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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  November 17, 2017 9:00am-10:59am GMT

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hello, it's friday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm tina daheley, welcome to the programme. theresa may meets fellow eu leaders in sweden today where she's expected to come under pressure over the brexit negotiations. we'll be live in gothenburg. also this morning we'll have the latest from zimbabwe we speculation is intense over the long—term future of robert mcgarr bay, and the military is still in control. the zimbabwe defence forces, the zdf, say significant progress has been made in their operation, adding that they have accounted for some of the criminals around president robert mugabe in order to bring them to justice since they were committing crimes that are causing social and economic suffering in the country while others are still at large. we'll hear from zimbabweans who were forced to flee from the country. and we'll meet the british military dog who's receiving the animal equivalent of the victoria cross for saving lives in afghanistan. hello, welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning.
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we're also talking about how you can protect yourself against online fraud this morning. it's expected to be a major problem this christmas with so many of us shopping online. if you've been targeted, tell us what happened to you. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. use the hashtag #victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today — the brexit secretary, david davis, has told the bbc it's time for other european union countries to compromise on brexit. he's refused to comment on reports that the government could scrap it's plan to write into law the date when britain will leave the eu. meanwhile, theresa may is in sweden this morning. she's with other eu leaders. let's chat with our political correspondent leila nathoo. what can we expect today? we i are
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expecting the same from david davis today, he says that they have made all the movement so far at our end, theresa may saying it is time for the eu to respond positively, and i think we are really trying to see a concerted effort building up now to get these talks moving on to trade. they are stalling on the basis of a lack of resolution of the three key issues the eu wants to see movement on, the rights of eu citizens, the irish border and the crucial issue of the divorce bill. david davis, the brexit secretary, suggesting it is up to the eu now to show flexibility. it is always in a negotiation, you wa nt it is always in a negotiation, you want the other side, mice, i want them to compromise! but we have made quite a lot of compromises, on the citizens' rights rod, we have made all the running. we have made the running in terms of things like the right to vote, where the european
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union doesn't seem to be able to agree that everybody involved, the 3 million europeans in britain and the million europeans in britain and the million brits abroad, should be able to vote, they can't do that. so we have been offering some quite creative, arises. we haven't always got that back. theresa may is in sweden holding talks with donald tusk, she is trying to persuade him to gearup to tusk, she is trying to persuade him to gear up to move the talks on as well, but he is expected to warn her that there is no guarantee the eu leaders will agree to that, and we have been hearing within the last half an hour also from the irish foreign minister who is saying that the eu doesn't believe they are in a place right now to allow the talks to move on to that second phase, so i think to move on to that second phase, so ithink in to move on to that second phase, so i think in these weeks before that eu summit in the middle of december, where all hopes are pinned that the eu will give the green light to move
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those trade talks on, i think in the intervening weeks, we will see a lot of effort going on behind—the—scenes to really try to persuade eu leaders to really try to persuade eu leaders to change their minds. leila, thank you very much indeed. annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. thank you. good morning, everyone. zimbabwe's president, robert mugabe, is reportedly refusing to step down immediately, despite growing calls for his resignation. the 93—year—old was put under house arrest during a military takeover on wednesday amid a power struggle over who would succeed him. yesterday he met the head of army but the outcome of the talks is not yet clear. police investigating the disappearance of a teenager in dorset are continuing to question a man arrested yesterday on suspicion of her murder. 19—year—old gaia pope was last seen in swanage ten days ago. the 49—year—old suspect is believed to be known to gaia. our correspondentjames ingham is in swanage. james, watch the latest that the police are saying about this
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investigation? well, annita, they say that they are still investigating every avenue that is available to them, so that may mean that guy is missing, but clearly they have reason to believe that she has come to harm. clothes were found that appeared to match those that she was last seen wearing, they were found on a coastal footpath by a walker yesterday, and searches are continuing this morning. the police and also volunteers joining them. also around here you can see this is a small coastal seaside town, inland rescue teams are helping with those searches, and so our coastal rescue teams. police still have this one man under arrest in custody, arrested on suspicion of murder. he isa arrested on suspicion of murder. he is a third person from the same family to have been questioned, two other people have been released but he is still being questioned. and the community around here still very much hopeful that this will end with
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good news. the family of guy telling us good news. the family of guy telling us yesterday —— the family of gaia telling us yesterday that they still remain hopeful. james, thank you very much. more than one million credit card users, who are struggling financially, have had their credit limits raised in the last year without being asked — according to the charity, citizens advice. it wants the chancellor to ban increases which haven't been requested in his budget next week. card companies say they've agreed to abide by a voluntary code of conduct to protect customers. the pay packages of senior police officers have been published in a central database for the first time. figures for 26! officers up to the rank of chief constable, reveal wide variations — some receive thousands of pounds in benefits, a small number claim large sums in expenses and others are paid nothing but a salary. the figures have been published by the home office as part of an attempt to increase transparency across forces in england and wales. the actor sylvester stallone has
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denied sexually assaulting a 16—year—old girl in a hotel room in las vegas in 1986. he was responding to reports giving details of a police account of the teenager's claims. no action was taken against the actor at the time. sylvester stallone's spokeswoman said it was a "categorically false story". conservationists in the united states have strongly criticised a decision by president trump to end a ban on importing body parts from elephants hunted in zimbabwe and zambia. a federal government agency said imports could resume today for elephants that are legally hunted. the us fish and wildlife service said hunting fees could help communities put money into conservation, but experts say that populations of african elephants are plummeting. the electric car maker, tesla, has unveiled the prototype of a new articulated lorry. the vehicle, known as a semi—trailer, can travel
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for 500 miles on a single charge. the company has also publicised what it says will be the fastest production car ever made. our technology reporter dave lee reports. this is the new tesla semi. rock music. it will travel 500 miles on a single charge, and elon musk thinks it will make electric the new king of the road. the thing that looks like it's not moving... laughter. is a diesel truck. but he has been under a lot of pressure lately. his company isn't yet making cars quickly enough to meet demand and so this new truck could be another distraction for the man who also dabbles in space travel. tesla's definitely taking some serious issues on the manufacturing side. model 3 delivery is measured in hundreds when they're supposed to be producing thousands every week.
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that is a huge issue. but the truck wasn't to be the only new vehicle on show here tonight. so the tesla fans that came here certainly expected to see a lorry. what they weren't expecting to see was a new roadster, and that's certainly got this energetic crowd extremely excited. so it turns out there was some cargo in the truck... for fans, an exciting one more thing, but for tesla's investors, it's just one more thing. now here's a real "tail" of bravery for you — a military dog that helped save the lives of troops in afghanistan is being awarded the animal equivalent of the victoria cross. mali will receive the dickin medal, after being seriously injured during an operation to clear insurgents from a building in kabul in 2012. despite his injuries he carried on performing his duties but eventually had to be carried to safety. and tina will be meeting mali and his handler, before 9.30. in one of the celebrity weddings of the decade,
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the tennis star serena williams has married alexis ohanian, the co—founder of the reddit website in new orleans. an entire block of the american city was closed off for the 200 guests who included the singer beyonce, the reality tv star kim kardashian, and the editor in chief of vogue magazine, anna wintour. the reception reportedly had a beauty and the beast theme. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. annita, thank you very much. let's get some sport with hugh woozencroft. good morning. it's a vitally important match and series for england's women in terms of the outcome of their ashes series. three t20 matches to play and defeat isn't an option. the first is today. we can speak to our sports correspondent andy swiss, who's in sydney. things haven't gone well so far for england. no, things starting to look perhaps
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slightly better. england now 86—5 after 11! overs. they got off to a terrible, terrible start, they lost their first wicket to just the second ball of the match, captain heather knight given out caught behind. that was followed by a huge amount of confusion and even farce, questions over whether she was actually out because the wicketkeeper had knocked the bails off with her gloves, also questions about whether the catch had been taken in front of the stumps, so heather knight at one stage was given a reprieve, but after lengthy consultation, eventually the umpires gave her out and she had to go, but it was a hugely confusing scene at the start of the match, and after that, things got even worse for england. they lost sarah taylor lbw
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for two, katherine brunt for a duck. at that stage, england were 16—1! and in terrible, terrible trouble. they have recovered a little bit since then, but in the last few minutes, narrative has gone to 26, sir england currently 86—5 after 11! overs. 0k, we will move swiftly to the men's. australia have been pretty confident, naming their squad for the men's ashes earlier than expected. were there any surprises? yes, there were. particularly the inclusion of their wicketkeeper, 32—year—old tim paine, who hasn't played a test match for seven years. even he admitted that he thought his test career was over, and he said that even he was surprised by what had happened. it is exciting. for an australian, it is the biggest news in cricket,
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and to be here in australia is even better. i feel like and to be here in australia is even better. ifeel like i and to be here in australia is even better. i feel like i am about to make it into test cricket again after seven years, so it is exciting andl after seven years, so it is exciting and i am absolutely pumped. and he wasn't the only surprise in the australian squad. 34—year—old shaun marsh will batter another six, and there was also an inclusion of 2a you rolled cameron bancroft who will open the batting and win his first cap at the gabba next week, so there we re cap at the gabba next week, so there were a few eyebrows raised about england's selection for this tour, and eyebrows raised about australia's squad as well. andy swiss, thank you forjoining us. and on day three of four in their final warm—up match, england were bowled out for 515 earlier, dawid malan getting himself a century. in reply, england have taken three wickets, with two from moeen ali.
