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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 20, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11am. the deadline for zimbabwe's robert mugabe to resign orface impeachment expires with no word from the president. i'm ben brown, live in harare, where is that deadline has come and gone with no word from mugabe. it seems inevitable there will be an attempt to impeach him in parliament and end his 37 year rule. charles manson — the us cult leader who sent his followers to commit a string of brutal murders — has died in prison aged 83. theresa may will meet ministers to discuss how much the uk should offer to pay the eu to settle its bill as it leaves. in the past couple of minutes, the german chancellor angela merkel arrives to meet the country's president as herfuture is arrives to meet the country's president as her future is thrown
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into doubt by the collapse of coalition talks. also this hour, celebrating their platinum wedding anniversary. the bells will ring out for the queen and prince philip who married in westminster abbey 70 years ago today. and tributes to the former wimbledon champion jana novotna, who has died of cancer at the age of 49. good morning. it's monday, november the 20th. i'm rebecca jones. welcome to bbc newsroom live. we are going straight to zimbabwe to see my colleague ben brown. hello from ra, where that deadline has come and gone for mr mugabe to
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resign. the president is still, against all the odds it would seem, technically head of state of this country, despite all the pressure from the military with their ta keover last from the military with their takeover last wednesday, from the ruling party zanu—pf which has fired him as its leader, and from people who have taken to the streets in their tens of thousands demanding he stepped down. when he refused to stepped down. when he refused to step down in a televised address last night, there were a shock across the country and there have been calls for more demonstrations to force him out. the leader of the war vetera ns to force him out. the leader of the war veterans who fought alongside mr mugabe in the war of liberation against white majority rule wants more people than the madrid at the weekend to take to the streets in a hurry again tomorrow and he said
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after 37 years of rule by mr mugabe, he cannot be allowed to rule for another 37 seconds. we are saying, mugabe, go now, your time is up, please let the country stamp ona time is up, please let the country stamp on a new page. you would have the dignity to spare the country further turmoil by announcing your departure immediately. if he cannot, andi departure immediately. if he cannot, and i am glad you disagree with the message we heard on thursday last week, we will bring back the people of zimbabwe to the streets. that was the chair of the war vetera ns that was the chair of the war veterans association, so it seems inevitable that if mr mugabe will not go of his own abolition, he will be forced out, not by the military
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despite their takeover and he is still under house arrest, but constitutionally through parliament. impeachment proceedings are likely to be launched soon. parliament will resume tomorrow and disgust that impeachment, which would need a two thirds majority in both houses of parliament but it could take weeks to carry out that process and oust mr mugabe as president if there is that two thirds road. i've been speaking to one member of parliament from the opposition mdc and he said it is time mr mugabe left office. iam angry i am angry mr mugabe is still president when he lost in several yea rs president when he lost in several years so he has no business at statehouse. we gather there will be
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an impeachment process if he doesn't resign in the next few hours. how long would that take to impeach him? it depends, it could take a few days ora it depends, it could take a few days or a few months, but the beauty is that it or a few months, but the beauty is thatitis or a few months, but the beauty is that it is a process provided for in the constitution. i think it is now the constitution. i think it is now the only hope for the country that the only hope for the country that the president is removed in terms of that section of the constitution. we saw thousands of people demonstrating here over the weekend, euphoric, they thought robert mugabe was on the verge of going. you think there will be more demonstrations now he is refusing to resign? i'm not sure about that but what you saw was an expression of the anger people have had over the years. it might surprise somebody that there was all that euphoria but it doesn't surprise me because people have
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wa nted surprise me because people have wanted president mugabe to go for as long as i can remember, ever since 2000, when they started voting for the mdc. that is an opposition member of parliament. more demonstrations being called for tomorrow. we saw on saturday rape scenes of euphoria and i°y saturday rape scenes of euphoria and joy as tens of thousands of people demand that mr mugabe leave office andi demand that mr mugabe leave office and i think those people were convinced that he was on the verge of resigning but he hasn't, so the ride demonstrations by students today at the university in harare and calls for more demonstrations. i've been talking to one activist and protester. i'm on the streets until he goes out. i cannot do anything else, i need to see him go, so we are in the streets to date and sitting in unity
