Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 11, 2017 6:00am-7:01am GMT

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. a british woman held in egypt on drug smuggling charges millions of people prepare to fall silent on armistice day. events will be held across the uk to mark the 99th anniversary of the end of the first world war. good morning. it's saturday, 11th november. also on the programme, a british woman held in each of four smuggling drugs appears in court. laura plummer is accused of importing illegal painkillers, a charge which could result in the death penalty. a lynx which escaped from a small zoo near aberystwyth has been killed by the authorities. they say they acted for the safety of the public. in sport, an inexperienced england side hold their own, against world champions germany. and on his international debut, goalkeeperjordan pickford is outstanding as he keeps a clean sheet at wembley,
6:01 am
and susan has the weekend's weather. murky weather around to begin the weekend across the southern half of the british isles. clearer and brighter conditions coming from the north, but all in all, actually feeling. —— a chilly building. —— feeling. millions of people will fall silent this morning, on armistice day, to remember those who have lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. it's the 99th anniversary of the end of the first world war. alexandra mackenzie is outside westminster abbey. alexandra, what's happening today? we can speak now about people who have lost their lives serving in the armed forces, they will be remembered today? absolutely. you join me on a rather wet armistice day morning. it is exactly 100 years since the end of the first world war. we are in the heart of westminster, where people will gather later today to remember the men and women who fell in all
6:02 am
conflicts. we are very close to the field of remembrance. the senator is just down the road. the senate half will be central today, on armistice day. —— cenotaph. but also on remembrance sunday, tomorrow. at 11 o'clock people will fall silent for two minutes, both today and tomorrow, for remembrance sunday. people will gather notjust here but across the country. we will see people gathering in glasgow at central station, at the trafford centre in manchester, at l5 city hall, at cardiff they, and there will be a special service remembrance as always at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. —— belfast city hall, at cardiff bay. there will be lots of people gathering today to remember those who fell. big ben,
6:03 am
behind me, has been silent for the last few weeks. but he then will be heard today at 11 o'clock and also tomorrow as people remember those who died and those who fell. —— but big ben. and of course there will be live coverage of armistice day commemorations from temple be 5am on bbc one. —— from 1055 a.m.. a british woman accused of drug smuggling in egypt is due to appear in court this morning. laura plummer, who's 33 and from hull, was arrested in cairo last month with nearly 300 tramadol tablets in her suitcase. she says the tablets were for her egyptian boyfriend, who has a bad back, and claims she had "no idea" they are banned in the country. but local police say that ignorance of the law is no excuse, as 0rla guerin reports. it looks like paradise. egypt's red sea coast has long been a tourist trap, but now one british visitor is trapped behind bars, accused of smuggling a heroin substitute to the resort of hurghada. 33—year—old laura plummer, a shop assistant, has been coming here for years. her family say she lives
6:04 am
for her holidays in the sun. for the past month she has been detained at police station number one, with others accused of drug trafficking. the offence can carry the death penalty here. well, we've managed to speak to laura plummer by phone. she told us she is being held in a cell about the size of her bedroom back home, but with 25 other women, so it's hard to breathe. she said her fellow inmates are trying to look after her, but no one speaks her language. she told us her spirits are at rock bottom. the police here say she was kept for good reason — because she had 300 tablets of tramadol. it's legal in britain with a prescription, but banned in egypt,
6:05 am
where it's the drug of choice for most addicts. laura plummer claims a colleague gave her the painkillers for her egyptian boyfriend, 0mar, who has a bad back. she told us they were in a chemist bag she didn't open. "i had no idea they were illegal here," she said. "i can't tell you how stupid i feel." ejections police say ignorance —— ignorance of the law is no defence. but friends and family say they hope thejudge will realise but friends and family say they hope the judge will realise she made an innocent mistake. the bbc understands that the labour mp, kerry mccarthy will submit letters to party officials on monday which she says show she received "unwa nted attention" from her fellow labour mp, kelvin hopkins. mr hopkins is currently suspended from the party, following accusations of inappropriate behaviour, which he denies. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. kerry mccarthy says she is speaking out to support the young labour activist who alleged: hopkins had acted inappropriately towards her after a meeting at sx university
6:06 am
four years ago. tell them not to do is currently suspended by the labour party while those allegations, which he denies, are investigated. —— kelvin hopkins is currently. kerry mccarthy is not making any formal complaint. instead, she is submitting information to the inquirer which she believes could be helpful. she says she first suffered on attention from mr hopkins in 1994, and more recently, she received a letter in which he described as a very attractive woman and confided he had a dream about. she is submitting this letter to the labour enquiry on monday. in a statement, kelvin hopkins describes kerry mccarthy is a long—term friend and says he is disappointed she appears to have gone to the press rather than telling him that she was unhappy. one of the latest hollywood figures to be accused of sexual harassment has admitted that all the allegations against him are true. five women have made claims against the american comedian louis ck. he's expressed remorse for his actions, as our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. another hollywood figure accused of
6:07 am
sexual misconduct. but to louis ck admits he did it. the new york times first reported the claims of five women who said he subjected them to various acts of indecency, and two of his accusers say it happened in his hotel room in a comedy festival in 2002. in a statement, the comedian said the stories were true and he was now aware of the extent of the impact of his actions. he said the power i had over these women is that they admired me, and i wielded that power irresponsibly. he adds: the statement doesn't include an apology to the women. hi, everybody. nice to see you all. what's up?
