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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 11, 2017 8:00pm-8:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm: the husband of a british woman jailed in iran has told the bbc he is due to speak to the foreign secretary tomorrow. a british woman held in egypt on drug smuggling charges has been referred to a criminal court for trial. we hope the court listen really carefully to the version of events that laura said from the outset in that laura said from the outset in that it was innocent and she was trying to help out somebody. formula one driver lewis hamilton calls for improved security after some of his team mates were robbed at gunpoint outside formula one driver lewis hamilton calls for improved security after some of his team mates were robbed at gunpoint outside a circuit in brazil. the owner of a welsh zoo says he is devastated and outraged after an escaped lynx was shot dead. also in the next hour: millions fall silent to mark armistice day. formula one driver lewis hamilton
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calls for improved security after some of his team mates were robbed at gunpoint outside a circuit in brazil. ceremonies have been held across the country — in memory of those who have lost their lives while serving in the armed forces. and coming up in 30 minutes: inside out north west asks if the emergency services could have responded any faster to the manchester arena bombing. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has agreed to meet the husband of a british woman who's in prison in iran accused of spying. the family of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe fear her sentence could be extended, following recent comments by borisjohnson that gave the impression she'd been teaching journalism in iran. her family insist she was there on holiday. here's our political correspondent, eleanor garnier. injail in iran.
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separated from her daughter and husband. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is british and iranian and facing a five—year sentence for allegedly plotting to topple the government in tehran. it's now understood the foreign secretary borisjohnson has agreed to meet her husband. i think it's important now that he tries to meet with us as soon as possible, next week, so that it's clear from a political point of view that the uk government is standing alongside nazanin and her family. this week, the foreign secretary had to apologise after he mistakenly told mps he thought mrs zaghari—ratcliffe had been in iran teaching journalists. mrjohnson later said his comments could have been clearer and the uk government has no doubt she was on holiday in iran. as her family have always insisted. but this week iran's state tv broadcast a report claiming the foreign secretary's comments about mrs zaghari—ratcliffe amounted to an
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unintended admission of her guilt. as eleanor explains, it's not yet clear when richard ratcliffe will meet mrjohnson. he says he is due speak to the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, tomorrow, and obviously they will be discussing the fate of mrs zaghari—ratcliffe, how she can possibly be brought out ofjail in iran. they will also be discussing the date of their up coming meeting, i understand. that is still very much up in the air, but borisjohnson has also said he will be travelling to iran before the end of the year, and one thing richard ratcliffe wants is to be allowed go on that trip with the foreign secretary. it sounds like there might be soem difficulties with that, but that will also be discussed too. now boris johnson insists that those mistaken remarks, those incorrect remarks that he said she had been teaching journalism, he insists they made no difference to her situation injail. mr radcliffe, though, just says he is focussed on getting his wife home.
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earlier, i spoke to dr homa hoodfar — who was inside the same prison as nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe — who explained to me why she was imprisoned. i was arrested and put in jail injune, and a few days after i was in my solitairy cell, they moved me to a different cell where nazanin was there. that's for the first time where i met her, and that is where i realised she was very, she was very unhappy and crying, and talking about her daughter, and could not believe why she's been held in in the prison. after having spent a month or so in another prison. how were you both treated? well, we were in a locked cell, and except when we were going for interrogation, and we should have twice a day a 15
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minute break of fresh air, but it wouldn't always happen. we were given two blankets to sleep, to put on the floor to sleep on and one under the head, and occasionally we would have the right to have a shower. how did you manage to keep a level—head under those circumstances? as you say, she sounded very upset to you. well, she was very preoccupied by her family, her daughter and husband, but in my case, i had no idea, because i was accused of dabbling in security matters, working with mi6 and the cia, but i decided to turn the situation into a research project for me,
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just to intellectually to keep myself involved, but she was preoccupied by her family. i was in a different situation. what effect do you think boris johnson's comments about her purpose in iran will have had for her case? well, it's a colossal mistake, i think it played right in the hands of the very conservatives who make this, and made up charges, and usually also to embarrass the elected body, the government that at the moment, the government is reformist, so that has — i am not sure how that kind of mistake can be corrected,
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because that is exactly the kind of thing that plays in their hands. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in sunday mornings front pages. at 10:20 and 11:30pm this evening in the papers — our guests joining me tonight are kevin schofield, editor of politics home and benedicte paviot, uk correspondent at the french broadcaster, france 24. a british woman charged with drug smuggling in egypt has been ordered to stand trial in a criminal court. laura plummer, who is 33 and from hull, was detained in the red sea resort of hughada last month. police claim she was carrying nearly 300 tablets of the painkiller, tramadol. the drug is illegal in egypt but available on prescription in the uk. speaking earlier, orla guerin said
