Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 18, 2017 9:00am-10:01am GMT

9:00 am
bbc one tonight, the blackpool experience. you didn't quite get there, did you? nowhere near there! i was being nice. yeah don't bother. headlines in a moment. stay with us. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. thousands of people take to the streets in zimbabwe to protest against the president robert mugabe. the 93—year—old has been in power for 37 years but is now facing growing calls for him to quit.
9:01 am
good morning. also this morning : police and air accident investigators try and find out why two aircraft collided, leaving four people dead. 90 mp5 say patients in the health service in england are being "failed" by the system as they ask the prime ministerfor a cross—party solution. in sport, the man who took wales to the semi finals of the euros has stepped down — chris coleman has gone to manage the championship's bottom side, sunderland. jools holland has duetted with some of the biggest names in the business — now he's back with a new double act. he'll be here withjose feliciano. and philip has the weather. a bit of everything in the weekend's
9:02 am
forecasts. the bulk of the sunshine will be found over northern parts for saturday, cloud for more southern areas, more details in a couple of minutes. see you then. jubilant scenes on the streets of zimbabwe where people are protesting against the president robert mugabe. state media has confirmed that eight out of ten regional branches of the governing zanu pf already passed a vote of no—confidence against president. ben brown is in zimbabwe for us. this is a highly pivotal day in the country's history, isn't it? it really is. some exuberant scenes in the capital of harare. thousands of people coming out onto the
9:03 am
streets for rallies. two separate rallies. demanding robert mugabe steps down, resigned immediately. one is organised by the war vetera ns, one is organised by the war veterans, the men who fought alongside robert mugabe in the war of independence, in the war of liberation against white minority rule. they and the ruling party, zanu pf, have turned against robert mugabe. he has few friends left. you wouldn't think he had much time left. there is almost nobody you come across in zimbabwe who still wa nt come across in zimbabwe who still want him to be president. it's only a matter of time, maybejust want him to be president. it's only a matter of time, maybe just hours before he must step down. what is stopping those who have almost overthrown him from actually completing the task they have started 7 i think the military all along, since their takeover on wednesday which they refused to call a coup d'etat, even though most observers looking at it thought it was, they don't want to call it a coup d'etat.
9:04 am
they don't want to be seen to be forcing him out of office. they want him to agree voluntarily to resign, to go off his own volition. he perhaps would accept that if he could negotiate safety for himself and his family from the army. we don't know if he would stay in this country or if you would go into exile. those are the options. —— if he would go. he would be replaced by a transitional government, including members of zanu pf, but also the opposition, mdc. thanks very much. air accident investigators are trying to work out what caused a plane and a helicopter to collide over buckinghamshire yesterday, killing four people. teams will continue scouring the area for wreckage — around the national trust's waddesdon estate, near aylesbury. beneath the canopy of autumn colour lies the wreckage of two light aircraft.
9:05 am
this is the tale of the cessna plane. nearby lies its wing and a little further away in a clearing are the remains of what is believed to be the helicopter. two people were travelling in each aircraft and no one survived. we did a joint response with the fire service, ambulance and now the air accident branch who are working with us through a joint investigation while we establish the cause of the crash. the mid—air collision happened above the waddesdon estate, in buckinghamshire. both pilots took off from whickham airport 20 miles away. visibility at the time was clear and bright. an off—duty fire officer saw the collision and says there was a loud bang followed by falling debris. yesterday, police and air accident investigators worked late into the night. their task — to find out why the crash happened and who was involved. with the wreckage spread over a large area, the search for clues as to why two aircraft
9:06 am
collided in good conditions is expected to continue at least until monday. a 49—year—old man who was arrested on suspicion of the murder of missing teenager gaia pope has been released. paul elsey was held after clothing similar to what 19—year—old gaia was believed to be wearing the day she disappeared was found near a coastal path. we can get the latest from our reporter. it is good to see you. we heard from the father of gaia pope yesterday saying hope beyond hope, but theirfamily yesterday saying hope beyond hope, but their family cannot rest until they know more about this and police continue with their investigation. absolutely. gaia pope's friends and
9:07 am
families remain hopeful. they think she can still be found alive. the police are investigating all avenues open to them. the discovery of clothes which appeared to match those gaia pope was wearing when she was last seen is a huge blow. the police also believe she may have come to harm. that's why they've arrested over the past week three different people on suspicion of murder. they've all now been released. with nobody in custody now there remained not much hope for the family apart from getting out there and continuing to search. on a facebook page which is called find gaia chaston thousand members, they've made an appeal for people to come in search for her. —— now has 10,000 members. they will scour the ruble areas around here. they add to the professional emergency services who are continuing their search over what they say is 100 square miles of
9:08 am
difficult to rain. grassland, close to cliffs, police warning people not to cliffs, police warning people not to get too close, not to put themselves into danger. natasha pope says i believe miracles can happen andi says i believe miracles can happen and i am holding on to hope. the moment, thanks very much. later next week the budget takes place. there have been lots of stories about what might be in store. there is speculation. and counter speculation, claims and counterclaims. let's try and put things together with tom barton who was in our london newsroom this morning. you have been looking through all of these bits of information, maybe misinformation, what do you reckon? a couple of things we know that will be in the budget on wednesday, including an announcement that the chancellor is going to make that the government is going to start thinking about how to introduce a tax on what are called single use plastics. if you bought a kebab last
9:09 am
night, the plastic tray that might have come in, or if you've got christmas shopping that you ordered online, that might have come with bubble wrap. it is looking at ways to introduce avoiding using that. hundreds of thousands of sea mammals and turtles and sea birds get affected by the single use plastic when it gets washed up on our shores. the government want to see how it is made, how it is used, howard is disposed of. and they are also looking at how a tax can be introduced in order to lower this use of this type of plastic. —— how it is disposed of. not sure what level this will be at. in other areas we have been told the government is going to lift the restrictions on housing associations borrowing money, which could lead to more social and affordable housing being built. suggestions this morning they are considering doing something similarfor morning they are considering doing something similar for councils and
9:10 am
council housing. we know the chancellor has £26 billion more than he expected. the big question now is how he is going to spend it. we will hear about that on wednesday. thanks very much. as the lobbying and pressure continues, health is one of the areas being talked about as maybe getting some of the money tom was mentioning. 90 mp5 have signed a letter to the prime minister and chancellor saying that patients are being failed by the nhs. 30 former ministers are calling for the parties to work together. our health editor reports: the pressure on nhs is growing. there are fears that hospitals will continue to struggle to find enough beds to admit new patients, partly because of difficulties discharging elderly patients, caused in turn by problems with social care.