6:08 am
louis ck is best known as a stand—up comedian. he is also a successful writer, producer and actor. hollywood's response to the allegations against him has been swift. his latest film, due to be released next week, has been scrapped. he has been dropped by several tv networks and netflix has cancelled plans to a stand—up special. the streaming service cited the comedian‘s "unprofessional and unacceptable behaviour with female colleagues". one of the world's most famous super models, naomi campbell, has said she's saddened by stories of abuse within the fashion industry. in an interview with the bbc, she said she believes there are more revelations to come. it seems to be a big problem and i think before it gets better it is going to get worse. we are going to hear about it, and what is going to have to come out. they are trying to
6:09 am
find a solution, i know. and i think... i think it isjust the beginning, really. the lid has been opened. a lynx which escaped from a zoo near aberyswyth has been killed. lilleth, the eurasian lynx, escaped after jumping over an electric fence last month, prompting a huge search. bernard wilson reports. the oration links, named lilith, is thought to have le pt links, named lilith, is thought to have lept over an electric fence. zoo staff again a hunt for her along with police and officials from ceredigion council. there were a number of sightings at one point it was thought she was hiding in bushes near desert. that she evaded ca ptu re. near desert. that she evaded capture. last night the council released a statement, saying the links had strayed into a populated area and it had been necessary to act decisively. it added the animal had been destroyed humanely and the safety of the public was paramount. the zoo has been closed since the animal's escape. britain is the most obese country in western europe. that's the claim from the organisation for
6:10 am
economic co—operation and development. its annual report says 27% of the british population is officially obese, and that levels are rising father than in any other developed nation. health organisations say the findings are sobering. almost 40% of battery—powered smoke alarms failed to go off in residentialfires in england in the past year, according to new figures. the local government association is warning people to check their smoke alarms in the run—up to winter, when the number of serious fires usually goes up. dan johnson reports. the images can be hard—hitting, and the message is familiar. but it appears it is still not getting through. figures show that in house fires last year, 40% of archery powered smoke alarms go off. —— battery—powered. form means fire alarms, the rate was more than 20%.
6:11 am
there is a claim that more than one in five households never test their smoke alarms. 0ne in five households never test their smoke alarms. one in ten households do not even have one fitted. check your fire alarms and smoke alarms at home. check the batteries are working. check they are in the suitable position where it is actually going to help you. make sure you have at least one on each floor of your house. that is the key message. we have seen too many smoke alarms and too many fires which haven't done theirjob because people haven't either placed them in the correct position, or check their batteries. with more boilers and heat is being turned on in colder weather, this is a reminder that smoke alarms and carbon monoxide designer you some as they are tried and tested and proven to work. —— u nless and tested and proven to work. —— unless they are tried. in a world of coffee lovers and pet owners it was only a matter of time before this latest trend came about. in just ten minutes this coffee shop owner in taiwan will create the perfect latte, topped off with your pet's face. all she needs is a photograph, some
6:12 am
frothy milk and a lot of patience! 0ne cup can cost up to £18 depending on the degree of difficulty, and many of her customers willingly let their drink get cold, just to take a few more pictures. what is that? what is that? i don't know what that was. i think it was a lot of cartoon cats. was it? all the froth was gradually... it didn't quite look the same. and apparently you don't really get a hot cup of coffee because you are waiting for the coffee froth to be drawn. and then people take photos of the coffee. all you could just have a regular coffee and then look at your pet when you go home. regular coffee and then look at your pet when you go homelj regular coffee and then look at your pet when you go home. i would go there and get a picture of you on my coffee. let's look at the papers. the daily mirror. borisjohnson, sparking outrage at a anglo spanish
6:13 am
event by whacking bullfighting. the front page of the daily telegraph. charities circumventing a ban on sending begging letters to elderly people by sending an itemised deer homeowner shots. lots of people will be familiar with those. the front page of the times. we will be talking about this later. jailed mother in torment. this is a british mother in torment. this is a british mother jailed mother in torment. this is a british motherjailed in mother in torment. this is a british mother jailed in iran mother in torment. this is a british motherjailed in iran who wept uncontrollably imprisoned after being separated from her child, and interrogated while wearing a hood. this is a collection of interviews by people who are in prison with her. she is 38. she has beenjailed for five years after being accused of wanting to topple the iranian regime. she has been separated from her child. and boris johnson regime. she has been separated from her child. and borisjohnson made comments about what she was doing in the country as well. we will be speaking to people close to that situation later. on the front page of the daily mail, if you are already tired of christmas stories,
6:14 am
here is another one for you. christmas sales are already on, says the daily mail. they are putting —— quoting big names. debenhams and house of fraser offering 66% discounts with a record amount of stock on sale. armistice day, 99 yea rs, stock on sale. armistice day, 99 years, marking 99 years since the end of the first world war. this newspaper is looking at the old £1 coins. they are using those for the p°ppy coins. they are using those for the poppy appeal. some readers have listed the appeal by £1 million. we will have a full review of the papers later in the programme this morning. it is 6:14 a.m.. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: millions of people will fall silent this morning on armistice day, to remember those who have lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. a british woman will appear in court in egypt this morning, accused of smuggling in 300 illegal painkillers, a charge which could result in the death penalty. we knew it was going to be a chilly