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england lead by 144 runs ahead of tomorrow's final day. i will be back with sport a little later, including a new sporting careerfor later, including a new sporting career for sir later, including a new sporting careerfor sir bradley later, including a new sporting career for sir bradley wiggins. we will look forward to it, thank you, hugh. robert mugabe, the man who has ruled zimbabwe with an iron fist for nearly four decades, is spending a third day under house arrest after the army seized control of the country. the world's oldest head of state stood relaxed and smiling yesterday alongside the generals who led the military operation against his government as negotiations over his future continued. some reports say the 93—year—old is refusing to step down but there are also rumours that progress is being made towards a dignified departure. meanwhile, military leaders say they will advise the nation on the outcome of the talks as soon as possible. this was zimbabwean tv earlier this morning. the zimbabwe defence forces say significant progress has been made in their operation adding that they have accounted for some of the criminals around robert mugabe in order to bring them to justice as
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they have committed crimes and cause social and economic suffering in the country, while others are still at large. ina country, while others are still at large. in a statement, the zdf say that they are still discussing with robert mugabe on the way forward. well, the fact remains that zimbabwe remains in the most extraordinary circumstances with rumours swirling about the future of mr mugabe and who will take over from him. many who saw him as a brutal dictator — he was accused of countless abuses of power during his 37 years in office — will be glad to see him go. and in the last few minutes, reuters reporting that he has made his first public appearance since the military ta keover public appearance since the military takeover at a university graduation ceremony. we will bring you those images as soon as we can get them. well, let's discuss this further. joining us now, daizy fabian, who fled zimbabwe 11! years ago because of a threat to her and herfamilies safety. she left behind her six—year—old daughter, who is now aged 21. her mother died yesterday,
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but daizy couldn't go home to say goodbye, or bury her. wilf mbanga is the editor of the zimbabwean. he was very close to mugabe at the start of both their careers. he travelled around the world with mugabe, but when he later became critical of the president, he was declared an "enemy of the police". he is under an arrest warrant in zimbabwe, so can't go back. lloyd kuveya is the southern africa researcher at amnesty international. and patience chakanga phiri, a resident in bulawayo, zimbabwe. welcome to the programme. thank you forjoining us and i'm sorry to hear about your mother. you fled zimbabwe after being targeted for being part of an opposition trade union party. what happened?m was the mdc that was formed from a trade union... they formed a party
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whereby the party was being formed, we we re whereby the party was being formed, we were not allowed, because there was no democracy in zimbabwe, we we re was no democracy in zimbabwe, we were not allowed to be seen with mdc cards or mdc t—shirts even to go outside in a proper rally. there was no democracy and until now there is no democracy and until now there is no democracy. besides what is happening now there is no change, we are being ruled by the military and now we are being ruled by the military. the only time zimbabwe will be free is when we have a free and fair election and outsiders, international monitors come in to zimbabwe and that is when zimbabwe will be free. now it is not free. it is like two children in the house mighting for the ball —— fighting for the ball. we are ruled under
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zanu. these people are together. all these things came out because the vice president was told to leave the office. you don't think that a change in leadership after four decades will make a difference? the change will make a difference after this when we have international monitors coming in our country and we have a free and fair elections to choose who we want. right now will the general is take over, there is no change right now. these people is zanu and the fight is an inhouse zanu fight. thank you for now. wilf, do you agree? she is making some valid points. but the fact is that will have to be a change. things
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will have to be a change. things will change. i understand... how do you think they will change? there is a parallel process going on as we speak. while they're talking to robert mugabe, there seems to be a plan to set up a transitional authority, that will include the opposition. that is happening at the same time. you were good friends with robert mugabe when he first came into power, can you give us a sense of what he was like. well, when i fist met him in 74 when he came out of prison, and i interviewed him for a story that i was doing for the star and we got to know each other well and he used to come to my house and have dinner. we used to sing along tojim reeves and
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pat boone. we were close and i believed he was the best person to run my country at the time. the first ten years, he did very well, they were talking about housing for all by the year 2000, health for all by the year 2000. they built schools. one of the things he succeeded in doing was educating zimbabweans. they are the most educated and unfortunately in the la st educated and unfortunately in the last ten years that has now taken a dive. education is now suffering, there are no drugs in hospitals, there are no drugs in hospitals, there is massive unemployment. 90% of population is unemployed. we don't even have our national currency. robert mugabe has wrecked the country in the last 20 years. like you say, i want to bring in
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lloyd, the lilt literacy level is 9796. lloyd, the lilt literacy level is 97%. that is a good thing isn't it? yes, the literacy level is good. there have been many people have gone to school. schools were built and so on. but there is a deterioration in the quality of education and there is a, you know, access to education has not been that good in the past few years. because of economic crisis and the mis—governance, we are seeing a reversal of progress that had been made in the first ten or so years. that is unfortunate on the part of zimbabwe. how do people feel about grace mugabe? do we know where she is. we don't know where she is. but generally speaking people do not
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like grace mugabe. he was interfering with the country, but she was not an appointed state official. she was within the structures of zanu pf party, but she failed to respect people in authority including the vice president. people think she has contributed to the problems we have seenin contributed to the problems we have seen in the ruling party today. which has peeled over into the crisis we are now seeing. i don't think that robert mugabe made his own decisions independently, he would have kicked out his vice—president and then precipitated this political crisis that we are seeing. up until now, we had heard
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about grace in the context of her love of shopping, what is life like there every day and how are people responding to what has happened?” am in the second city of zimbabwe and we are going on as normal. because we have been told to go on as normal. there has been nothing formally said about what happens next. so people are getting up and going to work and they're doing what they have to do. i'm at work now. and the work office, the newsroom is busy. i think it is as normal as normal can be. and it is very quiet. i would say peaceful. which for me also shows the kind of people that zimbabweans are. we are peaceful and loving and kind people. so we are all hoping and praying that nothing horrible happens to a our beautiful country and we stay here. it is
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interesting you say that people are going as if things were normal, but robert mugabe has been in powerfor nearly 40 years and he is under house arrest is what we are hearing, it is day 3, that is extraordinary for zimbabwe. so isn't that being reported on tv, are you not hearing that on the radio in the papers?m is every where. i think the biggest thing that maybe being here compared to being across is the number of is m essa g es to being across is the number of is messages and so much speculation is going around, especially with the use of social media. people are sending out a lot of stuff. everyone has information, which is not always entirely true. because as it stands there has been nothing official since the last official statement we got on... from the soldiers. so there has been nothing else. everything we have been hearing is
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speculation and i saw the pictures yesterday and still nothing formal came out. people are realising that we let it go, here we, i haven't been stopped searched. i haven't seen soldiers. i haven't seen police people. i haven't seen much change here. so i don't know. i think people are just trying to, keeping their heads down and hoping this passes and there is no bloodshed and no turmoil. thank you. a british military working dog who helped save the lives of troops in afghanistan is to be awarded the prestigious pdsa dickin medal — the animal equivalent of the victoria cross. mali, a belgian malinois, will receive the honour for his heroic actions during an operation in afghanistan in 2012. we actually had to climb up a concrete stairwell to get up onto the next floor, because that's where these guys were dropping grenades down through holes in our ceiling, theirfloor. and he went up and, sure enough,
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to show our little methods were working, he indicated to me that there was enemy up there. and that enabled us to work out a way of getting up onto the next floor without using the stairs. by the time the end of the operation came and we'd broken out of the roof, we'd already realised that we'd cleared the building. and i looked down and it was only then that reality bit and i took stock of what had actually happened to my dog over the course of the last, sort of, eight hours. he had quite a large laceration under his... just under his sternum, on the inside of his legs as well. again, his ear had a bit of a hole blown in it. all of us had been peppered with fragments from multiple grenades that had gone off. from operations that we'd been on previously, he had shown his...
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really shown his mettle and built a reputation among all the guys, so, as i say, by the time we launched onto this operation we really felt that we had a guardian angel amongst us, nothing was going to happen to us. well, earlier on i had the pleasure of meeting mali and his current handler corporal daniel hatley — who trained him as a puppy. an amazing dog to train. picks stuff up really quickly, loves to... wants to work, wants to learn. his general character, he's just a very funny dog, if that makes sense. he can always make you smile. right. and what's that training process like? it's quite intensive. you have to sort of constantly be teaching a dog. dogs learn very much through repetition, so we have to do things a lot of time for them to sort of pick it up by themselves. it's a very slow process with good progression but, again, very, very long process. we can see him in action now.
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yeah. how does he compared to other dogs who were serving in the military? he's just like any other dog that's serving in the military, butjust what he did on that day makes him stand out. he's having a lovely time, there. very comfortable on our rug! what exactly happened on that day? insurgency seized a multi—storey building in kabul, and an assault force was sent forward to obviously go and retrieve that building off coalition forces. and mali was the dog that was used on that operation, and he was sent into the building ahead of the forces to look for ieds and any potential enemy combatants. and he was hurt badly. he was. he received blast injuries from two grenades. he kept going. obviously afterwards he did receive some injuries that he had to be treated for at the end of the operation. and how long did it take for mali to recover? hello!