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it could be years before her case actually comes to trial. this trip was supposed to be a relaxing break but instead, she was detained. police say she had 300 tramadol tablets with her. they are legal in the uk. different story here in egypt. they are banned. they are widely abused. tramadol is the drug of choice for many addicts here. it is a substitute for heroin. the problem is the quantity she was carrying. she says she didn't know that troubles illegal here. she says she made no attempt to hide it. it
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was plainly visible at the top of her suitcase. she says a colleague gave her the tramadol because they said it would be good for her boyfriend, he apparently has back problems. she says she was bringing in here innocently, she didn't know it was bad and only discovered when she —— she was in trouble when she was stopped at the airport. her legal team have been guardedly optimistic that perhaps she might even get a today. instead of which, things have moved on a very different direction, and her case has been referred to a criminal court for trial. a pre—trial detention here in egypt can be a very long business. defendants can be kept in custody for up to two yea rs before be kept in custody for up to two years before their case comes to trial. what kind of help is the british government likely to be able to give? 50 british government likely to be able to give? so far, the foreign and commonwealth is has said that they
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are assisting the family of a british national who has been detained here in egypt. they tend to be quite tight—lipped in these cases. we have been speaking to the legal team throughout the day today, i think there was certainly a sense that this morning there was optimism, perhaps even an expectation, certainly hope, that she might be freed on bail. her mother had travelled here from the uk. we saw her standing in the court building hoping to get a glimpse of how daughter. she told me the last time she had seen her during a visit a few days ago that she was in very bad shape. the custody hearing that we we re bad shape. the custody hearing that we were expecting this morning and we were expecting this morning and we didn't take place, we're not sure why. news emerged a few hours later that the public prosecutor raced in cairo had referred this case for a seminal trial. it was always a possible eddie after she was charged with drug smuggling, it is a very serious offence here, as indeed in
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many other can trees, and under egyptian law, it can be punished with a death sentence or a lengthy term injail. her legal with a death sentence or a lengthy term in jail. her legal team with a death sentence or a lengthy term injail. her legal team will have to change gear and start building up to defend her in a criminal case in this court and no hearings have been set and no dates have been set and we do expect this process to drag on, certainly for months, if not perhaps for a year or two. earlier, we heard from laura's mp. we are hopeful that new information has come to life. her partner has come and admitted that he has problems with his back and has come with medical evidence to confirm that and i think that will go some way to showing that laura's versions of event are right. she is 33 years of age, she's a shop worker in hull. she goes to work in the
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morning, finishes in the evening, comes home and sits on the sofa and watches her favourite tv soaps. she is the woman of good character from a hard—working is the woman of good character from a ha rd—working decent is the woman of good character from a hard—working decent family and they are completely shocked and terrified by what has unfolded in front of them. she has done something very silly, she has taken drugs, and she was trying to relieve the back pain of the partner. but it isa criminal the back pain of the partner. but it is a criminal offence. tramadol banned in egypt. in the uk, it has to be prescribed by a gp and dispensed by a pharmacist. egyptian authorities are taking this very seriously indeed have to be respectful to their laws and customers that we hope they will listen carefully to the version of events that laura said from the outset that it was innocent in that
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she was just trying to help somebody. that has now been co nsta nt, i somebody. that has now been constant, i happy to say, by her partner, who says he has a back problem and he can prove that. members of lewis hamilton's formula one team have been robbed at gunpoint in brazil. a minibus carrying the mercedes technical staff was stopped as they left the interlagos circuit in sao paulo. a spokesperson for the team says valuables were ta ken but no one was injured. hamilton tweeted about the incident, saying formula i needed to do more to keep teams safe. jack nichols told us formula i could only do so much to help because of the sheer number of staff working in the sheer number of staff working in the city. it is a particular set of traffic lights on the way out of the circuit with this kind of thing is prevalent. the problem last month was that the teams were leaving after dark. the brazilian authorities have put in a lot of police but this year but when the
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teams are leaving, eight o'clock, nine o'clock might, that is when things can get a bit sketchy. we heard the stories in the build—up to the rio olympics last year about security concerns. there are ten teams in sao paulo. over all, you are looking at five or 600 people that make up the formula i paddock, that make up the formula i paddock, that travel around the world. naturally, they will all be staying in different places around the city. formula i and the circuit itself can do all they can in the perimeter of the actual venue but if you have got teams staying ten miles an direction oi’ teams staying ten miles an direction or ten miles and that direction, there is only a certain amount that formula i can do, short of not going to brazil anymore. let's talk to gary anderson — a former technical director with bothjordan and stewart grand prix. how long has this been a security