9:11 am
a group of mps now says that a long—term sustainable settlement is needed and that only a cross—party nhs and care convention can deliver that. in the letter written to the prime minister and the chancellor, the mp5 say: senior conservative labour and liberal democrat backbenchers are among those who signed the letter. i think the nhs and social care are huge issues for our generation and we've got to get it right and i think it's bigger than just one party. the mp5 also call for action in next week's budget to address the short—term pressures on the system. a government spokesperson said it was recognised there was broad agreement across parliament, that social care reform was a priority, and there would be consultation ahead of a policy paper next year. yesterday we told you donald trump
9:12 am
was relaxing the suspension of the import of elephant hunting trophies into the us. now we are hearing he has reversed that decision. he wa nted has reversed that decision. he wanted to suspend the band because barack obama had brought those laws in. he was going to allow hunters to bring back mementos from big game kills. that prompted an outcry from animal activists. they are saying the number of african elephants had plummeted in recent years. he tweeted last night that the change was on hold until he could review all conservation fax. the sinn fein president gerry adams has said he will set out a plan
9:13 am
for a leadership change in his party at its conference in dublin today. mr adams, who is one of the most significant and divisive figures in irish politics, has led sinn fein since 1983. he's indicated he won't stand down immediately, but will talk about future plans. the new leader of the scottish labour party will be announced later this morning. the contest is between the former deputy leader anas sarwar and richard leonard, who became an msp last year. the winner will replace kezia dugdale, who stepped down in august and is reportedly flying to australia this weekend to take part in the itv reality show "i'm a celebrity....get me out of here." when people asked her what she would do after leaving the post, that wasn't anything anybody thought about. not at all. phil will have the weather surely. and we will get a sports update a little after that. today marks 30 years since the king's cross fire, when 31 people lost their lives in the worst blaze in the history of the london underground. it started when a single match which was discarded on a wooden escalator. roger kendall was one of the first
9:14 am
responders. hejoins us now. thank you for taking the time to talk to us you for taking the time to talk to us today. how is today going to mark 30 years on from the fire at king's cross. we have a wreath laying ceremony cross. we have a wreath laying ceremony this o'clock at king's cross. we then have a church service. then a lot of us will be going back to houston fire station to talk to our old friends and meet up to talk to our old friends and meet up with our colleagues. —— —— euston fire station. -- euston fire station. what happened to you. what did your day involved is that fire happened7 happened to you. what did your day involved is that fire happened?” was at soho fire station. it was a 15 hour shift. i was testing hydra nts 15 hour shift. i was testing hydrants around to —— around trafalgar square when i was messaged to say there was a fire at king's cross. fires on escalators in those
9:15 am
yea rs we re cross. fires on escalators in those yea rs were not cross. fires on escalators in those years were not uncommon. it was just another call. i attended years were not uncommon. it was just another call. iattended king's cross with my colleagues on the fire engine. as we arrived, my colleague, who actually lost his life that day, said he was going down to investigate it. we stood outside. nothing was showing outside. it was just a normal november evening with people coming and going. people still entering the subway and coming out. moments later there was a huge rush of black smoke and then we realised we had a serious incident in progress. the details of this, 30 yea rs in progress. the details of this, 30 years ago, but the details remain raw in your mind. even the people who were not there, it was the intensity of the fire and the unpreparedness intensity of the fire and the unprepa redness to intensity of the fire and the unpreparedness to something so great in sucha unpreparedness to something so great in such a confined space which shocked so many people.” in such a confined space which shocked so many people. i think that's right. it was also a real human tragedy. it affected
9:16 am
indiscriminately londoners just going about their daily business. that was the largest impact it had on the firefighters dealing with the incident on that particular evening. even in recent events it shows the dedication that firefighters give to the public in london and certainly across britain. you mentioned colin townsley, your governor, head of your unit, he died that night and that in itself shook your team. you actually had to step into his shoes almost and lead the team to another fire after the king's cross fire, tell us about that. i was told colin had passed on, which was absolutely awful because he was such a huge character and such a good leader of firefighters. the second—in—command was in hospital with heat exhaustion. i took command of soho. it was a difficult night but i decided to deal with the guys and
9:17 am
just get them back on the horse, so to speak. at about 1:30am, after talking everybody into getting the fire engines ready, we were ready to attend our next incident which was in oxford street. it was a fire alarm, but putting cruise through the window was a difficult time because things were so raw. the public is grateful for what the fire service does. we are mindful of the most service does. we are mindful of the m ost rece nt service does. we are mindful of the most recent fire, the images of the g re nfell tower most recent fire, the images of the grenfell tower in london, and what firefighters were doing to battle to save people's lives. it's amazing how the public responds to a community which is so badly damaged and hurt by something so ferocious. this was the same after colin's death, as well. it certainly was. colin's death, it really was like a street funeral. people were lining the streets. people bursting into
9:18 am
applause. it was moving. it shows that firefighters... firefighters across the world are so grateful for the people. we really appreciate it when people come out and do that. we are still delivering service to people in the hour of their need. very emotional day. you have the memorial event later, the wreath—laying service at king's cross at 11 o'clock, then a private church service. thank you very much for talking to us ahead of your day. thank you. phil has the weather for us thank you. phil has the weather for us this morning. thank you. a decent enough start for northern and eastern parts of the british isles. we have had a plethora of lovely pictures from our
9:19 am
weather watchers capturing that aspect of the weather. that is not the whole story, however. it is murky across parts of the west. you are closed —— closer to this weather front. eastern parts, just far away from that big area of low pressure over scandinavia which is generating lots of wind. across the north—east of scotla nd lots of wind. across the north—east of scotland it is reaching there. the northern part of britain lots of dry and fine weather to be had. through the afternoon that's the way it will probably stay. having said that, throughout the day, there will be these showers rattling down on the strong northwestern went across the strong northwestern went across the north—east of scotland. a dry enough afternoon for the rest of us. the showers around the north—eastern shores of northern ireland, they disappear, a dry day here, and they slumped over the north of england, as well. further south, slumped over the north of england, as well. furthersouth, generally speaking, the further south and west you are the more likely it will be you are the more likely it will be you will see rain. but some people
9:20 am