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he was initially treated in afghanistan and was flown back to the uk a few weeks after that. from a general point of view he was pretty fit and healthy when he got back, but it was more just a healing process and stopping infection and getting him back to normal. it's quite rare for animals to win this award. i think mali is the only living animal to have won it in seven or eight years, is that right? i believe so, yeah. so how many dogs are used in combat? hundreds. if you go back to afghanistan in the sort of height of the conflict, there could have been anything sort of 130 plus dogs in afghanistan at the time. they are a massive, massive need for the forces. the guys want them on the ground, you know? everyone wants a dog on the ground. training's one thing, but what's it like when they are actually in a live situation? that training has to kick in. a lot of that must be dependent on the relationship that the dog, mali, has with its handler? absolutely. the bond is so imperative, and the bond he had with his handler was phenomenal, and that's why, you know, they worked together so well as a team and that's why, you know, he did what he did
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on the day and he kept going, you know? no training can prepare a dog for what he went through on that day, so for him to just keep going and get on with it and keep working through everything that happened was phenomenal. and he actually saved lives on that day? absolutely, yeah. absolutely saved lives. coming up: a survey suggest more than a quarter of scams happen at christmas — with some victims losing hundreds of pounds. time for the latest news — here's annita. thank you. good morning, everyone. david davis has there is growing pressure for a breakthrough before the end of the year. in the past half—hour,
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president mugabe has made his first public appearance since the military ta keover public appearance since the military takeover in zimbabwe on wednesday. the 93—year—old seen here meeting the head of the army yesterday is attending a university graduation ceremony in the capital. he has reportedly refused to step down immediately, despite growing calls for his resignation. police investigating the disappearance of a teenager in dorset are continuing to question a man arrested yesterday on suspicion of her murder. 19—year—old gaia pope was last seen in swanage ten days ago. the 49—year—old suspect is believed to be known to gaia. the pay packages of senior police officers have been published in a central database for the first time. figures for 261 officers up to the rank of chief constable, reveal wide variations — some receive thousands of pounds in benefits, a small number claim large sums in expenses and others are paid nothing but a salary. the figures have been published by the home office as part of an attempt to increase transparency across forces in england and wales. the actor sylvester stallone has
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denied sexually assaulting a 16—year—old girl in a hotel room in las vegas in 1986. he was responding to reports giving details of a police account of the teenager's claims. no action was taken against the actor at the time. sylvester stallone's spokeswoman said it was a "categorically false story". that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now with hugh. england have battled their way to a respectable if uninspiring score against australia. a terrible start less tha n against australia. a terrible start less than 16—4 at one stage, danny wyatt's 50 aided the recovery before she was run out. england currently 130-8, she was run out. england currently 130—8, just a couple of balls from the end of their innings. just six days until the men's ashes starts,
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moeen ali has shown some form with the ball. he has taken two wickets as england started their final warm up as england started their final warm up match against the australian 11. bbc sport understands former england women's head coach lee kendall admitted to using a fake caribbean accent towards eni aluko, as part of an fa investigation. kendall was cleared of "unacceptable behaviour" by the fa before stepping down from his role yesterday. and sir bradley wiggins will launch his competitive rowing career next month when he takes on the gb rowing team at the british rowing indoor championships. the 2012 tour de france winner says he may be a bit delusional. we'll see if he could do the job on the water as well. i will be back with a little more sport after ten o'clock. see you then. it's emerged that hundreds of domestic violence perpetrators are using animal cruelty as a weapon against their victims, according to figures seen by 5 live investigates. more than 700 calls made to the national domestic violence helpline, run by the charities women's aid and refuge, and women's aid in wales last year involved animal cruelty.
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other women report being unable to leave violent situations because they're worried about their pets. before we discuss this, i should warn you that you might find the subject matter unsetting. we can speak to adrian goldberg from 5live investigates. adrian, good morning. what the scale of this? as you say, these figures are from the national domestic violence helpline, they are the closest that we have got, no figures are compiled by any official body around this, so this isjust are compiled by any official body around this, so this is just a snapshot, and they show that of calls to the helpline last year, something like 6500 calls relating to domestic abuse, when victims were asked the question, has the perpetrator being involved in harming your pet or animal cruelty, 631 in england said that the perpetrator had been. if you throw in the figures from wales, that's
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closer to 700 perpetrators of domestic abuse who have also been involved in animal cruelty. in england alone, those figures amount to around one in ten of the perpetrators of domestic abuse also having a history of violence towards pets. but i should stress, the campaigners and charities involved in this believe that the true figure is likely to be much higher, because victims often won't blow the whistle on the abuse to their pets because they fear the pet may be taken away from them. and what is the evidence linking animal cruelty to domestic violence? it is very difficult to prove a causal link, but there is a growing body of research, particularly from the united states, suggesting that there is a link between those willing to perpetrate animal abuse and domestic abuse. speaking and anecdotally this week to an officer involved in domestic violence, he had looked at his ten most high—risk cases of domestic abuse, cases where the victim was in
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severe danger of losing their life or of being seriously injured. of those top ten, the top ten most at risk cases, in six of those cases, the perpetrator also had a history of animal cruelty. i should say as well it isn't just of animal cruelty. i should say as well it isn'tjust about of animal cruelty. i should say as well it isn't just about violence towards animals. it can also be about what is called coercive control, where a perpetrator may use the threat of violence towards a family pet in order to get what they wa nt family pet in order to get what they want and get compliance from their victim. how can we improve the identification of this? there is a charity called links, they go around teaching undergraduate, trainee vets, to spot the possible incidents of nonaccidental injury to animals, but also of the possible links between animal cruelty and domestic abuse, but at the moment, training is not mandatory for vets in this
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area, sporting a potential link between animal cruelty and domestic abuse. there are campaigners who think that that should be a compulsory part of that undergraduate training. at the moment, the british veterinary association is resisting that, but campaigners say that this is essential to protect both animals and victims of domestic abuse. adriaan, thank you very much. we can speak now to gemma willis, whose former partner was jailed for 13 and a half years for his violence and abuse. with her is dusty, who she was scared he would kill if she left him. in the end, she sought help from a pet fostering programme which discreetly housed him while she made her escape. she has waived her right to anonymity to highlight this form of extreme psychological and emotional abuse. and we also welcome clare kivlehan, who started the domestic violence dog fostering project at the dogs trust. gemma, how did your partner use
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violence against dusty to get at you? it was a different number of things, different occasions depending on what he would do. it was pure anger when it came to richard, for the last 12 months, he was just full of anger. so it wasn't just me that got it anyway, they didn't need to be a reason or excuse, and there was no blackmail or bribery involved, he was just that i rate, he'd hurt me and then go out into the garden and take it out on the dogs. he even pulled a pigeon's head off and through the body at me. so you had two dogs? what happened to the other one?” had to go into refuge, and i was panicking i would lose both the dogs, so a friend of mine offered to ta ke dogs, so a friend of mine offered to take one, she has still got her and ican take one, she has still got her and i can still see her, but i had to keep dusty. and when you say that he would take it out on dusty, what
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would take it out on dusty, what would he do? he pinned him in the corner in the shed, beaten him, hit him with shovels, he picked lola up and literally threw her across the garden. he would punch him. hejust wasn't nice. choke him, threw a piece of wood at him and marked as i. it must have been so difficult for you, because you don't want to leave him, but at the same time, he is with you and you suffered a lot of abuse at the hands of your partner who has beenjailed for what he did to you. what were your options at the time when this was happening? did you even know about the option of a dog fostering programme? i didn't have a clue. the day i left, i told him i was going to walk the dogs, and i never went back. i took my son to school, got to my mums, the police were there, they said i needed to go into refuge, i had already lost
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everything, because i was quite nervous, i had myself, my dogs, my son, and that is all i had left. irene holmes lola in 24 hours, and i rang the refuge and said, i have a dog, i need to bring him with me. wherever i go, he is coming with me, and the refuge said, you can't come with you. so you could bring him, but you couldn't take into the refuge? they gave me an number and said, they might not be able to help you, but there might be some direction they could point you in. soi direction they could point you in. so i made the phone call and i dealt with a lady called sarah the whole way through even while he was in foster ca re, way through even while he was in foster care, and she got me a straight placement for him. he was taken on february the 1st and looked after until i got him back. taken on february the 1st and looked after untili got him back. it taken on february the 1st and looked after until i got him back. it has been a journey of recovery for you both. dusty is a beautiful dog. been a journey of recovery for you both. dusty is a beautiful d to their didn't know what happened to their pet if they left behind. we know that refuges are not in a position because of the setup to be able to bring pets in, so we knew that we
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had to do something in the situations to get people away from the violence, but also from their pets. what is your response to gemma's story? we know that she has been through a huge ordeal, and it was so been through a huge ordeal, and it was so great that we were able to help dusty, and we work with the refuges direct, so that when people are third, they can let us know that they need our help and they can go into foster. and how many people know that this even exists? not many. since i came out with my anonymity, even with a local newspapers, it is overwhelming the response i get, with regards to women who were not aware of this. i had done some research and seen that it had been running, but it was literally in london, it hasn't been up literally in london, it hasn't been up in north yorkshire for very long. and now they are launching up there. it is hard to explain, but without sounding silly, dusty was like my baby, and! sounding silly, dusty was like my baby, and i wasn't leaving the house without him, so i know how other
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women feel when you think of the abuse you are getting, whether it be physical, emotional, mental, whatever, i know what it is like that you don't want to leave your pets. obituary lies how important it is, if that means you are then staying, and how many people end up staying, and how many people end up staying in abusive situations because they don't want to be separated from their pet. and it is the fear of them being hurt. over 5296 the fear of them being hurt. over 52% of the clients we work with thought that their pets had been abused or threatened with abuse, so you can see the scale of it. we know it is underreported by clients, because they feel the guilt personally, they feel the attachment to their pet and the guilt that it might be something they did all their fault that their pet has been abused, but we know that people stay in those situations unless they know there is somewhere for their pets to go. what about people who may be watching, and you think you need to get yourself out of that situation, especially if you have children, and
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shouldn't be prioritising your pet in that? you don't, it is not prioritising. to be fair, me personally, dusty holds the same level of commitment, passion, loyalty a nd level of commitment, passion, loyalty and mothering as logan does. and logan is your boy? he is. he is seven. so they are both equal. so to me, it was protecting him as well. it just me, it was protecting him as well. itjust all came me, it was protecting him as well. it just all came into me, it was protecting him as well. itjust all came into one. you don't think of any sort, there is nothing is running around you, it is, this is running around you, it is, this is what i have to do, this is who i need to protect, and if i walk out of the door, they have to come with me. and your partner wasn't violent towards logan. no. no. and is this scheme going to be running out across the uk? yes, it has been running in13 across the uk? yes, it has been running in 13 regions, we're extending to scotland, the north—east, the northwest and all of the home counties. we know more and
