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tv   Sportsday  BBC News  November 13, 2017 6:30pm-6:51pm GMT

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leads brexit deal before britain leads the eu. parliament will be given time to debate, scrutinise and vote. the agreement will only hold if parliament approves it. at least 400 people have been killed and thousands injured after a powerful earthquake in iran. a huge rescue operation is under way. the foreign secretary apologises to the family ofa secretary apologises to the family of a british woman jailed in secretary apologises to the family of a british womanjailed in iran for allegedly spying. he is due to meet the husband of nazanin zaghair—ratcliffe later this week. arthur collins, the former boyfriend of reality star ferne mccann has been found guilty of an acid attack ina been found guilty of an acid attack in a london nightclub. 14 people we re in a london nightclub. 14 people were injured in the attack. pressure is building on the republican pa rty‘s pressure is building on the republican party's nominee to step aside after allegations of sexual
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advances. more on the brexit debate as well after confirmation that mps will get that meaningful vote on a final deal. and we will discuss that story and all the other main stories of the day on the front pages of tomorrow's newspapers. hello and welcome to sportsday, i'm hugh woozencroft. will there be tears ofjoy or tears of sadness for italy tonight? the world cup greats stand on the verge of missing out on next year's tournament. we'll catch up with all the action at tennis's atp world tourfinals in london, where bulgaria's grigor dimitrov is off to a winning start.
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as they prepare for a less friendly welcome from australia's players. and we'll hear from four—time tour de france winner chris froome about his plans for more success in the future. if i'm not able to win any more, then so be it. i will give it my all. so plenty to come on the programme, but‘s let start with that crucial world cup play—off second leg which takes place in milan injust over an hour from now. sweden have a 1—0 advantage over italy heading into the match in milan and, if the four—time champions fail to make it through around, it'll be the first time they've failed to qualify for the tournament since 1958.
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understandably, the tension across the country is said to be unbearable and, as jim lumsden reports, they'll have to roll back the clock a little to turn things round. they have given us some of the memorable world cups and grace the picture of the style and passion all of their own. 2-0 to italy! one of the very constants of the tournament could be missing in russia next summer. could be missing in russia next summer. not since 1958 has a world cup that would be without italy for the defeat to sweden leave them teetering on the edge of the precipice. it is a very important match for all the squad for this
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country and the history of our national squad. there is a chance to overturn this result and we are working on this dream but we are also aware of the fact that this is also aware of the fact that this is a very important match for the squad, the country and the history of our national squad. italy have played in 18 world cup finals, been runners—up twice and have taken home the trophy four times. only brazil have one more. the swedes are pride brute force and a physical first leg ina brute force and a physical first leg in a physical once the seedling ikeme only three goals. in a physical once the seedling ikeme only three goalslj in a physical once the seedling ikeme only three goals. i can assure you that all the pressure is on italy because they are a big national squad. they have almost never miss the world cup. instead we have nothing to lose and we will play a great match, as we did in stockholm. from rome to milan, the streets will be still the night but, in the seething san siro stadium, defeat is an imaginable. every
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person coming to the stadium should leave their own club jersey. instead they should wear the blue colour and eve ryo ne they should wear the blue colour and everyone of us should have on our skin, that is the colour of italy. this is the only thing i have to say as advice. the whistling and criticism, there is time to do it, but after the minute. are the scenery on but after the minute. are the scenery on the way out? they have one game to save the day, so no pressure, then. so that's the task facing italy. we can speak now to italian sports journalist daniel verri, who is in milan. how have the media in italy been treating this match in how much it means to everyone there? the media? the media ? they the media? they are confident on one side but they also feel the pressure
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because obviously the night the pressure is on italy. we are meant to score two goals and not concede any, which is something that has not affected since june. any, which is something that has not affected sincejune. it any, which is something that has not affected since june. it will any, which is something that has not affected sincejune. it will not be easy, but there are 74,000 people in the san siro the mike to push italy over the line, and we all hope that it will have a happy ending. over the line, and we all hope that it will have a happy endingm over the line, and we all hope that it will have a happy ending. it has been a very long time since they missed out, 1958. what do you think the reaction will be like if the team fails to make it because they don't have the superstar names of teams of old? ido i do not need to tell you what the reaction will be! it will be a disaster, an apocalypse, a tragedy. these are the words that have been used in recent times by the politicians in italy, the manager himself. obviously, it will be a tragedy. hopefully, we will not be
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here tomorrow and discussing this. it will be a fantastic match, i am sure, in milan tonight, enjoy the thank you so much forjoining us. it's day two of the atp finals event in london with rafael nadal the star attraction. the world number one takes on david goffin in the second singles match at 8pm. earlier, bulgaria's grigor dimitrov admitted he felt pretty nervous after seeing off austrian dominic thiem in three dramatic sets on his atp finals debut. rounding up all the action for us is sue barker. we had an absolute thriller this afternoon in the 02 arena. grigor afternoon in the o2 arena. grigor dimitrov held on in the end. really good quality tennis, two different styles, dimitrov get into the net a bit more. up 5—4, serving for the match, never easy. there was a