6:15 am
weekend, but just how we knew it was going to be a chilly weekend, butjust how chilly? it looks wet as well! wet weather in the southern half of the british isles, which will make it feel cold. further north, brighter and much colder weather. it's that cold weather that will really dominate for tomorrow. back to today and here is the reason we have the wet weather to the south. it is out in the atlantic, but pushing a lot of moist air across south wales and southern england, so heavy rain there if you are heading onto the roads. not great conditions, but at least relatively mild. further north, clearskies conditions, but at least relatively mild. further north, clear skies and lovely sunshine. unfortunately the rain from the south—west of england and wales looks like it will be quite a feature today. elsewhere, a lot of sunshine. a lovely looking
6:16 am
day. step outside and it is going to feel chilly. wintry showers across the hills of scotland, northern ireland will be brighter by the afternoon. sunshine from northern england and hopefully for the midlands and east anglia. towards the south—west, here is the cloud. rain at times and the wind will be strong. gale force around the coast. more to come out of this weather system through the vetting and overnight. heavy rain for a time and that's treading into the south—east of england and across the midlands. but by the end of the night it heads off towards the continent. that sets us off towards the continent. that sets us upfor off towards the continent. that sets us up for the cold air to push all the way south for remembrance sunday. the isoba rs the way south for remembrance sunday. the isobars behind me, straight down to the south. that brings the ayre street in and it is going to feel chilly and all the more so going to feel chilly and all the more so because it will be windy. a
6:17 am
lot of sunshine around on sunday. greatly improving the prospects in terms of the way the weather looks for wales and the south—west, but he will be cold. showers for the irish sea coasts and north sea coasts. temperature 7—9 degrees. add on the wind and it will feel considerably chilly. the cold weather will be quite short lived. as we looked to the week ahead, monday will be cold and frosty, but then we start to bring in more cloud and it turns things are little bit milder into tuesday and wednesday. so basically the prospects for this weekend are quite wet for the british isles. further north, cold with sunshine. tomorrow for all of us is going to bea tomorrow for all of us is going to be a chilly day. thanks very much. see later. now it's time for the film review, with mark kermode and ben brown. welcome to the film review on bbc news.
6:18 am
and taking us through this week's releases is who else but mark kermode? mark, what have you got for us this week? a very interesting week. we have paddington 2 which you cannot have missed the adverts for. we have the florida project, a new film by sean baker. and professor marston and the wonder women. so paddington 2, what a great british cast. the first paddington was really lovely and charming. it really surprised everybody. is there any possibility that paddington 2 could live up to it? i went in thinking it can't. it does. it is lovely and charming. the story is paddington wants to buy a present for his great aunt lucy's birthday. there is a pop—up book of london but it is really expensive and he cannot afford it. the book goes missing and the finger or paw of suspicion
6:19 am
points at paddington. next thing is he is wrongly behind bars. here's a clip. in the past month these three shadowy individuals have all been seen snooping around three london landmarks. we think the thief you saw is part of a criminal gang, using the pop—up book as a treasure map. well, it's a theory. have you found out who they are? not yet. maybe i should have a look. i'm sorry, this is a private conversation. it's all right, mr brown. this is my friend, knuckles. and this is fibs, spoon, jimmy the snitch, t—bone, the professor, squeaky pete, double—bass bob, mad dog, johnny cashpoint, sirjeffrey wilcox... i hope i can rely on your vote. and charlie rumble. it's so wonderful to meet you all. it's a relief that paddington has made such sweet friends. would you excuse us for a moment. what are you doing?
6:20 am
talking to the nice men. nice men!? we cannot trust these people. look at them, talk about a rogues gallery, hideous. as for that bearded baboon, he hasn't got two brain cells to rub together. we can still hear you, mr brown. that was the light you turned off. the microphone is on the other side. it's got microphone written on it. you laughed at least four times in that clip! because it's funny! before we went on air you said is itjust a family film, in a way that sort of implied that "just" a family film was... the thing is, making a great family film is really hard. it made me laugh and i'm 54. it will delight the kids because the character of paddington is so beautifully realised. ben whishaw‘s voice is perfect. there is a mixture of childish and old beyond the years. there are lots of slapstick sequences. paddington is trying
6:21 am
to raise money for the book. he gets a job in a barber shop and it goes horribly wrong, involving an overhead fan. there are action sequences that are generally thrilling and seem to put paddington is in peril. you don't notice the interaction between the cg and the physical world. it was not until the end of the film where i thought they blended it really well. i never thought about paddington being a cg creation. i think making a really good family film is really hard and i thought this was really charming. the fact it was the second one, i expected the law of diminishing returns to kick him, it didn't. the bit where you see the different characters coming in, i think it is really, really funny. i think you would really like it. i suppose what i meant was it's a film you would take the kids to but if you aren't taking the kids? go on your own. the radio five show that i do with simon mayo, we had so many people writing in for the first film saying, i don't have kids, but i want to go and see paddington. is it fine?
