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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 19, 2017 7:00am-8:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and mega munchetty. a woman's body is found in the search for missing teenager gaia pope. the 19—year—old has been missing for 12 days — family members say they're devastated. she is the absolute light of my life. so beautiful, so emotionally wise and intelligent. good morning, it's sunday, the 19th of november. also this morning... after thousands of people in zimbabwe take to the streets, president mugabe will meet with army chiefs this morning to decide his fate. a promise of 300,000 new homes a year, as the chancellor says he'll do "whatever it takes" to fix the housing market. after 3a years of leading sinn fein, gerry adams announces he's standing down as president of the party. in sport, england are into the rugby
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league world cup semifinals. they have beaten papua new guinea 36—6. how volunteers hope to restore the last paddle steamer to be built in britain. and philip has the weather. good morning. there is a fine and adverts on a frosty start to sunday. a decent day in prospect from any pa rt a decent day in prospect from any part of the british isle. but there isa part of the british isle. but there is a change on the way. details in a few minutes. good morning. first, our main story. police in dorset say they're confident they've found the body of missing teenager gaia pope. the 19 year—old had not been seen for 11 days. specialist teams made the discovery on saturday, close to a coastal path near swanage. her family have said they are "absolutely devastated". she is... i'm not go on to say "was", and i never will. she is the absolute light of my life.
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so beautiful, so emotionally wise and intelligent. and so passionate, and artistic, and creative, and understanding. james ingham is in swanage with the latest. this is the news that everybody who has been involved, the whole community, the news that everybody was dreading. what is the mood like there this morning? 0ne was dreading. what is the mood like there this morning? one would imagine it is very sombre?” there this morning? one would imagine it is very sombre? i think it will be as many people will wake up it will be as many people will wake up to hear this news this morning. this was only confirmed late last night. some people will not have heard. this town has been rocked by gaia's disappearance. the community has come together to search for gaia. you can move from seeing
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posters and leaflets of her face. but included yesterday when many volu nteers but included yesterday when many volunteers were out searching in three different locations. hundreds of people turned up to help gaia's family and friends. but as they were doing that, police discovered her body on clifftops close to wear clothing a purse was found. they will carry out forensic tests on that area and on her body, as well asa that area and on her body, as well as a postmortem, to try to establish how she died. at the moment her death remains unexplained. police have until now been treated —— protruding this is a murder investigation. they will want more answers soon. thank you. the chancellor of the exchequer has pledged to use wednesday's budget, to help build 300,000 new homes a year. philip hammond has told the sunday times he'll invest billions and fix planning regulations to get builders building. he'll also announce funding to get driverless cars on the road within four years. emma vardy is in our
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london newsroom. the weekend before the budget we start getting the leaks, don't we? that is right. we have than having them all this week. there would be a range of measures aimed at tackling theissues range of measures aimed at tackling the issues which contributed to the conservatives losing seats at the last election. housing is emerging as one of the big headlines. that the chancellor, philip hammond, put it in the sunday times today is, he is, he says he will stage an intervention on housing. he is pointing the finger at all of these sites were he says there is planning promotion —— permission but not a lot is going on. he is targeting these speculative investors hoarding pieces of land. he has a strong message. he says, construction companies, if you have got places, if they have got planning permission, you need to start building. away from housing there is
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something for the tech fans. there will be new rules introduced to help developers do more on road testing on driverless vehicles. but make no mistake, the backdrop to all of this is that it is a difficult budget for philip hammond. the brexit arguments are dominating. and after that snap election which went wrong, there is pressure to get things back on track for the tories. thank you. we will keep in touch. zimbabwe's president robert mugabe is expected to meet military commanders this morning, a day after tens of thousands of protestors called for his resignation. mr mugabe has so far resisted calls to step down. his party, zanu—pf, is expected to begin the formal process of stripping him of his role. ben brown is in zimbabwe for us. good morning. it could be a monumental day for that country today? yeah, another crucial day for
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zimbabwe. yesterday we saw tens of thousands on the streets in harare, the capital. a real sea change in this country's history. people no longer prepared to put up with the dictator, robert mugabe, who has ruled them for 37 years. still it is a question of how he is removed constitutionally. that is what the army want. they don't want this to looked like a coup d'etat. they want him to go of his own free will, where he resigns, or to constitutionally get rid of him. that could mean impeaching him in parliament in the next few days. also what is crucial today is that there is a meeting of zanu—pf, the ruling party, who are expected to dismiss him as party leader. he would no longer be party leader of zanu—pf. there are negotiations today between the military and mr mugabe, where they will try once again to persuade him to step down.
