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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 20, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. robert mugabe clings to power, as he refuses to stand down as president of zimbabwe. in an extraordinary speech live on tv, in which he had been expected to quit, the 93—year—old instead promised to stay on for weeks to come. the operation i have alluded to did not amount to a threat to our world cherished constitutional order. nor was it a challenge to my authority as head of state and government. good morning, it is monday 20 november. also this morning: two days before the budget, theresa may sets out a plan for better transport between english cities and their surrounding suburbs. reducing the number
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of stillborn babies. pregnant mums are told that sleeping on their sides could save hundreds of lives. 70 years since their marriage at westminster abbey, the queen and the duke of edinburgh celebrate their platinum wedding anniversary with the release of three new portraits. good morning from this co—op distribution centre, as we look at how retailers are preparing for the festive period. if analysts are correct, it will be a tough one. i am looking at why. in sport: a terrible return to the premier league for david moyes, as his west ham side are beaten 2—0 by watford in his first match in charge. and carol has the weather. good morning. a fairly cloudy day ahead. we have some rain and drizzle
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in the west, drifting eastwards, depositing some snow on the hills north of the central belt. and for most of us today it will feel milder. i will have more details in 15 minutes. the zimbabwean president, robert mugabe, has shocked the nation by refusing widespread demands for him to stand down. giving a speech live on tv while under house arrest, during which he had been expected to resign, he instead announced his intention to lead next month's congress of the ruling party. he has now been given a deadline of midday today to quit, orface action. our africa editor fergal keane has this report. marimba music. the very music seemed designed to drain any drama out of the moment. and perhaps the geniality of the encounter was a giveaway. robert mugabe didn't look like a man about to walk into the wilderness. and his words, delivered 15 minutes into a rambling address, confirmed that he intended to stay as leader of the country and party, the congress is due in a few weeks from now. i will preside over its processes,
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which must not be prepossessed by any acts calculated to undermine it, or to compromise the outcomes in the eyes of the public. he praised the military and acknowledged the crisis in his country and party. this appearance has shocked zimbabweans, who were prepared to witness his resignation. i think we're being played. we're being played. i feel let down. by now we should have produced some sort of result, but we have nothing. it's like we are back to square one. i think the whole nation was expecting him to resign, and we're all shocked. i think people will be depressed, confused. there are big questions now. how can robert mugabe preside over a party which today removed him
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from the leadership? once—loyal supporters met to warn that he would be impeached by parliament if he did't step down from the presidency this is the moment when robert mugabe lost power in his own party, the party he dominated for so long, and has now been replaced as party leader by a man who was one of his closest allies for decades. the crocodile... the new leader, emmerson mnangagwa, is known as ‘the crocodile,‘ celebrated here for his ruthless cunning. but when it gets his prey... he may have agreed to pause, but he is unlikely to stop until he ousts his old comrade. we will be speaking to a member of zanu—pf about this in just over half an hour. the government has announced plans to transform transport links in cities across the uk, making it easier to get from the suburbs to the centre. it comes just days before the chancellor delivers his first autumn budget.
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our political correspondent eleanor garnierjoins us now from westminster. you really got ascends from the newspapers and the news over the weekend that the chancellor is under a lot of pressure ——. ascends. weekend that the chancellor is under a lot of pressure --. ascends. and the prime minister has a busy day ahead of her as well, with a budget just a few days away. the prime minister and the business secretary will be in the west midlands, spelling out some of those plans to improve transport links between city centres and suburbs, all with the aim of improving prosperity. later on, the prime minister will be chairing what i think could be a very significant meeting of the cabinet's brexit committee. that is a group of senior ministers who decide the government's negotiating position. we know that in those brexit negotiations money has been a key sticking point. that is partly because the eu and the uk have taken very different approaches to settling the bill. it is also
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because the uk has been making sure taxpayers here don't pay any more than they need to. it is also because, within the cabinet, there has not yet been agreement on the way forward when it comes to the cash. so at that crucial meeting today, will those ministers come to an agreement? as eu politicians remind us, time is ticking. i think we can expect a lively meeting. germany is facing a political crisis after angela merkel‘s attempts to form a three—party coalition government failed, following weeks of negotiations. the leaders of the pro—business free democrats unexpectedly pulled out of talks last night. it represents a serious setback for mrs merkel, who during 12 years in power was seen as a symbol of stable government in europe. police say there were no injuries to suggest any other person was involved in the death of missing teenager gaia pope. the i9—year—old's body was found on saturday in a field near swanage, 11 days after she was last seen. dorset police are treating her death as unexplained,
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pending toxicology results. today marks the 70th wedding anniversary of the queen and the duke of edinburgh. they have been married longer than any other royal couple in history. they will celebrate the latest in their long line of milestones privately with family and friends at windsor. our royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. in the gloom of postwar britain, their marriage was, in the words of winston churchill, a flash of colour. he was the dashing naval officer, she the future queen. in the 70 years since, theirs has proved to be a relationship which has truly stood the test of time. it's worked because their personalities and their characters complement one another. they're quite different, in many ways, but prince philip is the first to make the queen laugh
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uproariously, and is probably the only person who can also tell her to shut up. pictured in 1939, 18—year—old philip first caught princess elizabeth's eye on a visit to dartmouth naval college. it was the beginning of a friendship which grew into a lifelong partnership. the queen has referred to him as her strength and stay, the duke remarked that tolerance is essential to any happy marriage and the queen, he added, has that quality in abundance. 70 years after the royal couple exchanged their vows here, the bells of westminster abbey will peal for more than three hours in their honour. these images have been released by the palace to mark the couple's milestone anniversary. the queen and prince philip will celebrate at a private party at windsor castle this evening. some breaking news in the last few minutes. criminal and former cult
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leader charles manson has died in prison in california. he was 83. his followers committed a series of notorious murders in 1969. their victims included the actress sharon tate, wife of the director roman polanski, at their home in hollywood. manson himself was originally centred to death before that penalty was abolished in california. instead his sentence was changed to life in prison. 0ver california. instead his sentence was changed to life in prison. over the course of his life in prison he applied for parole on 12 separate occasions. last time that took place in 2012. the parole board said he appeared to have not made any effort to rehabilitate himself. he killed no one himself but his followers carried out those murders on his orders and he was convicted of those murders and sentenced to death in 1971, which was then commuted to life in prison. 0lympic gold—medallist and the chair of uk sport dame katherine grainger has urged british sports to improve the welfare of athletes. several governing bodies are embroiled in bullying allegations, and grainger said
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they must rise to the challenge of improving high—performance culture. it comes as uk sport releases new guidance to coaches and staff on how to treat athletes with more respect. and she will be joining and she will bejoining us and she will be joining us at 8:10 a.m.. we are talking about platinum wedding anniversaries for her majesty, the queen, but how about this. we all start out hoping that marriage will last a lifetime. but when you go out and buy your household appliances together, you probably give them five years, tops. but one couple in exeter are selling off some whitegoods they bought more than 50 years ago, and they are still in working order. sydney saunders and his wife, rachel, have a tumble—dryer, water boiler, cooker, and washing machine. they bought some of them when they got married in 1956, and have been using most
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of them ever since. we would be interested to hear from you if you have any appliances as old, or even older, than those. so, if you have got anything, get in touch with your stories and pictures via e—mail or on social media. iam sure i am sure my parents have some knocking around somewhere. we returned to our main story this morning, news coming in from zimbabwe where robert mugabe made a speech in which he was expected to stand down. he said he will stay on for at least a few weeks while zanu pf, the ruling party, hold a series of meetings. let's go to zimbabwe's capital, harare. what is the latest that we no? well, the latest, really, is that that deadline for robert mugabe still stands. from his ruling party, zanu pf, who fired him as their leader yesterday, they set him a deadline of resigning by mid—
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day to day local time. that is less than four hours' time, and if he hasn't resigned by then they will commence impeachment proceedings against him. he clearly isn't going to resign, he made that rambling speech last night when most of zimbabwe expected him to say he would quit. at the end of 20 minutes he had not talked about all the concerns about him at all. it was extraordinary, people looked at each other and said what on earth happened to that, because he isjust continuing for a few weeks, at least. the deadline stands. the impeachment process could begin tomorrow in the parliament kindly, and they would need a two thirds majority in both chambers of parliament to impeach him. and we will have more reaction to that and be speaking to somebody from the zanu—pf partya be speaking to somebody from the zanu—pf party a little later on this morning, about 6:a0 a.m.. zanu—pf party a little later on this morning, about 6:40 a.m.. you know the times for everything!” morning, about 6:40 a.m.. you know the times for everything! i know, i
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have memorised them. sport now, and sally is here. i wonder if david moyes ever looks back and things i should have stayed at everton in the glory years? well, he does need a challenge. he was not looking entirely happy yesterday in his newjob. david moyes's first game in charge of west ham ended in defeat. they lost 2—0 at watford, with goals in either half from will hughes and richarlison. west ham remain in the premier league's bottom three. not the best start for david moyes, and the fans not happy. chris coleman is the new manager of sunderland. coleman resigned as wales boss on friday and takes over the north—east side, who are bottom of the championship after one win in 17 games. has tennis got a new star? grigor dimitrov wins the world tour title in london, and will finish the year third in the world. the race to dubai, the contest to be
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the european tour's top golfer, goes right down to the final hole, as england's tommy fleetwood beats fellow countryman justin rose to take home the trophy for the first time. he was hugely emotional after that win, with a lot of lovely pictures in the papers today. we will talk about him and just a moment. let's take a look at what's happening with the weather. here's carol. good morning. we have a mixture of weather this week coming our way. low pressure will dominate through the week. mild conditions. some could hit 15 degrees. there will be rain and snow at times largely in the hills and it will often be windy from tomorrow. today we have low pressure moving west to east. we have a band of rain and rizal. we also have south—westerly wind. this
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mild air is putting in. it will be cold est mild air is putting in. it will be coldest around cape ness and the northern ireland. across scotland it isa northern ireland. across scotland it is a cold start. we have re— moving west to east, snow on the heels hill -- hills in west to east, snow on the heels hill —— hills in the north. across northern ireland and england we have a band of rain moving from the west to the east, not particularly heavy, though at times it could be, and that extends in towards kent. behind it, there will be a lot of cloud, but not the temperatures, tens, 11s and 12s. through the day the rain pushes east and it will be quite murky and wet in scotland, northern england and northern ireland with some rain coming in across the south—west. any sunshine today will be ata south—west. any sunshine today will be at a premium. if we see it it is likely in east wales, herefordshire for example, and the west midlands. temperatures are not worthy because
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in central england at this time of year the average temperature is seven 01’ year the average temperature is seven or eight. for some of us it will continue to climb through the week. as we move overnight, we have rain from today across scotland and another ban comes in behind it moving west to east. there will be a lot of cloud, murky conditions, and one 01’ lot of cloud, murky conditions, and one or two breaks. these are the night—time temperatures. you can see in scotland it won't be as cold as the night that has just gone. tomorrow a band of rain continues to move north eastwards. a lot of cloud coming in behind it. and another weather front comes from the west, bringing more rain. but we are still in the south—westerly flow. tomorrow it will be a windy day wherever you are. you will see some gales with exposure. look at the temperatures. ten in aberdeen, 12s, 13s, 14s even into the south—west. tuesday to wednesday we have an array of weather fronts coming our way and an
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array of low pressure as well, but behind this, embedded in this area, we will see some cold conditions coming our way. if we look at wednesday, a lot of cloud, windy and mild, then the cold air comes in during the course of thursday. for some of us by the time we get to friday there is the chance of some snow on the hills notjust across scotland, at the pennines and hills of wales as well. but that of course could change as friday is a long way off. thank you. not as cold as i was expecting it to be. i know. slightly disappointing. i was ready for all of the layers. be. i know. slightly disappointing. i was ready for all of the layerslj i was ready for all of the layers.” know. me too. let's take a look at today's papers. if you are wondering, step is out and about. i am going to start with the platinum couple. the queen and the platinum couple. the queen and the duke of edinburgh. 0ne the platinum couple. the queen and the duke of edinburgh. one of these three portraits to mark the 70th anniversary. and lots of papers
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talking about zimbabwe. even last night they were saying mugabe clings on. he was expected to resign in the tv address but he didn't. the other thing is theresa may may offer more in the brexit divorce deal — that is being discussed. there is a cabinet meeting later today. the mirror also has a picture of the royal couple. 70 years together in pictures. and the uk is vulnerable, it says. and ant and dec... the programme started. yes, yesterday. the first appearance from ant since going through rehab as well. yes, absolutely. and they were back to their best. and on the financial times, because death is out, looking at mugabe and zimbabwe. and talking about this earlier, this brexit divorce deal earlier, may might set it higher than first thought. on the
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front of the mail, millions spied on by greedy top universities, spying on ex— students in a drive for donations. and a picture of alan jones, taken off air over sex harassment claims —— aled jones. he says he won't appear on the bbc till it is sorted out. the daily telegraph is similar to the other papers as well. but at the bottom of the newspaper, on theirfront page, bargain hunters hope to find unbeatable discounts during the black friday shopping frenzy. the deals are often no different to others during the year. i might have guessed it. you mean they are pulling the wool of our eyes? unbelievable. the mirror, lovely picture of tommy fleetwood, here he is, and can you just see him and his wife and baby frankie, who is seven weeks old. can we just say congratulations for even being
