to $a0 billion for the three months to $a0 billion for the three months to september. growth in the uk services sector has
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accelerated to a six month high thanks to new orders. robust demand from clients helped the industry which accounts for three quarters of the economy notched up its fastest rise since april according to the purchasing managers index. the uk services sector, which accounts for most of the uk economy, grew by its fastest rate in six months in october, thanks to a rebound in new work. the markit/cips services purchasing managers' index — known as pmi — hit 55.6 last month, up from 53.6 in september and above economists' expectations of 53.2. the numbers pushed up the pound against the dollar and euro, partially reversing yesterday's sharp falls. sterling fell after the bank of england had reiterated that it would take a "very gradual" approach to raising interest rates further. let's get more on this from chris williamson, the chief business economist at ihs markit. thank you for talking to us. do you
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think these latest numbers add to the justification for what the bank of england decided to do yesterday and raise rates for the first time ina and raise rates for the first time in a decade? well, at face value, they do certainly. this is a strong number. it means current growth is better than most people expected. when you look at the service sector survey, the dominant part of the economy, alongside results earlier this week from the manufacturing and construction sectors, it points to the economy growing at the fastest rate for six months, is an upturn in the pace of growth, clearly coming on the heels of that bank of england rate hike. it means the economy at the moment is showing signs of life. the worry is that there are other components of the survey which sent more worrying signals. for example, business confidence about the year ahead fell to as low as it has been for 15 months, so businesses are growing increasingly cautious, and this is going to hit investment. so
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this is going to hit investment. so this is thejuggling this is going to hit investment. so this is the juggling act, this is going to hit investment. so this is thejuggling act, really. we are still maintaining solid growth in the economy, but business confidence about the future is gradually being eroded, and this is largely tied to brexit concerns. companies are worried that there is no clarity on what brexit will look like, what a transition period will look like, and as such, as each month goes by, they are going to start reducing their spending decisions. whether any regional differences in alt but in this survey, or was their growth rate across the uk economy, as far as sales is concerned ? across the uk economy, as far as sales is concerned? we are seeing broad—based growth across the economy at the moment. there is really strong growth in manufacturing at the moment. that is benefiting industrial regions like the north east and the midlands. the service sector, growth is clearly helping dry expansion in london and other more service oriented parts of the economy, even tourist related ones such as the south—west, so
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seeing broad—based expansion. the one sector across the uk which is struggling, however, is construction, and this is indicative of companies pulling back on their investment decisions in things like new offices, new factories, that pa rt new offices, new factories, that part of the economy is really starting to show signs of some distress at the moment. ok. thanks very much for talking to us. now, as i explained, the pound fell yesterday after indications as future rate rises would be few and far between. well, today, the deputy governor of the bank of england has told the bbc that the rise in inflation since brexit was one of the main reasons for yesterday's decision to increase interest rates. the fall in sterling has been partly blamed for the rise in prices. ben broadbent was asked whether that rise combined with the wage squeeze would cause many people economic pain. there will be some, but i think it
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is one part of how monetary policy works. equally, once you keep this in context, around a third of households have mortgages, interest payments on debt in aggregate for households are lower than they have ever been according to income. let's have a look at some of the other stories today. chinese e—commerce giant alibaba has beaten market expectations with a hugejump in quarterly revenues fuelled by online shopping. revenues for the three months to september rose 61% on the same period a year earlier, to £6.abn. it also raised its revenue predictions for the full—year forecast. alibaba is expanding from its core online businesses to investments in supermarkets and stores. "we had an outstanding quarter," alibaba chief executive daniel zhang said in a statement. franco—dutch airline air france—klm says being able to charge higher prices helped its profits in the three months from july to september. the company reported
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operating profit up 38.7% to almost a billion pounds, way above analysts' expectations. like other european airlines, it benefited from strong summer demand. arqiva, the uk's largest owner of tv transmitters, and food producer bakkavor have pulled their stock market listings because of market uncertainty. arqiva has postponed a stock market flotation that would have valued the group at £6bn. bakkavor, which supplies food like hoummous to m&s and waitrose, has scrapped its plan that potentially valued it at £1bn. both firms announced their listing plans last month, but cited market volatility for their change of heart. in october, a number of european companies floated but saw their shares perform weakly in the following days. lets check in with the financial markets now the ftse is in positive territory, hovering near record levels — it did dip a little earlier from highs of the day — after the services sector data came out and the pound rose.
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remember the 100 share index is stuffed full of international companies which get a boost from a lower pound — then their overseas earnings are converted to sterling. tech stocks were also in focus after us giant apple reported that its profits soared by a fifth — it's new flagship iphone 10 phone — also nicknamed the apple x — hits the shops today. there are rumours they are short in stock, which is probably why the handset has sold out. this is where the pound is against the euro — remember that is the money market rate — and not the exchange rate you would expect in the high street. that's all the business news. thank you very much. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with for a look at the weather. thank you very much. good morning.