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square until he goes. when you saw that speech last night on tv, how disappointed and angry reading that he barely mentioned all the pressure on him to go, never mentioned the demonstrations or the fact that people were against him in harare. yesterday before the speech i was ready to celebrate and then when i heard the speech i was disappointed. it was heartbreaking. i was actually in tears. it was heartbreaking. we expected him to resign, expected him to step down, to do the right thing and he said nothing. isn't that classic robert mugabe? that is classic robert mugabe? that is classic robert mugabe? that is classic robert mugabe. his sole ambition was to have power from the beginning. he got that part that is so dear to beginning. he got that part that is so dearto him beginning. he got that part that is so dear to him and he wants to hold
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onto with for ever and it was expected of him. that is an activist who was saying deeply disappointed that mugabe has not gone. in a sense it is difficult for the military who lost this ta keover for the military who lost this takeover on whether states to force him out by any other means than him resigning or constitutional means. they do not want to be seen as forcing him out at the barrel of a gun. let me show you some reaction in the newspapers here in harare. this is just in the newspapers here in harare. this isjust a in the newspapers here in harare. this is just a flavour of the mood of many people in zimbabwe, the daily news saying are gunned mugabe disregards zanu—pf. the ruling party has already sacked him as leader. people were expecting he would finally quit in that televised address and incredible disappointment that he hasn't and
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many of those who want him out now they will have to take to the streets again but that display of people power, will mr mugabe listened to with? i very much doubt it. back to you in the studio. let's look at some of today's other developing stories: the convicted cult leader, charles manson, who orchestrated a series of notorious murders in the 1960s, has died in prison in california. he was 83. in august 1969 members of his group killed seven people. manson believed the murders would start a race war, allowing him to seize power. james cook reports. charles manson — the name itself is synonymous with evil, a killer who did no killing, but whose crimes shocked the world. in august 1969, followers of his cult broke into the hollywood home of sharon tate. the pregnant actress, who was married to the director roman polanski, was brutally murdered, along with four of herfriends.
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the next night, the so—called manson family killed again, tying up and murdering a wealthy couple. newsreel: manson was arrested during a raid last month at the desert camp where he and his young followers were living. this was the ramshackle ranch in death valley where manson lived in a commune with his young, runaway fans. they apparently used lsd, and saw the guitar—playing ex—convict as a kind of saint, or perhaps a devil. charles manson was charged, not with wielding a knife or firing a gun, but with controlling and directing the killers. i don't accept the court, i don't accept the whole situation. like, i was in the desert, minding my business. this confusion belongs to you. it's your confusion. i don't have any confusion. i don't have any guilt. i know what i've done, and no man canjudge me. ijudge me. what have you done, charlie? and why had he done it? apparently to spark a race war.
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it would be called helter—skelter, and he would use it to seize power. in 1971, manson was sentenced to death on seven counts of murder, later commuted to life in prison. he gave several rambling television interviews in captivity but never explained how he persuaded his followers to kill for him. are you scared to die? sometimes i feel i'm scared to live. living is what scares me. dying is easy. over the years, charles manson applied for parole time and time again. but he died a prisoner, having shattered the peace and love of the 1960s with diabolical violence. 0ur north america correspondent, peter bowes, reminds us that the murders charles manson was convicted of were truly shocking. 1969 it was when the killings
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were carried out and for a brief period before the killers were caught and eventually taken to court, people in los angeles were terrified. the gruesome nature of those killings, sharon tate and the other four people in her home who were subbed and then over two—night period the next night, apparently choosing at random the home of wealthy couple in a part of los angeles called las feliz and those were brutal killings as well. some people remember those days was a tremendous amount of fear and then of course we had the trial which was the longest trial in american history at that time, full of drama, all the parole hearings he has appeared at over the years once again reviving memories for people who lived through those times. three people arrested in connection with the disappearance of gaia pope have been released from the police investigation without any further action.