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there. of course, tommy fleetwood, he won the race to dubai. his baby frankie fast asleep throughout. he is to get married in a couple of weeks. what a year for him. they it would be great if he goes to hollywood. what, frankie? no? no. maybe not. laughter i want to bring your attention to this. i will keep going, shall i? a picture of tony pulis. fantastic interview on radio 5 live, he is really talking straight about his future. ijust wa nt straight about his future. ijust want to bring your attention to this. fans expect to see ambition. no one goes to the cinema to watch the news. they used to. they used to, given a? in the old days. sometimes it is so crazy —— didn't they? i want to show you a bit of
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panic ina they? i want to show you a bit of panic in a moment, but one thing, the £1 bingo competition was banned after council accused pensioners based on illegal gambling dens. it is true. the gambling act says you cannot participate in bingo it in towards cash prizes paid for by an entry fee. i can see there are rules. maureen price is not happy. 76, great—grandmother, said "it is stupid. we only play for peanuts. it isa stupid. we only play for peanuts. it is a bit of fun and it is disappointing that they won't let us do itany disappointing that they won't let us do it any more". i am with them on that. i agree, do it any more". i am with them on that. iagree, yes. silly. do it any more". i am with them on that. i agree, yes. silly. anyway, yes. interesting story. now, we mentioned ant and dec. strictly. gemma atkinson will be here as well. and also blue planet. so many people
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in tears. because of the pilot whale. yes. i am thankful! in tears. because of the pilot whale. yes. i am thankful i went to bed before this moment. thank you. we are going to play a sad piece from blue planet. pilot whales have big brains. they can certainly experience emotions. judging from the behaviour of the adults, the loss of the infant has affected the entire family. unless the flow of plastics and industrial pollution into the world's oceans is reduced, marine life will be poisoned by them for many centuries to come. such a sad thing. it was to do with pollution, that is what they thought? not conclusive proof. that
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is what they think. there was a big section about plastic and david attenborough said 100 years ago we invented plastic and now it is causing issues. it wasjust invented plastic and now it is causing issues. it was just really moving to see the pilot whale cling on to its calf. the rest of the pot affected by that as well. the other interesting thing was about the plastic ducks that went over the side of the container ship. it was an experiment. all of the oceans are interconnected. it was a 15-year-old rubber duck that went around all of the world's oceans and ended up in scotland. amazing. that is a proper kroos, though, isn't it? one other thing, which i have lost, 0k. tech speak helps english rather than harms it. people were moaning about the use of emojis, irregular spelling and abbreviation in text messages, but they are deaf, not slow, messages, but they are deaf, not sloppy, or a sign of the decline in
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written english. so—called textism helps to convey meaning in the absence of conversation, according to hampton university in new york, they say they often add lols and smiley faces to communication for the sake of clarity of expression. not all bad. so don't moan at your kids. women are being advised to sleep on their side in the last three months of pregnancy to avoid having a stillborn baby. a study ofjust over 1,000 women found the risk doubles if women go to sleep on their backs in the third trimester. 0ur reporter ali fortescue has more. i knew something was wrong. i woke up i knew something was wrong. i woke up in the morning and i knew something was wrong. and we went to the hospital and when they couldn't find the heartbeat they nipped off to go and find a doctor, i knew that there was something not quite right. lots of cards. these are his footprints. great lost baby lewy at 35 weeks and she still doesn't know
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what caused her stillbirth. -- grace. he wasjust what caused her stillbirth. -- grace. he was just so tiny, he was perfectly formed. he had a beautiful upper lip. and i think you always think about the what—ifs, what if i did this differently, why has this happened? did this differently, why has this happened ? what did this differently, why has this happened? what have i done wrong? a lot of guilt. just sadness beyond anything that i have ever experienced. grace says she was never given any advice on sleep positions when she was pregnant. she is one of around 1000 women to have taken part in the midlands and north of england stillbirth study, the largest of its kind. it found that one in 225 pregnancies in the uk endedin one in 225 pregnancies in the uk ended in stillbirth. that is around 11 babies a day. it also found that the risk of stillbirth drops nearly 496 the risk of stillbirth drops nearly 4% if women sleep on their site in the third trimester. that could save
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around 130 live the year in the uk —— side. around 130 live the year in the uk -- side. # there were two in the bed and the little one said rollover. the study comes alongside a charity campaign. the advice is simple, sleeping on your site could halve the risk of a stillbirth. you might end up in all sorts of positions when asleep. but the important thing to remember is to start on your side. it is hard to know for sure but it is thought when you like on your back you might put weight on important blood vessels and restricting the flow of blood vessels to the baby. research has shown that the number of stillbirth in the uk has gone down but the figures are still high and above those in many other high income countries. we want to be one of the best countries in the world and one of the safest places to have a baby. so there is lots of work to do. this study will contribute to that. it has simple advice to give to women to cut the risk of having a stillbirth. grace has now started a new chapter. nine months ago, rubin
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joined the family. hearing the baby cry in the delivery room was just amazing. she will never know what would have happened if she had this advice but grace hopes her story and her part in the study can save lives. and that is really interesting. they say to sleep on your site because you are most likely to stay on your side for a considerable amount of time. don't worry if you wake up on your back. yes. we'll be speaking to an obstetrician involved in the studyjust after 8am this morning. you can get details of organisations offering support with the issues discussed in that film at bbc.co.uk/actionline. we told you that steph was in here for the paper run. the run up to christmas is traditionally a time when shoppers splash the cash, but there are signs we might be planning to spend a little less this year. that is what steph is investigating this morning. good morning. yes, iam in a distribution centre. you can see this truck has just been emptied.
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they have something like 3600 products sent to 260 shops in this region and 200 people work here doing that. as you say, we are here talking about spending this festive period. analysts are suggesting that we will spend less this year than in the past. if you look at what we are likely to spend less on, it is clothing, travel and big—ticket household items. the reason why it is because of what is happening with our pay and the fact that prices we pay for things are going up faster than wages. in other words, in real terms, we have less money than we did. if you look at the stats on where we are spending the money, one third of it is spent online rather than in shops. i will talk about all of this little later on. first, the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm sara 0rchard. the night overground is coming to london in less than a month. the victoria, central, jubilee, picadilly and northern lines already operate for 24 hours on the weekend. from friday 15th december, londoners will be able to travel between new cross gate and dalsonjunction on friday and saturday nights. there are plans to extend it to highbury & islington in 2018. police are continuing to investigate the death of a woman in muswell hill. the woman, who was named locally as cathy burke, died in her home. she was stabbed to death. neighbours left flowers and described her as a lovely lady. of course, today is the queen and prince philip's wedding anniversary, but they aren't the only ones celebrating this year. ted and doris box also married in 1947. they met at primary school and married a few days before ted was sent abroad to fight.
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so what is the secret to a seventy year marriage? how can you say any one thing? i have loved her, she has loved me back. she has been my best friend all these years. and that's it, just love everything about her. travel now. 0n the tubes this morning, there are minor delays on the metropolitan line and a part closure on london 0verground. 0n the roads, the m25 betweenjunction 21 the m1 and junction 22 at st albans — the outside lane remains closed in both directions for repairs to the barrier. it's been closed now since friday. in cannonbury, grosvenor avenue is closed for repairs to a burst water main. in wembley, the high road remains closed eastbound for sewer works. while in 0rpington, the high street remains closed for water works. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. hello, good morning. it is feeling a little less cold this morning. we have some cloud and light rain
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moving overnight and we get some slightly more mild air, leaving today rather cloudy but feeling rather damn. now, the majority of the rain has moved east by the cloud is big enough to produce the odd spot of rain here and there through the day. it is quite breezy as well. the temperatures are does not reflect this. it will feel mild between 12— 14 degrees in towns and cities, so overnight tonight it is similarto cities, so overnight tonight it is similar to last night with rain moving in from the west, light and patchy rain for a time, it stays breezy and we will hang on to the cloud as well. the temperature barely dropping, really marvel nights between 11 and 12 degrees, so staying in double figure was —— mild night. some bright spells around tomorrow. still quite breezy as well. the maximum temperature 14, maybe even 15 celsius through tomorrow afternoon. so remaining quite mild but as it will see it is quite mild but as it will see it is quite settled, then patchy rain through to thursday. things start to
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clear up through to thursday. things start to clearupa through to thursday. things start to clear up a little bit. some breaks in the cloud, the limb of sunshine. and similar to last week, things get a little bit u2 as we head into the rest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and lou. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: as the queen and prince philip celebrate 70 years of marriage, breakfast has been to meet another platinum couple, to find out the secret of staying together for seven decades. from 0lympic legend to one of the most powerful people in british sport — dame katherine grainger will be here to tell us how she will use her newjob to take on sport's culture of fear. after this week's american smooth brought their highest score yet, we will be asking strictly‘s gemma and aljaz if they can dance their way to the top of the leaderboard. good morning.
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here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: the zimbabwean president, robert mugabe, has defied widespread demands that he step down. in a highly anticipated speech to the nation, during which he had been expected to resign, he instead announced his intention to lead next month's congress of the ruling zanu—pf party, much to the disappointment of those who had gathered to celebrate. i think we're being played. we're being played. i feel let down. i think by now we should have produced some sort of result, but we have nothing. it's like we're back to square one. i think the whole nation was expecting him to resign. i think we're all shocked. i think people are going to be depressed, confused. i think it is enough, enough is enough. the people of zimbabwe have
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shown that they are sick of it. the american criminal and former cult leader charles manson has died in prison in california. he was 83. manson's followers committed a series of notorious murders in 1969. their victims included the actress sharon tate, wife of the director roman polanski, at her home in hollywood. manson himself was initially sentenced to death, before the penalty was abolished in california, as james cook reports. charles manson. the name itself is synonymous with evil, a killer who did no killing, but whose crimes shocked the world. in august 1969, followers of his cult broke into the hollywood home of sharon tate. the pregnant actress, who was married to the director roman polanski, was brutally murdered along with four of herfriends. brutally murdered along with four of her friends. the next brutally murdered along with four of herfriends. the next night, the so—called manson family killed again, tying up and murdering a wealthy couple. this was the ramshackle mansion, death valley,
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where manson lived in a commune with his young runaway fans. they a p pa re ntly his young runaway fans. they apparently used lsd and saw the guitar playing ex—convict is a kind of saint, or perhaps a devil. charles manson was charged not with wielding a knife or firing charles manson was charged not with wielding a knife orfiring a gun but with controlling and directing the killers. i don't accept the court, i don't accept the whole situation. i was in the desert minding my business. this confusion belongs to you. it is your confusion. i don't have any confusion. i know what i have any confusion. i know what i have done, and no man canjudge me. ijudge me. what have you done, charlie? and why had he done it? a p pa re ntly charlie? and why had he done it? apparently to start a race war. it would be called helter—skelter, and he would use it to seize power. in 1971 manson was sentenced to death on seven counts of murder, later commuted to life in prison. 0ver on seven counts of murder, later commuted to life in prison. over the yea rs, charles commuted to life in prison. over the years, charles manson applied for
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pa role years, charles manson applied for parole time and time again, but he died a prisoner, having shattered the peace and love of the 1960s with diabolical violence. germany is facing a political crisis, after angela merkel‘s attempts to form a three—party coalition government failed following weeks of negotiations. the leaders of the pro—business free democrats unexpectedly pulled out of talks last night. it represents a serious setback for mrs merkel, who during 12 years in power was seen as a symbol of stable government in europe. police say there were no injuries to suggest any other person was involved in the death of missing teenager gaia pope. the 19—year—old's body was found on saturday in a field near swanage, 11 days after she was last seen. dorset police are treating her death as unexplained, pending toxicology results. today it is the 70th wedding anniversary of the queen and the duke of edinburgh. they have been married longer than any other royal couple in history. they are celebrating their platinum wedding anniversary with the release
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of three new portraits, and will be spending their day with friends and family privately at windsor. there are pictures of them on most of the front pages, some very nice quotes, as well. 70 is an awfully long time. it is, in a good way. congratulations to them. and how long will david moyes last in his newjob? long will david moyes last in his new job? hopefully long will david moyes last in his newjob? hopefully more long will david moyes last in his new job? hopefully more than long will david moyes last in his newjob? hopefully more than one game. you never know, maybe we will turn him around. it is very early days, too early to say. west ham remain in the premier league's relegation zone, after david moyes lost his first game in charge. they were beaten 2—0 at watford. watford's goals came in either half, from will hughes and this strike from richarlison. another impressive performance from marco silva's side — the watford boss remains linked with the vacant manager's job at everton. and disappointment for moyes, in his 500th premier league game as a manager. we made a couple of chances
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to get ourselves goals. we didn't get them today. you know, the goals change games. if you get them, you know, it covers a multitude of sins. we didn't take the chances today. so we have to play better, that's what i think. i didn't really enjoy bits of the performance. but, if we'd got the goals in, i think it would have turned things around a bit. in the scottish premiership, hearts returned to tynecastle after six months away while the main stand was redeveloped. they could only manage a 1—1 draw against partick thistle, though, kris doolan's late equaliser spoiling the home side's day. chris coleman's new job after resigning as manager of wales will be to take charge of championship side sunderland. they are bottom of the table, afterjust one win in 17 matches. coleman has signed a 2.5—year deal to replace simon grayson, who was sacked last month. he will be in charge for tomorrow night's game at aston villa. no roger federer, rafa nadal or andy murray in the end—of—season world tour final in london, but we still got plenty of entertainment, and a victory for grigor dimitrov.