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more people are in this situation and they need to know about the project and they need to be able to get our help. thank you all very much indeed. you can hear more on this story on sunday at 11am on radio 5live with 5live investigates. and if you need help with any of the issues we've just talked about, you can find charities which offer support at the bbc action line — bbc.co.uk/actionline. coming up: theresa may says she hopes eu leaders will respond positively to her brexit proposals. christmas shoppers are being warned to watch out for online scams, as research suggests fraudsters are particularly likely to strike during the festive season. a survey of people who have been scammed found that in more than a quarter of cases, it happened at christmas with some victims losing hundreds of pounds. let's speak now to ross martin who is head of cyber digital eagles at barclays, andrew mcclelland who is head of insight at imrg,
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which is the uk's industry association for online retail. and to rishi chowdhury, was has been targeted by fraudsters online. let's start with you, what happened? soi let's start with you, what happened? so i was actually on holiday over new year and i found so i was actually on holiday over new year and ifound pay so i was actually on holiday over new year and i found pay pay pal account had been accused and four payments had been taken out. so i was given a notification a few days after and that is the first i found out about it. how much are we talking? 2,000 altogether. four payments of 500. pay pal thought that was fishy and let me know. what did you do? at the time, i was abroad and i had to call them and put ina abroad and i had to call them and put in a support request. it wasn't the quickest of kind of getting that result. but thankfully i got my money back in the end. how long did
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it take? probably took a couple of weeks in total. by the time i got through to someone and got a response and they started working on it. was there a question mark over whether you would get the money back? it was a bit different to the bank, because the bank are normally quite quick and you can get your money back quickly. at the point, i was like not sure. but thankfully i did get it back. how much of an impact did it have on you losing 2,000 when you have to wait to get it back? yes thankfully it wasn't my day—to—day spending money there. but it still had an impact in terms of ami it still had an impact in terms of am i going to get it back. has it changed how you shop online and how you behave? it has made me more, i work in tech and i think i'm fairly good with keeping myself safe online. but yeah, certain things
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like setting up identification and things like that you put off, because of ease or you know it is quicker without it. it is a good example of the fact it can happen to anyone. people seem to have the idea it is stupid people who are targeted, why would you click through to an e—mail or people have done something. more than a quarter of the scams are happening at christmas, how you protecting your customers. barclays a educating and creating awareness. our digital eagle programme means we can deliver digital safety sessions. there are simple things we can do to protect ourselves and education is the key. what the practical steps to protect people who bank with you? there are
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some simple things we can do. if we look at shopping at christmas, think about verify being web—sites that we are using. not divulging any pass words or official information. this is the easiest way for people to exploit us. are customers always protected who bank with you, if i have been targeted online and somebody‘s taken money, how long would i have to wait to get it back? we would like to refund customers in as little as 24 hours, almost immediately if they have been the innocent victim. that is something we will promote. if, are there any circumstances where you wouldn't refu nd circumstances where you wouldn't refund a customer? what we have to be aware of is we have all have a pa rt be aware of is we have all have a part to play as the customer, if you are the victim of a scam but you
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have instigated transaction you would be liable. if we instigate a transaction you could be at fault. ifi transaction you could be at fault. if i get an e—mailfrom somebody saying they're the taxman or the bank, if i then click through and that results in money being taken from my account, are you saying i wouldn't necessarily get a refund. if you have divulged personal details to enable the fraudster to commit the fraud there could be an issue. but we will look at each case individually. what about the fact that some of criminals are using bank accounts with mainstream banks like yourselves, aren't you doing more to crackdown on them? there is a huge amount of work we are doing to investigate how accounts are used and to almost anticipate when there is fraud taking place and look to
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shut those accounts quickly. security is always high priority for ba rclays. we a re security is always high priority for barclays. we are looking at new ways to protect the bank and our customers. andrew, why do you think more than a quarter of scams happen at christmas? one of the challenges that we as customers and user when we get into the mode of shopping or doing any transaction we focus on the task in hand and become blivengerred to some —— blinkered to some of the warning signs that are obvious. so as has been said, there isa obvious. so as has been said, there is a lot of advice about things 5 to look out for. sometimes it isjust ta ke look out for. sometimes it isjust take a moment. if an offer is too good to be true there is a chance it is. we are approaching one of
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biggest on online christmases. we tend to see an increase in people not being as careful perhaps as they could be, because we are all getting caught up in the idea of getting the task done, moving through the transaction and we often miss some of the warning signs. how are scams becoming more sophisticated? a lot of it, because a lot of it is technically is based they're able to re—create brands and messages to the smallest detail and as your previous speaker said, even someone with a tech background can get fooled by some of this stuff. it is, they're very good at re—creating the look of a brand, whether that is the tax authorities, the bank or a retail business, they can mimic a lot of that activity and make it difficult to detect, but it comes back down to if that deal looks a bit too good to
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be true, they're trying attract you for a reason. just slow things down and take a bit of care. none of these people seem to be caught, are these people seem to be caught, are the police doing enough to track these people down?” the police doing enough to track these people down? i think that is a difficult question to answer. the police have a finite amount of resources. the retail... this is a growing problem and surely it is a priority? it is a priority. and as i was priority? it is a priority. and as i was saying the banks and retailers are investing in technology, but the fraudsters are often innovating quicker than. there is jurisdiction issues. a lot of this will take place outside the country and we are relying the police having the local connections to follow that through. but it can be a difficult it is task tojoin the dots but it can be a difficult it is task to join the dots together. people
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will mimic brands and banks, where are the places they're targeting people online? often it will be offers through e—mail. sometimes through social media. classified adverts on listing web—sites. there isa adverts on listing web—sites. there is a lot of ways they can get the message in front of consumer. we would suggest one way of avoiding this, you see an offer coming through that looks too good to be true, step away from the e—mail and go directly to the brand's web—site and see if that offer is on the brand's web—site and go somewhere where you would expect to see the information. is anything practically that you can check, what obvious things you canlike at to identify —— can look at to identify it? the first and most obvious though
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sometimes the hardest to to detective is does detect is does the web—site look like the real one. looking for things you would expect to see. does the web—site you see on the shop hg bag the same as the web—site address. it is making sure does the text look right. is the grammar right. you don't have to be an english expert, but if the way products and services are being described doesn't seem quite right, brands spend a lot of time making sure the english and punctuation is right, sojust sure the english and punctuation is right, so just double sure the english and punctuation is right, sojust double check on whether it makes sense and does it fit with your expectations of that brand. thank you very much. cars
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driven by female characters who starred along 007 have gone on display in an exhibition in london. let's ta ke display in an exhibition in london. let's take a look. now the weather. i could just do with a heated windscreen! it was another frosty start this morning. particularly for england and wales, where we saw the low est of the temperatures, down to minus four in some places. we have some sunshine, but a few have avoided the frost in the west, because of the breeze. some cloud in north—west england and wales. but showers for the north and west of scotland and they will continue through the day and some will be heavy with hail and snow over the high ground. most of the uk stays dry. the lightest of the winds
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further south. after 15 degrees yesterday, 10 is the most we will imagine. it will stay on the cold side. cold for the evening commute home and further showers in scotland that will become more widespread and into northern ireland and northern england. and at midnight, the leonid meteor shower peaks tonight. the best advice is view early on, because cloud amounts will increase. showers in scotland and northern england. but there will be some gaps between the showers and the best of the gaps in eastern scotland and the south of england. it is here where we will see temperatures drop the furthest. a frost is expected. but not as widespread or as cold as it was last night. but it makes for a chilly start to the weekend and tomorrow expect more cloud, england and wales in particular. the cloud will come and go in the midlands and
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wales and southern england. there will be drier weather. showers in the north and east clear. but it remains damp throughout south wales and south—west england. here mild air trying to push in. but for most the cold air holds on and it will be that battle between mild and cold airforthe that battle between mild and cold airfor the rest of that battle between mild and cold air for the rest of weekend. the cold air comes back on saturday night. and the frost back on sunday. but mild air will try to work its way. linked to this front. painfully slow progress, but that does make for drier day for many. clouding overin for drier day for many. clouding over in the west. in the east we will see the brightest of the weather on sunday. that is how it is looking. hello, it's friday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm tina daheley,
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welcome to the programme. theresa may says she hopes eu leaders will respond ‘positively‘ to her brexit proposals as she arrives at a summit in sweden. david davis wants the eu to do more. we have been offering some quite creative compromises — we haven't always got that back. we will be live in gothenberg in just a moment. the parents facing eviction because of the "noise" from their crying baby. we'll be speaking to the father. and the top dog awarded britain's highest military medal for bravery. it was phenomenal, they worked together so well as a team, and he did what he did so well on the day, and he kept going, no training can prepare a dog for what he went through on that day. good morning. here's annita mcveigh in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. good morning. in the past hour,
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president mugabe has made his first appearance since the military ta keover of appearance since the military takeover of zimbabwe on wednesday. the 93—year—old, seen here meeting the head of the army yesterday, is attending a university graduation ceremony in the capital harare. he's reportedly refusing to step down immediately, despite growing calls for his resignation. the president of the european council is expected to tell theresa may not to assume that post—brexit trade phase of negotiations. we wa nt we want to move forward together, talking about the new partnership on
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trade. i look forward to the european union is responding positively on that so that we can move forward together and ensure that we get the best possible arrangements for the future so that we can get the best arrangement for the uk and the remaining eu 27. police investigating the disappearance of a teenager in dorset are continuing to question a man arrested yesterday on suspicion of her murder. 19—year—old gaia pope was last seen in swanage 10 days ago. the 49—year—old suspect is believed to be known to gaia. the pay packages of senior police officers have been published in a central database for the first time. figures for 261 officers up to the rank of chief constable, reveal wide variations — some receive thousands of pounds in benefits, a small number claim large sums in expenses and others are paid nothing but a salary. the figures have been published by the home office as part of an attempt to increase transparency across forces in england and wales. the actor sylvester stallone has denied sexually assaulting a 16—year—old girl in a hotel room in las vegas in 1986. he was responding to reports giving details of a police account
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of the teenager's claims. no action was taken against the actor at the time. sylvester stallone's spokeswoman said it was a "categorically false story". the number of foreign visitors to the uk rose during the summer. official figures show that the number of foreign visitors coming to the uk during august rose compared with the same month last year, but the number of britons travelling abroad fail. analysts say it is the latest sign of how the fall in the value of the pound is helping the uk's tourism industry. a military dog that helped save the lives of troops in afghanistan is being awarded the animal equivalent of the victoria cross. mali will receive the dickin medal, after being seriously injured during an operation to clear insurgents from a building in kabul in 2012. despite his injuries he carried on performing his duties, but eventually had to be carried to safety.