6:22 am
yes, believe me, the cinema will be full of adults going. it is what a family film used to be. it is for all ages and i think anyone with a heart and soul can enjoy it. looking forward to it. the florida project, rather different. tipped for oscars? i loved this. the name comes from the name that walt disney developed his community of tomorrow in florida, which then became walt disney world. it is a community of people living in more rundown motels beyond the boundary of the theme park. the motels are called things like the magic castle, but they are essentially rundown hotels where people live on the poverty line. all the purple paint in the world cannot hide the fact they are living in the red. the central character is 6—year—old moony who runs riot around the hotel while her mother struggles to make ends meet, much to the disdain of bobby, the hotel manager, played by willem dafoe. this film portrays a harsh world of economic reality but you see it from the kid's eyes. sean baker's previous film, tangerine, was shot on an iphone. it was shot on a combination of digital and 35 mil. it looks beautiful because we see
6:23 am
the wonder that the kids see. you see the strange buildings, the orange of orange world, the strange wizard of the souvenir shop. also the weird break out bits of grass, and trees, and cows which you don't expect right next to the concrete jungle. you get right into the lives of these people. baker described it as a modern day our gang. it's the idea that the kids are living in poverty in hard circumstances but you're seeing the world through their eyes. there is hardship. there are real tears in this but, as a portrayal of an innocent view of the world, that's also very streetwise and sassy, it is terrific. he never feels like a tourist in this environment. i thought it was touching and moving. it will move you to tears. it will make you laugh. starts with celebration by kool and the gang. that kind of tells you... it is also an ironic use of that phrase, the florida project,
6:24 am
which is about the community of tomorrow. well, this is a community of today. it has its feet on the ground, but its head in the air. film three is really intriguing, professor marston and the wonder women. it is all about the creator of the comic book character wonder woman. we already have the wonder woman movie, which was a record—breaking hit, directed by pattyjenkins. now writer and director angela robinson goes back to the creation of the character. we have the professor of the title played by luke evans. we have his smarter, sharper wife brilliantly played by rebecca hall and bella heathcote's 0live byrne. between them they invent the lie detector, they start a nonconformist family unit and they come up with the strange, fetishy comic book character who will go on to make millions. here is a look. a comic book? this is perfect. i will inject my ideas right into the thumping heart of america. i'll get a real artist to draw it properly. she's an amazon princess who lives
6:25 am
on an island of all women? paradise island. and a man crashes onto the island. yes, the spy. and she wears a burlesque outfit. it's athletic. and silver bracelets. they deflect bullets. what! ? we love you so much but nobody, and i say this with all the compassion and truth in my heart, nobody will ever publish this. the story flips backwards and forwards. it starts with the child association of america's investigation into this comic strip. they say this is full of spanking, and sex perversions, and bondage. explain yourself. the rest of the film is explaining it it looks back at where this character came from, about the alternative family unit, about the way these people become
6:26 am
involved in role—playing and s&m. he is a psychologist who thinks everything comes down to disc theory. best out at the moment? killing of a sacred deer. this is the yorgos lanthimos film and she is very hard to describe. it starts out as a jet—black comedy and then turns really sinister. takes a greek tale of revenge and take it forward from ancient greece to the 21st—century cinema screens. it starts, in that yorgos lanthimos way, being strange and off—kilter and then it moves into horror film territory. i have to say, it is not for everyone. it is a marmite film. if you lose patience with it, you will lose it big time. i really liked it. i felt really u nco mforta ble all the way through. i couldn't quite get the measure of it. and like mother, i thought it was really well done. it has haunted me and stayed with me. 0k! you are not convinced? i don't think you have convinced anyone with that! best dvd? sorcerer. 40 years ago this film tanked. this is a remake of wages of fear. it came back to cinemas and is still playing in some cinemas in the uk.