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the 19—year—old's body was found on saturday in a field near swanage, 11 days after she was last seen. dorset police are treating her death as "unexplained" pending toxicology results. mps are calling for a crackdown on the so—called "gig economy". delivery riders and minicab drivers for firms like deliveroo and uber are being exploited by loopholes in employment law, according to two committees of mps. they say workers face an "unacceptable burden" to prove they are not self—employed. the government says it's considering the findings of a recent review of modern working practices. ministers have announced plans to transform transport links in cities across the uk, making it easier to get from the suburbs to the centre. it comes days before philip hammond delivers his first autumn budget. theresa may willjoin the chancellor in the west midlands today, to announce plans for more investment in new technologies,
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including driverless cars. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details. news just newsjust in, news just in, and newsjust in, and the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has been making a speech at a conference in brussels looking at the future of the eu. he spoke about the possibility of a trade deal with the uk but warned it would be impossible for the uk to remain in the single market without following its rules. those who claim that the uk should share a big part of the single
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market, they must stop this contradiction. the single market is a package with four individual —— indivisible freedoms, common rules and enforcement structures. you can't note these rules very well liked the back of its hand. it has contributed to define them over the last 44 years with a certain degree of influence. we took note of the uk decisions to end free movement of people and this means clearly that the uk will lose the benefits of the single market. this is a legal reality. the eu does not want to punish, once again, it simply draws
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the political consequence of the uk decision to take back control. on financial services, uk voices told us financial services, uk voices told us that brexit does not mean brexit. michel barnier speaking in the last far. theresa may is meeting members of her cabinet to discuss the so—called "divorce bill" that the eu is demanding when britain leaves the bloc. downing street has dismissed reports that mrs may could be ready to double her initial offer, which was thought to amount to about £18 billion. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. mrs may has already signalled that she is prepared to pay up to £18 billion in florence speech and there is speculation at westminster that that some could go north of £40
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billion if the uk is to get the eu to agree to move on to those crucial trade talks, and even some of the leading brexiteers in cabinet seem resigned to having to pay that none but is everyone happy? i'm joined by the conservative mp nigel evans. would you be happy that some? know and we need to know what we are paying for. we all know the brexit vehicle has dual controls, ourfocus is on the accelerator and theirs is on the break so it keeps stalling. what will it take for michel barnier to get his foot off the brake? we are making concession after concession, we have already offered a two—year transition, we made a concession on eu citizens living in the uk that we value them, and on northern ireland remade concessions,
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we wa nt northern ireland remade concessions, we want to see no hard border there. it is about time the eu came to us and said this is what we are looking for? this is something that could be in the interests of the eu and the uk to have a deal for the in the interests of the eu and the uk to have a dealfor the uk leaves in two years then has its transition period and it will be to the benefit of everyone, especially the journalists who were facing crisis at the moment, that they can still send £800,000 in german cars to the uk without tariffs. if ministers agreed to pay more, how will the public react? i want to see the money saved spent on british nurses, not brussels bureaucrats. the chancellor of the exchequer has limited scope for manoeuvre, he cannot afford to play santa claus to the eu. he needs to make sure we're
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only paying for what we are contracted for and for every pound he unnecessarily gives the eu is a pound not spent on british public services. if philip hammond ends up paying money for which there is no obligation, he is paying a ransom andi obligation, he is paying a ransom and i thought british governments did not pay ransom money. what happens if the eu says you won't give us the money, no deal? is that a price you are prepared to pay. unlike theresa may i think no deal is much better than a bad deal and when the eu have a £70 million surplus in trade with the uk, in whose interests is to come to a trade deal? ministers say we're a country that meet their obligations and if we go eu pensions and long—term projects, we will pay that
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evenif long—term projects, we will pay that even if it goes further than the £18 billion committed. we will pay an obligations. when i go to a restau ra nt obligations. when i go to a restaurant they give me a bill and on that bill is everything i have eaten and drunk that evening. i would find it ridiculous to leave the restaurant if they asked me to pay another £100. we will have obligations on pensions and then maybe projects we have already started and make last five or ten yea rs, started and make last five or ten yea rs , we started and make last five or ten years, we will have obligations but we will not pay ransom money to leave the eu. but if those obligations come to £40 billion, you are ok with that. i want to see a list, it has to be transparency. the last thing i see one to happen is that to get michel barnier‘s foot after the break we throw money at the eu. i rememberwhen after the break we throw money at the eu. i remember when we were told
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margaret thatcher would never get a re bate margaret thatcher would never get a rebate that she brought millions back to the uk and theresa may has to show that same steel. so you don't think we should offer more cash until the eu offers something on trade. we need to know what the money is for. i will not see taxpayers' money thrown at brussels so we can leave the eu, unless we owe that money it should not go to brussels. nigel evans, thank you for your time. usually sensitive area not just your time. usually sensitive area notjust on conservative backbenchers but also among the public if we end up paying a large divorce bill to leave the eu. more than a thousand people working for two eu agencies in london will find out later which countries they'll be moving to, following brexit. the decision will be taken at a meeting of ministers from the 27 remaining member states. 19 countries have applied to be the new home of the european medicines agency and eight have submitted applications to house the european banking authority.