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he was up against david goffin, in a final few predicted. dimitrov is called baby fed, because his style is like federer‘s, and he showed off his skill in the decisive third set. he went on to win the biggest title of his career, and in the process, earn nearly £2 million. it has been a tremendous two weeks for me, honestly. it is such an honour to play here. this two weeks has been one of the best two weeks i have ever had. i am lost for words, iam not have ever had. i am lost for words, i am not going to live. usually i am good at that, but today is just one of those days. the finale to the european golf season came down to the very last hole, but tommy fleetwood has won the race to dubai for the first time, just ahead of fellow englishman justin rose. rose had started the day in terrific form. but the wheels came off his round on the 12th hole,
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putting his second shot into the water. two more mistakes handed fleetwood the title. he had an anxious wait before it was confirmed, but it has been quite a year for the 26—year—old from southport. it's been a big one. ba by frankie arriving safely, and he's great. i'm going to get married in a couple of weeks. and yeah, i mean, it's been the best year of my life, by an absolute mile. and, you know, on the course, it's been great. i've played some of the best golf of my career, and done things that i've never done before. and, off the course, i'm just such a happy person. so, it's — you know, we'll have to think of ways to better this one. champions exeter have gone back to the top of rugby union's english premiership, but they were made to work for it by harlequins at sandy park. it wasn't the best performance from the defending champions, but they ended up sealing a bonus—point win thanks to two tries from jonny hill.
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that puts them two points clear of saracens. there were also wins yesterday for bath and leicester. it has seemed like a long build—up, but england have arrived in brisbane ahead of the first test at the gabba, starting on thursday. no ben stokes, of course, as the all—rounder awaits the result of the investigation into an incident outside a bristol nightclub in september. the ecb have said stokes won'tjoin the tour while he remains under police investigation. his team—mates, though, are still hopeful he can play a part at some stage. it'd be amazing if stokesy comes out here. iam sure i am sure you guys would all think the same. he's a fantastic cricketer. we don't know what's going on at the moment. that's completely out of our hands, and until that's resolved, we actually don't know what is going to happen. but i'm sure that it will get resolved, sooner rather than later, we hope, because at the end of the day, we want the best cricketers playing in the ashes. it does feel like quite a long
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build—up. definitely ready for it to start. are you ready for christmas? iam start. are you ready for christmas? i am actually really organised. i have done a whole lot of wrapping. shops, rats and delivered. haven't shopped. —— shopped, wrapped and delivered. louise has no interest in this story. no, i have spent all my money and what they are saying, steph, is many people might not.” can't believe that. that is made that you already have your christmas sorted. i need you in my life. let me tell you where i am. i am at a distribution centre in the north—east. it is here you will get all the products coming out, about 130 trucks every day bringing products in, getting organised, sending them out again, all over the region to about 260 shops. certainly
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a busy operation. the reason we are here is that at this time of year is when these guys get really busy. john is the divisional director for the north, the co—op. what does it involve, getting ready for christmas? how much have things changed for you? along with the summer, christmas is our biggest trading period of the year. customers tend to trade up at christmas and buy lots of different products. so we have done a lot of work in terms of building our festive ranges and ensuring we are best placed to serve customers every day. does it involve getting more staff? will this place get busier, what does it mean in practical terms? generally we will be busier as we get things right for customers, so exceptionally busy. and obviously the reason we are here is that our statistics out from a nalysts is that our statistics out from analysts suggesting we will not be spending as much this christmas as we have done in the past. what does
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that mean for you? do you change the way you do things? what does it mean? so for us, we are hoping and planning to be busy, to have real growth. so the convenience sector is buoyant. customers are increasingly busy, and are looking to shop, often all the time. we expect to do well over the course of the period, and we plan for a busy festive period. thank you very much, we appreciate talking to you this morning. it is important to talk about the bigger picture, as well, what it means for all retailers. and we have diana here. i know we talk a lot about what is going on in the retail world. what do you make of this stuff from analysts, saying that people will not be spending as much this christmas? all of the data released has been similarto all of the data released has been similar to what we released, and visa saw sales drop in october, and thatis visa saw sales drop in october, and that is a product of high inflation
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and an interest—rate rise. it is reflecting what consumers are feeling, which is the fact that household budgets are constrained. when we talk about inflation figures, what it means in real terms is people just don't have as much money because wages haven't been keeping up with prices going up. absolutely. 0ur wages are fixed. they are going up by minimal amounts. yet prices are going up more than that. the overall inflation rate of 3% is average. some products are going up by more than that. if you are buying those products, they are much more expensive. inevitably, budgets are brought back and something has to give. who are the winners and losers? it is interesting, with the visa data this perennial and increasing demand for experiences is still continuing. so the restaurant chains and eating out venues will still continue to work because people want experiences. we have had
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enough of stuff. people will buy presents of course but yet they want to have more eating out and leisure, so that will be a winner. fashion is really struggling at the moment, really struggling at the moment, really having a tough time, and the visa data reflects what we see with sales data, which is fashion is finding it tough. and where are we spending money, because we have talked in the past about the growth of online. is it still happening, are we spending more online? the growth is happening. but it is slowing. that is inevitable. with every new venue and sector, slowing. that is inevitable. with every new venue and sector, there is huge growth in the beginning and overtime that growth minimises and levels off. and that is the same with online. yes, it is growing. and convenience is perfect. we don't wa nt to convenience is perfect. we don't want to go out to destinations necessarily and over budget. we do that on data, but it is still a small proportion of the total spend. 80% is still in store. interesting.
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thank you. i just want to take you further down here. it is fascinating. they have 3500 different products. you canjust imagine. it goes on for miles, all of the different shelves of products going out to around 260 shops in the region. 400 people work here. i was speaking with a lot of them who started earlier on. you have the milk distribution centre as well. a really busy time this morning to get the fresh milk to the shops. certainly a very busy operation. and it is quite cool as well because of energy—saving lights. they come on when you walk down the aisle to make sure it is not wasting energy. i will be here through the morning to talk about how retailers are preparing for this busy time. although it feels quite spoolily quiet. you are all on your own. —— spookily. jump around. see you little bit
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later. thank you. it is 6:48am. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: zimbabwe's leader robert mugabe has vowed to stay in power for several weeks, despite mounting calls for him to stand down. charles manson, notorious head of a cult which he directed to commit nine murders, has died in hospital aged 83. i was thinking of the weather.” think you were. in your revelation, almost everybody at christmas is ready. it has thrown new. i was thinking, where is my gift? a p pa re ntly thinking, where is my gift? apparently i have been left out. you have one. it is early days. bless you. yes, lou has a month to get to the shops. i know where i am on the list. laughter. i know that steph hasn't finished
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either because i haven't sent her my list. anyway. this morning we have christmas like weather, with some snow on high ground in scotland. and through the week it will be mild. much more mild than we would expect at the end of november. there will be rain and it will be windy, particularly from tomorrow. what is happening today is low pressure is dominating the weather with a set of fronts to bring rain from the west towards the east and some transient snow on the higher routes north of central lowlands and we have some south—westerly winds. that is a mild direction for us. it is pulling all of this atlantic air across most of the uk except for the far north—east of scotland, cape ness and the northern isles, where it is still cold. it is cold to start across scotla nd cold. it is cold to start across scotland with rain and drizzle moving from the west to the east. snow on higher ground, slushy areas to look out for. and we have rain moving across northern ireland and
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northern england. you can see it extending down three east anglia into kent as well. and we are looking at 8am. behind it, there will be cloud, murky conditions, and look at the temperatures, tens and 11s, which would be good maximum temperatures at this time of year. through the day the rain continues out of northern ireland, across scotland, northern ireland, cloud behind it, showers, south—westerly winds moving in. any sunshine will be are likely. if you see it, most places likely in eastern wales around herefordshire and the west midlands. temperatures range from six to 13 degrees. you can see how the north—east scotland is looking, it still cold at this stage. through this evening and overnight, there will be a lot of cloud around. we have today's rain across scotland, a fresh band coming in moving north—east was through the course of the night, leaving cloud in its wake. still, south—westerly wind,
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still mild, but now it is pushing northwards across a large chunk of scotland, except for the northern isles. tomorrow we start off with all of the rain, still moving north—east was, still a lot of cloud around, still the south—westerly wind, then another weather front the west. in between these fronts we have a warm sector and you will see temperature—wise, well, 12s, 13s, evenin temperature—wise, well, 12s, 13s, even in the northern isles, temperatures start to creep up. so on wednesday there is an array of low pressures and weather fronts, with a cold front here. there will be some cold conditions following behind. for the end of the week, the forecasts we are looking at is wednesday, a lot of cloud and mild weather, rain coming in, then the cold front comes in, things turned chilly apart from in the south, and the other thing is on friday we will all feel the draft. and we could see some snow on the hills as far south as wales, but of course it is a long
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way off and it could still change. so some christmas like weather here and there. you promised some sort of christmas like weather. thank you very much. pleasure. let's return to our top story. zimba bwe's embattled leader robert mugabe has vowed to stay in power, despite mounting calls for him to stand down. in a televised address, he said he intends to lead next month's congress of the ruling party, zanu—pf. yesterday, he was sacked as its leader and told he has until 10am today to resign, orface impeachment. let's speak now to zimbabwean journalist georgina godwin and zanu—pf‘s uk representative nick mangwa na. good morning and thank you for joining us. step back at it, this televised address, many said they we re televised address, many said they were expecting him to stand down gracefully. that is not what happened. it didn't happen and everyone watching around the world was stunned. i think that the army knew what he would say and sanctioned what he would say. there we re sanctioned what he would say. there were suggestions that maybe he read
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from a speech, swapped pages. i don't think that happened. the army wanted to give him a dignified excerpts. the problem is a disconnect between the army and the party. and i think that there has not been sufficient communication. the party has said they want to impeach him. war veterans have been aggressive in language and they might take the fight to the streets. it is very difficult. what happens now with the impeachment is that parliament will meet and, of course, many parliamentarians have been expelled because they were part of grace mugabe g40 group. it is step—by—step, it will take possibly weeks. they will need the opposition to vote with them to make up the two thirds majority that is needed. this is the one chance that we, as zimbabweans have, in the great march, the ringing endorsement of
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zanu—pf and the army, the people that have oppressed us for 37 years, we did not say it at any point, what we did not say it at any point, what we really need is electoral reform and we need to completely change the way that the security forces work. now, the opposition have a window to do that during this impeachment process. how long a road is it from mugabe being taken from power and then free elections? does it seem like a long way away for you, a long way off? the elections have to take place within five years, which means august 2018. zanu—pf and the army are in such disarray that is not possible. they would have to be constitutional tinkering. there will bea constitutional tinkering. there will be a transitional body. it depends how long that hangs on. white that is an extraordinary length of time, really, isn't it, five years. you say that is the earliest? by—election has to take place five years after the last one, so august
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2018, but it will have to be extended. we have seen people out on the street. they were celebrating. how dangerous is the situation right now? there are a couple of flashpoints we need to be careful of. the general, does he have support of the rank and file? are they angry he has made a deal with mugabe? are the people angry. mugabe says he would abide by the people. the people have spoken. ithink says he would abide by the people. the people have spoken. i think we as zimbabweans are very peaceful. a flashpoint is unlikely. we have to look at the regional bodies, the african union. the language has been very careful. that it is not a coup. that is so that there are no boots on the ground from the regions. we hope. and then of course the last thing is china, who are bankrolling zimbabwe to an enormous degree. this could not have happened without
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their say so. and v ndc have this window because i think unless they do something to open the economy, which means zimbabwe is a stable place to invest, then they will lose china and the economy will totally collapse. thank you very much for coming to talk to us. i imagine we will talk to you again. thank you. and the big day. that deadline is 10am, so we will follow that on the bbc. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchard. the night overground is coming to london in less than a month. the victoria, central, jubilee, picadilly and northern lines already operate for 24 hours on the weekend. from friday 15th december, londoners will be able to travel between new cross gate and dalsonjunction on friday and saturday nights. there are plans to extend it to highbury & islington in 2018. police are continuing to investigate the death of a woman in muswell
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hill. the woman, who was named locally as cathy burke, died in her home. she was stabbed to death. neighbours left flowers and described her as a lovely lady. of course, today is the queen and prince philip's wedding anniversary, but they aren't the only ones celebrating this year. ted and doris box also married in 1947. they met at primary school and married a few days before ted was sent abroad to fight. so what is the secret to a seventy year marriage? how can you say any one thing? i've just loved her, and she has loved me back. she's been my best friend all these years. and that's it, just love everything about her. travel now. 0n the tubes this morning, there are minor delays severe delays on the metropolitan line and a part closure on london 0verground.