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the signs so far are that he is being stubborn. as he always has been. he's refusing to leave office. we were talking to an expert who used to work on part of the zimbabwean government. he was saying that robert mugabe's future, as to whether or not he is allowed to stay in zimbabwe, depends on whether he accepts what seems to be the inevitable. those scenes yesterday show the outpouring of relief almost from the people. what was that like to experience? there were scenes of joy, to experience? there were scenes of joy, celebration. long into the night people were tooting their horns, there were still cheering through the evening. we have been talking to some of the people there. in years gone by they have gone onto the street and criticised robert mcgarvey, are demonstrated. they have been beaten by the police. they have been beaten by the police. they have faced water cannon and tear gas. they couldn't believe they had
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this freedom to roam around curare, to go to key government offices and demand the president to stand down. —— harare. people will not accept anything less than the ousting of robert mugabe. thank you. after 3a years at the helm, the sinn fein leader, gerry adams says he plans to step down. during his time as leader, he persuaded the ira to call a ceasefire, and pursued a political settlement in the form of the good friday agreement. his decision to resign brings to an end the longest party leadership in britain or ireland. republicanism has never been stronger. this is our time. we will grow even stronger in the future. but leadership means knowing when it's time for change. and that time is now. i will not be standing at the next election. investigators are continuing to look into the causes of a mid—air collision between a helicopter and a plane, after the bodies of the four men who died were recovered.
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police and air accident experts remain at the scene of the wreckage in woodland near buckinghamshire, as the families wait to formally identify their loved ones. the argentine navy has detected signals likely to be that of a submarine which disappeared on wednesday. the sanjuan was on a routine mission off the southern tip of argentina, when it lost contact with naval command on wednesday. the defence ministry is now working with a us company to trace the location of the seven failed satellite calls received on saturday. new advice on how to recognise and tackle sexual harassment in the workplace, is published today. the advisory and conciliation service, acas, has released guidelines for employers and employees which outlines the kind of behaviour which could be considered inappropriate and how to report it. sophie long reports. allegations of inappropriate behaviour by men considered to be hollywood greats and high profile politicians at westminster started a conversation about what sexual harassment is and what needs to be done to tackle it.
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now the conciliation service acas says it wants to help people identify sexual harassment at work and to give tips on how to handle it. the advice includes examples of the forms that sexual harassment can take, such as written or verbal comments, displaying explicit images or unwanted physical contact. sexual harassment can happen anywhere, at any time, to anybody. there are things that employers can do that will help manage that risk. but, nevertheless, it is a possibility and people need to be ready to identify it when it happens, they need to know what to do if it happens and they need to have a safe place and a safe way to report that, and possibly resolve it will take action around the matter as well. acas says if someone feels they are experiencing harassment, there are a number of people within an organisation that can help deal with complaints — like members of the human resources
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team, or union representatives. any kind of harassment that includes sexual assault or physical threats, it says, is a criminal act and should be reported to the police. sophie long, bbc news. the actor and singer, david cassidy, is being treated in a florida hospital for multiple organ failure. the 67 year—old who first found fame in the tv sitcom, the partridge family, was rushed to hospital three days ago, and requires a liver transplant. he is believed to be conscious and surrounded by his family, following reports he had been put in an induced coma. the queen and prince philip will celebrate their 70th wedding anniversary tomorrow. to mark the milestone, buckingham palace has released this new portrait. a set of six commemorative stamps have also been issued by royal mail. they feature the couple's engagement and wedding. they are the first royal couple to celebrate their platinum anniversary. many congratulations.
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driverless cars, new homes and disposable plastic containers will be on phillip hammond's agenda, when he delivers his budget this week. westminster watchers say he'll also be concerned with presenting a positive vision for post—brexit britain, and creating a moment of unity for his party. henry mance is the political correspondent for the financial times, and joins us from our london newsroom. good morning. we were talking to our political correspondent earlier and this is the weekend when the leaks started to come out ahead of the budget. anything surprise you? we have seen philip hammond talk positive about housing. it is not really surprising because we know the conservatives and labour leave this is an area where young people are being squeezed out of the housing market. homes costing too much. he is trying to be as bold as he can be without annoying traditional conservative voters who don't want homes built on the green
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belt. how positive is this budget going to be? we were saying with brexit negotiations going on, he is determined to give a positive outlook for the uk post brexit?” remember the time when budgetss were giveaways. at the moment that is not possible. there is still a budget deficit. we are spending more than we are bringing in. philip hammond doesn't think you can keep doing that forever. the labour party wa nted that forever. the labour party wanted to loosen the purse strings of it. i think you will try to present a positive message but the underlying picture is a bit grim. what do you mean? brexit has not helped the public finances. if you are philip hammond, who supported remain, you are thinking, i can't be upbeat and talk about the opportunities because i am looking at the numbers and they are not so good. there are calls from the party