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germany is on the cusp of a political crisis after talks on a new coalition government fell apart. eight weeks of negotiations following september's general election collapsed when a smaller party pulled out, leaving the future of the chancellor, angela merkel, in doubt. she will now hold crisis talks with the german president, who could call a new election. andrew plant reports. after three terms in office, angela merkel‘s hopes of staying in power rest on forming a coalition. an election in september left mrs merkel without a majority with some voters angered by germany's liberal policy towards refugees. translation: this is the day, at the very least, of deep thought about how things will proceed in germany. but i wish to tell you this, i, as chancellor, as acting chancellor, will do everything to ensure
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that this country is led well through these difficult weeks. to form a stable government, she needed to reach agreement with the free democrats and the greens. it would span from left to right on germany's political spectrum. but finding common ground has proved impossible. the leader of the free democrats saying the parties had no common vision for the country. translation: we will not abandon our voters for a policy with which we are not convinced. it is better not to govern than to govern badly. there are ways forward. negotiations could continue if mrs merkel can persuade the free democrats back to the table. without them, she could only form a minority coalition, something commentators say is highly unlikely which leaves the possibility of calling another general election. what's certain is the failure to form a coalition means
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angela merkel‘s position suddenly becomes much more uncertain after 12 years at the top of european politics. let's cross over to berlin and speak to our correspondent, damien mcguinness. this is an unprecedented situation. what happens next? right now angela merkel is talking to her party, the centre—right christian democrats, to see what party members want to happen, then she will meet the president because it depends what he wa nts to president because it depends what he wants to do, and together once they have talked and the president has given a statement we will be clearer about whether new elections will ta ke about whether new elections will take place. none of the various options we heard in the reports are good ones because if there are fresh
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elections it will take months before they are held, we could end up in a similar position because there could be difficult coalition talks which would be just as acrimonious as the ones in the past four weeks, or there is a minority government, that is seen as quite unstable because mrs merkel would have to decide to get agreement on a policy by policy basis, so that means she will have to try and talk to other political leaders and they will all have to come up with creative solutions to one that germany reaches a stable government because this is the largest and most powerful country in europe and with the eu facing numerous crises right now and having to make decisions about reforms, it is crucial that germany is economically and politically stable. what could this mean for brexit?”
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don't know if it means much for brexit directly because all parties agree on brexit, there is no difference in opinion there but it means there is a certain amount of political uncertainty in germany that so far germany has already been behind brussels and any attempts by british politicians to negotiate with berlin had been rejected anyway because berlin brett ferres everything to brussels, so directly the run up the impact but there may bea the run up the impact but there may be a wider impact because instability in germany does not mean things aren't going well in the eu in general. the owner of british gas, centrica, has announced it will scrap standard gas and electricity tariffs for new customers. it says this is part of a series of measures which will be significantly more effective than the government's proposed cap on energy bills. the managing director of home
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products and services at three is here. do you welcome this move? the devil is in the detail, it will all be about the prices of these tariffs and how well the british customers engaged with the new tariff. this only goes to new customers, they will contact existing customers but they need them to engage in the market and that is something they may not have done for a number of yea rs may not have done for a number of years so for 5 million customers on the standard tariff, we need to see they moved off and engage with the market and switch either to another british gas tariff or to another supplier as there are a lot of cheaper deals. it is a fixed rate
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deal always a better and cheaper option than a standard variable? deal always a better and cheaper option than a standard variable7m can move around but at the minute a lot of the prices you see at switching sides are generally fixed ta riffs switching sides are generally fixed tariffs deals, so you are signed in for a period. i tariffs deals, so you are signed in fora period. ithink tariffs deals, so you are signed in for a period. i think british gas are trying to say they want a period of time where you are actively prompted to think about switching your energy deal, they say the evergreen nature of standard verbal has meant less incentive for customers and also suppliers to prompt their customers to think about whether they are paying the right price for their energy, so that it right price for their energy, so thatitis right price for their energy, so that it is a good move, the fact customers will have to think about it should mean there is more switching around which increases competition and everyone should benefit, but i say should. would there be anything to stop british gas or other suppliers making their
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fixed rate deals more expensive? know, and even a price cap will not affect the price of fixed tariff deals. any parent, whether it is called a standard tariff or not, the new price cap should extend to those tyra nts, new price cap should extend to those tyrants, so it should mean more customers are prompted to think about their energy and should consider it and you would hopefully see more people switching, which means more competition, so even those who don't switch should feel the benefit of prices. british gas say they need to focus on efficiency and the more energy companies can do to lower their costs, and this should lead through two prices, we need to see that happen. you explain it well but it still sounds incredibly complicated. it is complicated and energy is something that we don't really want to think