6:27 am
it is an extraordinary movie. it is gruelling, muscular, visceral, really tense. it is a story about trucks filled with very volatile nitroglycerin being driven across treacherous terrain. it has a celebrated rope bridge sequence. it is one of the tensest things i've ever seen. it has a score by tangerine dream. 40 years ago it opened head—to—head with star wars and star wars won. people wanted to see light sabres and rocket ships and all that stuff. this was a really tough movie. 40 years later it is recognised as the masterpiece it always was. it is a work of art. i guarantee you, you will be gripped from beginning to end. you had me at a score by tangerine dream! once an old prog, always an old prog. mark, thank you very much. a quick reminder before we go that you'll find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/markkermode. and you can find all our previous
6:28 am
programmes on the bbc iplayer. that is it for this week. thank you very much for watching. goodbye from us. a british woman is due in court in egypt this morning, accused of drug smuggling after being caught with with nearly 300 tramadol tablets in her suitcase. laura plummer, who's 33 and from hull, says she didn't know the painkiller was banned in the country, where many people are addicted to the opiate. she says the tablets were for her egyptian boyfriend, who has a bad back. her relatives say they're concerned for her physical and mental wellbeing. the first time i saw her, i couldn't believe it. she was breaking down, she was begging me to take our home. your daughter is there and you can't bring her home. she is very set in her ways. she likes her home comforts. so to be somewhere completely out of her comfort zone, she will be struggling, it will be
6:29 am
traumatic for her. the bbc understands that the labour mp, kerry mccarthy will submit letters to party officials on monday which she says show she received "unwa nted attention" from her fellow labour mp, kelvin hopkins. mr hopkins is currently suspended from the party, following accusations of inappropriate behaviour, which he denies. the american comedia louis c.k. has admitted that sexual misconduct allegations made against him by five women are true. the emmy award—winning star said he had "wielded power irresponsibly" and could hardly wrap his head around the "scope of hurt" he had caused. his upcoming film, in which he starred with john malkovich, will no longer be released in cinemas. a wild cat which escaped from a zoo near aberyswyth has been killed. lilleth, the eurasian lynx, escaped after jumping over an electric fence last month, prompting a huge search. the local council said that despite "exhaustive efforts" to recapture her, she'd become a risk to the public, and had to be "humanely destroyed". britain is the most obese country in western europe.
6:30 am
that's the claim from the organisation for economic co—operation and development. its annual report says 27% of the british population is officially obese — and that levels are rising faster than in any other developed nation. health organisations say the findings are "sobering." almost 40% of battery—powered smoke alarms failed to go off in residentialfires in england in the past year, according to new figures. the local government association also found that 21% of mains—powered alarms didn't work properly. it's warning people to check their smoke alarms in the run—up to winter, when the number of serious fires usually goes up. check that the batteries are working. check they are in the suitable position that it is actually going to help you, make sure you have at least one on each floor of your house. that's the key message. we've seen too many smoke alarms and too many fires that haven't done theirjob because
6:31 am
people haven't either placed them in the correct position or check their batteries. mike has the sport for us 110w. batteries. mike has the sport for us now. the youngest england team for 37 years gives the german champions a runfor 37 years gives the german champions a run for their money. you look perplexed. no, i'm trying to look back 37 years and think who would have been in the young team then. well, you'll have to look them up. to be honest, it was forced on the england manager last night because he had eight senior players withdrawing because of various injury reasons. there has been so much talk about the young england teams. give them a chance. a fewer than trickled through last night and certainly held their own. when you use the term giving them a run for their money, it suggests an exciting contest. it wasn't bad. i've seen worse. it was goalless, i can't bring you any goals. that it was ok. i've seen worse. england manager gareth southgate described the performance of his young side as "really encouraging" after they drew 0—0 in their friendly against
6:32 am
world champions germany at wembley. disappointment though for the welsh in paris, they lost 2—0 to france. nick parrott rounds up the action, starting at wembley. last post plays. united in tribute to the fallen, both sides wearing poppies, germany for the first time in their history after the fur relaxed their ban on political and religious symbols. —— after fifa. hampered by injuries, england fielded their most inexperienced asides as 1980. jordan pickford was one of three debutantes to begin, with another two coming on as substitute. he kept england in contention, saving them twice in the first half. another new boy, ruben loftus—cheek, was man of the match. the 21 your old who plays for crystal palace shone in midfield, staking a claim for next summer's world cup squad. a very exciting player, we have known that a long time. we've been waiting for a night
6:33 am
like tonight, i guess. but we felt it was important to give him that opportunity. i wanted to do it last month. he had an injury. so i think he has —— he is one the public may not have been aware of it i think they will be after tonight. wales started with an experienced side in paris but there was no stopping the attacking force that france opened with. antoine griezmann and arsenal striker 0livier giroud struck in either half or a comfortable 2—0 win. it doesn't matter who they play against, they score lots of goals and have lots of possession. but it was good for us to experience that, great for our young players. probably the best team we have played against. we are trying to gather ourselves. it will be a difficult period. with the talents of david rooks, making his debut, and teenage striker ben would earn, combining well, it could also be an exciting period to come. —— then that would burn. —— ben woodburn. wales of course won't feature at next year's world cup, they missed out on a place
6:34 am
in the qualifying play offs, when they were beaten by the republic of ireland. the first leg, of their qualifying play—off against denmark is tonight in copenhagen. meanwhile sweden beat italy 1—0 in the first match of their play—off in stockholm. substitute jacob joha nsson scored just after the hour mark from a long deflected drive. italy will need a great performance in the return leg in milan on monday, if they're to avoid missing out on their first world cup since 1958. what next for patrice evra? he's been banned from all european club matches by uefa, until the end of the season and has left his club marseille by "mutual consent". it follows evra, kicking one of his own supporters, before marseille's europa league match last week. the former manchester united player is banned untiljune 2018 and has been fined almost 9 thousand pounds. the american goalkeeper, hope solo, has accused former, fifa president sepp blatter, of sexual harrassment. the world cup winner told a portugese newspaper that the 81 year old groped her bottom, during an awards ceremony in 2013.