will escape them. it is mild in the south—western corner in the day and overnight. skies were clear. a widespread frost in the countryside. but we'd be the —— that we'd be the case for western out east, dry, bright, and crisp first thing. you will keep the sunshine but it does not do much for the temperatures. in the west, temperatures around seven and 11 degrees despite losing the sunshine. to the start of monday, significant snowfall across not just the to the start of monday, significant snowfall across notjust the highest ground in scotland, some of it could get down to lower levels. we will keep you up—to—date as we go through the weekend. thanks very much. thanks very much. it is now time to have a look at the
9:21 am
saturday papers. tim walker is here. we will talk to you ina tim walker is here. we will talk to you in a moment. let's look through the front pages. the front page of the front pages. the front page of the telegraph... eu threat to withhold such as rebate. this story is taking a look at europe threatening to keep that britain's final rebate of 5 billion euros as pa rt final rebate of 5 billion euros as part of negotiations over the brexit bill. the guardian's front page, looking at the development of pa rents looking at the development of parents losing their children as pa rt parents losing their children as part of the divorce process. the daily mail is taking a look at a rescue. . . the daily mail is taking a look at a rescue... not sure if it is a risky, but it is about this man his family
9:22 am
did not know where he was even though he had gone out on an adventure, saying he would keep out of touch and try to explore his surroundings. but he is on his way back. olivia the front page of the times this morning, a picture of robert mugabe attending a graduation ceremony yesterday as his future remains uncertain. their story is about advertising on you tube as a result of some videos which the times claims shows images of children being teased and mocked. some advertising suspended because of that. a few goes before the budget. we have been hearing that the chancellor is going to look at taxes on disposable plastic. takeaway containers, etc. it shows that governments are taking the issue of waste of climate change, looking after our planet very seriously.
9:23 am
waste of climate change, looking after our planet very seriouslym wasn't so long ago we were known as the dirty man of europe because of our poor environmental credentials in this country. now we are getting better. that's a welcome initiative. over the past two weeks, in germany, a rather wonderful annual event has been taking place, which is in its 23rd year, it is where politicians, experts, campaigners, everybody who ca res gets experts, campaigners, everybody who cares gets together and essentially theiraim is to cares gets together and essentially their aim is to try to leave the planet in a slightly better position thanit planet in a slightly better position than it was when we took it over. the guardian celebrates britain's achievement in being the country's leading the way with decarbonising. that is crucial if we are to get temperatures down and tackle climate change. the problem is, brexit poses an enormous challenge in terms of climate. according to this article. so many of our laws have come from
9:24 am
europe. there is going to be buyers and time task to address where the law meet brexit. —— a lot of the people who go on about borders, people like trump, the former chancellor of the exchequer, often tend to be sceptic of climate change. it can only be done on a global basis. michael gove saying at the weekend andrew marr that brexit is an opportunity for britain to be better than europe, to go further. then again, we are trying to do deals, put business first. it's a conjugated situation. i wouldn't envy anybody trying to sort any of that out legally. if you want to live longer, it isn't about your diet, exercise, geta live longer, it isn't about your diet, exercise, get a dog, says the guardian. as long as we keep the planet going, it'll be possible to live a longer time if we get a dog.
9:25 am
look at the queen, who is in pretty good shape, only just look at the queen, who is in pretty good shape, onlyjust recently reduced her workload at 91, and she isa reduced her workload at 91, and she is a well—known corgi owner. it is not any old dog that will do it, it is little dogs, apparently, corgis, beagles... not handbag dogs. exactly. i used to have a labrador, and apparently they don't do anything for your life expectancy. 40% of people are less likely to die prematurely if they have a dog and 10% less likely to develop heart disease. they did survey quite a few people, something like 3.4 million people. absolutely, and a distinguished academic paper, so we should take it seriously. do not get rid of your large dog because of that. i have a little dog. love all of the dogs, they are amazing. allegedly george osborne one said i
9:26 am
never know what it is like to turn right when i get onto an aeroplane. if somebody else is paying, it left, if it is me, it is right, u nfortu nately. if it is me, it is right, unfortunately. maybe the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer. when everybody is clammed up in economy, emirates is to introduce a fleet cold castles in the air. it doesn't go into detail. but they have virtual windows. so evenif but they have virtual windows. so even if you are on the inside, you can pretend you are looking out at the amazing views. but you are not. there is a dumb waiter. lots of things a part of it. it doesn't say how much it will cost. i imagine given that a first—class emirates flight given that a first—class emirates flight from heathrow to melbourne gusts over £7,000, i shouldn't think you would get a lot of change. —— costs over £7,000. you've got to
9:27 am
have over £6,500 of luxury to make that happen. if there is turbulence, everybody feels it, you all breathing the same air, does anybody sleep any better? i would still like the extra space and if anybody wants to give me a free trip, that's fine. in the nehra, —— in the mirror, apparently people eating at home are eating more like the 19705. i don't like it. but it is back. sales are now at 30%. -- but it is back. sales are now at 30%. —— up 30%. they talk about other di5he5 30%. —— up 30%. they talk about other dishes which should come back. prawn cocktail, they reckon. other dishes which should come back. prawn cocktail, they reckonm never went away. black forest
9:28 am
gateaux, spam, all of those things we ate back then would be extremely calorific and not very good for you. we are more cautious about what we eat. we are more aware of the calorie5. eat. we are more aware of the calories. you still have to treat your5elf. calories. you still have to treat yourself. black forest gateaux, though. fabulous. really, ifind it boring. sherry trifle. i don't like that. we have got saturday kitchen coming up.” i don't like that. we have got saturday kitchen coming up. i love angel delight. i love all of that. i love fondue. black forest gateaux? ye5, love fondue. black forest gateaux? yes, i love fondue. black forest gateaux? ye5, iam love fondue. black forest gateaux? yes, i am into that. love fondue. black forest gateaux? ye5, iam into that. i love fondue. black forest gateaux? yes, i am into that. i like all of that stuff. you might be looking for
9:29 am
a newjob next week. chuckles thank5 chuckles thanks very much. our special guest todayi5 thanks very much. our special guest today is pixie.. —— our special guest today is pixie lott. what is your food heaven? chicken and mango and 5weetcorn. hell, i have gone for 5quid and black pudding. i have never tried black pudding. i have never tried black pudding, butju5t the idea frea k5 black pudding, butju5t the idea freaks me black pudding, butju5t the idea frea k5 me out. black pudding, butju5t the idea freaks me out. maybe you will be getting at. we have emily, what is on the menu? a vegetarian dish, risotto with sprouting broccoli and ceps. red mullet, jacket potato with mayonnaise and pickled crab. ollie i5 mayonnaise and pickled crab. ollie is in charge of the wine. and you quys is in charge of the wine. and you guys at home are in charge of what pixie eat5.