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we have had some thick fog around this morning. most of that has cleared away to give some sunny spells, but we still have thick fog across parts of march. this is a photo from a weather watcher in aldermaston. you can see pretty foggy conditions. you can see it is lifting, giving some other sunshine. it will stay cloudy for many of us. 0ur many also it will stay dry. the best of the sunshine will be across the north—east of scotland this afternoon. some sunshine across southern areas as that for the tens to clear, but for many it will stay cloudy. some spots of rain into north west wales and the north—west of england and up into the north west of scotland as well. look at things at 3pm this afternoon. the cloud increasing a little bit across south—western parts of england. sunny spells for many southern areas. 12—1adc. thicker cloud the
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further north you go across england and north wales. in scotland, we will see a bit of sunshine in the north—east. 0therwise, those cloudy skies giving outbreaks of rain in the far north—west and temperature is about 9—10dc. if you are heading toa is about 9—10dc. if you are heading to a fireworks display this evening, it'll to a fireworks display this evening, it‘ ll start to a fireworks display this evening, it'll start of dry but very quickly we are going to see some outbreaks of rain spreading into wales, north—west england, eventually into southern areas of england as well and also into the far north—west of scotland. that rain coming in is associated with this weather system which will be particularly heavy in central and eastern areas. clear skies further north and west. temperatures down to single figures. during saturday, this whole area of rain will continue to move gradually eastwards. not as erratic as the graphics system at the moment, hopefully. we have showers moving into northern, western areas and
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some sunny spells as well. a cold northerly wind. 8—9dc in the north. still double figures in the north east. the rain clears away for the evening, so if you are going to see the fireworks on saturday evening, it should be dry for many of us. scattered showers in western parts of the uk. 0n scattered showers in western parts of the uk. on sunday, it should be largely fine and dry. we have that chilly north, north—westerly wind. temperatures 8—10dc, so feeling noticeably colder, but if you are doing something on bonfire night itself, it should be dry and clear, so not bad at all. more details on the website. that is all from me. goodbye. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. a labour mp is suspended over allegations he harassed a member of staff — questions are being asked about why he was promoted to the frontbench
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byjeremy corbyn after the complaint was first made. i don't think i would have promoted him having known that this had taken place. and there was evidence because there was text message evidence. more claims against the former defence secretary michael fallon emerge. he's said to have made inappropriate comments to his cabinet colleague andrea leadsom. he denies the allegations. patel under fire after holding government meetings in israel without telling the foreign office. also... moves for new medicines to be fast—tracked so they get to patients faster. the government wants five new life—changing drugs or devices to be chosen for the new scheme every year. and president donald trump's twitter account is closed for 11 minutes — by a member of staff on their last day. good afternoon.
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it's november 3rd. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the storm over allegations of sexual harassment in westminster continues today. labour has suspended the mp kelvin hopkins after it was alleged he sexually harassed a party activist three years ago — he's yet to comment on the claims. his promotion to the shadow cabinet last year, after the complaint was first made and he was reprimanded by the party, has been criticised. meanwhile the former defence secretary, sir michael fallon, says he "categorically denies" allegations that he made inappropriate sexual comments to the commons leader, andrea leadsom — and in the last few moments we have
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had a brief statement from a downing street spokesman who says the leader of the house andrea leadsom did not and has not asked the prime minister to consider the position of sir michael fallon when he was defence secretary. there have been reports that she had done that, she had spoken to the prime minister asking theresa may to look at the position of sir michael fallon. but in this statement of the last few moments from downing street, andrea leadsom did not, it says, and has not, asked theresa may to consider sir michael fallon's position when he was still defence secretary. that break—in in the last few minutes. this is a real issue for labour, of course the issue of harassment which has be dealt with by the party but also that kelvin hopkins was
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promoted after this claim was made. that's right. i think this is serious for the labour party because it relates directly to jeremy corbyn. it calls into question his judgment. it had other claims made concerning the labour party but somewhere in the past but this is the first major allegation that comes underjeremy corbyn's leadership. it concerns a young labour activist who says that she invited kelvin hopkins to speak at a university labour event back in 201a. he had then sent her inappropriate text messages. there was a further meeting where he made her feel uncomfortable with other comments. and he also hugged her inappropriately, she alleges. these claims made in the telegraph newspaper. now, we now know that she reported as allegations firstly to a labourmp and then reported as allegations firstly to a labour mp and then they were taken on to the chief whip, the person in
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charge of party discipline at the time. now we understand that kelvin hopkins was given a verbal reprimand, this was back in december 20 15. can we reprimand, this was back in december 2015. can we do understand that the leader's office was aware that there had been an issue but we understand that they were not well aware perhaps of all the details. now in june 2016, so about six balls later, you'll remember a wave of resignations from jeremy corbyn's cabinets and he was scrambling to find people to fill those roles, really just get find people to fill those roles, reallyjust get enough people the table when his leadership was pretty much in disarray. so kelvin hopkins was brought in as shadow culture secretary then, albeitjust was brought in as shadow culture secretary then, albeit just for a few months. but the idea that the labour leadership knew about an incident concerning hopkins and then chose to promote him is being taken very seriously indeed. we haven't heard anything from carving hopkins himself. his office has declined to
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comment, jeremy corbyn has also declined to comment. he was asked about it this morning in his constituency by reporters and he did not make any comment about that. but the labour party have begun an investigation and stressed that they do take allegations very seriously. and let's look at the issue more widely. a code of conduct be considered for westminster. but you will have seen that statement from downing street and the last few minutes saying that andrea leadsom hadn't asked theresa may to consider the position of michael fallon when he was still defence secretary. that's right, further newspaper claims this morning that it was suggesting that andrea leadsom on the back of an encounter with sir michael fallon some six years ago after parliamentary meeting, these claims made in the sun and the mail newspaper, that to michael fallon had made an inappropriate comment to her at this meeting. and just this week she had taken those claims to theresa may. now, downing street had
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so far refused to come confirm whether such complaint to be taken to the prime minister but, as you say, within the last few minutes downing street has said that the leader of the house, andrea leadsom, did notand leader of the house, andrea leadsom, did not and has not asked the prime minister to consider the position of sir michael fallon when he was defence minister. downing street that denying that andrea leadsom had precipitated somehow sir michael fallon been asked to leave. certainly downing street have been sent me this morning that sir michael fallon had initiated his own resignation of his own accord. we have seen the exchange of letters. but it goes to show that there is clearly more to come out day by day hearing new allegations, certainly in the case of the labour party, a victim, an alleged victim coming forward to make claims to waive anonymity. and i certainly don't think that this story has run out of stea m think that this story has run out of steam just yet. thank you for that. let's go now to kelvin hopkins's