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0n the roads, the m25 betweenjunction 21 the m1 and junction 22 at st albans — the outside lane remains closed in both directions for repairs to the barrier. it's been closed now since friday. in cannonbury, grosvenor avenue is closed for repairs to a burst water main. in wembley, the high road remains closed eastbound for sewer works. while in 0rpington, the high street remains closed for water works. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling a little less cold this morning. we have some cloud, some light rain moving overnight and with it some slightly more mild air, leaving today rather cloudy but feeling rather damn. now, the majority of the rain has moved east by the cloud is big enough to produce the odd spot of rain here and there through the day. it's quite breezy as well. the temperature, though, doesn't reflect this. it will feel mild between 12—14 degrees in towns and cities, so overnight tonight it is similar to last night with rain moving
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in from the west, light, patchy rain for a time, it stays breezy and we are going to hang on to the cloud as well. the temperature barely dropping, really mild night, between 11 and 12 degrees, so staying in double figures. some bright spells around tomorrow. still quite breezy as well. the maximum temperature, again, 14, maybe even 15 celsius through tomorrow afternoon. so, remaining quite mild but as you will see it is quite settled, then patchy rain through to thursday. things start to clear up a little bit. we will see some breaks in the cloud, the odd glimmer of sunshine. and similar to last week, things get a little bit colder as we head into the rest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. robert mugabe clings to power, as he refuses to stand down as president of zimbabwe.
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in an extraordinary speech live on tv, in which he had been expected to quit, the 93—year—old instead promised to stay on for weeks to come. the operation i have alluded to did not amount to a threat to our well—cherished constitutional order. nor was it a challenge to my authority as head of state and government. good morning, it is monday 20 november. also this morning: reducing the number of stillborn babies. pregnant mums are told that sleeping on their sides could save hundreds of lives. charles manson, the notorious head ofan charles manson, the notorious head of an american cult he directed to carry out a series of murders, has died in hospital aged 83.
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70 years since their marriage at westminster abbey, the queen and the duke of edinburgh celebrate their platinum wedding anniversary with the release of three new portraits. good morning from this co—op distribution centre, where today we are looking at how retailers prepare for the festive period. according to the analysts, it is going to be a tough one for them. i will be looking at why. in sport: a terrible return to the premier league for david moyes, as his west ham side are beaten 2—0 by watford in his first match in charge. and carol has the weather. good morning. it is a fairly cloudy day ahead. we have some rain and drizzle moving from the west towards the east, with some snow on hills in scotland, north of the central belt. for most of us, it is going to be
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unseasonably mild. i will have more details in around 15 minutes. the zimbabwean president, robert mugabe, has shocked the nation by refusing widespread demands for him to stand down. giving a speech live on tv while under house arrest, during which he had been expected to resign, he instead announced his intention to lead next month's congress of the ruling party. he has now been given a deadline of midday today to quit orface action. 0ur africa editor fergal keane has this report. marimba music. the very music seemed designed to drain any drama out of the moment. and perhaps the geniality of the encounter was a giveaway. robert mugabe didn't look like a man about to walk into the wilderness. and his words, delivered 15 minutes into a rambling address, confirmed that he intended to stay as leader of the country and party. the congress is due in a few weeks from now. i will preside over its processes, which must not be prepossessed
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by any acts calculated to undermine it, or to compromise the outcomes in the eyes of the public. he praised the military and acknowledged the crisis in his country and party. this appearance has shocked zimbabweans, who were preparing to witness his resignation. i think we're being played. we are being played. i feel let down. i think by now we should have produced some sort of result, but we have nothing. it's like we're back to square one. i think the whole nation was expecting him to resign. i think we're all shocked. i think people are going to be depressed, confused. there are big questions now. how can robert mugabe preside over a party which today removed him from the leadership? 0nce—loyal supporters met to warn that he would be impeached by parliament if he did't step down
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from the presidency. this is the moment when robert mugabe lost power in his own party, the party he dominated for so long, and has now been replaced as party leader by a man who was one of his closest allies for decades. a crocodile... the new leader, emmerson mnangagwa, is known as ‘the crocodile,‘ celebrated here for his ruthless cunning. but when it gets his prey... he may have agreed to pause, but he is unlikely to stop until he ousts his old comrade. the american criminal and former cult leader charles manson has died in prison in california. he was 83. manson's followers committed a series of notorious murders in 1969. their victims included the actress sharon tate, wife of director roman polanski, at her
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home in hollywood. manson himself was initially sentenced to death, before the penalty was abolished in california, as james cook reports. charles manson — the name itself is synonymous with evil, a killer who did no killing, but whose crimes shocked the world. in august 1969, followers of his cult broke into the hollywood home of sharon tate. the pregnant actress, who was married to the director roman polanski, was brutally murdered, along with four of herfriends. the next night, the so—called manson family killed again, tying up and murdering a wealthy couple. this was the ramshackle ranch in death valley where manson lived in a commune with his young, runaway fans. they apparently used lsd, and saw the guitar playing ex—convict as a kind of saint, or perhaps a devil. charles manson was charged not with wielding a knife or firing a gun, but with controlling and directing the killers. i don't accept the court, i don't accept the whole situation.
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like, i was in the desert, minding my business. this confusion belongs to you. it's your confusion. i don't have any confusion. i don't have any guilt. i know what i've done, and no man canjudge me. ijudge me. what have you done, charlie? and why had he done it? apparently to start a race war. it would be called helter—skelter, and he would use it to seize power. in 1971, manson was sentenced to death on seven counts of murder, later commuted to life in prison. over the years, charles manson applied for parole time and time again. but he died a prisoner, having shattered the peace and love of the 1960s with diabolical violence. let's get the very latest on this story from our la reporter peter bowes. thank you very much for your time this morning. he always wanted to be
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a famous rockstar. you know, we are talking about him now, and this name many years on still causes so many painful memories for so many people. it certainly does, and strikes fear through the heart of those people who lived through that time in the late 1960s. who lived through that time in the late 19605. 1969 it who lived through that time in the late 1960s. 1969 it was when the killings were carried out, and for a brief period before the killers were caught and eventually taken to court, people in this town of los angeles were terrified. the gruesome nature of those killings, sharon tate, and of course the other four people in her home who were stabbed, and over are two night period the next night, apparently choosing a random the home of a wealthy couple in the heart of los angeles, and they were brutal killings as well. some people remember those days with a tremendous amount of fear, and the trial was the longest trial in
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american history at that time, full of drama. and, as we havejust been hearing in games's report, all the pa role hearing in games's report, all the parole hearings that he has appeared out over the years, once again reviving memories for people who lived through those times —— james's report. peter, thank you very much. peter reflecting on the news that charles manson has died at the age of 83. the government has announced plans to transform transport links in cities across the uk, making it easier to get from the suburbs to the centre. it comes just days before the chancellor delivers his first autumn budget. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnierjoins us now from westminster. another essential day ahead. that's right, and it could be a pretty significant meeting of this brexit cabinet committee. it is basically a group of senior ministers who decide the government's negotiating position. and we know that part of the sticking point with brussels in
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these brexit negotiations is muggy. that is partly because the eu and the uk have taken different approaches to settling the bill. it is also partly because the uk has been pushing back to make sure taxpayers here do not pay any more than they need to. but it is also because, so far, the cabinet has not yet agreed on a way forward when it comes to the cash. so when these ministers get together with the prime minister later on, will they be able to come to an agreement? well, as eu politicians continuously point out, the clock is ticking. so the pressure is certainly on, and it isa the pressure is certainly on, and it is a busy day for the prime minister. she will be in the west midlands with the chancellor, highlighting plans to improve transport links between cities and suburbs, all with the aim of improving productivity. germany is facing a political crisis, after angela merkel‘s attempts to form a three—party coalition government failed
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following weeks of negotiations. the leaders of the pro—business free democrats unexpectedly pulled out of talks last night. it represents a serious setback for mrs merkel, who during 12 years in power was seen as a symbol of stable government in europe. today it is the 70th wedding anniversary of the queen and the duke of edinburgh. they have been married longer than any other royal couple in history. they are celebrating their platinum wedding anniversary with the release of three new portraits, and will be spending their day with friends and family privately at windsor. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. in the gloom of postwar britain, their marriage was, in the words of winston churchill, a flash of colour. he was the dashing naval officer, she the future queen. in the 70 years since, theirs has proved to be a relationship which has truly stood the test of time. it's worked because their personalities and their characters complement one another.