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and that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. i'm veryjealous you're getting to meet lots of lovely dogs in the studio today! i know, it has been an absolute treat. some of your messages coming in about mali, a heroic dog who saved lives in afghanistan, the bond we have with military dogs is special. another tweet saying, why would you want to hurt the dog? we had dusty on too, kaler said, what a brave lady, it takes a lot of courage to come forward and tell your story, so glad it has all worked out well for her. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. time to get some sport now with hugh. all the focus on the women's
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ashes this morning. in blood have —— england have been set a target, they had a terrible start, losing captain had a terrible start, losing captain had a terrible start, losing captain had a night onjust had a terrible start, losing captain had a night on just the second ball of the innings, and they were reduced to 16—4 and in real trouble before a half—century from wyatt helped to steady things. but then she was cheaply run out without adding another run. fran wilson got 23, and a multitude of dropped catches which australia could yet come to regret. in reply, playing very well, 30 without loss after four overs. and australia's when seen “— four overs. and australia's when seen —— men seem confident of victory, they have opted to release their squad details early.
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wicketkeeper tim paine is back, seven wicketkeeper tim paine is back, seve n yea rs wicketkeeper tim paine is back, seven yea rs since wicketkeeper tim paine is back, seven years since his last test appearance. he admits he thought his career was over. it is exciting, i think it is the biggest series in cricket, and to happen to be here in australia is brilliant. i made a test seven years ago, but i feel like i'm about to make it again, so it is extremely exciting, and i'm pumped for it. england's batsmen are in control of theirfinal pumped for it. england's batsmen are in control of their final warm up match ahead of thursday's brisbane test. moeen ali struck on day three to leave england leading the australian cricket 11 by 144 runs ahead of tomorrow's final day. bbc sport understands that the former england women's goalkeeping coach lee kendall did admit to using a fa ke lee kendall did admit to using a fake caribbean accents towards any aluko as part of an fa investigation kendall was cleared of unacceptable behaviour by the fa before stepping down from his role yesterday. his admission was not included in the fa statement, who said no further
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action was necessary. sir bradley wiggins is set to make his competitive rowing debut at next month's british indoor champion chips. the 2012 tour de france winner will compete in the 2000 metre race at london's olympic velodrome on the 9th of december. he retired from cycling in december 2016, and admits it may be a bit of a delusional decision. and england have taken their first wicket in that vital t20 match, 30—1 now, australia, after four of their 20 overs, they are chasing 123 for victory. thank you. eu council president donald tusk is expected to tell theresa may to give up hope of starting post—brexit trade talks before christmas. the prime minister is meeting mr tusk at a summit in gothenburg in sweden later. he says the eu needs more clarity from mrs may on the current round of negotiations. speaking to the bbc this morning, the brexit secretary david davis the prime minister said she wanted
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to move forward together in negotiation with eu leaders. those continue, and we look forward to meeting the european council, and we are continuing to look through the issues. i was clear in florence that we will honour our commitments, but of course we want to move forward together, talking about the trade issues in partnership for the future. i have set out a vision for that economic partnership, and i look forward to the european union responding positively to that so that we can move forward together and ensure that we get the best possible arrangements for the future that will be good for people in the united kingdom and across the remaining eu 27. thank you. our correspondent kevin connolly is in gothenburg. how do you think it will go down with her european counterparts? i'm sure theresa may would love to know
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the answer to that! very interesting the answer to that! very interesting the prime minister has come all this way to talk about core subject matter of this european summit, which is the future of workers' rights, that won't take effect until long after the uk has ceased to be a member. theresa may's business here is brexit, she has had a series of bilateral meetings already with the leaders of poland, ireland and sweden, we think she has more planned and she will have that key meeting with donald tusk. you heard there that this is a time for eve ryo ne there that this is a time for everyone to start thinking about moving forward together. the problem is that other european leaders just don't see this as a kind of moment of mutual opportunity, which is how theresa may and david davis like to portray it. they see it as a matter of damage limitation, and i think most crucially of all, where the uk is calling on the european negotiators to show a little creativity, the realfeeling on the european side is that it was a
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britain that decided to leave the eu, and therefore even now, critically at this moment with the december summit looming, any movement, the next movement, has to come from britain, and realistically has to be about money. kevin connelly, thank you very much. so what does the rest of europe make of the current state of talks? let's talk now to italian mep and chair of the powerful committee on economic and monetary affairs, roberto gualtieri from the progressive alliance of socialists and democrats, german mep hans—olaf henkel from the european conservatives and reformists group, and hungarian mep dr gyorgy schopflin from the european people's party. a very good morning to you. roberto, what is your response to david davis's comments yesterday and theresa may's this morning? we look forward to start the discussion on the framework of the future
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relationship that has been opened by the speech of david davis. i would have a lot of comments about the number of points he made, but as everybody knows, to start the discussion, we need to have sufficient progress in the first phase, and we are not there. so i really hope, i urge our counterpart to allow this to happen, so to allow us to start this discussion by a arriving to the sufficient progress in the three areas. we still have some important but not so minor issues open on the citizens rights but for us the first priority, for us in the parliament, and we are able of course to secure a deal on the financial settlement, which has to implement what theresa may has already said, that the uk will honour all the commitments they can to its membership, which is a fair principle, but has to be translated
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ina principle, but has to be translated in a printable agreement so that we can in a printable agreement so that we ca n start in a printable agreement so that we can start phase two and to skuse the points made by david davis, and i would highlight that he had some contradiction, but we have to start there. and what do you make of david davis saying that there are a range of concerns across europe, the biggest one being that the british departure will be an example to others. let me at the outset say that i have been against brexit, but that i have been against brexit, but that i have been against brexit, but that i do believe that one should respect the vote of the british people, and as you heard from a italian colleague, they talk about to conditions which barnier has asked britain before they can start trade talks. there is a third condition, by the way, which he made asa condition, by the way, which he made as a condition, that is that britain should come up with a solution for the border between northern ireland
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and ireland. let me take this as an example. how can britain be expected to come up with a solution without knowing what kind of a trade or custom steel is in place? and by refusing to let britain now start to talk about this particular area, the customs deal, the european commission makes it very difficult for britain to come up with a proposal. on the basis of money, i asked my italian colleague a very simple question. if you go into a shop, you don't name the price without knowing what you're going to get for it. so how do we move forward , get for it. so how do we move forward, then? well, i think we should move forward by the eu letting britain to start on the trade negotiations now, and not like michel barnier said, i do you do this within two weeks, or else. in
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my view, the european community does a bit of blackmailing here, because these three conditions, two of those cannot be fulfilled without knowing what kind of a trade deal exists, is that logical? dr gyorgy schopflin, do you think some progress will be made before christmas?” do you think some progress will be made before christmas? i would like to hope so, but i am as a mystic. what i see is that the united kingdom has had any amount of time to prepare its position, and is doing so very slowly, and there is not really that much actual negotiation. the european union's position has been very clear since april this year, the council mandate, barnier has made his position clear, and i think the problem has arisen because the british side has not come up with anything that the european union, the commission side could actually engage with. sol
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the commission side could actually engage with. so i hope this changes, but it really does look as if there won't be any movement in december at the summit, and who knows at that point when they move into the next stage, when they will start talking about the trade deal. you say even if brexit was called off, britain wouldn't be allowed backin off, britain wouldn't be allowed back in the same way. yes, things have moved on. you remember the jean—claude juncker speech, the state of eu, brexit was dealt with ina state of eu, brexit was dealt with in a sentence and a half. it means for the 27 brexit has become a side issue. it is quite astonishing in its own way that the united kingdom of course is still one of 28 legally, but politically less and less so. the interface between london and brussels is diminishing all the time. thank you all. still to come: it's going to become illegal