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constituency. 0ur route correspondent is there tom barton. tom, tellers what's been happening there this morning and the response to it. white well, from his office we have had no response, we have contacted them today may have declined to comment. friends of his have told is that they are surprised to see these allegations, that they are out of character from the man that they know. while mps here in the east of england who know mr hopkins well have said that are shocked to see these allegations coming out. more widely, we have heard from mps within the labour party expressing their shock. in particular at the fact that kelvin hopkins was promoted to the shadow cabinet after these allegations were put to the labour party, after he was reprimanded. among those mps today was the backbencherjess
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phillips, who said that his promotion to the shadow cabinet seemed wrong. welcome i think it will probably be part of an investigation but don't think i would've him having known that this had taken place and there was evidence because there was text message evidence. sol evidence because there was text message evidence. so i don't think i would have promoted him and i know that the victims felt a little bit bereft by his promotion. that is with in the labour party backbench. as for the labour front bench, we have had very little in the way of response. in a statement last night, they said that they take allegations like this very seriously and they have robust procedures in place to make sure that they are dealt with. as for the labour leadership in the question of whetherjeremy corbyn should have promoted mr hopkins to the shadow cabinet, well, we put those questions doing today and he didn't give as any response. good
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morning, mr corbyn. thank you from tomorrow, goodbye. did you know about the allegations against mr hopkins, mr corbyn, before you promoted into the shadow cabinet? leave them alone! thanks. we were aware of the allegations against mr hopkins, so? goodbye. now, we have tried to contact kelvin hopkins today. we have no look, he's not answering his phone or his door at his home in the constituency here so we still wait to hear what his view is on these allegations. 0k, tom, thank you for that. tom barton in luton north. and joining me now in the studio is the leader of the women's equality party. i'd like to get your take first on the allegations surrounding kelvin hopkins and the question of his
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promotion after this allegation be made. yeah, i think it is unsuitable. i think what it also demonstrates is the lack of a proper code of conduct, frankly. and what is particularly interesting in this context is that just is particularly interesting in this context is thatjust this week is particularly interesting in this context is that just this week the labour party has sent out to staff its proposals for a new internal policy against sexual harassment in the new code of conduct. i have been contacted the new code of conduct. i have been co nta cted by the new code of conduct. i have been contacted by several people who share that with me to say, "this is no good, it will not work. it is still not clear enough about precisely how we expect people to behave. it is not clear enough about the nature of harassment and it is not independent enough, so there is not independent enough, so there is not that independent third—party reporting system." yes, i mean on that point of course parties should have their own codes of conduct on various issues but in terms of the harassment issue, will an internal
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code of conduct ever be a substitute foran code of conduct ever be a substitute for an independent body? welcome you could argue that an independent body will never do thejob could argue that an independent body will never do the job because this isa will never do the job because this is a systemic problem that is actually rooted in a major imbalance in power. and that requires doing the really hard work of legislative change so that we are dealing with the stuff that is keeping women as second—class citizens. hey, the fact we don't invest in care, lack of representation. but you could say an independent body could not stand accused, one would hope, of influence from politicians. —— yes, hopefully. i think it's a shame where only talk about reporting, but if we are talking about reporting, yes, it has to be independent and parties have to have their own code of conduct. the conservatives don't have their own code of conduct at all because it keeps getting voted down. and it is frankly not a
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surprise that they've made a scapegoat or disciplined one person, michael fallon, and then in his place the chief whip has come, the man who knew all about these insta nces man who knew all about these instances of harassment over the yea rs instances of harassment over the years who apparently has made jokes about them. that speaks volumes... well, we can't verify that. but it speaks followers about the seriousness of this. welcome if we look at that breaking news from downing street saying that andrea leadsom didn't actually prompts theresa may to do something about michael fallon. it seems that he has taken action in self rather than being pushed out of his position. so perhaps that says to you that there needs to be more formal structure where people are very clear what is a cce pta ble where people are very clear what is acceptable and what isn't. listen, men know what is acceptable, then not harass anyone can fire them. this is about power and we need to
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look at of behaviour because it is all on a spectrum of control. do think that westminster is more archaic, if i can use that word, on this than other areas of public life? i think this is a systemic problem across all organisations and institutions. i think it is not surprising that we've seen this epidemic in westminster. as. as much as we've also seen it in the media and entertainment industries because these are areas that are dominated by men but which also, their output continues that domination of men. is that the media and entertainment industries objectify women, they sexualised women, they tell stories about men that exclude women. and as long as westminster is men out numbering women who will not have a system that truly represents women. thank you very much fit time. bbc news has... bbc news has learned that the international development secretary,
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priti patel, held a series of meetings in israel to discuss government business without telling the foreign office. the meetings took place over two days in august while ms patel was on holiday in israel. no civil servants were present but she was accompanied by a leading pro—israeli conservative lobbyist. downing street has said that ms patel did nothing wrong. a diplomatic editor been following the story. well, the custom is that their office will tell the foreign 0ffice their office will tell the foreign office that everyone can be coordinated. there can be diplomatic support on the grounds that minister, they cannot people there to help them go to meetings, most of the civil servants do but do them on the civil servants do but do them on the trip. that can be everything from logistics, note—taking, helping out with security that is needed for these trips. what is unusual therefore is for ministers to engage in meetings overseas without the foreign office local diplomats knowing. and that is what happened here. patel was on holiday and she took time out from a holiday to go took time out from a holiday to go to various meetings where,
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reportedly, official business was discussed. now, they response to that when you talk to mps and ministers. some of them say, look, it's just in ministers. some of them say, look, it'sjust in their view ministers. some of them say, look, it's just in their view bad form. it's not the way ministers should behave, things should be done above the radar, not below the radar. but other concerns are different. some mps isa other concerns are different. some mps is a this is not political, this is priti patel dread when the sport of conservative donors who are supporters of israel. i have to say, her friends strongly reject that accusation. but then others say there is a technical problem here. they say that potentially she may have breached the ministerial code of conduct which brazenly says very clearly that ministers should make sure that there is not a perceived co nflict—of— i nterest sure that there is not a perceived conflict—of—interest between them public and private interests. what has been the government response? welcome of is a lot of questions to the department for international development over this. they chose to respond in detail but a source said
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look this was a private holiday that she was on and that she paid for this holiday. i have spoken to a senior source in downing street that says that in their view priti patel has done nothing wrong. that was james landale, our diplomatic correspondent. the headlines on bbc newsroom live... a labour mp is suspended over allegations he harassed a member of staff — and was later promoted to the frontbench byjeremy corbyn. more claims against the former defence secretary michael fallon emerge. he's said to have made inappropriate comments to his cabinet colleague andrea leadsom. he denies the allegations. life—changing drugs to be prescribed faster — the government wants five medicines each year to be fast—tracked. it's back to hugh now for more support. hello there.