6:35 am
a spokesman for mr blatter, has described the accusation as "ridiculous". it's advantage australia on day 3 of the women's four day test against england in sydney. the hosts resumed on 177 for 5 but quickly added to their total with ellyse perry hitting her first test century. she's still at the crease on 131 not out. england have ta ken just one wicket so far, laura marsh the bowler, and anya shrubsole with the catch. australia are 306 for 6, that's a lead of 26 runs. england's men meanwhile have this morning beaten a cricket australia xi, by 192 runs, as their build—up, to the ashes continues. the autumn international rugby season gets underway today while with the home nations, facing the best of the southern hemsiphere, over the next month. first up it's scotland against samoa. it'll be the first murrayfield test for scotland coach gregor townsend. we will have to be very good
6:36 am
defensively but also very good in attack. if we give a team like samoa turnover ball or kick poorly, they will be very dangerous against our structured defence. britain's katie archibald missed out on gold at the world track cycling championships in manchester after being overtaken in the final moment of danger and see them. she took silver but could have been one better. she won the elimination race but could hold on. americanjennifer valenti took on the victory, outsprinting her to take the title. how about this dramatic start to the season full written‘s 2—man bobsleigh team. competing at the world cup event in lake placid in the usa. brad paul and toby looby
6:37 am
crashed early in the second. they flipped their bobsleigh upside down, as toby falls out of the back, basically, still coming down the ice. thankfully, both athletes walked away from the accident pretty much unscathed. completely unscathed? yeah. i suppose you have to go with it. yes, you don't want those heavy bobsled is on top of you. he walked away. lewis hamilton is not seeking his foot off the gas. he dominated practice ahead of tomorrow's resilient grand prix. he topped the time sheets in both sessions, and his mercedes teammate, va ltteri sessions, and his mercedes teammate, valtteri bottas, just four hundredths of a second behind. the finding is this afternoon. back to football. you are about to see the roughest of tackles anywhere this weekend. disgraceful. showing a good turn of pace on the pitch in argentina, a playful dog, in his pursuit of the ball, he takes down one of the players. because of that,
6:38 am
in this lower league match, he is substituted, to be replaced, perhaps by harry kane—ine. substituted, to be replaced, perhaps by harry kane-ine. do we know whose dog it was? no, that amazes me. a dog it was? no, that amazes me. a dog that size, how does it get into the stadium? dog that size, how does it get into the stadium ? maybe dog that size, how does it get into the stadium? maybe in a lower league game, it is not like going to old trafford. i'm sure conspiracy theorists will say belonged to a memberof the theorists will say belonged to a member of the opposing team. theorists will say belonged to a member of the opposing teamm could be! it did seem to specifically go for the one player. yes, it was on a mission. was there a dog invasion football pitch story la st a dog invasion football pitch story last week? it happens all the time. there was a cat last week. there was the famous loftus road cap. more on that later. it has been described as dancing with cars because of the way the drivers move themselves around a series of of soup cools. the sport of gymka na series of of soup cools. the sport of gymkana grid is based on the old sport of horse gymkana, but using ca rs. sport of horse gymkana, but using cars. three—time world champion luc would amend the rest of the british tea m would amend the rest of the british
6:39 am
team go to south africa for the finals, and this week ijoined him at silverstone in training. it is noisy, it is rather unruly, on the edge, and yet... clasicla. amazingly graceful. taking the car through spin has been reimagined by the drivers competing in the gymkana championship. i can smell the burning rubberfrom championship. i can smell the burning rubber from here. championship. i can smell the burning rubberfrom here. you can see the smoke coming out of the car. this is what you get from pirouetting with 1.5 tons of metal around the tightest of corners. i hate to think what this will do to one's some eight. —— stomach. hate to think what this will do to one's some eight. -- stomach. you are put in the car with various manoeuvres. sliding drifts, doughnuts, sometimes we go around four times. you have to memorise the course. you have to think of how
6:40 am
many times you will go around each obstacle. it is dancing, with the car. ladies and gentlemen, will luc wood, in his nissan skyline, and his passenger mike bushell, please take two to four. —— take to the floor. the glee i like taking to the dancefloor, you don't know if it is rumba orzumba as dancefloor, you don't know if it is rumba or zumba as you go into a blur. but luke was in complete harmony with his car. speed, precision, you have to be a complete pinpoint accurate. you can get a couple of seconds penalty and that can bea couple of seconds penalty and that can be a matter of winning or losing. it is a sensation on your senses, nothing comes close to it, i have never experienced anything like it. all my senses have been rearranged, luke. my goodness. it. all my senses have been rearranged, luke. my goodnessm was amazing. i want to go again. amazing is one word for it. jim
6:41 am
started —— gymka na amazing is one word for it. jim started —— gymkana started with horses before cars were ever invented. now it has gone up a gear. the drivers rarely get out of second gearas the drivers rarely get out of second gear as they go around the course. it isa gear as they go around the course. it is a team effort. they go sideways, they tend to get hot. it isa sideways, they tend to get hot. it is a lot, trying to keep the car is cool is a lot, trying to keep the car is cool, trying to keep the tie is cool cool, trying to keep the tie is cool, and also keeping the car in controlled whole time it is getting so hot. there is a purpose to this. the sport is sometimes it is also testing because it challenges the ability of driver and car to deal with extremes. i think most people could then at it from coming out in the car and experiencing what it is like. when the car is sliding, how much control you have of a car. lots of panic, just letting everything kind of settle down. you can regain your composure and say, it is ok, i think everybody should have a go. your composure and say, it is ok, i think everybody should have a gom course it has to be done under supervision and a proper track. and strides at home. when you are a