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they're quite different, in many ways, but prince philip is the first to make the queen laugh uproariously, and is probably the only person who can also tell her to shut up. pictured in 1939, 18—year—old philip first caught princess elizabeth's eye on a visit to dartmouth naval college. it was the beginning of a friendship which grew into a lifelong partnership. the queen has referred to him as her strength and stay. the duke remarked that tolerance is essential to any happy marriage, and the queen, he added, has that quality in abundance. 70 years after the royal couple exchanged their vows here, the bells of westminster abbey will peal for more than three hours in their honour. these images have been released by the palace to mark the couple's milestone anniversary. the queen and prince philip will celebrate at a private party at windsor castle this evening. some lovely quotes from the front
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pages. prior to the wedding, prince philip told the queen mother he had fallen in love completely with her daughter. philip once remarked my job, first, second and last, is never too late the queen down. 70 yea rs, never too late the queen down. 70 years, quite something. the president of zimbabwe, robert mugabe, has defied demands from the army and his own party to step down. in an address to the nation last night, the 93—year—old made no mention of a resignation, even though the ruling zanu—pf party has given him until 10:00am today to hand over power orface impeachment. 0ur correspondent ben brown is in the country's capital, harare, for us. what has the reaction been? so many people expecting him to perhaps stand down, and that is not what he did. good morning, louise. a
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huge sense of disappointment and angen huge sense of disappointment and anger, really, among many zimbabweans who watch that speech last night, just assuming he was finally going to resign. especially after being sacked by his own zanu pf ruling party. this is the headline in one of the newspapers this morning, louise, arrogant mugabe disregards zanu pf and says he is going nowhere. let's get some reaction now from one of the opposition members of parliament. james is from the opposition party in zimbabwe. what was your reaction when you saw the speech last night? there is nothing mugabe said which i did not expect. you must know the syste m did not expect. you must know the system in zanu pf of entitlement and impunity. so that was entitlement and impunity at play. are you angry he has refused to resign, despite all this pressure, the demonstrations we saw here?” all this pressure, the demonstrations we saw here? i am angry he remains president, because
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his sell by date was in the year 2000, when he lost to the opposition party, and again he lost in 2002, 2005 and 2008. so president mugabe has no business, or status. we gather there will be an impeachment process if he doesn't resign in the next few hours. tell us about that. how long would that take, to impeach him? it depends how fast parliament moves. it could take a few months. the beauty ease it is a process provided for in the constitution section 90 seven. it is the only hope for the country that the president is removed in terms of that section of the constitution. what about the people, we saw thousands demonstrating over the weekend on the streets behind us. they were euphoric. they thought robert mugabe was on the verge of going. do you think there will be more demonstrations now he is refusing to resign? i'm not sure about that but what you saw was an
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expression of the anger people have had over the years. it might surprise someone like you that there was all of that euphoria. it doesn't surprise a person like me. people have wanted president mugabe to go since 2000, when we started voting for the mdct. mugabe, the oldest head of state at 93, and it looks like he could still be around, as you have said, for at least a couple of weeks or months even. what we must now tell zimbabwe is that the removal of mugabe must follow due process. we want to go to constitutionalism. that is what the community expects us to do. and we must community expects us to do. and we m u st follow community expects us to do. and we must follow the constitution. the best way to do it is either president mugabe resigns by notifying the speaker of parliament in terms of 96 section one of the
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constitution, he informs the speaker of parliament, or he is removed by impeachment. thank you very much for being with us, opposition mp here in harare, capital zimbabwe. the impeachment proceedings might take time, and against all of the pressure from the people, his own party and the army, robert mugabe is still technically president of this country, even though, extraordinarily, he is still technically under house arrest after the military takeover. yes, extraordinary times. thank you very much indeed. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: that is where we start, the embattled president robert mugabe is facing a deadline set by his own party to resign after a surprise speech where he refused to stand down. charles manson, notorious head ofa
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down. charles manson, notorious head of a cold, which he directed to commit nine murders, has died in hospital aged 83. we will have more on that news about charles manson with the man who wrote a very interesting book about his life and times as well. time now to take a look at this morning's weather with carol. that is a very nice picture, a bit of splashing about in the mud. yes, it isa of splashing about in the mud. yes, it is a cracker. for some of us we have some rain. and the forecast is quite unsettled. 0ne have some rain. and the forecast is quite unsettled. one thing you will notice is it is going to be mild through the course of the day and for some it is already miles. tomorrow it will be windy offence. quite strong wind as well. today low pressure is dominating the weather with fronts moving west to east, taking rain with it. snow on the scottish hills. look at this heat coming from the atlantic. south—westerly winds, which for us isa mild south—westerly winds, which for us is a mild direction, as indicated in yellow here. it moves across the british isles, except for the north—east of scotland, where it is
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still cold and away from the west of scotla nd still cold and away from the west of scotland it is a cold start with rain, snow on the hills north of the central lowlands, so some slushy weather on the high routes and rain moving across northern ireland and northern england this morning. here we are already into the high temperatures as you can see. in the west, 11 and 12s. that rain will move east through the morning. it will leave a lot of clout behind it, some murky conditions, damp and drizzly weather, but nothing wrong with those temperatures for this time of november. through the day we hang onto a lot of rain across northern england and scotland. it will be particularly heavy. —— it won't be particular heavy. this noble fate and wrangle will turn later and then showers across wales coming in. some brightness across parts of east wales, herefordshire, the west midlands, for example. temperatures above where they should be at the state in november. the average is seven or eight. we are looking at 13s. the tempo to will
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continue to climb. across scotland, three in the northern isles, and about seven. those temperatures will also climb. through this evening and overnight rain rejuvenates across scotland. we have a band coming from the south—west moving north eastwards. this south—westerly wind, this cloud and murky weather. look at the temperatures now. even at night across the north of the country we are looking at temperatures higher than they currently are. as we move through tomorrow we still have the rainbows in north eastwards. then later in the day we have a new band of rain coming in across northern ireland, fringing into western parts of the uk. a feature of tomorrow's weather will be the wind. it will be quite windy. in the west in exposed areas we are looking at some gales. temperatures climbing up. 10 degrees in aberdeen. 14 in plymouth and st helier. as we head into the end of the week, low pressure is driving the week, low pressure is driving the weather and we have a cold front putting in an appearance. behind
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that we see a return to some cooler conditions. so to translate that onto the charts, on wednesday it is still cloudy, still very mild for the time of year, but it is turning cooler on thursday. thank you very much. let's ta ke let's take you back to the story that has been breaking over the last hour. the notorious cult leader charles manson, convicted of the murder of nine people, has died in prison. geoff quinn wrote a biography about charles and joins us from texas on the phone. thank you for coming on the programme. so, reacting to the news charles manson has died at the age of 83. for those viewers just turning has died at the age of 83. for those viewersjust turning on has died at the age of 83. for those viewers just turning on their tvs, remind us why he was so notorious. charles manson was not only notorious for the so—called tate lobbe murders in america, in 1969,
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but also for his great sense of public relations. he played the american people and people across the globe like a puppet master. always able every few years to get back to our attention with an incendiary interview, claiming he was engaged to a young follower, a couple of years ago there was a near death, supposedly. frankly, iam a little surprised that he expired this time. if manson somehow could bea this time. if manson somehow could be a where of the reaction to his death, he would be thrilled. what he a lwa ys death, he would be thrilled. what he always wanted more than anything else was attention. and obviously right until the end that's what he got. he always carefully managed that attention and the press interest in him as well. these murders took place at the end of the 19605. it is worth reminding people that he did not take part in the murders. he convinced others as part
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of this manson family to take the lives of others. that is true. people always forget when we say that that he was in fact personally involved in the murder of a ranch hand in la named shorty shea, after the tate murders, so despite what logy the tate murders, so despite what mythology would tell us, charles manson shed blood and killed himself, so he was not only someone who incited others to murder, he was a murderer himself. and, jeff, you looked into his early life in your book — did you discover anything, or speak to anyone that suggested that there may be things to be learned which led to what he did in later life? actually, i was able to talk to his sister and his cousin and these were people who had never been interviewed before that always tried to stay out of sight. even as a
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child, five, six years old, manson was fascinated with violence, he was particularly interested... (inaudible). and he actually attacked his cousin with a sickle when he was still a tiny child. he was disagreeable from an early age. he was violent. hundreds of people who have talked about him and dealt with in three is life, i could not find one person who could ever recall one kind thing he had done for another person or a generous thing he had done. he was simplya generous thing he had done. he was simply a despicable human being. thank you for your time this morning. the life and times of charles manson. charles manson has died at the age of 83. the law changed in california and he was sentenced to life in prison. it is just coming up to 7:25am. women are being advised to sleep on their side in the last three
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months of pregnancy to avoid having a stillborn baby. a study ofjust over 1,000 women found the risk doubles if women go to sleep on their backs in the third trimester. 0ur reporter ali fortescue has more. i knew something was wrong. i woke up in the morning and ijust knew something was wrong. and we went to the hospital and when they couldn't find the heartbeat they nipped off to go and find a doctor, i knew that there was something not quite right. lots of cards. these are his footprints. grace lost baby lewy at 35 weeks. she still doesn't know what caused her stillbirth. he was so tiny, he was just perfectly formed. he had a beautiful upper lip. and i think you always think about the what—ifs, what if i did this differently, why has this happened, what have i done wrong? a lot of guilt. just sadness beyond anything that i have ever experienced. grace says she was never given any
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advice on sleep positions when she was pregnant. she's one of around 1,000 women to have taken part in the midlands and north of england stillbirth study, which is the largest of its kind. it found that one in 225 pregnancies in the uk ended in stillbirth. that's around 11 babies a day. it also found that the risk of stillbirth drops by nearly 4% if women sleep on their side in the third trimester, which could save around 130 lives a year in the uk. # there were two in the bed, then the little one said, "roll over". the study comes alongside a charity campaign. the advice is simple, sleeping on your side could halve the risk of a stillbirth. you might end up in all sorts of positions when asleep. but the important thing to remember is to start on your side. it's hard to know for sure but it's thought when you lie on your back you could be putting
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weight on important blood vessels and restrict the flow of blood to the baby. research has shown that the number of stillbirths in the uk has gone down, but the figures here are still high and above those in many other high—income countries. we want to be one of the best countries in the world and one of the safest places to have a baby. so there's lots of work to do. and, actually, this study will contribute to that, because it has given us some simple advice to give to women to cut the risk of having a stillbirth. grace has now started a new chapter. nine months ago, rubin joined the family. hearing the baby cry in the delivery room was just amazing. she'll never know what would have happened if she'd had this advice, but grace hopes her story and her part in the study can save lives. we'll be speaking to an obstetrician involved in the studyjust after 8am this morning. you can get details of organisations offering support with the issues discussed in that film at bbc.co.uk/actionline. let us know what you think about
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that and anything else we are covering this morning. we are going to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are this morning. we will see you with the national headlines just after 7:30am. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchard. the night overground is coming to london in less than a month. the victoria, central, jubilee, picadilly and northern lines already operate for 24 hours on the weekend. from friday 15th december, londoners will be able to travel between new cross gate and dalsonjunction on friday and saturday nights. there are plans to extend it to highbury & islington in 2018. police are continuing to investigate the death of a woman in muswell hill. the woman, who was named locally as cathy burke, died in her home. she was stabbed to death. neighbours left flowers and described her as a lovely lady. today is the queen and prince philip's wedding
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anniversary, but they aren't the only ones celebrating this year. ted and doris box also married in 1947. they met at primary school and married a few days before ted was sent abroad to fight. so what is the secret to a seventy year marriage? how can you say any one thing? i've just loved her, and she has loved me back. she's been my best friend all these years. and that's it, just love everything about her. travel now. 0n the tubes this morning, there are minor delays on the metropolitan line and a part closure on london 0verground. severe delays at the moment on tfl rail. 0n the roads, the m25 betweenjunction 21 the m1 and junction 22 at st albans — the outside lane remains closed in both directions for repairs to the barrier.
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it's been closed now since friday. in cannonbury, grosvenor avenue is closed for repairs to a burst water main. in wembley, the high road remains closed eastbound for sewer works. while in 0rpington, the high street remains closed for water works. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling a little less cold this morning. we have some cloud, some light rain move in overnight and with it some slightly more mild air, leaving today rather cloudy but feeling rather damp. now, the majority of the rain has moved east but the cloud is big enough to produce the odd spot of rain here and there through the day. it's quite breezy as well. the temperature, though, doesn't reflect this. it will feel mild between 12—14 degrees in towns and cities, so overnight tonight it is very similar to last night with rain moving in from the west, light, patchy rain for a time, it stays quite breezy and we are going to hang on to the cloud as well. the temperature barely dropping, a really mild night, between 11 and 12 degrees, so staying in double figures. a mild start to tuesday,
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still quite a bit of cloud around. some bright spells around tomorrow. still quite breezy as well. the maximum temperature, again, 14, maybe even 15 celsius through tomorrow afternoon. so, remaining quite mild but, as you will see, it is quite unsettled, patchy rain through to thursday. things start to clear up a little bit. we will see some breaks in the cloud, the odd glimmer of sunshine. cloudy for the next couple of days. and similar to last week, things get a little bit colder as we head into the rest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: the zimbabwean president, robert mugabe, has defied widespread demands that he step down. in an address to the nation last night, the 93—year—old made no mention of a resignation, even though the ruling zanu—pf party has given him until 10:00am today to hand over power orface impeachment.
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germany is facing a political crisis, after angela merkel‘s attempts to form a three—party coalition government failed following weeks of negotiations. the leaders of the pro—business free democrats unexpectedly pulled out of talks last night. it represents a serious setback for mrs merkel, who during 12 years in power was seen as a symbol of stable government in europe. police say there were no injuries to suggest any other person was involved in the death of missing teenager gaia pope. the 19—year—old's body was found on saturday in a field near swanage, 11 days after she was last seen. dorset police are treating her death as unexplained, pending toxicology results. 0fficials says the search for an argentine naval submarine that went missing with 44 crew
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on board is being hampered by bad weather conditions. teams from several countries have intensified their efforts in the south atlantic to find the ara sanjuan submarine, which vanished last wednesday off the argentine coast. the us navy has sent a second ship with special tracking equipment and deep—sea rescue modules tojoin the search. today it is the 70th wedding anniversary of the queen and the duke of edinburgh. they have been married longer than any other royal couple in history. they are celebrating their platinum wedding anniversary with the release of three new portraits, and will be spending their day with friends and family privately at windsor. and that picture and the others are on the front page of many of the papers. there is a lovely piece in the telegraph, saying she loved him from the first time she saw him. he was her act of rebellion, she her act of conformity. in ten minutes' time, we will bring you the weather, with carol. i was going to say the weather will
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have carol, but it is the other way around, normally. which came first, carol or the weather? you can do the weather, if you like. no, i can barely do the sport! david moyes has had a tricky start, and you do look at him sometimes, i said to you earlier, a penny for those thoughts, having left everton, gone to manchester united, gone abroad, back again. what about positive thoughts? he is thinking i am at a new club, i will turn things around and we will have a great rest of season. west ham remain in the premier league's relegation zone, after david moyes lost his first game in charge. they were beaten 2—0 at watford. watford's goals came in either half, from will hughes and this strike from richarlison. another impressive performance from marco silva's side — the watford boss remains linked with the vacant manager's job at everton. and disappointment for moyes, in his 500th premier league game as a manager.