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uefa has suspended marseille defender patrice evra after he lashed out at a fan before their game against vitoria on thursday evening. he's been given a one match ban but will face a hearing later on friday. i'm joined now by our football reporter katie gornall. it is unclear at the moment exacted what prompted this but they trouble flared up in the warm up ahead of their game against the portuguese side. as we about see from the footage, marseille fans jumped barrier. patrice eva goes over to confront them. at first he is pulled away, his team—mates intervene. but then later he goes back and appears toa then later he goes back and appears to a mechanic at the head of one of the marseille fans. now, he is sent off. he was forced to watch a game from the stands. he is the first player in europa league history to be sent off before the game begins. we have had a statement from marseille. they say an internal investigation will be carried out
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and they say a professional player must keep his cool in the face of provocation and insults, as hard and as unjustified as they are. similarly, the club can only condemn behaviour such as this. that is the stands marseille is taken. france thrashed —— australia thrashed france in the rugby league world cup. equals the record for the number of tries scored in a single match of the world cup. the player competed here... bringing captain joe root bringing captainjoe root says it's important to get the right balance with him and his team—mates about what they can do between games. it
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follows incidents involving two players outside nightclub in september. it is very sad to say that what happened in the summer was not acceptable. i think we have got to make sure that we don't go too far the other way and sit in our rooms and not experience being in australia. of course you it's not about going out and getting drunk. it is about making sure that we are in the best possible place to win an ashes tour. that is all the sports now. the full round up just after 1:30pm. eight catalan government ministers spent last night in jail after a spanish judge refused to grant them bail. they're facing charges related to their attempt to make catalonia independent from spain. tens of thousands of catalans staged a protest against their detention. a warning for you — this report from our reporter tom burridge contains flashing images from the start. in the police vans are eight men and women who a week ago ran catalonia's government. now, taken to a prison in madrid.
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they face serious charges, including rebellion against the spanish state. ajudge denied them bail. as the news filtered through, their supporters gathered outside the regional parliament in barcelona. angry... ..and in shock. the government they elected, now behind bars. can you believe it, in a democratic country, that these things happen, again? we don't understand. we are very, very sad, deeply sad, deeply sad, and terrified. madrid argues it has no influence over today's decision taken in the courts, but these activists and people across catalonia sympathetic to the pro—independence cause say that claim is absurd. many people across spain and here in catalonia are also outraged,
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but at catalonia's pro—independence politicians who have pushed things so far. roquelle tells us they have flouted spain's laws. she is worried and says she might move abroad. so a new chapter to this catalan crisis and everyday, under the surface here, divisions more entrenched. tom burridge, bbc news, in barcelona. plans to speed up the time it takes for new, life—changing medicines to reach patients have been announced by the government. the move follows pressure by the pharmaceutical industry and medical charities which say that patients are losing out. it could mean certain drugs will be available up to four years earlier than they are currently — our health editor hugh pym reports. medical research is producing exciting new drugs and treatments but there have been complaints that it takes too long for them to be approved for use by the nhs.