6:42 am
first—time passenger, the dance moves don't seem quite as graceful. classical. classical music plays. i tried to keep a straight face. i know you are looking at my face. but it is hard, when the geforce is involved. i would want to go again and again! i am not very good at rides like that. did it feel like a fairground ride, that fast? yes, but it could cope with those forces. he is tried to emulate lewis hamilton, winning a fourth title next weekend. 0n winning a fourth title next weekend. on your scale of nausea inducing sporting activities that you've been involved in, was it right up there? yes, it was up there with the racing, when the planes do that. an adrenaline right. it was incredible, in terms of their driving skills. i was able to admire those. were you offered another right? yeah. what did you say? i said i wanted to have
6:43 am
a rest and admire from the sidelines. wise. millions of people will fall silent this morning on armistice day to remember those who have lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. a british woman will appear in a court in egypt this morning, accused of smuggling in 300 illegal painkillers, a charge which could result in the death penalty. let's find out what's happening with the weather. a lot more chilly? good morning! we spoke earlier about the rain in southern areas of the uk at the moment. let's take a closer look. this is the south—west of england and wales. this is the radar picture. heavy downpours around. the thing to note is at least temperatures are in double figures. still some mild air to the south of the british isles. further afield,
6:44 am
the british isles. further afield, the skies are clear and the picture is dry, but also considerably colder. temperatures in scotland hovering just above freezing. through the day will always struggle with thick cloud to the south and the outbreaks of rain. windy for the south—west of england. further north, the best of the sunshine. a very chilly feel. this is the south—west of england this afternoon. not a lot of change. temperatures still around the 12— 13 marks, but it will feel chilly. south wales also wet. cloud will linger in the south. hopefully the midlands and east anglia will brighten. northern england and scotla nd brighten. northern england and scotland get the best of the sunshine. showers possible in scotland. it could be wintry, even down to 300 metres across the hills. for the rugby, a chilly story. hopefully we will have a bit of brightness. for visitors to cardiff, pretty wet prospects. we have the
6:45 am
lord mayor's show in london. a pretty grey story, possibly with drizzle by the end of the —— drizzle and by the end of the day it will head back into the east of england. strong wind in the british isles, heavy downpours. you will notice it moved to the far south—east by the end of the night. that's the change for remembrance sunday. this move into france and then we opened floodgates for the air to move straight down from the arctic across the british isles and of course the arctic. it is chilly there and chilly for us across the board. they and all the more so when we add on the effect of the northerly wind. showers for wales and the south—west from the early part of the day, tending to clear in the afternoon. showers along the east coast in the morning. some of them getting further inland as we head into the second part of the day. here rather temperatures. it doesn't look very warm, add on the effect of the wind
6:46 am
and it will feel considerably colder. in the next week we start with the chill on monday morning, especially frosty. then we lose the sunshine for tuesday and wednesday and we get milder air coming in from the atlantic. rina has brought the wet weather to the south of the british isles and further systems will come on like this, meaning changes for next week. so this weekend rain in the south, sunshine and showers further north and a chilly feel. thanks very much. back with the headlines at seven a.m.. now it's time for click. welcome to china, to shenzhen.
6:47 am
believe it or not, this place was once a small fishing village. yeah... not anymore. now, it's a mega—city of nearly 20 million people. it's most famous for creating consumer electronics, often imitations of premium brands. but as china has opened its doors to international trade in the last decade, it has undergone a transformation, making strides toward becoming a global power and moving away from that image of being a simple manufacturer of good, fake or otherwise, to one of innovation, especially of tech. "made in china" is fast becoming "designed in china." next week, we'll visit some of the companies that call shenzhen home, but this week, we are meeting this guy. this is little cloud, and recently, he's gone where no turtle
6:48 am
has gone before. he's just completed a test flight of a journey that one day might take humans to near space. this is kuang—chi's traveller project. we have seen this kind of stratospheric helium project before. we visited worldview in the us back in february to see their enormous inflatable. i think you have the world's biggest table. and a spanish outfit, zero to infinity, is also trying something similar. so why does the traveller project's director feel he can beat them to it. we want to be the first one. we need to try hard to become the first one. because, in shenzhen, the environment is very good, and a lot of people want to do big things. and the government supports us.
6:49 am
so, i think that shenzhen gives us a very good environment to accelerate the progress. the secret, though, is also in the science. now, the balloon material looks quite ordinary, but of course, it's not. it is a special kind of polyethylene which has to resist the low, low temperatures of the stratosphere, damaging effects of ultraviolet and ozone. and it also needs to be able to stop the really, really tiny molecules of helium from escaping. this kind of space tourism is billed as being cheaper and safer than rocket—based alternatives being trialled by virgin galactic and spacex. normal people, even older ones, can do this. you don't need a strong body. you must be very strong to be an astronaut and train for many days and years.