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we made a couple of chances to get ourselves goals. we didn't get them today. you know, the goals change games. if you get them, you know, it covers a multitude of sins. we didn't take the chances today. so we have to play better, that's what i think. i didn't really enjoy bits of the performance. but, if we'd got the goals in, i think it would have turned things around a bit. in the scottish premiership, hearts returned to tynecastle after six months away while the main stand was redeveloped. they could only manage a 1—1 draw against partick thistle, though, kris doolan's late equaliser spoiling the home side's day. chris coleman's new job after resigning as manager of wales will be to take charge of championship side sunderland. they are bottom of the table, afterjust one win in 17 matches. coleman has signed a 2.5—year deal to replace simon grayson, who was sacked last month. he will be in charge for tomorrow night's game at aston villa. no roger federer, rafa nadal or andy murray in the end—of—season world tour final in london, but we still got plenty of entertainment, and a victory
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for grigor dimitrov. he was up against david goffin, in a final few predicted. dimitrov is called baby fed, because his style is like federer‘s, and he showed off his skill in the decisive third set. he went on to win the biggest title of his career, and in the process, earn nearly £2 million. it's been a tremendous two weeks for me, honestly. it's such an honour to play here. this two weeks has been one of the best two weeks i've ever had. i'm lost for words, i'm not going to lie. usually i'm good at that, but today is just one of those days. the finale to the european golf season came down to the very last hole, but tommy fleetwood has won the race to dubai for the first time, just ahead of fellow englishman justin rose. rose had started the day in terrific form. but the wheels came off his round on the 12th hole, putting his second shot into the water. two more mistakes handed fleetwood the title. he had an anxious wait
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before it was confirmed, but it has been quite a year for the 26—year—old from southport. it's been a big one. ba by frankie arriving safely, and he's great. i'm going to get married in a couple of weeks. and yeah, i mean, it's been the best year of my life, by an absolute mile. and, you know, on the course, it's been great. i've played some of the best golf of my career, and done things that i've never done before. and, off the course, i'm just such a happy person. so, it's — you know, we'll have to think of ways to better this one. champions exeter have gone back to the top of rugby union's english premiership, but they were made to work for it by harlequins at sandy park. it wasn't the best performance from the defending champions, but they ended up sealing a bonus—point win thanks to two tries from jonny hill. that puts them two points clear of saracens. there were also wins yesterday for bath and leicester. it has seemed like a long build—up, but england have arrived in brisbane ahead of the first test
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at the gabba, starting on thursday. no ben stokes, of course, as the all—rounder awaits the result of the investigation into an incident outside a bristol nightclub in september. the ecb have said stokes won'tjoin the tour while he remains under police investigation. his team—mates, though, are still hopeful he can play a part at some stage. it'd be amazing if stokesy comes out here. i am sure you guys would all think the same. he's a fantastic cricketer. we don't know what's going on at the moment. that's completely out of our hands, and until that's resolved, we actually don't know what is going to happen. but i'm sure that it will get resolved, sooner rather than later, we hope, because at the end of the day, we want the best cricketers playing in the ashes. i have been listening to a lot of the players being interviewed over the players being interviewed over the last few days, and one of the great things they talk about is how the locals are supporting, you know,
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obviously the home side, and just giving already a little tiny bit of needling to the ponds, already. -- poms. we are cutting down on spending this year compared to last year. is that why you haven't got the present?” have got sally one, carol, naga... steph has a present coming her way. if you want to pick one up, for me, that would be lovely.” if you want to pick one up, for me, that would be lovely. i have loads of ideas. not least there are 60,000 bottles of the sector in this distribution centre alone —— prosecco. we have thousands of 0x is of sweets, as well. i think dan will
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be upfor of sweets, as well. i think dan will be up for that. louise is a very healthy person, so i will have to look at what i will get her, and sally might like some prosecco as well. it is around 3500 different product lines. easy for them at this time of year. there are around 400 people who work here, and we are talking about this today because new research suggests we are not going to spend as much this christmas as we have done in previous years. i will talk a bit about why that is the case in a minute. first we will chat tojohn, the case in a minute. first we will chat to john, he the case in a minute. first we will chat tojohn, he is the managing director for this division, chat tojohn, he is the managing directorfor this division, this region. tell us a bit about how you prepare for christmas. hello, steph. at the core, christmas is our biggest trading period of the year so biggest trading period of the year soa biggest trading period of the year so a lot of planning and preparation goes into ensuring that we get it right. our customers tend to trade up right. our customers tend to trade up at christmas, so we have a lot of exciting, new, irresistible products from deserts to party food to
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delicious confectionery. and our stores are geared up to suggest that we can serve customers over the christmas period —— dessert. both in stores and remotely, there is a lot of extra work, but a great time of yearin of extra work, but a great time of year in terms of customers. and how are people shopping? what is interesting is how people have changed from the big shop two more, little and often. we absolutely see that. what we tend to find is that people are increasingly busy so they tend to shop more, little and often, and from a convenience point of view thatis from a convenience point of view that is convenient for us. we're enjoying that changing customer a beer. thank you for your time this morning. that is one perspective, from the co—operative group. what do other retailers say? this research from these are you saying that it could be a tough time from all retailers this year —— visa. this is
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something we have talked a lot about in the past, haven't we? tell us your thoughts on what is happening in retail at the moment. inflation has gone up 3% now, so household budgets are squeezed, as wages are not going up by anywhere near that. an inflation rate of 3% is an average, so some prices are going up by more than 3%, and if you are paying for those products, and your wages are only going up by 1%, you are wages are only going up by 1%, you a re clearly wages are only going up by 1%, you are clearly worse off. people are feeling the pinch. who are the winners and losers? fashion is finding it really tough at the moment. sales in fashion have declined. they have for a long time and you will see that in the sales going on. experienced retailers, so food and beverage, hospitality, they have all seen increases in sales, actually. people want to go out have experiences, and leisure. in a way they are substituting that for buying product now. we can do that
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online and when people want to go out, they want to have fun and have an enjoyable time. you mentioned online. i will bring injames from experion. we have experienced a boom in online logistics, because of the changing way we all shop. while big distribution centres like this and delivery vehicles are the kind of visual manifestation of that, it is all powered by data. and how much is that changing? is online still way we are seeing a lot of growth? we are certainly witnessing a boom. last year on black friday and cyber monday alone weep processed 24 million address validation checks, which is vital to make sure that people get their presence in time. and this will increase further, by about 20%. thank you very much for your time. before we go, we will have a look down this isle. it is fascinating is seeing how this work, works, they scan things, and i will
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go and carry on looking for presents. i am actually rubbish at buying presents. iam presents. i am actually rubbish at buying presents. i am to obvious, i need some inspiration.” buying presents. i am to obvious, i need some inspiration. i think you might have been a bit obvious with your 60,000 bottles of prosecco for carol. thank you, so you a bit later on. “ see you a carol. thank you, so you a bit later on. -- see you a bit later on. a plan to improve public transport links in cities across the uk, and backing for driverless cars. it is a fitting way to start the week for a government that is trying to show it does still have a sense of direction. some £250 million have been allocated to the west midlands. business minister greg clark can tell us more. hejoins us now from our birmingham newsroom. i know you are in birmingham because you are talking about an announcement on transport today. no new money, but you are talking about improving transport links between city centres and suburbs. can you give mea city centres and suburbs. can you give me a sort of practical example of yes, i will.
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yes, iwill. it yes, i will. it is any investment that will be available to city regions like birmingham. 0ne that will be available to city regions like birmingham. one of the things we know is, if you think of london, it is quite easy to get around london. you can go from croydon to central london in 20 minutes. in and around our the cities you have towns are not far apart but quite hard to get around to. it is not as easy to zip backwards and forwards. so what this will do is to say to places like birmingham and the west midlands and other areas across the country where the travel between the city centre and the surrounding towns, between the smaller towns themselves, slows people down, takes a long time to get to work, difficult for business to get in touch with clients, they should be upgraded so that you can
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improve the productivity of those areas. and i want to know if you are putting your money where your mouth is. if we look back at london, 1.3 billion spent in london, you say the links are better, birmingham will get £250 million, what do you say to those who say that there is this north— south divide. those who say that there is this north- south divide. this is part of the long—term industrial strategy which is for the first time looking at those connections between the smaller towns and the big cities. what we will set out next week is a whole series of measures so that places right across the country will have more funds themselves. the mayor of the west midlands here has been campaigning for precisely this. 0ne been campaigning for precisely this. one of the things he wants to do is connect the light rail from the black country, riley hill near dudley, to the rest of the connections in the west midlands. it
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is going to make a big difference. this is something that they have been campaigning. i think it is right that we devolve those funds so that people in charge locally can make those decisions and there is more to come. let's talk about the budget which is of course this week as well. and we know that the election was meant to revitalise the party along with the party conference. what does philip hammond have to do to make sure that happens? one of the important things that we have to do is to address some of the opportunities but also some of the opportunities but also some of the challenges over the next few years. and one of the things we are talking about today is the future of new technology in cars. in west midlands, famous the world over for its cars. cars are changing and there is a revolution in how they are powered. they are going from diesel and petrol to electric. they are being automated. you've got intelligence systems driving them.
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we need to be at the forefront of that. we can be. we have one of the best reputations in the world. to be at the forefront you have to invest in itand at the forefront you have to invest in it and so what we are doing through the budget and this will be a big theme of it is investing in the areas for the future in research and development and also in the skills people will need to make use of these technologies. so looking to the long—term, making sure we are fit for the future as a country, is the aim of the project.” fit for the future as a country, is the aim of the project. i want to ask specifically about philip hammond. he has been in the papers this weekend. he was given the nickname "friendless feel", others say he is set up to fail. is it his last budget? anyone in his position faces a difficultjob to balance the requirements that we have, to properly fund the public services and also to invest in the future. he
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isa and also to invest in the future. he is a guy with a cool head, he has been looking at all of the requirements that are there. the fa ct requirements that are there. the fact that what we are talking about today here in the west midlands, investment, new investment in the industries of the future, investment in training for people so that they have those skills, investment in making sure that our towns and cities are better connected, i think it shows the whole government is looking at what we need in the long—term to be prosperous and to improve our productivity. let's talk about brexit as well. we know that there is a cabinet meeting as far as i understand. there is a suggestion that we might be prepared, the government may be prepared to double the divorce bill. would you back that? figures of £40 billion. aru suggesting it is the right idea? forgive me, the right approach to any negotiations, including this one, is to exercise discipline, and
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as the eu is doing, that you form your negotiating position, you deploy that in a united way, rather than talking about it in advance. we wa nt to than talking about it in advance. we want to get a good deal. i think everyone. . . want to get a good deal. i think everyone... there is a real groundswell of opinion notjust in this country but i think on the continent that we want and need to get the deal that brings us together. ok, can ijust... and go on to talk about these important terms on the final deal as to how to trade with each other which, given the opportunities that i have just been talking about, it would be crazy to do that in a full hearted and vigorous way. would you back money being spent and how would you sell that to other members of your party who seem vehemently opposed? asi party who seem vehemently opposed? as i say, i take a simple view on this. when we discuss our
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negotiating position, you have to do that in private. i think you need to maintain the discipline of that. he set out your position and then you ta ke set out your position and then you take that to deploy in the negotiations to come. it doesn't serve our national interest for individual ministers to speculate about what that position should be. the business secretaryjoining us from birmingham, greg clark, thank you for your time. let's find out what the weather has in store. it was milder than we expected it to be. you are quite right. the last three mondays it has been really cold. today away from the west it is fairly mild to start the day with temperatures in double figures. and through the day it will be a mild week for most of it. there will be some rain at times. it will be windy especially from tomorrow. what we have at the moment is low pressure dominating the weather. with the
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fronts taking rain from the west to the east, it will deposit snow on the east, it will deposit snow on the scottish hills above the central lowlands, and also want again we've got some south—westerly wind coming m, got some south—westerly wind coming in, that is a mild direction for us, as indicated by the yellow on the chart. still the northern isles and the north—east scotland sticking out in the blues for you. it is cold. it isa in the blues for you. it is cold. it is a cold start across scotland this morning. we have snow in the highlands of the hills, so there is going to —— there will be some slushy weather. and then there will be some band of rain coming in and some drizzle. so this afternoon it is cloudy and wet across northern england. the rain won't be very heavy foremost. cloud across east anglia, down to kent, the midlands, the isle of wight, and that is thick enough for the odd spot of light rain and drizzle. the same into south—west england. you can see the odd spot of rain coming out of the
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cloud. it would be raining all of the time. in north wales around herefordshire and the west midlands we could well see some sunshine. northern ireland, lots of cloud through the day. some splashes of rain at times. cloudy and still cold particularly in the northern isles. the maximum temperature only two degrees. through the evening and overnight we see the rain rejuvenate across scotland with winterman is in the hills. south—westerly winds again. look a the hills. south—westerly winds again. looka mild it the hills. south—westerly winds again. look a mild it is. these would be good daytime temperatures for the time of year. the mild weather pushes up further north into scotland. it won't be as cold at night as well. tomorrow we start with the rain in scotland continuing to drift north eastwards. then a new band comes in across northern ireland, parts of wales and south—west england. tomorrow will be noticeably windy and gales in the
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north—west. temperatures by then 11 in glasgow, ten in aberdeen. quite different from today. 14 as we push into the south—west. heading into wednesday, low pressure is dominating the weather. we have a couple of cold fronts coming in. at the end of the week on friday it will start to turn a bit colder from the north. thank you very much for that. are you an apology. why? someone said i love your new haircut andi someone said i love your new haircut and i didn't notice you have had a haircut. i don't mind. and i didn't notice you have had a haircut. idon't mind. it is and i didn't notice you have had a haircut. i don't mind. it is fine. is it too late? no. as we've been hearing this morning, the queen and the duke of edinburgh are marking their 70th wedding anniversary. but how do you make a success of a long marriage? by by noticing things, i think. to find out, breakfast'sjohn mcguire has been speaking to one couple who are also celebrating seven decades together, and are as happy today as they were on their wedding day.