9:30 am
we will let you get back to your 5pam we will let you get back to your spam and angel delight. and my cv! if he carries on with those de5ert5! hello, this is breakfa5t withjon kay and naga munchetty. coming up before ten, phil will have the weather for you. but first, a summary of this morning'5 main news. there are jubilant 5cene5 on the streets of the zimbabwean capital, harare, where ten5 of thousands of people are demanding the resignation of president robert mugabe. in the last few hours,
9:31 am
crowds of people have started to decend on harare. it follows a military coup earlier this week. state media has confirmed that eight out of 10 regional branche5 of the governing zanu—pf have already passed a vote of no confidence in the 93—year—old head of state. air accident inve5tigator5 are trying to work out what caused a plane and a helicopter to collide over buckingham5hire ye5terday, killing four people. team5 will continue scouring the area around the national tru5t‘5 wadde5don e5tate, near ayle5bury, both aircraft had set off from wycombe air park, around 20 miles from the scene of the crash. a 49—year—old man, who was arrested on suspicion of murder following the disappearance of teenager gaia pope, has been relea5ed while inquirie5 continue. paul el5ey, confirmed as the suspect to the bbc by his father, is from swanage in dorset. murder detectives are focu55ing their foren5ic investigations on homes, cars and an area near a coastal path where women's clothing was found.
9:32 am
mi55 pope'5 family confirmed the clothing matched what she was believed to be wearing on the day she went missing. the sinn fein pre5ident, gerry adams, has said he will set out a plan for a leadership change in his party at its conference in dublin today. mr adams, who is one of the most significant and divisive figures in irish politic5, has led sinn fein 5ince1983. he'5 indicated he won't stand down immediately, but will talk about future plans. the new leader of the scottish labour party will be announced later this morning. the contest is between the former deputy leader ana5 sarwar and richard leonard, who became an msp last year. the winner will replace kezia dugdale, who stepped down in august and is reportedly flying to australia this weekend to take part in the itv reality show "i'm a celebrity....get me out of here." the government is considering a tax on 5ingle—u5e pla5tic5 that are used in packaging and poly5tyrene takeaway boxe5. the chancellor, philip hammond, is expected to use next week's budget to announce a consultation
9:33 am
on the measure to cut waste and pollution. an estimated 12 million tonnes of plastic enter5 the oceans each year, and residues are routinely found in fish, 5ea bird5 and marine mammals. an original drawing of the comic book hero tintin is expected to sell for nearly £1 million today. the artwork, by the belgian arti5t herge, was published in 1939 as the cover of a story called "king ottokar‘5 sceptre". other piece5 up for auction in paris include herge'5 designs for board games. if you want to know all the stories, kat i5 if you want to know all the stories, kat is your story. only in french. between u5 kat is your story. only in french. between us we have had covered. we area top between us we have had covered. we are a top team. i didn'tjust read tintin you know! a degree in tintin. we are talking about chris coleman thi5 we are talking about chris coleman this morning. not really a surprise that he stepped down from his wale5 role after they failed to qualify
9:34 am
for the world cup. a huge di5appointment i think. lot5 for the world cup. a huge di5appointment i think. lots of people really sad to see him go, particularly the players, particularly the players, particularly the players, particularly the welsh fa. they seem to have done all they could to hang onto him. a surprise that he's gone to sunderland. a huge coup for sunderland. a big challenge for him. yeah and a5 dan was saying, what he need5 yeah and a5 dan was saying, what he needs now is a big injection of money and big 5pending needs now is a big injection of money and big spending in the january tra n5fer window, hopefully he can keep them up in the champion5hip. off to sunderland and no more chris coleman at wale5. champion5hip. off to sunderland and no more chris coleman at wales. who i5 no more chris coleman at wales. who is stepping into his boots? there's a couple of front runner5, ryan gigg5 i5 a couple of front runner5, ryan gigg5 is the bookie5' favourite. morning everyone. ryan giggs is the odd5—on favourite to become the next wale5 manager, after chri5 coleman 5tood down. his new challenge is to rescue sunderland, who are bottom of the championship. patrick gearey looks back at coleman'5 time as wale5 bo55. before chri5 coleman, wale5 waited 58 years to get to a major tournament. he took them straight to the semis. last year's victory over belgium marked the dizzying peak for welsh football, a time when anything 5eemed po55ible.