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the government says it wants to streamline the process in england so that new drugs for diseases like cancer and devices to help manage conditions like diabetes can be made available to patients more rapidly. under what is called the accelerated access pathway, the approval process will be cut from as much as seven years, to three. in april next year, five new drugs and treatments will be selected for fast track treatment. this number could be increased annually in future. at the moment there at various stages that any product, whether it's a drug or a device, whatever it is, has to go through in terms of regulatory approval or cost effectiveness and so on, commercial negotiations with the nhs. the idea is to bring them all together to run in parallel which will make the process operate much more quickly so that those things that really do have life changing impacts on people can be brought forward sooner. 0ne charity said it hoped the scheme would go some way to ending bureaucratic delays and speeding up access to new drugs. the association of the british pharmaceutical industry said the government's policy was very
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welcome and should benefit thousands of patients, but no extra nhs money is being committed at this stage to spend on medicines — that could hinge on what's decided on the budget. hugh pym, bbc news. the little earlier i spoke to the director of campaigns care at muscular dystrophy uk. his carefully welcoming the news. be giving a cautious welcome and for families living with these conditions time really is of the essence. in a year waiting for treatment london muscles could be irreversibly damaged so we hope this will go some way to speeding up access to emerging treatments. so this is about buying time, buying a better quality—of—life for longer? alan mak
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absolutely and i think that's an important point but we also feel that the government could go even further still. we have got concerns that some drugs could be overlooked is that this scheme is and we know that five drugs are going to be looked at but we know that there are so many emerging treatments on the horizon we actually don't think five is going to be enough and we became that they look of that again. well, tell about that again because there aren't any cure is currently for muscle wasting conditions but what sort of treatments have you heard about that are out there, that are showing promise, that could help? well, there are some treatment in clinical trial that we think be promising. there are drugs already available, one to treat babies with available, one to treat babies with a spinal condition at it took a long time to be approved by the nhs in this country, so we hope that this scheme could speed up access to the access to these kind of drugs. in
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that example, the uk was one of the last countries in europe to grant access, so we hope that this new scheme can help fast—track those kind of innovative products. so reading the detail of the government's plan, if it classify something as a breakthrough, that locks up breakthrough website encourages it to be speeded up through clinical trials and so on so it cant get from lab to patients faster. but i know you want further clarification on how those breakthrough treatments can be defined. absolutely. so any step that can be speed up this treatment will be welcomed but we don't see any clarity yet about how a breakthrough designation can be made and how those decisions can involve patients and families. so we are really keen that families can also be at the heart of this process and help shape this emerging skin. so are welcome from you at muscular dystrophy uk but more questions you wa nt a nswe rs
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dystrophy uk but more questions you wa nt a nswers to. dystrophy uk but more questions you want answers to. how the families that you work with reacted to this today? well, i think the families we've spoken to today are relatively hopeful about this news, particularly when they hear about some of the drugs available in other countries with some promising results in clinical trial. time is of the essence, it is a progressive muscle wasting condition so any steps to help end delays should be welcomed by patients and families. nick and go from muscular dystrophy uk. twitter says it is investigating how donald trump's account came to be this activated for a total of 11 minutes. those searching for the page were informed that page doesn't exist. twitter soon issued an explanation saying the president's account was inadvertently did this activated by a twitter employee. it
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later clarified that it was the employees's last day in the job. while many people took to the internet last night to voice a pleasure what happened. a number of gifts and means worth posted. this one from abc news shows a character from madmen strutting out of the office as their way of announcing the news of what had happened. and then you have raising a glass. his leonardo dicaprio in the great gatsby saying i/0 twitter drinks are taking trump off—line. mr trump is being actively using the social media platform to promote his policies and attack his political opponents both during the political campaign last yearand opponents both during the political campaign last year and since taking office in january. campaign last year and since taking office injanuary. but many of his tweets are being controversial. in september, twitter was forced to justify a tweet he had sent in which he appeared to directly threaten north korea with destruction. that's the tweet you continue screen now. and another tweet saw him falsely
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linked arise in the uk crime rate to radical islamic terror. well, i've just been checking donald trump's twitter account and he is back to eating. lots of them, i can tell you, in the last hour or so. and this is what he wrote about an hour ago. my twitter account is taken down for 11 minutes by a rogue employee. i guess the word must finally be getting out and having an impact. the time is 12:28pm. it has emerged that the ashes of the moors murderer ian brady have been scattered at sea. documents show that the cremation took place at southpaw without any ceremony. five decades on from crimes that shocked the country, ian brady's body has been unceremoniously buried at sea. there was no music and flowers were not allowed. these were the conditions
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set by the high court, which stepped in over fears his remains would be scattered on saddleworth moor. it was here that brady and myra hindley buried the victims they tortured and killed. brady was sent to prison in 1966 for murdering 12—year—old john kilbride, 10—year—old lesley ann downey and 17—year—old edward evans. in 1985, he also admitted killing 16—year—old pauline reade and 12—year—old keith bennett, whose body has never been found. he died of natural causes in may of this year. in the early hours of wednesday 26th 0ctober, ian brady's remains were sealed in a weighted urn and sent to the bottom of the sea. it's time now to leg and look at the weather forecast. this it's time now to leg and look at the weatherforecast. thisjoin ben. it has been a fairly quiet week, all things considered. we had some fog
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but things will step up a gear as we head towards the weekend. we have a wea k head towards the weekend. we have a weak weather fronts bringing some very patchy rain. elsewhere, there isa very patchy rain. elsewhere, there is a lot of cloud around but some brighter skies. the best of these to the midlands and also the far east of scotland. 9—15dc. this weather front as we go through this evening willjoin forces front as we go through this evening will join forces with front as we go through this evening willjoin forces with a more active frontal system from the south and these two weather systems combined will bring a really wet night across england and wales, from very heavy bursts of rain. clear skies for northern ireland and scotland and colder feel. it'll take awhile lose this ring from the south—eastern parts of south anglia will stay cloudy and down all day long. further west, some sunshine and hefty showers which could be wintry over the hills in scotland and ties of 9-1adc. over the hills in scotland and ties of 9—1adc. for the weekend, a living will clear away to leave a mixture of sunshine and showers, but it will be cold by date and by night. this is bbc newsroom live.