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about, we just wanted to be there and there is a balance to be struck between constantly thinking about switching suppliers and making sure you get a good deal, so fixed ta riffs you get a good deal, so fixed tariffs can help in bad because they are there for a period of time, you receive a prompt which we all need because it is not something we all worry about but if you get a letter or e—mail to say you need to think about it, you can you can ring up your supplier. 0ur switching site has a phone line where you can discuss the whole of the market and that is free. there are options available it is not all just online but suppliers will cater
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for those that need a bit of handholding. it isn't us, graded as people think and their safety nets in place, because it is the energy market and it is essential. so generally, things don't go wrong as much as people think they would so we would urge people, whoever you are with, to have a look and think about switching. good. to you. thank you so much. let's catch up with the weather. fairly changeable weather as we see weather fronts moving in fairly changeable weather as we see weatherfronts moving in off fairly changeable weather as we see weather fronts moving in off the atlantic. some outbreaks of rain working east, becoming increasingly patchy into the afternoon in the north. there will be a few breaks cloud, particularly in the east, and temperatures just breaking out into double figures in the south, around 13 celsius. do this evening and overnight we will start to see our next weather front pushing north and east it up there will be heavy bursts and a bit of mist and burke
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overnight. temperatures in the south staying in double figures, overnight lows in the north could reach freezing. tomorrow will start fairly wet in the far north of scotland. we will see an ex—weatherford pushing in from the west and it will bring outbreaks of rain for northern ireland in south—west scotland, wales and south—west england as we move through the day. further east, fairly cloudy. temperatures at a maximum of 14, breezy tomorrow, as well. this is bbc newsroom live. our latest headlines... the deadline passes for robert mugabe to stand down as zimba bwe's president. so far there is no sign of him relinquishing power. the notorious us cult leader charles manson has died in prison aged 83. his followers were behind a string of brutal murders in the 1960s. theresa may is to chair a meeting of some
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of her senior ministers to try to make progress on stalled eu talks. they are expected to discuss how much the uk should offer to pay the eu to settle its bill as it leaves. talks on forming a coalition government in germany have collapsed, leaving angela merkel facing her biggest challenge in 12 years as chancellor. the country's president could call fresh elections. and months of high temperatures and virtually no rain has caused drought in portugal. we'll find out what this means for the portugal's population of bees. sports news now withjessica, and some very sad tennis news. it's been confirmed that the former wimbledon champion jana novotna has died after a long battle with cancer. she was 49. novotna won 17 grand slam titles during her career, including wimbledon in 1998. but it was her tears after her loss in the final in 1993 that endeared her to the british public.
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here's our tennis correspondent russell fuller. i think ithink in i think in many ways, that's going to be the abiding memory ofjana novotna amongst british fans, the emotion she was prepared to share, could maybe help but share, after losing the wimbledon final to steffi g raf losing the wimbledon final to steffi graf in 1993. it was jana novotna's first wimbledon final, the great steffi g raf first wimbledon final, the great steffi graf was her opponent novotna was the winning position but steffi g raf was the winning position but steffi graf came back and she received her runner—up trophy from the duchess of kent, who quite literally provided her with a shoulder to cry on. she was back in the final four years later, losing to martina hingis, and the duchess of kent benn said to her, "if you come back and make the finalagain, i'm sure her, "if you come back and make the final again, i'm sure it will be a case of third time lucky," and so it proved because she came back in 1998 and this time she was victorious. she won a wimbledon singles fight. those titles were just as singles
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level. she was a wonderful doubles player as well and won a number of doubles titles, 76 in total, 16 grand slams, and she was a very athletic player and won book competition for the czech republic, and won 0lympic medals in singles and won 0lympic medals in singles and doubles and was number one in the world in doubles, number two in singles, and we have the privilege of sharing a commentary box with her at wimbledon in recent years and she is never ostentatious in her delivery but you could see her passion for the sport, her love of the game, the way players conducted the game, the way players conducted the points. that really shone through. tony pulis has this morning been sacked as west brom head coach. pulis leaves the hawthorns with the club just a point above the relegation zone and without a win in ten top—flight games. albion were beaten 4—0 at home by chelsea on saturday. 0ur reporter simon stonejoins me now. with the club's owners
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watching that defeat, was there a sense of inevitability about today's decision? i certainly think this morning's announcement will come as no surprise to anybody who has had a connection with west brom or anybody who was at the hawthorns on saturday. huw lewis has got a reputation for being a results man. —— tony pulis. he has three points from 21 league games, has the lowest percentage possession, has the lowest number of shots. all this body of evidence has stacked up. the fa ns body of evidence has stacked up. the fans booed him, those that were left at the end of the game, on saturday as you rightly say, the ambitious chinese owner was making a rare visit to the hawthorns, his first since the opening day of the season, which cannot have gone unnoticed, and there was only one outcome after saturday's game. thank you for
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joining us and bringing us up to date. sussex have appointed jason gillespie as their new head coach. the former australia fast bowler, who coached yorkshire to the county championship title in 2014 and 2015, has agreed an initial three—year deal at hove. gillespie spent time on the coaching staff at kent last season and will take up his role in early 2018. that's all the sport for now but i will have more for you in the next hour. we will see you then. many thanks. let's get more now on our main story, and a deadline set by zimbabwe's ruling party for robert mugabe to stand down as president has expired. zanu pf has warned they will bring impeachment proceedings against him because of his failure to quit. so what happens now, and how will this leave zimbabwe on the world stage? let's speak to dr knox chitiyo, from the international foreign affairs think tank chatham house. he's an associate fellow at its africa programme. thank you for coming in. to us.