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for sports coaches to have a sexual relationship with 16 and 17 year olds in their care. will young people in sport feel safer? we'll speak to the ceo of uk coaching. robert mugabe, the man who has ruled zimbabwe with an iron fist for nearly four decades, has been seen in public for the first time since the military takeover at a university graduation ceremony in harare. these are the aimenings of robert mugabe. he wore slowly along a red carpet and joined the crowd of graduates singing the national anthem. our correspondent is in zimbabwe. how much progress has been
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made? we don't know, the military says they're continuing negotiations. there is a team from the neighbouring country, south africa, here trying to broker a deal. the development today is very significant of robert mugabe stepping out of his official residence, because up until yesterday we were aware that the military had confined him to his residence. but the military is keen to make this not look like a coup and don't alienate robert mugabe's supporters who have a lot of respect for him. the military itself has a lot of respect for robert mugabe and thatis lot of respect for robert mugabe and that is a challenge to the negotiations, because many people we understand would rather he steps down and that he makes the decision himself to step down. but sources say that robert mugabe has indicated he would like to serve his full term until the election. that would mean
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elections next year. it is interesting that the military is determined not to make this look like a coup with the photographs we saw and this footage. why are they so scared about that? that would have repercussions for them regionamly and internationally. the african union suspended egypt from the regional body when a military coup was executed there. so they would not want to alienate their allies in the region. and they also are allies in the region. and they also a re careful to allies in the region. and they also are careful to make sure that they hand over power from are careful to make sure that they hand over powerfrom one are careful to make sure that they hand over power from one civilian leader to another without you know it looking like they have taken over the leadership of the country. partly because of dynamics in the country, robert mugabe is a respected figure and as we understand it he isn't really the problem here. it is his wife and her ambition to succeed him. but she has
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been absent and she isn't attending the ceremony her husband is presiding over now. and also absent is the ministerfor presiding over now. and also absent is the minister for higher education who is a close ally of mrs mugabe, who is a close ally of mrs mugabe, who we understand the military is also holding. thank you. if you were watching the programme with chloe yesterday, you'll have seen former footballer andy woodward making a powerful call for more to be done to protect young sports players from abuse. well since that interview the sports minister tracey crouch has announced tougher rules for sports coaches. we'll here more about what she's proposing in a moment. first here's a clip from andy's interview. personally, after doing all the studies and all the research and the groups of people that have supported me over the last year, i don't believe that it's a safer place than it was a year ago. but i have the tools and the knowledge and the understanding and also the groups of people around me that can make that change now and will make it a much
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safer place for children, because that's what it's all about. and this can't happen again, what happened all them years ago to all these players, this cannot happen again. in parliament yesterday, sports minister tracey crouch responded directly to andy's comments made on this programme. as a consequence of that courage, he has made sure that we in government and other parts of the sporting sector are taking this issue incredibly seriously. which is why i'm actually pleased to announce that i have secured ministerial agreement with the department ofjustice, the ministry ofjustice and the home office, to change laws on the position of trust so that it includes sports coaches. so, that means it'll become illegal for sports coaches to have a sexual relationship with 16 and 17 year olds in their care. does that mean young people in sport can now feel safer? joining me is the ceo of uk
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coaching, mark gannon and with me in the studio is almudena lara from the nspcc. mark, why isn't this illegal already? it is a good question. i don't know. it is a position that we as uk coaching and the nspcc have been advocating for a long time. the good position about the position about trust it is notjust the sexual consent of 16 and 17—year—olds. it is about a duty of ca re 17—year—olds. it is about a duty of care preventing harm to people taking part in sport. we welcome the announcement. how much of a difference do you think it will actually make? i think it is a strong step, a bold statement towards making better improvements. there has been a lot done in recent yea rs, there has been a lot done in recent years, but this is a powerful statement to take us further. i still think there is some work to be done. sports are regulated and
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advised by the nspcc and the government. but i still think there is some centralisation that would allow us to have a better understanding of who is coaching and what they're doing. let' bring in the nspcc, the age of consent in the uk is 16, although that is 18 if a person holds a position of trust. it cove rs person holds a position of trust. it covers teachers and carers, but not coaches. yes and that is a gap in the law. we need to make sure that gap is closed. what is your response to this news? we welcome the news andl to this news? we welcome the news and i think it comes at a good time. but not as early as we would have liked to see it happening and we need to make sure it goes from the promise to change the law into actual changing the law. so that children can be safer. do you think the law goes far enough? we think the law goes far enough? we think the changes to the law need to be
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extended beyond coaches to other adults in a position of trust, like people in youth workers that have access to young people and can manipulate the access they have to their own benefit. what more can sports clubs do in general? what we advocate is that sports clubs should have a strong safe guarding policy in place and the safe guarding of children is taken seriously and that would mean that all the club understand the needs and the requirements to keep children safe as well as parents and carers so they can actually demand from the sports club that the children in theircare are kept sports club that the children in their care are kept safe. is that their care are kept safe. is that the case for all sports clubs, mark? yes it is. i think one of the challenges is those clubs that are not necessarily governed by a
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national body. it is the providers who are not aligned. that is not to say there is not great coaching going on, but there should be a better system. what sorts of sports are they? well, it is not sports necessarily, maybe somebody who has been a participant in sport and they're setting up their own classes or sporting activities, but they're not necessarily aligned to a governing body. if you're a parent and your child is going to a sports club, what should you look out for? to see if the club is aligned to the national governing body of the sport or the local authority so, then there are measures they have to adhere to and that puts more safeguarding in place. it is important we recognise there are a
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lot of people coaching and we acknowledge some of the concerning things that have come to light, we have to make sure we do all we can to make sure it is safe. there is a lot of good coaching and we need to sure we mitigate this. what is your advice to parents? parents need to encourage children to take part in activities and shouldn't be scared, because most of the coaching is good coaching and children are safe. but they need to keep alert to the signs of grooming by adults in sports activities. if the child feels isolated or starts changing behaviour, they need to be alert to those signs and they need to raise those signs and they need to raise those with the child and with the adults that they take. what impact has andy woodward speaking out has
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on calls to you. it is brilliant to have people with high profiles speaking. that raises awareness. i don't think we would be here today if it were not for his bravery. and we need to make sure that people feel free to talk and feel safe to talk about things that go in sports or behind closed doors. so we can ensure that children are kept safe. do you think the law needs to be extended to other areas. yes. what are they? to other youth activities. for example? when children going to activities that are not regulated like the scout activities or they have after school activities that might not pass the threshold of a regulated sport but actually involves adults spending time with children and gaining their trust and
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having access to them. thank you very much. still to come a campaign be against cuts to bereavement pay. i want to read you one message from kim on facebook, a lot of you have been getting in touch to do with pet violence. good news about pet fostering forfamily, violence. good news about pet fostering for family, experiencing domestic abuse. 17 years ago i left an abusive relationship. i put up partly because of not wanting to lose my pet. i learned it was a common factor. keep your messages coming in. now time for the latest news. time for the latest news — here's annita. in the past hour, president mugabe has made his first public appearance since military takeover in zimbabwe on wednesday.
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the 93—year old, who has been held under house, appeared at a graduation ceremony at a university in the capital harare. he's reportedly refusing to step down immediately, despite growing calls for his resignation. the president of the european council is expected to tell theresa may not to assume that post—brexit trade talks will start as she hopes next month. theresa may will meet the president of the european council in sweden later, where he's expected to warn that she might not achieve her aim of starting post—brexit trade talks next month. it's thought donald tusk will again demand more clarity from the prime minister on the uk's plans to settle the first phase of negotiations. police investigating the disappearance of a teenager in dorset are continuing to question a man arrested yesterday on suspicion of her murder. 19—year—old gaia pope was last seen in swanage 10 days ago. the 49—year—old suspect is believed to be known to gaia. way you the pay packages of senior police officers have been published in a central database for the first time.