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for him to relax austerity following the election. do you think you will not do that? i think you will not really do very much in that direction. the indications are that he will be cautious and that he is actually a believer in the basics of austerity. 0n actually a believer in the basics of austerity. on his plans there would still be a budget deficit. there would still —— we would still spend more than we receive until the middle of 2020. that is still quite away, if you think about the recession and the financial crisis, thatis recession and the financial crisis, that is a long time with a budget deficit. he doesn't think we can wait any longer. if you are expecting a big radical plan, if you are expecting him to completely change what this comment is about, you will be disappointed. what about the place to build more houses? that is likely to be seen as positive. it is likely to be seen as positive. it isa is likely to be seen as positive. it is a cross—party demand? yes, but look at the scale. sajid javid, the cabinet minister in charge of housing, he wanted the
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government to borrow 50 billion to spend on these things. what philip hammond is talking about is 5 billion. so, it is a lot of money, a big figure. it is not the scale that one of his own colleagues thought was necessary. i think you can be attacked by labour on that point. the difficulty with being really bold is that you create enemies come often. you leave yourself open. we saw in philip hammond's only other budget that he tried to do something radical on national insurance, what self—employed people pay in tax, and he fell flat on his face. he doesn't wa nt to he fell flat on his face. he doesn't want to do that. the way of not doing that is don't take any big risks. i think that will be his overriding principle on wednesday. what do you make of the relationship between number 11 and number 10 downing street? there have been reported tensions between philip hammond and the prime minister.m isa hammond and the prime minister.m is a pretty extraordinary situation. at theresa may done better in the election, she would have sacked this
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quy- election, she would have sacked this guy. he would not be in a job delivering the budget this week. it must make philip hammond feel uneasy about his position, or at least resentful. having said that, theresa may has changed her advisers, so the relationship is a little better as a result. i think there is still a marriage of convenience, rather than a really close partnership. david cameron and george osborne, whatever you felt about them, you had to think they were pretty close. they didn't come out into public with their disagreements and you felt they were on the same page. it's not quite the same with these two. they were on the same page. it's not quite the same with these twom will be interesting this week. thank you forjoining us. good morning, if you arejust getting up. a cold start in many parts of the country. a rather beautiful sunrise? southend—on—sea. the weather
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watchers are beginning to get out and about. we are always very grateful because they keep us in touch with what is going on with the weather across the british isles. as you say, it was a pretty chilly start under the clear skies. that is certainly the case through central and eastern parts, a bit of rust around and mist and fog. further west, the clouds stuck around for a good part of the night, particularly in the far west of cornwall, the scilly isles and into northern ireland. it has produced the odd spot of rain here and there. that is the likelihood as far ahead as mid—afternoon. increasing amounts of cloud coming in across much of the south—west, up across much of western wales as well. generally speaking, the further east you are, cool throughout the day. i think the thing you will notice is that as the clear skies get a bit more hazy with time, more in the way of cloud for northern ireland, the western side of scotland, and a greater chance of a bit of rain. that isjust a of scotland, and a greater chance of a bit of rain. that is just a taste of what is to come overnight. chilly throughout the central and eastern parts. this is part of the problem
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overnight, because we will bring mild airfrom the overnight, because we will bring mild air from the atlantic. that's no initially in scotland will fall to as low as 200 metres or so. gradually, it will rise to the course of the night as increasing amounts of mild air comes in from the atlantic. the same mild air, five or 6 degrees, as opposed to —5 last night, the really mild stuff towards the south—west quarter. eventually, it wins out across the greater part of the british isles, save for scotland. quite a dank started a day. not a lot of sunshine for sun—worshippers. ii, 12 or 13 degrees. further north, one of those days. never better than five, six, seven or 8 degrees. it stays dank and murky, and a bit grizzly. that is the sort of pattern for the middle part of the week, where we have the high—pressure down to the western mediterranean and we have low pressure. quite a number of isobars there. we have this combination of wet and windy fair. but mild, given the flow that is
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going to come up and at us from way down in the mid—atlantic. this week is certainly wet and windy at times. some of that rain is really quite heavy as well. it will be mild and then later in the week, around about friday, into the forthcoming weekend, we suspect it will turn a lot colder and brighter as a consequence. no longer that mild feel of midweek. mild, dank and murky, or cold and bright? yes, that is often the way at this time of year. orton, not winter, not quite yet. which do you prefer? i am an optimist, i like the cheery skies, i am happy to put on a fewer layers. well, nature has given mea fewer layers. well, nature has given me a few layers. it is not fat, you understand! of course! you are not alone. i have never heard that. wide skin? a natural duvet! stop it! you
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have nothing of the sought. volunteers restoring the last paddle steamer to be built in britain are appealing for help in tracking down artifacts and equipment from the ship. the maid of the loch was left derelict on the banks of loch lomond over 35 years ago and the group are now on the final push of a fundraising campaign to get her sailing once again. lorna gordon has been to take a look. in the grey drizzle of an autumnal day, the last paddle steamer to be built in britain. she's not sailed for more than 35 years, moored up and, for part of that time, left to rot — until steam—ship enthusiasts saved her from sinking. it's a thing of beauty, but it needs a bit of work. absolutely, it sure does. it needs a lot of work, and a lot of money spent on it. the obvious things are that the paintwork and all that kind of thing...