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let's sta nd thank you for coming in. to us. let's stand back for a moment and look at the last few days. can you tell us why they matter? how significant is what has happened in zimbabwe? it is momentous and i don't say that lightly, because not everything is momentous but this is momentous, because what we have is a national convergence for perhaps the first time since 1980. you've got people of all races, all parties are agreed for now, there is a social convergence as well, and people are agreed around that one theme that the president needs to step down. but it is a very fragile moment because their natural fault lines across zimbabwe, economically, politically. so there is a real urgency for this foreclosure to come sooner rather than later because the longer this is stretched out the
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more volatile becomes. at the moment, robert mugabe is showing no signs of stepping down so what happens to him next? a number of things are happening simultaneously. the dialogue between the president and the military is continuing. the parliament will sit to impeach him, although that may be slightly bureaucratic process because of impeachment have to be done. the regional organisation, of which mugabe is a member, is meeting tomorrow, and they are going to meet because they see this as a real crisis. so a number of things are happening at various levels but i think the real pressure now is on president mugabe to step down as soon as possible, because it is very fragile and there are going to be street demonstrations, and people are trending that they are going to stay on the streets until he goes, but it could become a very volatile
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situation. if he is impeached, what would he be impeached for? well, people may lay various charges against him on various things but, essentially, part of the impeachment process will be because he has been told by his own party, by parliament, to go and he is not going. that is part of the reason that they will impeach him because he is defying the party and the legislature. so you think he will go... ...itis legislature. so you think he will go... it is impossible to say how this will go but that is the preferred option of the military. they didn't want to be seen, especially yesterday, to say to him in full force yesterday, "you must go now," but they will be ramping up the pressure on him to resign and do a resignation speech in the near future. does the opposition play a significant role in this as well? in
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terms of the parliamentary impeachment process, the opposition will certainly play a part because this will be one immense moment in which all the parties will agree on the impeachment process, and when we have the next president coming in the hope is that it will be an inclusive government which may include the opposition at some level. let's end by going back to the beginning, if you like. i asked you how significant this was. you said for zimbabwe it is momentous. what about on the world stage? what does this mean for zimbabwe there? it is very important globally. zimbabwe in many ways is the gateway to southern africa and this whole process of the president departing, if it is done in a peaceful way, i think it holds a zimbabwe in a higher light. he has also been, for all his flaws and for what he has achieved, he has been an icon of pan
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african is. that is coming to an end. i have really enjoyed talking to you. thank you so much. women are being advised to sleep on their side in the last three months of pregnancy to avoid having a stillborn baby. a study ofjust over 1,000 women found the risk doubled if women slept on their backs in the third trimester. ali fortescue reports. i knew something was wrong. i woke up in the morning and ijust knew something was wrong. and we went to the hospital and when they couldn't find the heartbeat, they nipped off to go and find a doctor, i knew that there was something not quite right. lots of cards. these are his footprints. grace lost baby louis at 35 weeks. she still doesn't know what caused her stillbirth. he was so tiny, he was just perfectly formed. he had a beautiful upper lip. and i think you always think about the what—ifs, what if i did this differently, why has this happened, what have i done wrong?