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we are delighted to share such a special year with you and hope that your celebrations are particularly happy and memorable. among the cards in honour of happy and memorable. among the cards in honourofjim happy and memorable. among the cards in honour ofjim and betty's wedding anniversary is one from another platinum couple. we had one for our 60th, one for our 60 feet and this one. they first met as teenagers as bettie, evacuee from bristol, writer jim's place in gloucestershire. they we re jim's place in gloucestershire. they were married five years later in 1947. the princess has been in the abbey for nearly an hour. the royal wedding of princess elizabeth and the duke of edinburgh took place in westminster abbey before kings, queens and outside hundreds of thousands of people. although of course there celebrations were more modest, betty and jim were
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determined not to let post—war austerity hamper their special day. clothing coupons, you know. i had to borrow a wedding dress.” clothing coupons, you know. i had to borrow a wedding dress. i had a little car that are sold to my father and he gave me the money that i used. we were lucky to have a wedding cake. a two tier wedding cake. usually the cakes were made out of cardboard and then they would lift it up and there would be a little cake inside. food was rationed. from the palace twopenny, elizabeth and her husband waived to the crowds. the queen's golden anniversary were invited to buckingham palace. and 20 years on betty and jim buckingham palace. and 20 years on betty andjim are buckingham palace. and 20 years on betty and jim are the guests of honour at a family party with their five daughters, 14 grandchildren and 12 great—grandchildren. yes, i like
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to see them after school, on the weekend and stuff. and you know they have been to buckingham palace? have a? yes, when they were married for 50 yea rs. a? yes, when they were married for 50 years. i didn't know that. do you know who else has been married for 70 years? the queen. my friends at school were like, that is a long time. it is indeed. what is their secret? we have always loved each other. we have always been very loving. that is the thing. we don't treat each other like strangers. we a lwa ys treat each other like strangers. we always kiss good night. hold hands. yes. so, hasjim and betty danced the anniversary waltz or possibly their 70th time, hopefully they will keep dancing for many more. i love them. i think there was a
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clue in their chairs they were sitting in. they were very close together. it was definitely his and hers. see what i mean? and did you notice that betsy said quite a lot andjimjust said notice that betsy said quite a lot and jim just said yes. he just agreed. that is the key. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. see you at 8am. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchard. the night overground is coming to london in less than a month. the victoria, central, jubilee, picadilly and northern lines already operate for 24 hours on the weekend. from friday 15th december, londoners will be able to travel between new cross gate and dalsonjunction on friday and saturday nights. there are plans to extend it to highbury & islington in 2018. police are continuing to investigate the death of a woman in muswell hill. the woman, who was named locally as cathy burke, died in her home.
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she was stabbed to death. neighbours left flowers and described her as a lovely lady. today is the queen and prince philip's wedding anniversary, but they aren't the only ones celebrating this year. ted and doris box also married in 1947. they met at primary school and married a few days before ted was sent abroad to fight. so what is the secret to a seventy year marriage? how can you say any one thing? i've just loved her, and she has loved me back. she's been my best friend all these years. and that's it, just love everything about her. travel now. on the metropolitan line and a part closure on london 0verground. —— 0n the tubes this morning, there are minor delays on the metropolitan line and a part closure on london 0verground. severe delays at the moment on tfl rail. 0n the roads, the m25 betweenjunction 21 the m1 and junction 22 at st albans — the outside lane remains closed in both directions for repairs to the barrier.
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it's been closed now since friday. in cannonbury, grosvenor avenue is closed for repairs to a burst water main. in wembley, the high road remains closed eastbound for sewer works. while in 0rpington, the high street remains closed for water works. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling a little less cold this morning. we have some cloud, some light rain move in overnight and with it some slightly more mild air, leaving today rather cloudy but feeling rather damp. now, the majority of the rain has moved east but the cloud is thick enough to produce the odd spot of rain here and there through the day. it's quite breezy as well. the temperature, though, doesn't reflect this. it will feel mild between 12—14 degrees in towns and cities, so overnight tonight it is very similar to last night with rain moving in from the west, light, patchy rain for a time, it stays quite breezy and we are going to hang on to the cloud as well. the temperature barely dropping, a really mild night, between 11 and 12 degrees, so staying in double figures. a mild start to tuesday, still quite a bit of cloud around. some bright spells around tomorrow.
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still quite breezy as well. the maximum temperature, again, 14, maybe even 15 celsius through tomorrow afternoon. so, remaining quite mild but, as you will see, it is quite unsettled, patchy rain through to thursday. things start to clear up a little bit. we will see some breaks in the cloud, maybe the odd glimmer of sunshine. cloudy for the next couple of days. and similar to last week, things get a little bit colder as we head into the rest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and lou. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. robert mugabe clings to power as he refuses to stand down as president of zimbabwe. in an extraordinary speech live on tv in which he had been expected to quit, the 93—year—old instead promised to stay on for weeks to come. the operation i have alluded to did
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not amount to a threat to our well cherished constitutional order, nor what it a challenge to my authority as head of state and government. good morning. it's monday 20th november. also this morning: charles manson, the notorious head of an american cult which he directed to carry out a series of murders, has died in hospital aged 83. reducing the number of still born babies — pregnant mums are told that sleeping on their sides could save hundreds of lives. 70 years since their marriage at westminster abbey, the queen and the duke of edinburgh
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celebrate their platinum wedding anniversary with the release of three new portraits. good morning from this distribution centre where today, i am talking about how retailers prepare for the festive season. if the analysts are right, it's going to be a tough one, soi right, it's going to be a tough one, so i will be looking at what is happening. in sport — a terrible return to the premier league for david moyes as his west ham side are beaten 2—0 by watford in his first match in charge. west ham remain in the relegation zone. and carol has the weather. it's a cloudy start the day. it will be cloudy throughout much of the day, with the rain pushing from the west east and possibly some snow in the hills of the highlands. but it is much milder and becoming milder as we go through this week. the zimbabwean president, robert mugabe, has shocked the nation by refusing widespread demands for him to stand down.
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giving a speech live on tv while under house arrest during which he had been expected to resign, he instead announced his intention to lead next month's congress of the ruling party. he's now been given a deadline until ten o'clock this morning to quit or face action. 0ur africa editor fergal keane has this report. marimba music. the very music seemed designed to drain any drama out of the moment. and perhaps the geniality of the encounter was a giveaway. robert mugabe didn't look like a man about to walk into the wilderness. and his words, delivered 15 minutes into a rambling address, confirmed that he intended to stay as leader of the country and party. the congress is due here in a few weeks from now. i will preside over its processes, which must not be prepossessed by any acts calculated to undermine it, or to compromise the outcomes
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in the eyes of the public. he praised the military and acknowledged the crisis in his country and party. this appearance has shocked zimbabweans, who were preparing to witness his resignation. i think we're being played. we are being played. i feel let down. i think by now we should have produced some sort of result, but we have nothing. it's like we're back to square one. i think the whole nation was expecting him to resign. i think we're all shocked. i think people are going to be depressed, confused. there are big questions now. how can robert mugabe preside over a party which removed him from the leadership? 0nce—loyal supporters met to warn that he would be impeached by parliament if he didn't step down from the presidency. this is the moment when robert mugabe lost power in his own party, the party he dominated for so long, and has now been replaced as party
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leader by a man who was one of his closest allies for decades. a crocodile... the new leader, emmerson mnangagwa, is known as "the crocodile", celebrated here for his ruthless cunning. but when it gets its prey... he may have agreed to pause, but he is unlikely to stop until he ousts his old comrade. the american criminal and former cult leader, charles manson, has died in prison in california. he was 83. manson's followers committed a series of notorious murders in 1969. their victims included the actress, sharon tate, wife of the director, roman polanski, at her home in hollywood. manson himself was initially sentenced to death, before the penalty was abolished in california, as james cook reports. charles manson — the name itself is synonymous with evil, a killer who did no killing,
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but whose crimes shocked the world. in august 1969, followers of his cult broke into the hollywood home of sharon tate. the pregnant actress, who was married to the director roman polanski, was brutally murdered, along with four of herfriends. the next night, the so—called manson family killed again, tying up and murdering a wealthy couple. this was the ramshackle ranch in death valley where manson lived in a commune with his young, runaway fans. they apparently used lsd, and saw the guitar—playing ex—convict as a kind of saint, or perhaps a devil. charles manson was charged not with wielding a knife or firing a gun, but with controlling and directing the killers. i don't accept the court, i don't accept the whole situation. like, i was in the desert, minding my business. this confusion belongs to you. it's your confusion. i don't have any confusion.
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i don't have any guilt. i know what i've done, and no man canjudge me. ijudge me. what have you done, charlie? and why had he done it? apparently, to spark a race war. it would be called helter—skelter, and he would use it to seize power. in 1971, manson was sentenced to death on seven counts of murder, later commuted to life in prison. over the years, charles manson applied for parole time and time again. but he died a prisoner, having shattered the peace and love of the 19605 with diabolical violence. theresa may will chair a meeting today with ministers as they try to find a way to make progress in the stalled negotiations with the european union. they're expected to discuss the so—called "divorce bill" that eu leaders have insisted must be resolved before the talks can move onto trade. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnierjoins us from westminster. we have been speaking to the
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transport secretary about this, greg clark. they are refusing to discuss whether they are talking about the brexit bill. that's right. it could bea brexit bill. that's right. it could be a significant meeting later today of this brexit cabinet committee. it isa group of this brexit cabinet committee. it is a group of senior ministers that decide the negotiating position of the government. we know money has been a major sticking point in these talks. that is partly because the eu and the uk have taken very different approaches to settling the bill. it is also partly because the uk has been pushing back to make sure taxpayers here don't pay any more than they need to. but it is also because the cabinet has not yet agreed away forward when it comes to the cash. so at this meeting, will those senior ministers finally agreed a plan? as eu politicians keep reminding us, the clock is ticking, the pressure is on. it is
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going to be a busy day for the prime minister, because she will be in the west midlands as well a few days ahead of the budget, highlighting plans to improve the transport links between the cities and suburbs, all, they say, in the name of improving prosperity. germany is facing a political crisis after angela merkel‘s attempts to form a three—party coaltion government failed following weeks of negotations. the leaders of the pro—business free democrats unexpectedly pulled out of talks last night. it represents a serious setback for mrs merkel, who, during 12 years in power, was seen as a symbol of stable government in europe. today marks the 70th wedding anniversary of the queen and the duke of edinburgh. they have been married longer than any other royal couple in history. they will celebrate the latest in their long line of milestones privately with family and friends at windsor. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. in the gloom of post—war britain, their marriage was, in the words of winston churchill, a flash of colour.