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questionable one he did not challenge, the ball was out. if the ball had come in, two match points. very difficult to call the lines. but again he felt he would win and suddenly it was 5—5. he did very well to respond, break again and eventually serve out. the nerves he showed at the end of that, can you teach a player not to feel those nerves? nerves are a good thing because it shows you care. if you we re because it shows you care. if you were not nervous, it would mean you we re were not nervous, it would mean you were not nervous, it would mean you were not interested in it, but it is the way you manage those nerves and he has been very honest and frank in his assessment afterwards, he is thrilled to be in the championships for the first time. coming out of the stadium, it was nerve—racking but they will take a lot of confidence from getting his first win under his belt and sets up nicely in the group. rafael nadal encore this evening against david goffin, but always worry about his knees. over the years, he has
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struggled with his knees but he manages them well. at this moment in time, they will all have a few aches and pains, but hopefully it is something that raffle will manage this week because it is a tournament he has never won, there are so maybe brother want to see him play and to reflect on him being the number one player of the year. he would love to be playing on clay, i am not sure he will succeed without. if you don't ask, you don't get, but roger federer will say, i would like it to be on grass. that they could go on for some time. tim, thank you very much, or views. also coming up in the programme: we hear the remarkable story of the surfer who was stranded at sea for two days. and we'll meet the 47—year—old who's broken one of the oldest records in football. now, cricket fans, there
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are ten days to go now until the battle for the men's ashes begins in brisbane. england have been preparing for the first test with a spot of interaction with the local wildlife. our correspondent, andy swiss, is following the tour. welcome to townsville here on the north queensland coast. ten days to go until the first ashes test in brisbane, and england arrived here hoping to fine—tune their preparations for the final warm up game starting on wednesday. matches like this are a chance for players to explore a bit of the area and this morning, moeen ali and alastair cook visited a local wildlife sanctuary where they got to feed a crocodile named willie post—op can you imagine the headline writers having fun with that? moeen ali has not played either of england's matches so far because of a side
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strain, but the good news is he says he is fit and ready for whatever australia have to throw at him. that is part the game. it is not something i have not had before. these things happen. australians like to talk about a lot and big themselves up. for us guys, we need to stay calm and make sure we are ready. i know it will be tough. i have always backed myself and my ability to stop hopefully, i will back that even more in this series and do well for england. moeen ali set to play on a four—day match it against the cricket australia 11, starting on wednesday. england still have plenty of questions to answer, particularly over the batting. no one has scored a century yet so far one has scored a century yet so far on this tour and there were two horrible collapses in the last game in adelaide. england will be hoping to get a few runs and wickets under their belts before that first ashes
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test in brisbane, starting on the 23rd of november. ok, let's take a look at some of today's other stories. centre jamie roberts has been recalled to the wales squad for the rest of the autumn internationals. he comes in amid concerns over the fitness ofjonathan davies following his ankle injury in their defeat by australia on saturday. scotland prop wp nel will miss the remaining autumn tests after breaking his arm against samoa. he's set to be replaced by zander ferguson. newcastle propjon welsh has been called into the squad as cover. some of great britain's leading gymnasts have yet to sign a new contract to be part of the world class performance programme. double olympic champion max whitlock is among those still waiting for a final version from british gymnastics and some athletes are said to be unhappy. now, some sad news. tim gudgin, formerly the voice of bbc television's saturday tea—time football results,
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has died aged 87. gudgin retired in 2011, a week before his 82nd birthday, ending a career lasting more than 60 years. he joined grandstand in 1976, reading out the horse racing and rugby results until 1995, when he became the second person — after len martin — to read out the football results. chris froome has told the bbc that he's targeting more tour de france victories and is not considering retirement. froome won the event for a fourth time injuly and then followed it up by winning the vuelta a espana. now 32, froome says he's still hungry for more success. i'd definitely do not feel as if i am there yet. i guess i will know when the time is right. but for the time being, i'm still hungry, still
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motivated to keep trying to win another tour de france and i will ta ke another tour de france and i will take it one year at a time. as long as the body is able to do this, i will keep going. there are five tour de france wins, which is currently the record of number of wins. that would naturally be my focus for next year, to try to join that very elite clu b year, to try to join that very elite club of four guys who have ever done that before but, having said that, i am not fixating on that. i'm trying to reach a certain number of wins, i'm just trying to do the best i can do as i'm just trying to do the best i can doasa i'm just trying to do the best i can do as a professional cyclist, and if thatis do as a professional cyclist, and if that is four tour de france wins, so be it. i will give it my all and, if ican win be it. i will give it my all and, if i can win another few, that will be fantastic as well. i will give everything i have and that will be the biggest goalfor everything i have and that will be the biggest goal for me. six months ago, we brought you the story of matthew bryce, who was stranded at sea for two days
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after his surfing trip went disastrously wrong. matthew almost died and was rescued 13 miles off the coast of northern ireland, vowing never to surf again. well, time is a great healer, and matthew has decided he's ready to get back in the water. alex gulrajani has been along to meet him. a moment matthew bryce thought would never happen again. i knew i was going to die. it wasn't a question, it's... it was a fact. lucky to be alive — that's how belfast coastguards have described a surfer who was rescued from the irish sea last night. matthew bryce was picked up 13 miles off the argyll coast... i was thinking i was going to die. i was almost convinced. i didn't think i'd see the sunrise. i'd totally given up. i'd resigned myself to the fact i was going to die. i'm sitting here in the dark — i can't describe how cold. it's not as if you went out for a snowball fight and your hands are a bit cold. it's like life is just being sapped out of your core.