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a lot of guilt. just sadness beyond anything that i have ever experienced. grace says she was never given any advice on sleep positions when she was pregnant. she's one of around 1,000 women to have taken part in the midlands and north of england stillbirth study, which is the largest of its kind. it found that one in 225 pregnancies in the uk ended in stillbirth. that's around 11 babies a day. it also found that the risk of stillbirth drops by nearly 4% if women sleep on their side in the third trimester, which could save around 130 lives a year in the uk. # there were two in the bed, then the little one said, "roll over". the study comes alongside a charity campaign. the advice is simple, sleeping on your side could halve the risk of a stillbirth.
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you might end up in all sorts of positions when asleep, but the important thing to remember is to start on your side. it's hard to know for sure but it's thought when you lie on your back you could be putting weight on important blood vessels and restrict the flow of blood to the baby. research has shown that the number of stillbirths in the uk has gone down, but the figures here are still high and above those in many other high—income countries. we want to be one of the best countries in the world and one of the safest places to have a baby. so there's lots of work to do. and, actually, this study will contribute to that, because it has given us some simple advice to give to women to cut the risk of having a stillbirth. grace has now started a new chapter. nine months ago, reuben joined the family. hearing the baby cry in the delivery room was just amazing. she'll never know what would have happened if she'd had this advice, but grace hopes her story and her part in the study can save lives. specialist underwater rescue
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equipment has arrived in argentina from the united states to help for the search for a missing submarine. it disappeared five days ago in the south atlantic with portable crew on board. five countries are now involved in the rescue mission. months of high temperatures and virtually no rain has caused drought in spain and portugal. more than 80% of portugal is officially classified as enduring "severe" or "extreme" drought. now there are concerns for the country's population of bees — which are crucial to pollinating crops. georgina smyth reports. beekeeping is serious business. this man's 600 times should be brilliant 800 tonnes of money each year but portugal has suffered its driest weather for more than 20 years — so bad, in fact,
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weather for more than 20 years — so bad, infact, it weather for more than 20 years — so bad, in fact, it went far fewer flowers a nd bad, in fact, it went far fewer flowers and so less food for the bees, causing the honey yield here to crash to a quarter, just two tonnes this year. translation: to crash to a quarter, just two tonnes this year. translatiosz was a bad year because we had a very dry spring and hot summer and after three months the bees could not collect a ny three months the bees could not collect any pollen. it has been very wea k collect any pollen. it has been very weak for beekeepers. the lack of food means beekeepers have to buy in pollen substitutes. he needed a whole tonne just to keep his hives alive. it is the same story across the country. translation: spring this year didn't have humility to give enough metaphor bees to produce honey. after prolonged drought, late spring and forest fires, production decreased 80 present. honeybee population worldwide has been in serious decline due to pesticides, parasites, changing climates and loss of habitat. in portugal, every
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pa rt loss of habitat. in portugal, every part of the agricultural industry has been affected but, for beekeepers the driest weather for two decades has pushed their colonies almost to collapse. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live... mps from zimba bwe's mps from zimbabwe's governing zanu pf movement have been summoned to discuss impeaching president robert mugabe after his refusal to step down. charles manson — the us cult leader who sent his followers to commit a string of brutal murders — has died in prison aged 83. german chancellor angela merkel is meeting the country's president, amid doubts over herfuture following the collapse of coalition talks. the business news now. centrica, the owner of british gas,
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confirmed this morning that it will bring to an end the standard variable tariff for new customers. that's the tariff that energy suppliers force on customers when they don't opt for a specific fixed—term deal, and it's the tariff that the government has said it will put a cap on. there's a draft bill published this morning that should stop companies signing up bogus self—employed labour to cut costs. and it will propose that their employees should be called "workers by default" — that is they should automatically enjoy basic safety standards and benefits. theresa may is meeting key cabinet ministers to discuss britain's offer to the european union for the so—called "divorce bill" brussels insists is needed to unlock trade talks. chancellor philip hammond told bbc 0ne's andrew marr show they were "starting to unblock that logjam". so, centrica — it owns british gas — has said it will scrap its standard gas and electricity tariffs, or standard variable tariffs — for new customers. these are the tariffs that have come
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in for a lot of criticism. the compare service uswitch said a few months ago seven out ten customers are on these svts and they are overpaying by up to £288 a year each. worse, half of them don't even realise they're on an svt. then the government said it was going to put a cap on how much svts could charge. we asked the chief executive of centrica at whether customers now on average would be better off. yes, we believe so. we believe better offers, is continuing to drive our costs down, the government looking at some of the costs in the bill, which i recognise is a very difficult subject... all of this, i believe, and we believe will give a fairer, better, more competitive dealfor fairer, better, more competitive deal for customers fairer, better, more competitive dealfor customers and fairer, better, more competitive deal for customers and better deals ultimately. that was centrica's chief executive iain conn.