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issue in brazil? it has been a problem since19 73 when i first went. problem since 19 73 when i first went. what has changed now? i understand it was worth the past? it was pretty bad. basically, if you we re was pretty bad. basically, if you were ina was pretty bad. basically, if you were in a hotel or50 was pretty bad. basically, if you were in a hotel or 50 metres away and you could get stuck by someone with a knife. all the teams staying near to the circuit but it is still difficult tojust feel near to the circuit but it is still difficult to just feel safe. what sort of areas where you travelling through to get to the circuit? you come out of the circuit and to get back to the hotel, it is a dual carriageway. there is very heavy traffic. and one of the things i neverdid. on the
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traffic. and one of the things i never did. on the kerb—side full is top lots of people are walking down the street and you never know what is going to happen. you always stay in the middle lane so you have at least got cars between you and the public. you used to do all of the driving, and insisted upon it?|j thought my safety was put in my hands than in somebody else is. i always felt better in the van. at one point, we were at the side of the dual carriageway and there were some people there that i didn't like the look of. you just keep your eye oi'i the look of. you just keep your eye on what is going on. as an area, it is reduced rough. obviously, having formula i in the country brings a lot of money in those ill, in the sao paulo area in particular. whether security responsible at eli? the worst thing you can do is leave
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the circuits, or all the vehicles that are passing the windscreen. we made sure that basically we camouflaged ourselves little bit. have a bus with all the team in it. what do you draw the line that? it isa what do you draw the line that? it is a difficult thing because south america, anywhere, it is this situation. how feasible would it be to use helicopters to get at least the drivers are some of the staff out to the surge in it? i know helicopters are used frequently above sao paulo because the traffic is so bad. the team consists of 60 to 70 people. it is where do you fall the line —— drop a line. to 70 people. it is where do you fallthe line —— drop a line. we had a bus and a driver and every day...
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nobody... in sao paulo is one road that takes you back to the hotel area. that, again, they know that most coming back, at some point during the night. it is a bit too black and white. is it really is just down to formula i to sort this all the sao paulo authorities?” think the sao paulo authorities are doing that test. it is a huge city with a huge amount of people. i spoke to my friend and he said he would collect me at the air port. i think that teams have to take some responsibility if they go to those
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ill. the people that were there and that was stopped last night were people that have no say in it, they have to go because they team is going there. i'm sure the sao paulo police will stand in and help a bit. our apologies of the cacophony of p°p5 our apologies of the cacophony of pops and squeaks we could hear during that interview. the headlines on bbc news: the husband of a british woman jailed in iran has told the bbc he is due to speak to the foreign secretary borisjohnson tomorrow. a british woman charged with drug smuggling in egypt has been ordered to stand trial in a criminal court. members of lewis hamilton's formula one team have been robbed at gunpoint in brazil. sport now, let's get a full roundup, from the bbc sport centre. lots to get to through.
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we're going to start with rugby union's autumn internationals which got under way today and wales' torrid run against australia continues. the wallabies were 29 points to 21 winners, clocking up a 13th consecutive victory over their hosts in cardiff. it had looked promising for warren gatland's side early on. steff evans going over in the corner to help push wales in front after an early australia try. but the tourists fired back with three more of their own, the pick of them from kurtley beale. the perfect tackle from the full—back and he snuck out of it with the ball! a hint of a knock—on from the fullback, but he didn't hang around. the welsh team reacted too late, giving beale a free run to the try line. a late wales try narrowed the gap but australia won by eight points. in dublin, ireland have beaten south africa 38—3. early penalites gave the home side a 9—0 lead. then andrew conway capitalised on a springbox error to get the opening try of the game an outstanding
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performace by the irish. more tries followed, and jacob stockdale scored the last of them to complete a big win for the home side. plenty of action elsewhere today. italy beat fiji. the all blacks are currently beating france 7—0 in paris. earlier, an unimpressive england overcame argentina at twickenham, beating them for the third time in six months, this time by 21 points to eight, and there was an 11 try thriller at murrayfield where scotland edged past samoa 44—38. i think they all go down to the wire, to within seven points, similarto wire, to within seven points, similar to the world cup, that game. i suppose we had a commanding lead at one stage so it was disappointing to allow more back in the rain. —— game. credit to samoa and credit to
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oui’ game. credit to samoa and credit to our players for staying in front. it's a big night for the republic of ireland, with the first leg of their world cup playoff against denmark under way in copenhagen. they've played around half an hour and the latest score is 0—0. lewis hamilton says his crash in qualifying for the brazilian grand prix shows he's human and he's determined to have "fun" from the back of the grid tomorrow. he lost control of his mercedes at 160 miles an hour on turn six of the interlagos circuit, before thudding into the tyre barrier. he stayed in his cockpit for a few moments before letting his team know he was uninjured — but there was significant damage to the car. hamilton has already won his fourth formula one title — and it's his team—mate valtteri bottas who'll be on pole tomorrow. england's women are struggling to avoid defeat in the women's ashes against austrlia. they need to avoid losing quick wickets tomorrow on the final day of their test match if they are to keep the series alive. england closed day three, on a0 without loss in their second innings but they are still 88 runs behind the hosts.