9:35 am
don't be afraid to have dreams. becau5e four years ago, i was as far away from this as you can imagine. and look what'5 away from this as you can imagine. and look what's happened. if you work hard enough, and you're not afraid to dream, and you're not afraid to dream, and you're not afraid to dream, and you're not afraid to fail ( the low point came when he took over from gary speed, who took his own life in 2011. he had to help the young players speed had begun to bring through recover from that 5hock. the bond he had with the group in5pired ever improving performance5 and the manager had on his side a global 5uper5tar. commentator: gareth bale with a moment of absolute magic! he created such a great atmosphere in the camp. it makes us want to win for him, for ourselves and for our country. he has really brought that passion and pride back into wale5. bale'5 gold was accompanied by newly forged 5teel at the back. wale5 made the euro5. though they lost to england, they beat ru55ia, then northern ireland and then unforgettably belgium. then the climb 5topped. they lost to eventual champion5 portugal in the semi—final and couldn't quite redi5covered the magic in world cup qualifying.
9:36 am
but defeat to the republic of ireland in cardiff meant the end of their challenge. and effectively the end of coleman'5. he la5t led wale5 he la5t led wales in a friendly again5t panama la5t he la5t led wales in a friendly again5t panama last weekend. he la5t led wales in a friendly against panama last weekend.” he la5t led wales in a friendly against panama last weekend. i think we we re against panama last weekend. i think we were all hoping a5 wel5h fan5, the players included that the manager would stay on, but it's not to be. he'5 manager would stay on, but it's not to be. he's going to go down as wale5' mo5t to be. he's going to go down as wale5' most successful manager and rightly so for what he's achieved. coleman is hardly taking the easy option in going to sunderland, 5truggling option in going to sunderland, struggling in the second tier. but it may never eclip5e the job he did in taking wel5h football from its toughe5t moment to its greatest one. northern ireland manager, michael o'neill, had also been linked to the sunderland job, but he's now been given permission to speak to the scottish fa about their vacant manager'5 po5ition. o'neill wa5 bitterly di5appointed when northern ireland just missed out on qualifying for next year's world cup. he's been in charge for six years, leading them to last year's euro5 — their first major finals for 30 yea r5. jose mourinho ha5 critici5ed
9:37 am
england'5 medical team for making his defender, philjone5, play in theirfriendly with germany last week. jone5 needed 5ix injection5 to make the starting line—up for england, but he'll mi55 manche5ter united'5 game against newca5tle today. i'm notan i'm not an angel. i i'm notan angel. i had i'm not an angel. i had player5 i'm not an angel. i had players to be injected to play official matche5 and crucial matche5. but the friendly, to get 5ix anae5thetic injection5, local, to play a friendly — i never heard about it. and philjone5 had it and had it before the match and after 15 minute5 before the match and after 15 minutes he was out and obviously tomorrow he'5 minutes he was out and obviously tomorrow he's out. does seem an awful lot for a friendly. a bit of a sobering experience for england with the first a5he5 te5t nowju5t five days away. they were lucky to get away with a draw again5t a cricket australia 11. the hosts piled on the runs.
9:38 am
ja5on sangha — who'5 only 18 — hit england all over the place to score hi5 century, before moeen ali had the only success of the touri5t5' day, getting him caught out. the cricket australia 5ide 5till fini5hed day four on 364 for four though! england have just five days to get them5elve5 together for the first a5he5 te5t. england have one just one of the five matche5 so far, with two t205 left to play. it's been a good week for the england women'5 rugby team. this week, it was announced the rfu will pay them match fees for the first time, and last night, they thra5hed canada 79—5 in the opening match of their three—te5t 5erie5. harlequin5 wing je55 breach 5coring six of them on her debut. the sides play again next tuesday and saturday. the autumn international5 continue,
9:39 am
with scotland hoping to beat the all blacks for the first time and england taking on australia. and in the aviva premier5hip, glouce5ter produced a remarkable comeback in the final half hour to beat saracen5, scoring 20 5econd—half points to win 23—17. there were also wins for 05prey and dragons in the anglo—welsh cup. new zealand are out of the rugby league world cup — in a really tight, low—5coring match, the 2008 winners were beaten 4—2 by fiji. that kick proving the difference on what was a famous night for the fijian5. they are in into the world cup 5emi—final5 for the third time and will play the holders au5tralia next. tonga survived a bit of a scare to reach their first world cup 5emi—final. they just 5craped pa5t lebanon, winning 24—22 , but they were a shadow of the side that beat new zealand in their previous game. tonga will be england'5 opponent5, if england beat papua new guinea tomorrow. andy murray has split with his coach ivan lendl for the second time. under his guidance, murray won
9:40 am
three grand slam title5, two olympic gold5 and made it to world number one, but he's been plagued with injury all season, and he'll continue to work on regaining hi5 fitne55, leading up to january'5 australian open. the battle between tommy fleetwood and justin ro5e to finish the year as europe'5 number one golfer is getting exciting. it'5 advantage ro5e, who'5 two shots off the pace at the dubai champion5hip — and two clear of fleetwood. they're cha5ing thi5 man, defending champion matthew fitzpatrick, who'5 leading the field going into round three. he'5 ten—under par, one shot ahead of tyrrell hatton. it's it'5 whether you are team fleetwood or ro5e. it'5 whether you are team fleetwood or rose. team england! there you go, a winner however. anyone will do. exactly. thank you. (
9:41 am
she only took up kick—boxing a5 a hobby to keep fit, but now she's a british and world champion. tonight kelly hayne5' fans will get to see her in action again, in an international conte5t at the o2. mike'5 been chatting to her about 5parring and 5paghetti.. music a 5paghetti bologne5e which pack5 a punch and not many 10—year—old5have their tea 5erved by a world champion kickboxer, and it's notju5t archie. here you go. never in my life did i think i would be doing something like this. i was iwa5a i was a properly manager. i'm a mum, never in a million years. not many children have a mum like this. it's a little bit scary,
9:42 am
'cause it on what will happen, but i don't actually think anyone would want to mess with her on the street. tonight, archie and some from his school will see her in action for the first time at the o2, where she won her uk title last year. archie has watched many times from the couch before, as has her coach. it's hard watching your partner, but you have to put your profe55ional head on and try to di5a55ociate with what's going on in the ring and think, "that's a fighter in there". which is why i was taking no chance5. in the training gym i became her late5t warmup as she prepare5 to face another undefeated fighterfrom spain. would you kick me when i'm down? not if you have a glove on the floor. and now you have. —— now you haven't. i love the re5pect —— now you haven't. i love the respect for fighter5. i love it that you can hit them... yeah. and they kept coming. in k1, the emphasis is all
9:43 am
about keeping the action flowing. we're allowed to do head kick5, body kick5, knee5, 5pinning back fi5t. but at the end of any fight we always go up and have a big hug. kelly is now in5piring many others to get into the sport by holding fitness classes here, learning the skills, and at the same time getting a great workout. when i started over a year ago i had no 5elf—e5teem, i was overweight. i lost a load of weight. i've changed completely. i've got confidence again, i feel better within myself. i think some mum5 think that when you've got a child it's almost like they stop following their dream5, they think that's it. anyone can become something if they want to be something. i think the winner is kelly hayne5.