6:50 am
however, this does not need that. why did you choose a turtle. ah, that's a good question. because the turtle has a long life. sometimes it can be living for more than 100 years! the turtle can live in water, it can survive in an low—oxygen environment. is it cruel to send a turtle up there? hmm... what can i say? ijust say we need to do this kind of experiment before human beings in the near space. we need to pick up a kind of animal. hmm... well, as usual, not a great life
6:51 am
being an animal involved in human exploration. while these guys are busy trying to win a race to space, others are trying to put a rover on the moon. and, fortunately, this time, it's not a real dog. now, you may remember earlier in the year we visited the indian space start—up, team indus, in their bangalore warehouse. they're one of five teams competing for a $20 million prize if they are the first company to land and drive a robot on the moon. but don't just take my word for it, take this chap's. december, 2017, blast—off! the team indus spacecraft goes into two day's of earth orbit, and then boom, four and a half days to the moon. 12 days spiralling down to the surface. and then, if it all goes well, out comes the rover, travels half a kilometre,
6:52 am
sends back hd video, and wins the prize. what could possibly go wrong? and one thing we learned while we were there was that to save costs, they're sharing their rocket space with a japanese competitor, ispace. well, now we're paying them a visit to find out how they think they're going to win. this is the space suit. and this is a hammer to break something. 0k. well, with the important stuff out of the way, time to talk space. what inspired you to enter this challenge? i have always been interested in space. i worked for a firm that one weekend asked me, why don't you help in the lunar race? it may be a small operation, but what they lack in size they certainly make up for in style. it is notjust the skyhigh rents of tokyo responsible
6:53 am
for the diminished dimensions of the office, it is also because their plan to hitch a ride on the team indus lander means ispace only have to build the rover, ideally one that is faster than team indus. i suggested this to team indus as well. just put in a little bit of a weapon on the side to bump them into a hole. that's a horrible case. they are not prepared to cheat but it definitely looks like a smart ride. a depth camera is being designed to recognise unexpected rocks and stop before it collides with anything. and because of a communications delay ofjust over a second, it will be steered and moved one step at a time to give everyone time to think as it gradually moves across the surface. mind you, you still need the very
6:54 am
best pilots and technicians in the business to command and strive this thing. looks like i'm going to scrape that rock. seriously? oh, man! this isjust a demo unit for numpties like me to use, but the real prototype is being developed just across the office in the clean room and the one they build next will be the one that actually goes to the moon, well, if nothing goes wrong, say, by letting me touch it. it is so light. just four kilograms. remarkable. i am john walker, the chief engineer. the worst thing that can happen is we go to the moon and for whatever reason we don't get any function. —— information. we are trying to win this competition, but at the end of the day, we want to keep going back to the moon again and again. so we need that starting point, we need data. we need to verify the simulations. that is why a huge part of the mission's costs goes towards testing, and that means rigourous checks on the bespoke
6:55 am
wheels, control systems, electronics, and perhaps most crucially of all, the communication system. of course, it is notjust team indus and hakuto in the competition, there is america's moon express, israel's space il, and synergy moon, made up of six continents. they all have contracts, but when they take off is anyone's guess. it is very secretive. what happens if you find out they launch in november? it is possible. however, it is very difficult to launch without any notification beforehand. so, i'm still very... i am sometimes nervous when they will make an announcement.
6:56 am
just like the other teams, ispace is about more than just one mission to the moon. they are hoping that the data they gather and the skills they learn could have much more profound complications after the mission whether they win or not. we recognise this race isjust the start of everything in the future. and we think that the moon is the best place to mine resources and then supply resources such as fuel into space. this is the first step for this establishment. there is certainly a loss that could go wrong. —— a lot. besides the perils of space, they still need to waste a huge deal of cash here on terra firma before anything can take off. one thing is for sure, though. we are so excited about this race to the moon. but what's becoming apparent
6:57 am
is it is notjust about getting there first, it's notjust about the prize money, it is just as important to get data back and build up this knowledge to be able to go there again and again and again in the future. and when these guys launch, we are going to bring that to you. that is it for this week. there is more on the full length version online. now, have you ever wanted to meet us in the flesh? no, me neither. but if you have, note this address. you can get tickets to the live show, happening soon. you can see some of the things we have brought to you on the show live on stage.
6:58 am
apply now, tickets are running out! thank you for watching. we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. millions of people prepare to fall silent on armistice day. events will be held across the uk to mark the 99th anniversary of the end of the first world war. good morning, it's saturday 11th november. a british woman held in egypt for smuggling drugs, appears in court, laura plummer, is accused of importing illegal painkillers — a charge which could
6:59 am
result in the death penalty. a lynx which escaped from a zoo near aberystwyth has been killed by the authorities. they say they acted for the safety of the public. in sport, an inexperienced england side hold their own against world champions germany.
7:00 am

39 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on