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bit of rotten wood there? rotten wood. all of that will be replaced or renewed. the paddle boxes will be bright and sparkling again. in her 30 years of service, royalty and heads of state were amongst the millions of passengers who graced her decks. on a saturday night, there'd be entertainment. and on a summer's day, it would be full of families who'd come from glasgow to see loch lomond. in its heyday, the maid of the loch would have been packed with passengers enjoying a day out on the water. many of those who are helping to restore it have fond memories of this ship, and want a new generation to enjoy it too. was it exciting, as a boy? oh, yes, fantastic. never seen anything like it in my life. there's a wonderful feeling about watching the power — i mean, this is power. this is raw power. all these pistons — the two pistons going backwards and forwards, turning the shafts, making the paddles go through their cycle,
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making her go through the water... it'sjust — i mean, "magic" is the only word there is to it. hard work by volunteers has erased some of the damage caused by the years of neglect. but with anything of value stolen, any metals that could be melted down sold as scrap, they now need help in tracking down any artefacts that still exist, like this recently returned ship's wheel. the ship was stripped bare before we took it on. but over the years, we've had one or two things back. the most important one is the ship's bell. you want to hear it? yeah, go on, then... you need to give me a hand...! if i lift it, you can give it a ding... there's lots of other ones that people have taken off. no recriminations, wejust need to know that, if they're safe, would people please give them back? securing the heritage of this historic ship, and moving one step closer to seeing the maid of the loch raising steam and sailing once again.
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it will be fantastic when she set sail again. it will be fantastic when she set sailagain. a it will be fantastic when she set sail again. a phenomenal effort when they restore these wonderful old boats, paddle steamers. i've never been on a paddle steamer. never. we're going to be on the bbc news channel until nine o'clock. at the very end of the programme we will be talking about windermere, a similar kind of thing. but the nature of the way that the ecology is changing, on windermere. 0h, lake windermere? yes, but interestingly it is not a lake. well remembered! people tell off when we get it wrong. we're here on the bbc news channel until nine this morning, still to come... only a few months ago, andy cole was so gripped by depression he couldn't bear to leave his home. now, after climbing ben nevis every day for a month, he'lljoin us to explain why the outdoors has saved his life.
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fascinating story. all aboard for a trip along japan's prettiest railways as the travel show finds out why part of it now lies abandoned. i've been to japan recently, there are some amazing views. eight—year—old lily suffered shrapnel wounds and a bruised lung when she was injured in the manchester arena bombing earlier this year. we've been speaking to her as she returned to her karate club to prove she's fighting fit. a young lady not to be trifled with! all that to come on the bbc news channel. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now. thank you for watching us on the bbc
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news channel. we love it when you stay with us and don't watch the football. let's look at the newspapers. we have got a debut on the breakfast sofa. daniel hughes is a specialist in handling negotiations. he will tell us what caught his eye. first, pages. the sunday times has got an interview with the chancellor, where he is pledging to use the budget to help build 300,000 new homes a year. the observer is looking at the protests in zimbabwe overnight. people marched on the capital. they we re people marched on the capital. they were urging president mugabe to resign. the sun is saying how liz jones has been taken off air over alleged sexual harassment. a spokesperson for aled jones said, he accepts that his behaviour over a decade ago was occasionally juvenile and apologised
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for any upset caused. the bbc has not commentated on the allegations. the sunday mirror features with the story we're leading on this morning about the body of missing teenager gaia pope, being found by police. danny east here. you are a trained negotiator. you train other people in negotiations. you train some of the civil servants now negotiating brexit. there is a story in the mail on sunday which shines an interesting light? i can't be here and not talk about these negotiations. every paper has got something about brexit. what they are looking at here in the mail on sunday is the letter that was recently sent byjohnson, gold etc to the prime minister. —— michael gove. it illustrates the difference
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between the sides. the eu, who seem to be taking really quite unaligned approach. the messages are very consistent they are getting across, whether it be from die welt —— donald tusk, michel barnier or anyone involved. it shows the complexity on the uk side. and that perhaps they have got to fight battles at every turn. it is a difficultjob. battles at every turn. it is a difficult job. as an expert negotiator looking at this process, i know the answer to this, but i have to ask it, who is getting it right? them or us? i have to say, some of the early battles appear to have been won by the eu. there is even a negotiation about how the negotiation will be conducted in terms of, are we going to look at the trade dealfirst, terms of, are we going to look at the trade deal first, which the uk wa nts to the trade deal first, which the uk wants to do? eu safe, no. we have to sort out the settlement bill, the