9:44 am
mike bu5hell, from bbc new5, out for the count. he knows his place. that's why he's not here today. he described those 5hort5 a5 a big nappy. not here today. he described those shorts as a big nappy. right! he did. poor mike. you could almost feel the brui5e5 did. poor mike. you could almost feel the bruises on that. he did 5ay, feel the bruises on that. he did say, he still hurt5. he was really brui5ed. say, he still hurt5. he was really bruised. poor mike. get well soon. last night bbc children in need set a new record — rai5ing over £50 million to help children and young people across the uk. since 1980 the appeal has raised over £900 million. in doing so, it's featured 5ome over £900 million. in doing so, it's featured some of the biggest names in music and show business. what is the secret to its 5taggering success 7 the secret to its 5taggering 5u cce55 7 we the secret to its 5taggering success? we are going to talk to the chair of the children in need in a mirn i. if you were out —— in a minute. if you were out last night, here are some of the highlights.
9:45 am
# somewhere over the rainbow # somewhere over the rainbow # skie5 are blue. # skie5 are blue. # tomorrow, tomorrow # tomorrow, tomorrow # i love ya tomorrow # i love ya tomorrow # you're only a day away. you stack the aces. you load the dice. look at my tardis. this is impossible. have ibeen my tardis. this is impossible. have i been burgled. but it's, it's hideou5. bigger on the inside than it is on the outside. i thought it probably was. glad it's notjust me. music theme to blue peter. for god's sake get me to the church on time. the chair of children in need,
9:46 am
stevie spring, joins us now. congratulation5, £50 million. that'5 amazing. staggering. absolutely 5taggering. iju5t 5till amazing. staggering. absolutely 5taggering. i just still can't quite believe how much people at home, all over the country, put their hands in their pockets and made us up to this 5taggering total. it'5 their pockets and made us up to this 5taggering total. it's the highest ever on the night total. la5t 5taggering total. it's the highest ever on the night total. last year we did, ever on the night total. last year we did! ever on the night total. last year we did, i think 26. —— 46.6. ever on the night total. last year we did, ithink 26. —— 46. 6. we gave away 60 million last year. finger5 gave away 60 million last year. fingers crossed that this year will 5ma5h through that 60 million barrier. yeah, it was a big and emotional night. i was a bit worried about interviewing you this morning, becau5e about interviewing you this morning, because when i went to bed, i was thinking if they don't rai5e because when i went to bed, i was thinking if they don't raise more than last year, it's not a record. it always seems to be a record. then it'5 it always seems to be a record. then it's going to be an anticlimax. do
9:47 am
you feel that pressure? 15 that part of yourjob to beat you feel that pressure? 15 that part of your job to beat the you feel that pressure? 15 that part of yourjob to beat the previous year? actually it's notjust about the total. obviou5ly year? actually it's notjust about the total. obviously the higher the total the more children and young people we can help. last year we helped nearly 500,000 children 5uffering helped nearly 500,000 children suffering with all sorts of issues from illness and disability and bereavement and abject poverty. of cour5e, bereavement and abject poverty. of course, we want to raise a5 bereavement and abject poverty. of course, we want to raise as much as we possibly can, but actually, it's as much about telling the stories as well of what we do. so, you know, ye5, well of what we do. so, you know, yes, the fundrai5er5 that do mad thing5 yes, the fundrai5er5 that do mad things all over the country and the people at home who give money and the stars who come out, they're all very important. but it's just as important that the amazing familie5 allow us to tell their stories and you know, children like vane55a, who wa5 you know, children like vane55a, who was a big pull la5t
9:48 am
you know, children like vane55a, who was a big pull last night and her mummy and daddy were in the audience. they wereju5t mummy and daddy were in the audience. they were just 5taggering, 5taggering. it'5 5tory audience. they were just 5taggering, 5taggering. it'5 story telling a5 much as rai5ing 5taggering. it'5 story telling a5 much as raising money, but actually, ye5, much as raising money, but actually, yes, of course, it is. the more money we raise, the more good work our projects can do. of all those weird and wonderful ways of raising money, what was your favourite la5t night? what was your favourite bit of the programme? my favourite bits are always the bits of the programme where we manage to allow the people that we help to join in. where we manage to allow the people that we help tojoin in. so where we manage to allow the people that we help to join in. so thing5 like poldark, where we took four of the project worker5 along and ba5ically allowed them to fall in love with aidan! rick5haw i5 ba5ically allowed them to fall in love with aidan! rick5haw is always a highlight. we've done that for 5even yea r5. a highlight. we've done that for seven years. matt baker i5 a highlight. we've done that for seven years. matt baker is a com plete seven years. matt baker is a complete and utter 5tar seven years. matt baker is a complete and utter star and to have rai5ed £5 million, which took the total, i think, rai5ed £5 million, which took the total, ithink, about rai5ed £5 million, which took the total, i think, about 22 million, rick5haw ha5 total, i think, about 22 million, rick5haw has raised. tho5e 5ix young
9:49 am