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a potentially ever settle day at the ashes and ultimately one that would lead the australian fans smiling, thanks to one of the greatest innings the women's game has ever seen. innings the women's game has ever seen. resuming on 70, elise perry took off where she took off. with alyssa healy peppering the sydney crowd, england's hopes of a first innings lead soon banished. they eventually found the elusive breakthrough. they were unable to capitalise. natalya dropped on zero and it proved costly mistake. england's seemly stumped for ideas. by england's seemly stumped for ideas. by the time of iraq clobbered one straight, the damage had been well
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and truly done. perry proved unstoppable and she dazzled her way toa unstoppable and she dazzled her way to a double 100 and extraordinary individual display before australia finally declared 168 ahead. england survived intact but they will need all their grit and determination to survive intact. tanya was very positive and it worked for her and we got a real fight on our hands tomorrow but to start in that fashion was really pleasing. it has given us confidence and it is a big day for us. the very toughest of days for england and another one —— tough one to come, a battle to avoid defeat and keep the ashes hopes alive. that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you on bbc news throughout the evening. millions of people have observed two minutes silence for armistice day, marking the moment in 1918
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when the fighting came to an end in the first world war. ceremonies have taken place across the uk, including at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire, and at the cenotaph on whitehall in london, from where our correspondent adina campbell reports. preparing for remembrance to the sound of pipes, better rims from the second world war and those from later was on parade in whitehall. in that drizzle, before them, the cenotaph, britain's stark memorial to its water bed, keeping faith with cou ntless to its water bed, keeping faith with countless lives lost in conflict. at 11, big ben silent for three months because of a pair works, marked the hour. bell tolls.
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the last post. today's events and just about those who lost their lives in world war i and world war ii. the cenotaph also stands as a reminder of those service men and women caught up in other conflicts. i thought it was really emotional because so many people died. i think it is a pretty good way to pay respects.” people died. i think it is a pretty good way to pay respects. i think it makes the memories more real. there
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is the opportunity to really reflect oi'i is the opportunity to really reflect on what was given during those times. today's services have given a chance to many people to remember those who fought and what they fought for. the owner of a small zoo near aberystwyth have said they are devastated after an escaped lynx was shot dead yesterday. the animal disappeared at the end of last month, prompting a huge search. the local council says that despite "exhaustive efforts" to recapture her, she'd become a risk to the public, as bernard wilson reports. the eurasian lynx, named lilith, is thought to have leapt over an electric fence at borth wild animal kingdom. zoo staff began a hunt for her along with police and officials from ceredigion council. there were a number of sightings, and at one point it was thought she was hiding in bushes near the zoo, but she evaded capture. last night the council released a statement, saying the lynx had strayed into a populated area and it had been necessary to act decisively. it added the animal had been destroyed humanely and the safety
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of the public was paramount. the zoo has been closed since the animal's escape. speaking to the bbc, the owner of borth animal kingdom, dean tweedy, said that he took full responsibility for the death of the lynx. we are absolutely devastated. i'm both physically and emotionally broken. we have been up the last three weeks day and night following her movements. putting out traps and cameras and things like that so that we could follow her. and we thought we were closing in on her. but i don't know. we know she had some success hunting birds, the rabbit and things like that. she was becoming a little bit more self—sufficient, i think. less likely to go into one of our traps. but we are all deeply,
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deeply saddened by what happened. i would have loved to have seen her shot with a dart, but apparently that was not an option. we're told that the terrain was not suitable. there was also issues with licenses for dart guns and things like that. absolutely heartbroken. we are absolutely responsible. we only took over six months ago, and the zoo was in a real state of disrepair. we've been working all summer long building new enclosures for animals, we've built new enclosures for several species here, and ironically the next project on the list was building a new lynx enclosure. because there were too many
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in that small enclosure. that's probably the reason why she escaped, because they were fighting and things like that. she could have been just chasing a bird. it's hard to say. let's take a look at the weather. tomorrow looks as though the weather is set fairfor tomorrow looks as though the weather is set fair for most, but it is worth bearing in mind, there will be a noticeable cold wind and yes, we keep coastal showers on the west and east coast, before that we have some rain to clear across central and southern england through the night. a scattering of showers through the cheshire gap as far as the midlands, one 01’ cheshire gap as far as the midlands, one or two showers in scotland. wintry

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