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our latest headlines: a labour mp — kelvin hopkins— is suspended over allegations he harassed a member of staff. questions are now being raised over why he was later promoted to the frontbench byjeremy corbyn. meanwhile the former defence secretary, sir michael fallon, has said he "categorically denies" allegations that he made an inappropriate comment to the leader of the commons, andrea leadsom. cabinet minister priti patel is facing questions after holding two days of undisclosed meetings in israel without telling the foreign office. new medicines and treatments for some serious conditions could be fast—tracked in england with the government wanting multiple new drugs or devices introduced every year. thousands protest against the jailing of eight catalan ministers sacked over the regions push for independence from spain — they are are accused of rebellion,
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sedition and misuse of public funds. more now on those allegations of sexual harassment in westminster. labour has suspended one of its mps, former shadow culture minister kelvin hopkins, after it was claimed he sexually harassed a party activist three years ago. let's talk now to jacqueline abbott—deane, a behavioural expert at the consultancy, tactix. thank you very much for coming along to talk to us. tell us about the kind of work you do with companies in advising them how to behave in various situations, i assume. yes, i think the first thing to say is that the media is actually doing itsjob because when we first started talking to our ftse100 companies a couple of years ago about silencing
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culture and about voice and culture, there was a mild interest. and what we can say now is there is a lot of interest. and that interest is coming about as a result of the types of stories in the last couple of years that the media has brought to the attention. so i think one of the really good things to say about media is that that maybe is influencing boards and ceos to think about how do we create cultures where it is ok and save to be able to speak up, where there is voice as opposed to silence. so our work is in two phases. the first of all are able to diagnose in an organisation, so in all organisations there are pockets of fantastic practice, there are pockets of bad practice. but what we are able to do is understand where the pockets of silence either dry these bad behaviours. and behaviours where employees feel it
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is futile to speak up because the last time i give you an idea you actually took it to somebody else andi actually took it to somebody else and i did not get credit for it, or the last time i spoke up about something that i didn't think was right. so how do you create culture change in organisations to give people confidence that when they do speak up they will be listened to and their concerns will be dealt with appropriately. so that is an ongoing process and cultures change inside out, not outside in. so it is a combination of activities that need to take place, but the first one and the most important one is how do you create psychological safety. and psychological safety in an organisation is around the values and beliefs of notjust the organisation, but the leaders, because i think one of the things that goes unrecognised is if you are a leader or a manager, however you behave, then that is the perception
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that your employees will have. behave, then that is the perception that your employees will havem sets the tone. absolutely. it is interesting that you say that organisations and cultures change inside out, not outside in. in relation to westminster, obviously you have been looking at codes of conduct and revised codes of conduct that the parties may be looking at, but also there have been clearer calls for an independent body that would adjudicate, if you like, claims of sexual harassment and claims of sexual harassment and claims of sexual harassment. do you think in westminster uni that outside in approach, that independence, in orderfor it outside in approach, that independence, in order for it to outside in approach, that independence, in orderfor it to be effective? i think the sad thing is that in its current structure, you probably do. as it has been said, there is no hr department in the palace of westminster, so until such time as the culture has changed sufficiently then i think probably
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yes you are going to need some kind of independent body to look at that. but the ideal situation is that anybody that is working in the palace of westminster, as in any other organisation, has those values and they understand what trust and behaving properly and reporting and having transparency, that is what should exist, and it doesn't exist. we know that. we are finding that out every day. so i think in the short term there is probably going to need to be not so much on outside and change to the culture, because a tour that independent body is just going to monitor and review. the real change is going to come from the inside. ok. very interesting to talk to you. thank you very much. a delivery driver is critically ill
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after a corrosive substance was thrown his face. it was an attempted robbery, according to police. two men driving a morbid repeatedly sprayed a chemical in the driver ‘s. 0fficers sprayed a chemical in the driver ‘s. officers are calling the victim's condition life—threatening and are appealing for witnesses. twitter says it's investigating how donald trump's account came to be deactivated for a total of 11 minutes. those searching for the page were informed "that page doesn't exist". twitter soon issued an explanation saying the president's account "was inadvertently deactivated due to human error by a twitter employee."
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it later clarified that it was their last day in the job. 0ur washington reporter laura bicker‘s been explaining how much the president relies on twitter to help get his message across. for 11 whole minutes, we got to see what a twitter world would be like without donald trump. he was out for 11 minutes at around eight o'clock. and when it came to the page, when you went on to it, the message was simply, "sorry. this page does not exist." twitter said it was investigating and initially said it was human error, but gave a statement saying that what they have learnt is that was done by a customer service employee on their last day. a number of people are asking the question of how one employee can take down one of the most prolific twitter accounts and one indeed involving the us president. something certainly that twitter will have to answer for. meanwhile, donald trump has continued with his prolific twitter habits. it doesn't seem to have held him back. he has already talked about the fbi and whether or not it is still great, and also he is calling on the department ofjustice to investigate hillary clinton. katy howell is from the social media
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agency immediate future. she said president trump's twitter style is very different to his predecessor barack 0bama. i think ithink 0bama i think 0bama had a gift for opening the doors to a little more personality. he rounded his style of presidency using twitter to develop his personality a little bit more. whereas, if you look at donald trump, we have somebody who is keen to get his opinions out first. uses a very divisive kind of tactic, such as harsh words and often really quite violent imagery. so completely different styles between the two of them. and they're certainly doesn't appear to be them. and they're certainly doesn't appearto bea them. and they're certainly doesn't appear to be a filter, does there,
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with president trump, in terms of what he is saying. it seems to quite spontaneous. yes, and i think that is part of his urgency to get his point across very quickly. he wants to get, without fact checking, his opinions out there and uses a lot of negative wording, it kind of tactic for saying he is not good at something, so therefore you can say what he wants. an example would be so and so is really ugly, but i shouldn't say that because it is politically incorrect. so he gets his opinion out in a very strange way that is not a normal weight or an acceptable way by other people. and you see any sign that anyone is trying to rain this in, or if they are, that they're having any success ? are, that they're having any success? no, because he uses a rather clever tactic at the moment which is being seen in court cases, which is being seen in court cases, which is being seen in court cases, which is that he blocks people who really call him out. so anybody else with a high profile but calls out,
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he blocks them from his account, and that means that they can no longer see what is happening on his twitter page. that in itself is an insight into the man behind the twitter account, isn't it? it is indeed, yes. i was also thinking when i asked to that question about the people behind him in his administration and any attempts that they might be making to intervene and to rein him in somewhat, do you see any sign that that is happening? it is actually quite interesting because i think the white house itself is claiming that the potus is the official account and the donald trump is his own personal account and as i understand that there are only one or two people who have access to potus to post out for him and he is treating it like a personal account. however, we also know that he is
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publishing policy statements, ideas, and values, on his own account. none of us should be surprised, though, at the way that he uses twitter, because it fits with his mission statement, if you like, right from when he announced that he would be running for the presidency and his claim that he would be different from the typical politician. yes. of all he did not start on twitter like that. back in 2009, he was much more promoting things and began to get teeth as he moved through his apprentice bull and then into his presidency it became quite a magnificent movement into the profile that we see today. new details have emerged about the killing of four american special forces and four local troops in the west african country of niger last month. among those who died was army sergeant ladavid johnson, whose widow recently accused president trump of treating her insensitively during a condolence call. cbs reporter deborah patta has been to the site of the attack in tongo tongo.