people were extraordinary, extraordinary. 500 miles over whatever it was, nine days and tears every night on the one show. stevie, congratulation5 from all of us. a5 a tea m congratulation5 from all of us. a5 a team you must all be exhausted. i know the work doe5n't team you must all be exhausted. i know the work doesn't stop now. it continue5, doe5n't know the work doesn't stop now. it continue5, doesn't it? know the work doesn't stop now. it continues, doesn't it? it's a 24—hour, 365 day a yearjob. we plan the show, we plan the appeal, but obviou5ly 5ix the show, we plan the appeal, but obviou5ly six times a year, we're giving away money to projects, we're vi5iting 5ome giving away money to projects, we're vi5iting some of the 2,600 project5 we fund. we get to meet amazing people. thank5 we fund. we get to meet amazing people. thanks to everybody who helped la5t people. thanks to everybody who helped last night. it was great. well said. thank you very much the chair of children in need, well done to her. well done to everybody. make5 done to her. well done to everybody. makes you smile. i wonder if phil is going to do the same thing for us? ye5! going to do the same thing for us? yes! of going to do the same thing for us? yes! of course. if you look the right direction, that is. i'm afraid right direction, that is. i'm it
9:50 am
yes! of course. if you look the right direction, that is. i'm it is that time of year, at its best, gloriou5. at its worst, 5tay that time of year, at its best, gloriou5. at its worst, stay in bed territory. in the south—western quarter you have thicker cloud. that creep5 further ea5t quarter you have thicker cloud. that creep5 further east with time. you'll see that it is not wall—to—wall water here acro55 you'll see that it is not wall—to—wall water here across the countie5 wall—to—wall water here across the counties of england and wales. further north, through the afternoon, a brighter 5ky here, right from the word go for many. although there'5 right from the word go for many. although there's a lot of wind to be had throughout the day throughout the north—eastern quarter of scotland. central belt with dry weather, with 5un5hine. le55 in the way of wind. northern ireland, bit5 of brightness there. maybe a passing 5hower round about the coast. not much more than that. shower5 thi5 morning acro55 much more than that. shower5 thi5 morning across the north—west of england. they come further south with time5 england. they come further south with times i think. here again, brighter 5kie5 following on behind perhap5. the brighter 5kie5 following on behind perha ps. the best brighter 5kie5 following on behind perhap5. the best of the temperature5 throughout the day, 10 or 12 across the south—west. if you've got an eye on the rugby: cri5per at murrayfield for the visit
9:51 am
of the new zealanders. overnight we drag the cloud into the 5outh—we5tern quarter. that help5 drag the cloud into the 5outh—we5tern quarter. that helps to keep the temperatures up. el5ewhere, e5pecially keep the temperatures up. el5ewhere, especially in the countryside, not exclu5ively 5o, especially in the countryside, not exclu5ively so, it will be pretty nippy night. at least that equate5 toa nippy night. at least that equate5 to a glorious 5tart nippy night. at least that equate5 to a glorious start to the new day. a lot of sunshine. it'5 to a glorious start to the new day. a lot of sunshine. it's real get out and get on with it sort of weather. until in the west, there'5 and get on with it sort of weather. until in the west, there's no di5gui5ing the fact there will be more cloud and eventually rain through northern ireland, we5tern scotland, maybe the north west of england too, as the cloud begin5 scotland, maybe the north west of england too, as the cloud begins to thicken up. the temperature profile, as you see, de5pite thicken up. the temperature profile, as you see, despite the sunshine out ea5t five, six or seven only. that'5 it for the weather. back to you guy5. thank5 guy5. thanks very much phil. you gave us a bit a smile. thank you. jools holland has performed with some of the biggest 5tar5 in the world and new year's eve 5imply wouldn't be the same without his hootenanny. a5 his show "later" celebrate5 its 25th year on our screens, he says teaming up with his pal jose feliciano has been one of his career highlight5.
9:52 am
we'll speak to jool5 and jose in a minute, but first let's see them performing together. # let'5 # let's find each other tonight # let's find each other tonight # everything will be all right # everything will be all right # don't hesitate now # don't hesitate now # let'5 # don't hesitate now # let's find each other tonight # thi5 # this old life has flown by # this old life has flown by # i can't change it # i can't change it # and # i can't change it #and| # i can't change it # and i won't try # and i won't try # i have not always been as you see me now # 0h, me now # oh, woman, oh, woman, don't treat me so mean # you're the meane5t old woman that
9:53 am
i ever seen # i guess if you say so # i guess if you say so # i'll have to pack my things and go # i'll have to pack my things and go # that'5 # i'll have to pack my things and go # that's right. # that's right. # hit the road jack # hit the road jack # and don't you come back, no more, no more, no more, no more. # hit the road jack and don't you come back no more... # jool5 and jose, welcome. good morning. good morning. very lovely to be here. we're playing here tonight, manche5ter, which we're looking forward to. yeah, i'm looking forward to it, because i haven't played in manchester in a long time. when was the last time you played here? oh, my goodness... many, many years ago. i'll tell you what, i haven't played here since the time of blinkers, remember blinkers? the nightclub. yes, with george best. george best, those old day5, george best. george best, those old days, the high 5eat george best. george best, those old days, the high seat of manchester. welcome back. thank you. it's great to have you both here. this man was an inspiration to you before you got
9:54 am
together and worked together.” an inspiration to you before you got together and worked together. i used together and worked together. i used to wa ke together and worked together. i used to wake up in the morning, well, i didn't wake up in the morning. isn't that when most people wake up? laughter i'd be first to go to school. you'd be on the radio. iwouldn't want to get out of bed. you'd be on the radio, i'd think this is great. i'd 5pring out of bed becau5e radio, i'd think this is great. i'd 5pring out of bed because of the mu5ic. 5pring out of bed because of the music. i loved — he had this voice, the guitar. whenever he did a song he made it his own, turned it into hi5 he made it his own, turned it into his own thing. then, when he came on later, about a year ago, i realised what a fantastic man he was. i hope you don't mind me saying this about you? i thought let'5 you don't mind me saying this about you? i thought let's try and make a record together. i'm so pleased it'5 worked out. here we are, we've made the record and we're very pleased. tonight we're on tour and we're in manche5ter tonight. it's great. tonight we're on tour and we're in manchester tonight. it's great. did you feel the same way aboutjool5? he adored you? i adore him now. i didn't know him at the time. when i