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figures for 261 officers up to the rank of chief constable, reveal wide variations — some receive thousands of pounds in benefits, a small number claim large sums in expenses and others are paid nothing but a salary. the figures have been published by the home office as part of an attempt to increase transparency across forces in england and wales. the number of foreign visitors to the uk rose during the summer. officialfigures, show the number of international tourists coming to the country in august rose by 5% to 3.9 million, compared with the same month last year. however the number of britons travelling abroad fell. analysts say it's the latest sign of how the fall in the value of the pound is helping the uk's tourism industry. were. it does look great, australia
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could retain their women's ashes title, and they have started very well indeed, they have lost a couple of wickets. best mini's half—century have helped push them now to 77—2 after ten of their 20 overs, so they are well on their way to the 133. just six days until the men's ashes starts, and mowing alley has shown form, taking two wickets in the final warm form, taking two wickets in the finalwarm up form, taking two wickets in the final warm up match. they will take a lead of 144 into the final day. bbc sport understands that the former england women's head coach lee kendall admitted to using a fake caribbean accent towards any aluko. kendall was cleared of unacceptable behaviour before stepping down from his role yesterday. and sir bradley wiggins will launch his competitive rowing career next month. that is when he takes on the gb rowing team
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at the british indoor champion chips. the 2012 tour de france winner says he may be a bit delusional, we will see a fierce right on the 9th of december. i will be back with more after 11. thank you, hugh. let's return now to an issue we've discussed on the programme before — the financial support made to families when a parent dies. you may remember that the goverment changed the rules earlier in the year. before april 6th 2017, families would get regular payments for up to 20 years. now they get a larger initial sum, but regular payments stop after 18 months. charities, church leaders and some politicians say the changes leave 75% of uk families affected by bereavement worse off financially, compared to before. days before the bereavement benefit changed, we spoke to a man we called "alan". he had a wife and two young children. he also had incurable cancer. if i were to have died, or still do, in the next couple of days my family will benefit
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from the current support system. two days later, we lose £50,000. what conversations have you had with your family about this? i've explained the situation to them, i've said in some ways it wouldn't be a bad thing if they lost me a couple of days early, because at least there'd be more financial support available. of course, even talking in those terms is very upsetting. and how do they react when you say that? well, they are... they're very shocked that the government, which as far as we all understand, talks a good story about being caring and compassionate,
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but in actual fact has deemed arbitrarily that the period of bereavement which for 70 years has been set by the government as children up to the age of 19 to 20, suddenly the whole process of bereavement is now different, for some unknown and unexplained reason. and theresa may even yesterday supported the theory, no support for it whatsoever, that you can acceptably bereave for 18 months and then suddenly all is well. i know she's not a parent, as such, and may not have some of the emotional feeling and empathy towards children but, nevertheless, her advisers shouldn't have
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let her speak out in such a simplistic way, because we've all had people... known people who had losses, and losses and the pain and the anguish don't suddenly turn off like a tap at month 18. so it was perhaps one of the most naive things someone senior has ever said. alan died a few weeks after this interview. the government says it will monitor and review the effect of bereavement support payment, but a team of charities, experts and bereaved relatives say even more needs to be done to help families who lose a parent of working age. particularly to protect children. welljoining us now is lucy twomey—freidlander, whose husband died in 2015.
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they had four children together. the chair of life matters — ben brooks—dutton. georgia elms, from the charity, widowed & young. and former conservative pensions minister — baroness ros altman. the task force was formed not long after the changes to bereavement pei we re after the changes to bereavement pei were brought in in april. what have you been doing since then? we brought together the task force to fight the changes, and when that didn't happen and the changes went forward , didn't happen and the changes went forward, we realised that even if we had managed to do that, there was a lot that needed to be done, so we have been working together as a community of parisian supporters and bereaved parents and we have looked ata bereaved parents and we have looked at a series of recommendations. we took those policy recommendations to the house of commons earlier this week. their response? it was positive. there were some really good reaction was there, but there is amounting to climb because there is amounting to climb because there is so much that needs to be done. we have made a film which we are asking
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people to share with their mps,... ina people to share with their mps,... in a nutshell, what are the recommendations? the headline is how we find the children, effectively at the moment, bereaved children are invisible, no record is kept. so we put a freedom of information request through to find out how many there were, how many there are, and there is no record whatsoever. why does that matter? because if we can't find them, we can't look at the statistics or get help to them, so local authorities can't know where they are or how they need support, so the first recommendation is to register, when you register a death, that dependent children would be included on that. on my wife's death certificate it doesn't say that she had dependent children, which is what makes them invisible. you can find out how many children are from divorced parents, that statistic is taken divorced parents, that statistic is
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ta ke n every divorced parents, that statistic is taken every year, but when a parent dies, the child becomes invisible. baroness ross orton, you were part of our coverage in april. where do you stand on these changes? after your programme, a cross—party group of us wrote to the secretary of state for the department for work and pensions and asked him to reconsider some of the changes. we understand that the government wanted to simplify bereavement support payments, that is absolutely right. but what i find unacceptable is that the money has been reduced for families with dependent children. it's true that families without dependent children will get more in the new system, but it seems to me absolutely wrong that the government is saying that after 18 months, parents with children who have been bereaved should be over their mourning period and don't need any more support. so what we want to
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encourage the government to do is think again on this one and perhaps introduce specific benefits for children so that after the 18 months, money can be paid to dependent children is a special benefit if they have lost a parent. would that have helped you, lucy? yes. i guess it looks... on paper. they've died before 2017, so i am lucky, on paper. tell us what happened. viv was 36, very well, he was a happened. viv was 36, very well, he was a doctor, i am a nurse, we both worked in the health service, he had finished night shifts, our youngest was finished night shifts, our youngest was nine months old, i was on maternity leave and preparing to go back to work. and he went for his normal sunday run, and he went out to hampstead heath, and he collapsed. he then died, and it is
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you still can't believe you are talking about your family more than two years later. he was taken to hospital, and he died two days later. so it was very sudden, and we worked in the health service, but nothing could prepare you, your world isjust shatters. your children's world shatters. how many children? we have four children, they were all different ages at the time, my youngest nine months old, my four—year—old, my eight—year—old. and ijust my four—year—old, my eight—year—old. and i just remember that my four—year—old, my eight—year—old. and ijust remember that feeling at the hospital, it was one of utter terror, but really feeling that, 0k, someone is now going to tell me what to do. something is going to kick m, to do. something is going to kick in, and no, it doesn't. i havejust got the most amazing friends, the most amazing family, and it was down to them to figure out what to do. and then i was extremely lucky that
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one of my friends put me in contact very early on, and a few month later i heard about grief encounter one of the charities involved, and it is that point of contact, being in contact with other people that had been bereaved and other widows, but also the support from the charity, it is not a government body, that has really been the main source of support for us. and if you didn't have a strong support network, if you hadn't heard about outside agencies, what do you think would have happened ? agencies, what do you think would have happened? do you know, i can't really contemplate what that must feel like, but i know for lots of other people who are widowed, that is their reality. and i don't think anyone can underestimate how much every aspect of your life changes.
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the simplest tasks, you go from being a well functioning person about to return to work to just being engulfed and not being able to leave the house. i remember within the first week or two just sobbing that i couldn't get my daughter dressed, i didn't know how. so to not have friends and family, or to not have friends and family, or to not have friends and family, or to not have outside agencies would have just made my life impossible, but my children's life, just, yes. let me read you a statement from the department for work and pensions who say, we have already made a commitment to monitor and review the effect of treatment support payment, and we will carry this out once we have assessed all aspects of the arrangement. it says it changed the benefit in the first is to modernise the system. why do you think it doesn't work? they have totally not modernised it with regard to the fa ct modernised it with regard to the fact that they are basically saying
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18 months. my children are ten and 12 now, and they are still grieving for the loss of their father. basically, 18 months is not modernising it. the other key thing is that if they were modernising it, a lot of children now, their parents aren't married, and basically they still have not included that, so they will only pay the bereavement support payment of people who are married. so what happens if you have been living with your partner? forget about it. you get nothing. they are ignoring it. if you move in with somebody while you are claiming the bereavement support payment, you lose it, so the government recognise it then, but they don't recognise it when... that isjust it then, but they don't recognise it when... that is just horrendous. it is 2017, a lot of people have children when they are not married, and they are just forgetting those, and they are just forgetting those, and they are just forgetting those, and the fact that they have just forgotten that, if they are modernising it, why have they not included that? what do you think
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needs to happen? they need to look at the 18 months, to move that. i was bereaved when i found out i was pregnant the following day after my husband died, so i would have been entitled to claim the money until my daughter was 18. but not every body is like that. the standard term is six years. they are saying 18 months, they really need to look at the length of time, but also, it is other things. the task force are looking at other things that they need, so it is like every single yeari need, so it is like every single year i have to tell my children's schoolteachers that they are briefed. so one of my daughters went to an assembly where a vicar came in and was talking about rabbits dying, and was talking about rabbits dying, and saying that you all know about somebody that's dying, and my daughter ended up leaving their crying, because the vicar had been told, they didn't know that there was children in that class that were bereaved. so it is notjust about the finance. it is the whole way
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that bereavement is considered. we have been very careful not to make this aboutjust have been very careful not to make this about just financial support, it is very much about the emotional support they need, too. the policy recommendations we are looking at are about education, training for all teachers and carers of children, about grief and bereavement so that they can give children the support, getting it on the national curriculum so that children can learn about it, notjust curriculum so that children can learn about it, not just when curriculum so that children can learn about it, notjust when it has happened to them. and creating a cross government strategy so that there are proper systems in place to work together, and also having a proper consultation about this. i see the statement from the dwp, but going back to the question about what would happen, nothing happens at the moment, when a child is born, people come round, people monitor the situation, come round to the house, rio ferdinand talks about it in his book, he says it so well, it is in our report, when a child is born, there is so much help there, but when a parent dies, you are completely on your own.