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irish border, the rights of eu citizens in the uk. that seems to be working that way. they have already got some concessions from us in that regard. the budget this week. this is something that everybody is frustrated about. paying through the nose for parking when you go to hospital. yeah. it is in every paper. there is something about the budget. as you would expect. it a lwa ys budget. as you would expect. it always seems an opportunity for a tra nsfer to always seems an opportunity for a transfer to get some positive headlines, create some diversion. there are all sorts of angles. this one, i'm sure we have had the situation where you have had to go to hospital to pick someone up or go yourself, and the charges, there may be some headlines. you are obviously a cricket fan, by the fact you chose this story? this is on the ashes, which starts this week. it starts this week. it is partly about the ashes. for me it is about something
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else. i love this story. this is graeme swann, who is, finally enough, one of england cricket's most successful operators in recent yea rs most successful operators in recent years as most successful operators in recent yea rs as a most successful operators in recent years as a bowler. we're about to have the first test in brisbane, which is a cauldron, and we haven't won there in how many series. it is intimidating. that is the angle every other article has gone with. but he says, if we win there, imagine what that will do for the aussies. no coincidence he was so successful. the royal family and meghan markle, harry and meghan markle. you can imagine an argument over the breakfast table in a few yea rs if, over the breakfast table in a few years if, as everybody seems to be reported, this relationship gets more serious. and also on the eve of another royal marriage about to hit
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70 years tomorrow. they have uncovered that meghan markle's decedent was beheaded at the orders of king henry viii. you canjust see it. yourfamily of king henry viii. you canjust see it. your family has of king henry viii. you canjust see it. yourfamily has never liked my family! hang —— harry and angela merkel would never argue! a marriage made in heaven. we will see you in an hour. headlights up. —— headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. here's a summary of the main
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stories from bbc news. police in dorset say they believe they've found the body of missing teenager, gaia pope. the 19—year—old had not been seen for 11 days. specialist search teams made the discovery on saturday close to a coastal path near swanage. detectives said the death was being treated as "unexplained". the family have thanked all those who've helped in the search for gaia. zimbabwe's president, robert mugabe is expected to meet military commanders this morning, a day after tens of thousands of protestors called for his resignation. mr mugabe has resisted calls to step down but his party, zanu—pf, is expected to begin the formal process of stripping him of his role. mr mugabe has led zimbabwe since independence from britain in 1980. the chancellor of the exchequer has pledged to use wednesday's budget to help build 300,000 new homes a year. philip hammond has told the sunday times he'll invest billions and fix planning
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regulations to get builders building. he'll also announce funding to get driverless cars on the road within four years. after 3a years at the helm, the sinn fein leader, gerry adams, says he plans to step down. during his time as leader, he persuaded the ira to call a ceasefire and pursued a political settlement in the form of the good friday agreement. his decision to resign brings to an end the longest party leadership in britain or ireland. the argentine navy says it has detected signals likely to be from a submarine which has been missing since wednesday with 44 crew on board. the sanjuan was on a routine mission off the southern tip of argentina when it lost contact with naval command on wednesday. the defence ministry is now working with a us company to trace the location of the seven satellite calls made on saturday. the actor and singer, david cassidy, is being treated in a florida hospital for multiple organ failure. the 67 year—old who first found fame in the tv sitcom, the partridge family, was rushed to hospital three days
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ago, and requires a liver transplant. he is believed to be conscious and surrounded by his family, following reports he had been put in an induced coma. the queen and prince philip will celebrate their 70th wedding anniversary tomorrow. to mark the milestone, buckingham palace has released this new portrait. a set of six commemorative stamps have also been issued by royal mail, they feature the couple's engagement and wedding. they are the first royal couple to celebrate their platinum anniversary. imagine being married for 17 years? i have got a way to go. you may make it, if she puts up with you. that is more to the point. good morning. they have done it! england. through to the semifinals
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of the rugby league world cup. as he predicted. —— as you predicted. not the perfect performance from england. lots of mistakes. hopefully they can step up bid for a tongue in they can step up bid for a tongue in the semifinal. did papua new guinea not play well either? the difference in this core, 26-6... if either? the difference in this core, 26—6. .. if england either? the difference in this core, 26—6... if england didn't do well... ? their defence was brilliant. papua new guinea couldn't get through the defence. going forward, lots of arabs. it is like i am some sort of england —— rugby league expert! england —— rugby league expert! england owing to the semifinals of the rugby league world cup. here is tim hague. england have strolled the way through the world cup so far, but with sam burgess back, could they
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marched through their quarterfinal against the colourful and physical papua new guinea? we got an indication after 90 seconds. david mead flattened. he would not return. it's some up the first half. england accident and ahead through a familiarfinisher. accident and ahead through a familiar finisher. it is yet another try forjermaine mcgillvary!! watkins— mcgillvary double act did the damage again a while later. same corner, same result. there was the odd bump on the road. it didn't bother kevin brown or his team—mates. alex walmsley going over before half—time. ben currie after it. papua new guinea got some reward for their efforts. watkins no longer the provider as he scored twice himself. is he going to be caught? no! another leeds rhino got the