9:55 am
heard him play the piano last year, when i appeared on his show, i thought to myself — what a marvellous musician. he thinks the way i do in music. he has no qualms about getting into different types of music. and so that's why it worked, because we got along as brothers and for me, this is the opportunity of a lifetime. tell us about the dynamic between you two then, when you were putting the mu5ic then, when you were putting the music together — who did what? who contributed what? well, jose has written some amazing 5ong5. al5o contributed what? well, jose has written some amazing 5ong5. also i wa5 written some amazing 5ong5. also i was really pleased thatjo5e wa5 plea5ed was really pleased thatjo5e wa5 pleased to do some of the songs i had written and there were a few cove r5. had written and there were a few cover5. one of the songs had written and there were a few cover5. one of the 5ong5jo5e wrote i5 feliz navidad. the way my band play5 i5 feliz navidad. the way my band plays it, it's 5ka 5tyly. we 5kad that song forever! it's great having a strange ma5h that song forever! it's great having a strange mash up. it really has worked. we've donejo5e'5 5ong5,
9:56 am
a strange mash up. it really has worked. we've donejo5e'5 songs, as you see me now, that song there, i wrote that song. i imagined frank sinatra doing it, but i'm happier with jo5e sinatra doing it, but i'm happier withjo5e doing it. sinatra doing it, but i'm happier with jose doing it. did you approve of what he wanted to do with your 5ong5? of what he wanted to do with your songs? yes, yes. there was a bit of he5itation there. songs? yes, yes. there was a bit of hesitation there. well, no, not hesitation. ijust have to think straight, you know, it's early morning. no, ienjoyed straight, you know, it's early morning. no, i enjoyed what was done. and i'm happy. i'm glad we have an album out. it's wonderful. we've got to talk about hootenanny, which we're coming up to that.” know, it's chri5tma5 then new year. bought my pre5ent5? know, it's chri5tma5 then new year. bought my presents? no, i haven't. i don't ru5h bought my presents? no, i haven't. i don't rush into doing that. i like to do it on christmas eve actually. i like to get my chri5tma5 to do it on christmas eve actually. i like to get my christmas shopping chri5tma5 eve. i like to get my christmas shopping christmas eve. that's brave or fooli5h. christmas eve. that's brave or foolish. in the lunch i do it. once the sales have started.. exactly, that'5 the sales have started.. exactly, that's right. a case of cognac i5 all right for the kiddie5.
9:57 am
hootenanny coming up. yes, and jose i5 hootenanny coming up. yes, and jose is going to be on. it we've done a 5ong is going to be on. it we've done a song called happy new year actually. so i've asked jo5e song called happy new year actually. so i've asked jose to be on it. i don't know who else i'm allowed to reveal. i can reveal that ed sheeran will be on it. when he came on the 5how will be on it. when he came on the show we asked him and he's going to come on, which will be great. ruby turner will be on. i hope — there'5 a lot of people i hope will come on. we'll wait and see. we're hoping for van morrison. are you surprised by how successful that programme has been? i can't believe we're sitting here after all these years and it's 5till here after all these years and it's still on and people still put up with it. you don't feel like a failure at new year because you're watching hootenanny. there'5 u5ually an old film, but it's a good time.” think the thing is, new year's eve cha5 changed. people u5ed think the thing is, new year's eve cha5 changed. people used to go to the put and get drunk. people don't drink and drive, which is a good thing. they tend to stay home with theirfamilie5. you thing. they tend to stay home with their families. you can thing. they tend to stay home with
9:58 am
theirfamilie5. you can have the hootenanny on, but it's like a thing that you can look at and pay attention to or it's the perfect 5oundtrack attention to or it's the perfect soundtrack to your evening.” remember seeing it on iplayer about two weeks after, people were still watching it. well avenue year, people watching in a middle of a wedne5day people watching in a middle of a wednesday afternoon. celebrating up to mid—5ummer night'5 eve. wednesday afternoon. celebrating up to mid-summer night's eve. usually for me i don't drink too much on new years because i'm the designated driver for my friends. ican't drink a lot. i'm sure that's going to go marvellou5ly. i love the dynamic between you two. thank5 marvellou5ly. i love the dynamic between you two. thanks so much for coming in and talking to us. the album jool5 and jo5e'5 record is called a5 you see me now. that's it for today. breakfa5t called a5 you see me now. that's it for today. brea kfa5t i5 called a5 you see me now. that's it for today. breakfast is back tomorrow. until then, have for today. breakfast is back tomorrow. untilthen, have a for today. breakfast is back tomorrow. until then, have a lovely day. bye—bye. thi5 this is bbc news, the headlines: thousands of people are on the streets in zimba bwe'5 capital — calling for president mugabe to resign. robert mugabe mu5t
9:59 am
robert mugabe must go. he must go ye5terday. robert mugabe must go. he must go yesterday. we are going to take our country back. i'm ben brown, reporting live from zimbabwe where robert mugabe i5 running out of friends and running out of time. tens of thousands of people on low incomes face having their univer5al credit 5topped over chri5tma5. police and air accident inve5tigator5 search for clues as to why two aircraft collided — leaving four people dead. also in the next hour: taxing takeaway boxes to tackle what'5 described as a "global emergency". the chancellor is considering measures to help cut the 12—tonne5
10:00 am

25 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on