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i would add, the benefit is one aspect, to talk of 18 months, we are two and a half years in, my child wasn't ready to have any kind of therapy for at least 18 months, which is when that payment would have stopped. i take her to grief encounter once a week. my four—year—old has somebody from the charity that goes into her school. but what the payment allows and it is based on national insurance contributions, it allows me as the pa re nt contributions, it allows me as the parent to navigate juggling work with looking after and caring for, caring for three young children, my son is at university now, three young children, but also children that... they're bereved and they do have, it is not extra needs, it is a
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different, things come up. it gives you that added, things change and i don't know what the next year for my children will entail and what they will need. so having that payment, ifi will need. so having that payment, if i had that payment then taken away the pressure on me... 18 months, it is nothing in the timeline. i'm sure we will be back to revisit this story. thank you all for coming in today. now imagine this. you're a parent with a young family in rented accommodation. you've got two kids, one of which is a 15—month—old who naturally cries a lot. you then receive a letter from your management company threatening you with eviction because of the "noise" your baby has been making. that is what happened to parents attila and ilkido wurth, who were told that if the noise continued, they would be given "two weeks' notice to vacate". let's speak now to attila wurth, whojoins me on skype from london.
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how did this escalate? well, it started immediately as we moved in. the next day we got a noise complaint. at that point we didn't know what it was and we tried to be quiet. so make sure that we don't disturb the neighbours. but then soon we got further complaints and we wa nted soon we got further complaints and we wanted to find out what was it. turned out it was her our daughter crying occasionally before 7. or our son sometimes running out to the potty at 6.40 and times like that. although usually he only wakes up after 7. but occasionally it happened sooner. and as there is a clause in the contract that we should be very quiet between 11 and 7, they immediately started
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threatening us with eviction. the management company say, we didn't issue a threat of eviction, we stated if the level of complaints continued, we would be left with no alternative but to consider this as an option. what is happening now? well, what really happened, he sent us an e—mailfirst well, what really happened, he sent us an e—mail first saying that we agreed ina us an e—mail first saying that we agreed in a phone conversation that if there is more noise we will leave the property. which we didn't. so they made that up. then we, we told them we can't just leave they made that up. then we, we told them we can'tjust leave like that, and we are not going to leave, then they sent us another e—mail to say that if noises continue, we are going to get a section 8 note that is will give us two weeks to eleven. i don't know if that is not a threat, i don't know what is. they said up to that time we should try to be quiet. how stressful is that
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for you with two small children? to be quiet. how stressful is that for you with two small children7m is terribly stressful. we just moved in and the move was stressful enough and then we have to hear we have to move again. we moved here for a reason. so we don't want to move anywhere else, because we are renting this pricey accommodation to be close to a good school. if we move, our son will not get in. so we just can't. thank you very much for coming on to talk to us about what happened. a british military working dog who helped save the lives of troops in afghanistan is to be awarded the prestigious pdsa dickin medal — the animal equivalent of the victoria cross. mali, a belgian malinois, will receive the honour for his heroic actions during an operation in afghanistan in 2012. we actually had to climb up a concrete stairwell to get up onto the next floor, because that's where these guys were dropping grenades down through holes in our ceiling, theirfloor.
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and he went up and, sure enough, to show our little methods were working, he indicated to me that there was enemy up there. and that enabled us to work out a way of getting up onto the next floor without using the stairs. by the time the end of the operation came and we'd broken out of the roof, we'd already realised that we'd cleared the building. and i looked down and it was only then that reality bit and i took stock of what had actually happened to my dog over the course of the last, sort of, eight hours. he had quite a large laceration under his... just under his sternum, on the inside of his legs as well. again, his ear had a bit of a hole blown in it. all of us had been peppered with fragments from multiple grenades that had gone off. from operations that we'd been on previously, he had shown his...
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really shown his mettle and built a reputation among all the guys, so, as i say, by the time we launched onto this operation we really felt that we had a guardian angel amongst us, nothing was going to happen to us. well, earlier on i had the pleasure of meeting mali and his current handler corporal daniel hatley, who trained him as a puppy. an amazing dog to train. picks stuff up really quickly, loves to... wants to work, wants to learn. his general character, he's just a very funny dog, if that makes sense. he can always make you smile. right. and what's that training process like? it's quite intensive. you have to sort of constantly be teaching a dog. dogs learn very much through repetition, so we have to do things a lot of time for them to sort of pick it up by themselves. it's a very slow process with good progression but, again, very, very long process.
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we can see him in action now. yeah. how does he compared to other dogs who were serving in the military? he's just like any other dog that's serving in the military, butjust what he did on that day makes him stand out. he's having a lovely time, there. very comfortable on our rug! what exactly happened on that day? insurgency seized a multistorey building in kabul, and an assault force was sent forward to obviously go and retrieve that building off coalition forces. and mali was the dog that was used on that operation, and he was sent into the building ahead of the forces to look for ieds and any potential enemy combatants. and he was hurt badly. he was. he received blast injuries from two grenades. he kept going. obviously afterwards he did receive some injuries that he had to be treated for at the end of the operation. and how long did it take for mali to recover? hello!
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he was initially treated in afghanistan and was flown back to the uk a few weeks after that. from a general point of view he was pretty fit and healthy when he got back, but it was more just a healing process and stopping infection and getting him back to normal. it's quite rare for animals to win this award. i think mali is the only living animal to have won it in seven or eight years, is that right? i believe so, yeah. so how many dogs are used in combat? hundreds. if you go back to afghanistan in the sort of height of the conflict, there could have been anything sort of 130 plus dogs in afghanistan at the time. they are a massive, massive need for the forces. the guys want them on the ground, you know? everyone wants a dog on the ground. training's one thing, but what's it like when they are actually in a live situation? that training has to kick in. a lot of that must be dependent on the relationship that the dog, mali, has with its handler? absolutely. the bond is so imperative, and the bond he had with his handler was phenomenal, and that's why, you know, they worked together so well as a team and that's why,
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you know, he did what he did on the day and he kept going, you know? no training can prepare a dog for what he went through on that day, so for him to just keep going and get on with it and keep working through everything that happened was phenomenal. and he actually saved lives on that day? absolutely, yeah. absolutely saved lives. what is he up to now? he is at the animal defence training regiment and he helps me train new handlers how to handle dogs. today you have the medal with you, that is the actual medal? yes. it is the equivalent of the victoria cross? yes. it is the actual medal. there we go. this will be presented to mali today. what will happen? we will go on stage, we are going to meet princess alexandria, the patron of the pdsa and she will bestow the honour. and
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joins good company. are you nervous about today? yes it is always nervous. it is like anything. he is an animal, he will do what he wants on the day. so i'm a bit nervous. but he's fantastic dog and i'm sure he will behave himself. it is quite new for both of us. quite overwhelming. yes. mali is eight? yes. how many more years does he have of work? each dog is individual and it is based on their character and it is based on their character and what our vets believe, but he is so fit and strong that he probably has a good couple of years left in him. he does low level work and gets a lot of time off. how has that training changed? dogs have been used in combat before. has that advanced the type of role they play? absolutely. i think we have now got
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a better upsing, the sciences behind —— understanding the science behind training dog, how scents work and the dog oes brain works, training is more technical and well planned and growing with the times. what does he get for treats if he is able to do incredible things and he is being rewarded for the ultimate act of bravery, what does he get? for him he likes a bit of cheese or sausage and his toy. that is all he wants. thank you and congratulation and have fun today. he sits down right at the end of the interview! thanks mali. it was great to have him on the programme. i think he should be receiving his medal around now. as we have been reporting, robert mugabe has made his first public appearance in zimbabwe since the
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military took over control of the country on wednesday. these are the littest pictures. he appeared at a university graduation in the capital. there will be a lot more on this on newsroom live with anita. you can get in touch with us on twitter and just a reminder it is children in need day today. many people will be taking part in extraordinary challenges to raise money for disadvantaged young people across the uk. last year's appeal raised £60 million. tonight's programme starts on bbc1 at 7.30. thank you for your company today, have a great day. it was a cold and frosty start for
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many. we had some sunshine and we have still got that sunshine in many areas, still that crunch on the ground, still some pockets of frost her and there. but with that sunshine continuing in much of england and wales. more cloud in northern areas and for scotland and northern ireland some showers feeding in and a strong westerly wind. but colder compared to yesterday especially in the south. tonight we will continue with the showers in scotland and we will see some rain in northern england and wales. clearer spells to the south—east of england and here we will see a frost developing into the early hours of saturday morning. a frost also likely in scotland. elsewhere temperatures just above freezing. during saturday cloudy with some rain in wales and central and southern areas of england. some
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sunny spells in the north—east with showers in the far north. but a cold day again. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11. theresa may is at an european summit in sweden — amid warnings the eu might not start trade talks in december. we want to move forward together, talking about the trade issues and trade partnership for the future. david davis calls for more movement
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on the european side of the talks. we have been offering some quite creative compromises — we haven't always got that back. zimbabwe's president, robert mugabe, makes his first public appearance since the country's military took control of the country. also coming up — police investigating the disappearance of a teenager in dorset are continuing to question a man arrested yesterday on suspicion of her murder.
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