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seventh and final try. ryan hall making it 36—6. tonga next in the semifinals. england are picking up speedin semifinals. england are picking up speed in this world cup. they have been good old tournament. there are some big boys, they tackle ha rd there are some big boys, they tackle hard and run hard. it was a big test. we came up well. we're still building. we are into the semis and thatis building. we are into the semis and that is where we wanted to be. in rugby union, england continued their dominance against australia, with their fifth straight win over the wallabies. danny care went over for the final score to seal a record win by 30—6. england face samoa next weekend. well, yeah, ithought weekend. well, yeah, i thought early on probably we were just a little bit sloppy in our attack. we created
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some opportunities, picked some wrong options. defensively we were good most of the game, dropped our line speed. but having so many players coming in and out of the side, i was really pleased. the game of the day though was in scotland — they came within one converted try of a first ever win over new zealand, but they were beaten 22—17 in a thriller at murrayfield. fly—half beauden barret scored this breath—taking try for the all blacks to put them into what looked like a commanding lead, but scotland pushed the world champions all the way. in the final minute of the match stuart hogg thought he might‘ve broken through to win the game, but he was just forced out of play as the clocked hit full—time. we spoke in the week. you don't get too many chances, just because of scheduling, injury and non—selection. this is one of the best teams in world sport, notjust by. best teams in world sport, notjust rugby. let's not forget that. what we do is pretty good, but we are
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gutted, to be honest, gutted that we lost the game. i'm very proud of the effort, but we lost. an experimental welsh side hung on to beat georgia i3—6 at the principality stadium. wales made 11! changes to the side that lost to australia last time out. young winger hallam amos got the only try of the game. and ireland beat fiji in dublin but only just. there were 11! and ireland beat fiji in dublin but onlyjust. there were 11! points ahead at one stage but needed a late penalty to finish the match off. manchester city still a pretty unbeatable. they have preserved their big lead at the top of the premier league, beating leicester city 2—0. manchester united, chelsea, liverpool and arsenal all won as well. here is the pick of the action. sitting comfortably? it is as close as you get to manchester city at the top of the table, playing the ghana football few could live with.
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leicester city were the latest to come up against a side having their own goal the season competition. jesus finished off a flowing move. kevin de bruyne providing the brilliance. he help us enough to win another one, to give more distance for the three contenders. we will keep going. still a points clear of manchester united, who rediscovered their swagger against newcastle. —— paul pogba back from injury and on the scoresheet in a 4—1 win. still daylight between the manchester clu bs. daylight between the manchester clubs. just a point between those in north london. arsenal beat tottenham 2-0 north london. arsenal beat tottenham 2—0 in the derby. chelsea have jumped double spurs. they trust west brom 4—0. they are now without a win in ten games. theirfans made an early exit. could their manager follow? the important thing is doing
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the right thing for the football club. whether that is me staying and keeping going, whether it is a change, they will have to make that decision. the decision should be made for the benefit of the football club, not the benefit of any individual. what west brom wouldn't give for a win. liverpool l3 a row. —— liverpool have three in a row. matt —— mo salah scored twice against southampton. it is equally sweet for burnley. three straight wins as well. there are 2— nil when at home to swansea keeps them seventh and swa nsea to swansea keeps them seventh and swansea city in the bottom three. and celtic look pretty unbeatable. 64 games since their last league defeat. they had to wait until 12 minutes from time to beat ross county. leigh griffiths with a free kick. hamilton, stjohnstone and motherwell one. england women have
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lost the ashes but they have won their penultimate t20 of the series in australia to save some face. they could still draw the series. they won by 40 runs, withjenny gunn taking four wickets. there will be a straight shoot out between two englishman for a golf‘s race to dubai title. justin rose has a two shot lead over tommy fleetwood going into the final round. should either of them go on to win the tournament, they will top the money list for the year on the european tour. and who would have predicted this final of the atp tour finals at the start of the atp tour finals at the start of the week? it is grigor dimitrov against david goffin. dimitrov beat jak scott —— jack sock. gough and beat roger federer in three sets. he said the win gave him so much happiness. for a federer it was only his fifth defeat of the year. only five matches lost in the whole
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season. he should be on the way down, shouldn't be? but he is still as good as ever. thank you. anyone who has ever suffered depression will know what a difficult struggle it can be. the key to overcoming the onus was to conquer britain's highest mountain. andy cole's doctor recommended he should get into the fresh air to boost his mood. he took the advice literally. he climbed ben nevis not once but every day for the month of october. good morning. how are you? not too bad. however the lakes? feeling good now they are back on terra firma. take us back to where you were. for a year and a half you we re you were. for a year and a half you were feeling down. how? three years ago everything had come to an end. i run myself down to the ground, some personal problems. i didn't see any