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he was the dashing naval officer, she the future queen. in the 70 years since, theirs has proved to be a relationship which has truly stood the test of time. it's worked because their personalities and their characters complement one another. they're quite different, in many ways, but prince philip is the first to make the queen laugh uproariously, and is probably the only person who can also tell her to shut up. pictured in 1939, 18—year—old philip first caught princess elizabeth's eye on a visit to dartmouth naval college. it was the beginning of a friendship which grew into a lifelong partnership. the queen has referred to him as her strength and stay. the duke remarked that tolerance is essential to any happy marriage, and the queen, he added, has that quality in abundance. 70 years after the royal couple exchanged their vows here, the bells of westminster abbey will peal for more than three
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hours in their honour. these images have been released by the palace to mark the couple's milestone anniversary. the queen and prince philip will celebrate at a private party at windsor castle this evening. with a host of sport's governing bodies embroiled in bullying allegations, the woman with one of the most powerful roles in british sport is calling for improvements to the welfare of athletes. dame katherine grainger, who won rowing gold at london 2012, said there was "a lot more to do" on duty of care, and promised that would lead to more medals, not fewer. dame katherinejoins us now. normally, we talk about your incredible achievements of the sport, but there are some real issues to get to the bottom of this
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morning. the conservative mp damian collins also chairs the culture, media and sport '5 committee. he said "british athletes have fewer rights than an uber driver and desperately need an independent watchdog to try and protect them". you agree? it's a very strong statement. i have been an athlete for 20 years. i would disagree in that i think athletes do have rights and they do have a voice. but not all of them have been heard. it is ha rd all of them have been heard. it is hard as an athlete and as someone who has seen the amazing and inspirational aspect of sport to year these stories. you want people who have been in the sport and have loved it and developed and grown and experience wonderful things, and it is heartbreaking to hear that there are some who have had bad experiences within sport. but it is good that we know that now. i didn't know the scale of it. that awareness means that things are now happening
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and action is being taken. it is a long list. british gymnastics has hit the headlines. there also inquiries about gb taekwondo, british swimming and canoeing other things. it seems to be across all sports. how has it become endemic?” don't think it is endemic. it is not across all sports and even within those sports, it is not widespread. but any instances are too many. you don't want to hear these headlines. it isa don't want to hear these headlines. it is a very high pressured environment to be in. and everyone in it, whether it is athletes or coaches or support, everyone is trying to do incredible feats and they are being pushed very hard. sometimes it goes too far. when you speak to coaches who are involved,
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some of them feel that they don't know how far they can go now. you wa nt know how far they can go now. you want it to be a high pressure environment to manufacture what you will get in competition. you want people to be pushed to physical and mental amazing feats, and yet it is a fine line. how do you get close to pushing your athletes to make sure they achieved without it going too far? there are a few things. we need to make sure the people in leadership positions are supported in the behaviours that are right. and when people have experienced any situation they are uncomfortable with, they need somewhere to go and be listened to. ultimately, everyone in the system once the success that we have seen for a long time, but in the healthiest possible way. the challenge is whether we can keep the performance at the level we want it to be at, but make sure the
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integrity and dignity is there for everyone? and what about funding? there is the approach which has been talked about, win at all costs and you will get lottery funding. sports is about winning medals and doctors that need to change? the uk athletics is the body that decides whether managers. the remit for uk sport from the government is to inspire the nation through paralympic and olympic success. the whole point is to get the success. that is why it exists. that is where he we have celebrated in the last few 0lympics he we have celebrated in the last few olympics and have enjoyed those few olympics and have enjoyed those few moments. but for the first time, and that drive for perfection that we are all trying for, sometimes it gets pushed the wrong side of the line. and if it goes anywhere near the line, we need people who can speak out about it or have action taken quickly. it is not that we
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need to shift our whole thinking of where sport goes next, it is that it needs to be healthier. cani can i ask you about sir bradley wiggins because he will make his competitive rowing debut next month and this is on the back of, he has beenin and this is on the back of, he has been in the news recently, he will not face charges over what took place in 2011. we can see some pictures of him. i know he spoke to louise a few months ago about how well he was doing on a rowing machine. is it a surprise to you? and can he make the switch in sport when they are such different disciplines? they are different disciplines, but i rode with rebecca andi disciplines, but i rode with rebecca and i was world champion with rebecca a few years ago and she made a successful swap into cycling. so, there is already a mix between cycling and rowing that exists and it's possible. i think, cycling and rowing that exists and it's possible. ithink, i know cycling and rowing that exists and it's possible. i think, i know that bradley is being coached and advised byjames bradley is being coached and advised by james cracknell. he knows a thing
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or too. he won't go lightly on bradley. it will be interesting for all of us to see how he does. would you like to see him at an 0lympics if his numbers are right?m you like to see him at an 0lympics if his numbers are right? if his numbers are right and he can move a boat fast, it will be fascinating to watch him compete. all eyes on sir bradley, thank you. let's find out what the weather has in store. here's carol. 0h oh dear, you don't want to be on that motorway this morning. we have a lot of rain, we've got snow, but generally this week, it is going to turn milder. rain at times and windy. to give you a comparison of temperatures in balmoral the temperatures in balmoral the temperature is freezing, but in wales, it is 14 celsius. that would bea wales, it is 14 celsius. that would be a good day time maximum temperature. much less a temperature at this time of day. low pressure is dominating our weather and it is
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taking rain and drizzle with it from the west towards the east, but we are being bathed in south—westerly winds. that's a mild direction for us hence the higher temperatures, but it is not across the north—east of scotla nd but it is not across the north—east of scotland and neither will it be during today. so you are going to have a cold day. there goes the rain moving through northern ireland and northern england and also scotland p we will see that snow for a time, we are not looking at huge amounts and it is on high ground. as the rain moves away, the main band, we will be left with a lot of cloud and rain coming out of the remaining cloud, nothing particularly heavy, but it's the temperatures really that are of most interest. looking at 115 and 12s at this time of year, we will be looking at 75 and 8s 12s at this time of year, we will be looking at 75 and 85 as our maximums. a lot of cloud across southern counties. rain and drizzle here and there with brightness and spots of rain continuing across parts of south wales, but parts of wales especially in the east and around herefordshire, the west midlands are favoured for seeing sunshine today. northern ireland,
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when we lose this morning's rain, it will be replaced with cloud and lighter rain, but you can see it is a narrow band. and the same across scotland. the rain will be on and off during the day and it will be cold. inverness getting up to a high of six celsius. for 0rkney and shetland, three celsius. through the evening and overnight, the rain rejuvenates across scotland and on the hills it could be wintry, a new band sweeps in from the south—west moving north—east wards. the milder conditions start to move across scotland. so we'll lose the freezings that we had and they will be replaced by 65 and 7s. freezings that we had and they will be replaced by 65 and 75. tomorrow, we start off with the rain. a nice big arc of it. there will be a lot of dry weather and cloudy and the next weather front comes in from the west bearing more rain and tomorrow west bearing more rain and tomorrow we will be bathed in south—westerly winds. so it's not going to feel cold. ten celsius in aberdeen instead of the 6 or 7 today and 14s
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as we push south and south—west. towards the end of the week, from tuesday and into wednesday and then into thursday, low pressure dominates our weather. we have got a couple of cold fronts and behind the cold fronts, we tend to pull in some colder conditions. so to translate that on to our graphics, wednesday we are in the mild weather. london could hit 15 celsius, other parts of the south—west, west wales could hit 15 celsius. there will be rain in the forecast, but by the time we get to thursday, we are starting to see cooler weather coming in from the north. by friday that will be pushing further south and we could see snow on its hills as far south as wales for example by friday, but that's a long way off and that could well change lou and dan. thank you very much thank you very thank you very much. women are being advised to sleep on their side in the last three months of pregnancy to avoid having a stillborn baby. a study ofjust over 1,000 women found the risk doubles if women go to sleep on their backs in the third trimester. 0ur reporter ali fortescue has more.
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i knew something was wrong. i woke up in the morning and ijust knew something was wrong. and we went to the hospital and when they couldn't find the heartbeat they nipped off to go and find a doctor, i knew that there was something not quite right. so lots of cards. these are his footprints. grace lost baby lewy at 35 weeks. she still doesn't know what caused her stillbirth. he was so tiny. he was just perfectly formed. he had a beautiful upper lip. and i think you always think about the what—ifs, what if i did this differently, why has this happened, what have i done wrong? a lot of guilt. just sadness beyond anything that i have ever experienced. grace says she was never given any advice on sleep positions when she was pregnant.
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she's one of around 1,000 women to have taken part in the midlands and north of england stillbirth study, which is the largest of its kind. it found that one in 225 pregnancies in the uk ended in stillbirth. that's around 11 babies a day. it also found that the risk of stillbirth drops by nearly 4% if women sleep on their side in the third trimester, which could save around 130 lives a year in the uk. # there were two in the bed, then the little one said, "roll over". the study comes alongside a charity campaign. the advice is simple, sleeping on your side could halve the risk of a stillbirth. you might end up in all sorts of positions when asleep, but the important thing to remember is to start on your side. it's hard to know for sure, but it's thought when you lie on your back you could be putting weight on important blood vessels and restricting the flow of blood to the baby. grace will never know what would
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have happened if she had this advice, but grace hopes the study and her part in the study can help save lives. professor alexander heazell, clinical director at the tommy's stillbirth research centre, joins us now. you have looked at this. there are four studies and it is clear the advice needs to be that women should sleep on their side? there have been four studies, two in new zealand and one in australia and now this one we conducted in the uk and all of those show the same effect that sleeping on your back increases the risk of still birth after 28 weeks. some interesting detail in the piece that we just showed there as well. how soon after pregnancy then should women start sleeping on their side? so, if terms of the study that we
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did and the others, they look after 28 weeks. this really applies to the last 12, 14 weeks of pregnancy. and is there any reason why that, that you know, that that might be the case? so, we know that when a mum lies flat on her back in pregnancy, the weight of the baby can press on the weight of the baby can press on the big blood vessels in a mum's tummy which means that less blood goes back to a mum's heart and that means that less blood and less oxygen reaches the baby. there is a plausible reason why this might have an effect. we have got lots of people getting in contact this morning. it is worth backing up as well again something we heard earlier. if you wake up and you have rolled on to your back, that's not a cause for concern, is it? absolutely not. the question we asked what position do you go to sleep in because that's something that you can change whereas we can't change the position that we wake up in. right. we think that's important
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because the position that you go to sleep in is the position that you spend the most time in while you are asleep. so how, some people will wa nt to asleep. so how, some people will want to sleep on their backs, maybe that's what they do, how do you encourage people and people who don't feel comfortable on their side to do so? in physical terms, i guess? our study showed that the majority of mums already do sleep on their side because in late pregnancy it can be uncomfortable. many mums actually say they find it very difficult to sleep on their backs. if people are used to it then i think what we would want to do is maybe say we think it's better to sleep on your side, we think it's better for baby and maybe putting a pillow behind your back or some practical measure would be a helpful thing to do. how does our advice compare with the advice that mothers would be getting in our countries? there is a the lo of varying advice. this is part of the problem, isn't it? by doing the studies and coming up it? by doing the studies and coming up with more clear advice for
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pregnant mums that we want to actually reduce anxiety and reduce the sort of old wives tales that exist for some mums. in new zealand they have begun to give this advice to mums and they have seen a significant fall in the number of babies stillborn. right, ok. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. you can get details of organisations offering support with the issues discussed in that film at bbc.co.uk/actionline it's time for the news, travel and weather where you are. some fairly changeable weather through the next few days as we see a series of low pressure systems and weather fronts feeding and off the atlantic. we do have rain in the forecast this week. we are also going to see milder temperatures today, dragging in milderairfrom
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the south except for the far north of scotland. it will be a cloudy day, with outbreaks of rain and drizzle working their way east. it will be heavy this morning across scotla nd will be heavy this morning across scotland and northern england. some brea ks scotland and northern england. some breaks in the cloud for north—eastern parts of wales and the midlands. during rush hour, patchy outbreaks of rain. murky conditions across scotland. cloudy with outbreaks of rain for northern ireland into northern england. some brea ks ireland into northern england. some breaks in that cloud across the midlands and in the east of wales. starting to see a bit of heavy rain pushing into the south of wales later. temperatures in plymouth around a maximum of 13. this evening, it stays wet in scotland. with the sea outbreaks of rain pushing north eastwards. temperatures overnight will not be falling too far in the south,
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staying largely in double figures. 0n staying largely in double figures. on tuesday, we will see outbreaks of rain. further east, largely saudi, —— largely cloudy, but again fairly mild. through the week, milder temperatures to begin with and we will see the wind picking up through tuesday and wednesday. this is business live from bbc news with jamie robertson and sally bundock. uncertainty with a capital u — what now for chancellor angela merkel after talks to form a coalition government in germany collapse? live from london, that's our top story on monday, 20th november. could fresh elections be
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on the cards in germany at a time when the eu needs strong leadership more than ever? also in the programme — bye—bye after brexit — two important eu agencies currently in london will have to find a new home now that the uk is leaving the eu.
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