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the village of tongo tongo is so remote, our nigerian military escort had trouble finding the road to get there. this is where the 12—member american team and 30 nigerian soldiers stopped to get supplies. this villager told us he saw three orfour armed men on motorcycles approach the us convoy. he was so nervous, he walked 25 miles to speak to us at another location. "we thought if it is just a few terrorists, the soldiers can kill them easily," he said. "but we didn't know there were so many more of them waiting nearby. it was a trap." once the isis fighters had managed to lure the troops away from the village, their numbers multiplied and suddenly they were under attack. you can still see the bullet casings that are left over
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from the intense shooting. the burnt out shell of a school. bloodstained bushes and empty boxes of ammunition are all that's left now. the man told us there were at least 60 attackers, armed with machine guns and rocket—propelled grenades. the fighting lasted over two hours. when it was over, he said he saw the bodies of three american soldiers slumped near their vehicle. the all three were stripped of their uniforms. discovered before the body of sergeant ladavid johnson about half a mile away. it is still not clear howjohnson got separated from the rest. this soldier would only talk if we concealed his identity. "he'd been stripped of his uniform," he told us. "his hands were tied, and they'd shot him the head." the pentagon would not comment. there is still some confusion over why this american team had their mission extended,
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and what exactly their assignment was, but either way, it meant that they camped out overnight in dangerous territory, and that might have alerted the extremists to where they were. deborah patta, cbs news for bbc news. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: a labour mp is suspended over allegations he harassed a member of staff — and was later promoted to the frontbench byjeremy corbyn. more claims against the former defence secretary michael fallon emerge — he's said to have made inappropriate comments to his cabinet colleague andrea leadsom . he denies the allegations. life—changing drugs to be prescribed faster — the government wants five medicines each year to be fast—tracked. moron that story now. my
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my eyesight affects my central vision. so i can see yourface, basically. mine is a degenerative thing, so over time it will get worse, so there is a point in time where i would expect to be blind. the current treatment they are trialling are focused on stopping that degradations of the idea that it would take seven years for it to get from being merely means that i could have lost my eyesight, so this news means that that could be sped up news means that that could be sped up and that is really great news. it
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gives a lot of hope to me and i expect a lot of people with different conditions. and probably lindsay as well. tell us about this drug that you would like to access and the difference it would make to your life. yet, the drug is a precision medicine, so rather than treating the symptoms of cystic fibrosis, it would treat the underlying cause so for me personally i have seen in the past year or two years quite a decline in my lung function and had i have had access to this drug when it was licensed two years ago, it could have prevented that decline. and i'm now at the point where i'm looking at end stage of my condition and possibly long transplants, so obviously having access to a drug like this could prevent me from deteriorating my help. lindsay, do you get angry that you know that drug is out there that could help
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you, but you can't get hold of it? it is incredibly frustrating. obviously, it is like a carrot that is being dangled and essentially it feels as though the drug is there, it is available. i have had to watch my health deteriorate knowing that this medication is out there and could eventually stop that decline, but ijust don't have access to it. professor richard barker, why is it that these drugs are not available on the nhs now? why is it taking so long. we have a rather complicated pass the parcel process, actually, soa pass the parcel process, actually, so a company will present data to the regulatory authorities. they will then allow them to move to the next age, which will often be a discussion with nice in england and then there will be two or three stages and then the nhs will decide whether or not they are going to pay for its either centrally or locally, so this can take 5—7 years, even once the data is available that the drug works. so this is about collapsing that process and having
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many of those discussions simultaneously. there is no reason why they shouldn't take place. so this new pathway, accelerated access pathway, brings together the people who have to have that conversation as early as possible. and this is ultimately going to make drugs cheaper, as i understand it. because some money will be given to the pharmaceutical industry to speed up the process and in return you sell them back to the nhs is cheaper. we hope these measures will result in many benefits, including cost to the nhs. i think andrew and lindsay's stories are a perfect example of when a medicine is available, it is incredibly frustrating for everybody, including the pharmaceutical companies, that patients cannot get access. many conditions are untreatable, of course, but when we really produce something, it has to get to patients as quickly as possible, so this is a great step in the right direction. it's emerged a conservative mp's
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general election fund took hidden payments from a developer as a multimillion—pound loan he personally oversaw paid out. more than £37,000 was channelled to david mackintosh's 2015 campaign from 1st land ltd, while he was leader of northampton borough council. most of a £10.25m loan he signed off to redevelop northampton town fc has vanished and police are investigating. howard grossman, of 1st land ltd and mr mackintosh deny any wrong doing. tom barton has more. six field stadium, northampton. almost four years since £10 million of taxpayer's money was loaned for it to be redeveloped. its stands, half completed. a shadow of the grand plans for its future. the stadium itself— functional but there. the land around it — empty, where a hotel and housing should have stood. most of the money now missing. the man who personally
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oversaw that £10.25 million loan to this football club was david mcintosh. he did so in his capacity as leader of northampton borough council, but at the same time, he was also the conservative candidate for the parliamentary seat of northampton south, and his campaign front for that election was receiving tens of thousands of pounds in hidden donations from businesses and individuals with links to the company which should have been spending the loaned money on redeveloping this stadium. that company was first land limited. its director was howard crossman. he is seen here on the left at the turf cutting ceremony for the redevelopment in 201a. alongside him, the future mp, david mcintosh. we have previously shown how £30,000