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way out, any option, apart from seriously to consider taking my own life. i took the brave step a couple of months later and asked for help from the doctor. some medication. after a few more months he recommended that i try to get out to the outside. see how i feel. a friend of mine took that literally. he said, on my days off we can go to the lake district. i was not speaking to anybody. i was just indoors. i shot myself away from the world. i thought i could do with them on my own. as i found most —— out, that wasn't to be. you just got the bug? yeah, really enjoyed it. it helped me put my problems into perspective. it shows you how big you really a re perspective. it shows you how big you really are in this world. also, i suppose, you said you took the brave step to go to your doctor. it
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is obviously and intimidating thing for you to open up. i think it is for you to open up. i think it is for anybody. it is that, i need help, i need something. a lot of people tend to sit back and pretend that it people tend to sit back and pretend thatitis people tend to sit back and pretend that it is going to go away. i didn't feel that was happening with me. i had to take that step or it would have been catastrophic. for whatever reason, having been to the la kes, whatever reason, having been to the lakes, you came up with the idea walking up ben nevis everyday from. what was it, the endorphins, was it being outdoors? what helped you? certainly the endorphins being released gave me the desire to get off medication. i wanted to get that back into the system. sorry, out of the system. so yeah, i love the outdoors, the scenery. some of the site you can see. and the weather is nice. you did it every day for the
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month of october. what did you do when you got up and you saw it was chucking down with rain, it was freezing cold? chucking down with rain, it was freezing cold ? digi just chucking down with rain, it was freezing cold? digi just think, i'm not going? i had 29 days like that in all. that was literally consecutive. i have got a big following on facebook at the moment. seeing the messages and the support and the continuous donations inspired me to go, the weather is not actually that bad, the skin is waterproof, head down, off i go. not actually that bad, the skin is waterproof, head down, off i gom one of the pictures you were in sunshine. the weather looks quite nice. in some ways, there is nowhere better to be on a day like that than high in the hills? certainly when it is weather like that. that was a gorgeous afternoon. it was the final day. how long did it take each time?
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i tried to give it some variation. on average about six hours up and down. speaking to many people across the world who could relate to the depression and mental health that i was chatting about. and it is still very recent. are you in a better place? iam very recent. are you in a better place? i am getting there. it has helped my own development, my own recovery. onwards and upwards. literally! glove. thank you for coming in. i wonder if it is mountain climbing weather? shall we find out? good morning. minus for the last timei good morning. minus for the last time i looked at the top of the cairngorms. you don't have to go that high. misty, a ratherfrosty start for some. those are the temperatures. down to a about —4, minus five. under relatively clear skies for much of the country. the weather fronts becoming an
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increasing player during the day. no great rush to change things today. what we will find in central and eastern part a spectacular bright frosty start would become a bit more hazy with time. we lose the frost. it was never a player across the far south—west. temperature about ten or 11 across parts of devon and cornwall and into the isles of scilly. through the afternoon, dry if you're out and about. low—level, high—level, it doesn't make a lot of difference. the cloud will fill in a western scotland through northern ireland. you will have some rain in places by the end of the day. still some showers in the north—eastern quarter of scotland. chilly where you see the sunset. 78 degrees in these. we bring this area in from these. we bring this area in from the atlantic and it converts to snow. there are 200 metres originally in the first part of the night across scotland. that will gradually rise with time as we are inundated with mild air from the
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atlantic. it is much milder than the last nightjust atlantic. it is much milder than the last night just passed. atlantic. it is much milder than the last nightjust passed. 10 degrees difference. mild are getting into the south. it is a wet start on monday. no getting away from that. just watch out for the hill fog. the payoff is as we lose the bulk of the rain, yes, we keep the cloud, it is mild for northern ireland, england and wales. it is one of those days in scotland. leaden skies, some rain. temperatures never better than six, seven, 8 degrees. mild as we get into the middle part of the week. the payoff at this time of the year is more wet and windy weather. not idealfor climbing year is more wet and windy weather. not ideal for climbing mountains. thank you. we are going to bring the headlines at eight o'clock. first, the show. this week this week, japan's prettiest railways... there is a push for the last carriage, maybe it has the best views. chomping your way through the big apple. we just eat crazy things for the sake of eating crazy things.
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the things we eat are actually really really delicious. this is the tadami line in centraljapan. it's regarded as one of the country's most beautiful train routes, and hugs the tadami river as it makes its way from fukushima to niigata prefectures. and it's especially beautiful in japan's autumn colours. the train stations along the tadami line are so unassuming and quaint, this doesn't even look like a train station, it looks more like a post office to me. but it is really bustling inside. people come here for the view and it attracts a particular crowd. it's popular chiefly with older people, a handful of railway enthusiast and of course, at this time of year, leaf peepers. there is a bit of a push for the last carriage, maybe it has the best views. today is unusually busy.