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six months on, matthew bryce is ready to get back into the water. but any fear or apprehension he had has been replaced by pure excitement. how are you feeling? i'm excited. i'm going to go in now. i'm going tojump in right now. yeah, i'm buzzing. and with the support of his friends, he was back where he once said he would never venture again — on a surfboard. how cool was that, seeing him back out there? it's awesome. keeping his passion going, and everything. this is perfect. eventually, he even found his feet. not bad for six months away. there were a couple of points where i was getting tossed a bit in the water, and you're thinking, whoa — hang on, it's fine. and reunited on water with the surfboard that saved his life. this board, matthew,
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must mean a lotto you? it's a special board for me. i could never get rid of this. if i'd lost the board, if i hadn't been able to get back to it, if the leash had snapped, if i'd decided to throw it away, i would have died. it was the only thing that was keeping me safe. even if i stop surfing, it'll go on the wall. yeah, i'll always keep it. but there are no plans to hang it up just yet. in fact, the ocean is calling. matthew and his friends will be back in the sea this weekend, determined not to give up on his passion. i want to go and, you know, live as much as i possibly can. i hope to god i'm never going to experience anything that horrific again, and i'd never wish it on anyone, either. but, if i can take some positives out of it and if i can try and get a message out to people to be safe, go out with friends, don't go surfing alone, don't be reckless like me, i think some good can come from it. alex gulrajani, bbc news.
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now, one of the greatest records in football has been broken by a 47—year—old goalkeeper from leamington spa. when paul bastock turned out for wisbech town at thetford town on saturday, he passed peter shilton's longstanding record of 1,249 competitive club appearances. the bbc‘s tom williams has been to meet him. a momentous day. it is 11 seas while supporters go through the usual warm up supporters go through the usual warm upfor supporters go through the usual warm up for the supporters go through the usual warm upforthe team. supporters go through the usual warm up for the team. beans on toast does the trick. paul bass stop, 1250 matches, and that is the secret to your longevity? it is. it puts the wind in your sales! can you believe this day has arrived? no, it is amazing. two weeks ago, i was looking at hanging the gloves up. i thought i could be an x factor! i
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went from nobody to everybody wanting to have a chat with me. where do the head, and a rousing sendoff and the practice pitch to run through set pieces. he's 47 now. he has played the 17 different clubs but treats today's game of the it is his first. he grew up idolising peter shilton. now poised to beat him. he was everything i wanted to be asa him. he was everything i wanted to be as a young man. for christmas i would ask for england in yellow jersey. i hung on crossbars because i read that as what he did to make some bigger. i never grew but my arms got a wee bit longer! it is an hour's coach tried to thetford. wisbech are in the ninth tier of english football and favourites to progress. i spoke to him a couple of weeks ago. i said,... he said, it is
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about enjoying it. since then we have had a chat, great results. he has fallen in love with the game again and all of a sudden he has hit this record. he has been overwhelmed, i think. a guard of honour, 286 and the crowd, the biggest of the season gave paul are welcome. the supporters club gave him a memento. things finally settled down at 3pm. wisbech14—1, scoring a goal worthy of the occasion. a late penalty means he missed out on a clean sheet. not to worry. a great day, surpassed everything i have ever dreamt of and i appreciate everything everyone has done for me. i do not know what else ican done for me. i do not know what else i can achieve in football apart from wembley in this cup! it is a great cap and fitting to the end. special day, go and enjoy the celebrations with your mates, well done. a wembley final would be the fairy tale. his team—mates will try to make the dream come true.

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