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in donations was channelled through three associates of howard crossman to the northampton south conservative association. we can now reveal that there were five further hidden donations. each one from businesses and individuals linked to howard crossman, each one for £1500, just below the amount that needs to be declared to the electoral commission. and will be next conservative government continued to support me as an mp? the money helped david mcintosh to become the mp in the 2015th helped david mcintosh to become the mp in the 20 15th general election, but the man he defeated says that he didn't donations we have uncovered call into question the legitimacy of the results. we had nothing like the sums that now seem to have been made available to the conservative party. we declared all over donations, whether or not they needed to be or not. people can see what i spend. it wasn't a huge amount but money does make a difference. we had the people and the passion but we were out down
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to it came to the money. did you know about the source of the donations? after our last investigation, i try to stick to david mcintosh. today, again, he turned down our interview request. he said that the best of his knowledge, all donations over the legally required amount work published in accordance with the law. howard crossman has always denied any wrongdoing. after coming under pressure from his constituency party, david mcintosh decided to stand down from parliament at the general election earlier this year. meanwhile, the police investigation into the missing millions continues. officers have read 200,000 e—mails and seized more than 2000 exhibits. so far, seven people have been arrested and ten interviewed under caution. now, if you are a fan of whatever the latest gadget is then you can probably understand why these people in moscow are prepared to wait in the freezing cold to be amongst the first to own apple's newest
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offering. the launch of the iphone 10 comesjust hours after the company confirmed they'd made a profit of almost $11 billion in the three months up to the end of september. so can that success continue? a bright, new tech future isjust over the horizon. but that's what they'd like you to think. this is iphone x. around the world, devoted followers of apple are queueing up, braving the cold in russia. sleeping on the streets in singapore. and finally, celebrating in sydney. paling $999 for the newest iphone as it goes on sale today, and that is the 6a gb model. it goes on sale today, and that is the 64 gb model. you have samsung selling the same thing at about ao-50% selling the same thing at about ao—50% less than what apple is charging. apple is a good company
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and a good brand in that is mainly what we are paying for. everyone is paying for the brand and everyone knows it. so how did we get here? at the heart of the iphone is a revolutionary multi—touch user interface. in 2007, the first iphone was launched. it wasn't the first smartphone, but it was noticed. ten yea rs on smartphone, but it was noticed. ten years on and smartphones in all their forms years on and smartphones in all theirforms are global. years on and smartphones in all their forms are global. over 2 billion have been sold around the world. changing the lives of the poorest and the most powerful. more than half are in asia. it is where apple faces some of its most stiff competition. samsung, the world's largest smartphone manufacturer, is based in south korea. the two previously clashed over who invented features like the slide to unlock. and samsung would be rooting for this new model to fail. it is making the iphone x screens. at $868
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billion, apple is now the world's most valuable publicly traded company. with the announcement that its profits rose by 90%, could this new venture push them into the julian? —— trillion? in a moment, the news at one with jane hill. first, the weather. good afternoon. it has been quite wea k good afternoon. it has been quite weak weather but things will step up into the weekend. it started this morning on a still zero with light wind and quite a lot of fog in some places. as our weather watcher in powys has captured, there were some spells of sunshine, but quite a lot of cloud. you can see the satellite picture from earlier on. cloudy conditions across many places. this cloud up to the far north—west, this isa cloud up to the far north—west, this is a weather front which during this evening will push southwards and eastwards and itjoin forces with
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this frontal system pushing up from the south—west. so the two weather systems combine to bring a spell of really wet weather, particularly across england and wales tonight. some really heavy bursts of rain. the skies will clear in northern ireland and it will turn shealy and we will see some showers pushing in from the west. your weekend gets off toa from the west. your weekend gets off to a soggy start across a good burst of east anglia and the south east. heavy rain going eastwards. still mild at this stage. 13 celsius in london. brighter skies out west. they cold fuel to the weather. some showers blowing into western coast of england and wales. bright skies across northern england and eastern scotland. some sunshine for northern ireland but a scattering of showers blown in on the westerly wind and it will feel chilly in the wind tomorrow. this band of rain will be pushed away. likely to stay cloudy and down across the extreme east of england for a good part of the day. elsewhere, we will see those sunny skies. wintry over the scottish
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hills and mountains and temperature is just 8—1adc. if you are going to a fireworks display on saturday night, by many areas it will be dry and five. the terms of some showers pushing in across western areas. sunday should generally be a quieter night with the dry weather and clear skies across many parts of the country. but it will feel decidedly chilly by then because as we go through sunday it is the day of things settling down. showers initially, which fade away. a widespread frost. rain initially over the weekend which will clear to leave sunshine and showers but it will feel colder. jeremy corbyn under pressure to explain why a labour mp
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was promoted after he'd been accused of harassment. kelvin hopkins is now suspended while claims made by a party worker, made by a party worker, ava etemadzadeh, are investigated. they refused to act, it made me feel powerless and alone. we'll have the latest from westminster. also this lunchtime. the man accused of trying to kill his wife by tampering with her parachute begins to give evidence. faster access to new medicines
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and treatments for nhs patients in england. there are trials of new drugs and knowing they
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