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normally only around 35 people a day come here for the eight daily departures. it is a serene trip through some of the country's lesser—known backwaters. but there is a problem. this is tadami station, and everyone has to get off now, because the next six stations are the ones that have been damaged in the floods. this area escaped the twin tsunami and nuclear disasters that made fukushima's name globally infamous. butjust two months later mother nature struck again. heavy storms caused flooding which made a long stretch of the track here unusable. a handful of stations were shut and to this day remain abandoned. this is one of the six disused stations and this sign here says "beware of the bears." locals don't much use the service that is
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remaining. it's less useful now that you can't travel uninterrupted from one side to the other. but it does still occupy a special place in some people's hearts. wow, look at this view. the colours are amazing. for a start, it's a beautiful thing to photograph. there is quite a view from up here, no matter what season it is. and it is not one that kenko hoshi is alone in enjoying. in thailand we don't have any autumn. i come for the autumn, leaves change colour. i thought this train moving is a very perfect shot. how did you feel in 2011 when the floods destroyed part of the tadami line?
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the operator, jr east, plans to restore the entire line by 2021. but in the meantime, in an attempt to get more young japanese using the line, these comedians are hosting tours of it. you'll notice a very different crowd from the passengers i was with earlier. this time, it's exclusively young women, most of whom would probably never have come here in the past. each comedian, including this palm reader, takes turn entertaining each group of passengers, so everyone gets their money's worth. money line. happy line! the tadami experience also takes in local
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temples, and the kaneyama well where you can drink the naturally occurring sparkling water. i expected to see a lot of old people on a bus tour like this, but i was really surprised to see so many young people. i think it's a really clever marketing tool to get these comedians on board. this looks like a lot of fun. finally, new york city. people are looking for a little
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special. new york is a food city. there are a lot of different kinds of foods to eat. tremendous ethnic diversity. this is new york's major chinatown. it is big and far—away. about 40 minutes. but it is still inside the city. we are going down here. this is the luxurious entrance to the golden mile. whenever i am in flushing, i tried to stop by and have some lamb dumplings, peak years 01’ have some lamb dumplings, peak years or duck heads. we start of the club in 2005. it started off in a tiny little malaysian chinese place in manhattan chinatown. six people. we had pork intestine is, we had tripe.
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it was a fantastic feast. the next time we met, there were 12 people. and the next dinner, there were 20 people, then 30, 50, 100. and the next dinner, there were 20 people, then 30,50,100. it kept going. so now we have got, i think, somewhere around 2500 members in new york city. 1500 in los angeles. and a thousand in san francisco. tomorrow we already have sri lankan food in staten island. to get there we are going to have to take a subway. a ferry. and a van will stop this is eggplant served with sweet and sour. he has had this restaurant for at least ten years from what i can see.
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before that he cooked in saudi arabia and in bahrain as a private chef to somebody very important. he has travelled all over the world. the restaurants are usually extremely excited to see us. they are small out of the way places that don't see 30 people coming in at once. my name is sanjay. welcome. applause. i am going to show you the baby goat today that i cooked. i'm going to bring a round everybody. 0k? -- around. one of the biggest misconceptions is that we just eat crazy things for the sake of leading crazy things.
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that is not true. the things that we eat our really delicious. that is chicken lizard. that islam black curry. it is a food club but it is also a social club. there are journalists, lawyers, a few policemen. there are architects, construction workers. it is very diverse. people love relationships. there is a marriage group, a baby group, there is a marriage group, a baby gi’oup, someone has a there is a marriage group, a baby group, someone has a tad too. it has become a fixture in people's lives. it is not really needing club for people who want to eat in manhattan. it isa people who want to eat in manhattan. it is a club for people who want to explore the outer reaches of their city and what it has to offer. that is it for this week. next
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week... we are in dubai for a special programme. we had deep into the desert to try traditional falcinelli 200 feet in the air from a hot desert to try traditional falcinelli 200 feet in the airfrom a hot air balloon. a unique experience. what a beautiful bird. and if you want to see the longer version, you can and if you want to see the longer version, you can go and if you want to see the longer version, you can go to iplayer. if you want to follow the team in real time you can sign up to the social media feeds. in the meantime, from everybody here, in fukushima, goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. a woman's body is found in the search for missing teenager gaia pope. the 19—year—old has been missing
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for 12 days, family members say they're devastated. she is the absolute light of my life. so beautiful, so emotionally wise and intelligent. good morning, it's sunday the 19th of november. also this morning... after thousands of people in zimbabwe take to the streets president mugabe will meet with army chiefs this morning to decide his fate. a promise of 300,000 new homes a year as the chancellor says he'll
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