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i mentioned a moment ago uswitch, the energy analysts. do you think consumers are going to be better off because of this on average? british gas are the fourth supplier to make this announcement and what it should do is trigger people to compere across the market at the point they are coming off a fixed term deal and so that should be positive because it should be encouraging people to make an active choice about their bill and that has positive effects for competition, which means prices should come down for everybody. but at the end of the day, that still needs to apply to british gas on the other suppliers making these announcements, and they need to respond with better prices for consumers. is this move going to ta ke consumers. is this move going to take away the default option, the fa ct take away the default option, the fact that a tariff which everybody just falls into? it will certainly doa just falls into? it will certainly do a lot to move away from the currently... there are now 60 present of customer sitting on those
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default tariffs and that is really important because they average about £300 more expensive than the cheapest deal at the market and so customers who are sitting on those deals are paying far too much for the energy and so the thing that is really going to make that difference is people engaging, taking a moment to check what the best deal for them is and voting with their feet if they are not getting it. the all argument is all was being from a gobbi's point of view, if you take away these high tariffs, you are going to spread the load. —— the argument has always been from the company's argument has always been from the compa ny‘s point of argument has always been from the company's point of view... argument has always been from the company's point of view. .. the intention is to really get people switching and it is that fear that customers are going to move and leave that means that energy suppliers have got much more incentive to keep prices down for customers. and we've seen some really good positive moves in this direction. 600,000 people switched just last month, which brought the total for the year just last month, which brought the
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totalfor the year up just last month, which brought the total for the year up to 4.5 million, which is bigger than the total amount of switches in 2014, so all of these effects force energy suppliers to offer better deals to their customers. but in a way, that doesn't answer the point because they are not going to lose money, are they? they all was going to put up are they? they all was going to put up their rates in order to cover their costs and make a good margin. so in their costs and make a good margin. soina their costs and make a good margin. so in a way, you are never going to get away from the fact they are going to be putting up their tariffs. it is unfortunately the case that these are companies that do make profit and so that is something that we can't get away from. however, the effect of people comparing across the market will do more than anything else to bring down prices for customers. thank you very much indeed. a quick look at the market... they have recovered a bit. not worried about the breakdown of negotiations between angela merkel and her partners in germany, but it has
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upset the market is a bit but they have recovered. centrica has recovered. the pound is looking quite strong against the euro, the row weakening, with worries about the political situation in germany. —— the the political situation in germany. -- the eu the political situation in germany. —— the eu row weakening. aquino duke of edinburgh are celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary. —— the queen and duke of edinburgh. they will celebrate privately with family and friends at windsor this evening, as our royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. in the gloom of post—war britain, their marriage was, in the words of winston churchill, a flash of colour. he was the dashing naval officer, she the future queen. in the 70 years since, theirs has proved to be a relationship which has truly stood the test of time. it's worked because their
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personalities and their characters complement one another. they're quite different, in many ways, but prince philip is the first to make the queen laugh uproariously, and is probably the only person who can also tell her to shut up. pictured in 1939, 18—year—old philip first caught princess elizabeth's eye on a visit to dartmouth naval college. it was the beginning of a friendship which grew into a lifelong partnership. the queen has referred to him as her strength and stay. the duke remarked that tolerance is essential to any happy marriage, and the queen, he added, has that quality in abundance. 70 years after the royal couple exchanged their vows here, the bells of westminster abbey will peal for more than three hours in their honour. these images have been released by the palace to mark the couple's milestone anniversary. the queen and prince philip will celebrate at a private party at windsor castle this evening. the headlines are coming up
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on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with a look at the weather and here is lucy whipp forecast. some fairly changeable weather as we move through this week. we will see a series of low pressure systems and weather fronts moving in a series of low pressure systems and weatherfronts moving in off a series of low pressure systems and weather fronts moving in off the atlantic, so there will be spells of at times. the breeze will pick up as well but as we move through today we are going to start to drag in some milder air. just the far north of scotla nd milder air. just the far north of scotland staying in the cooler air. here is the radar and satellite from earlier. fairly cloudy, some outbreaks of rain across scotland in particular. as we go through this afternoon it will become increasingly patchy across scotland and northern england. there will be some breaks in the cloud, particularly in the high ground, so that the north—east of wales, the midlands and north east england. through rush hour tonight, it will
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be fairly murky across scotland, plenty of cloud and patchy outbreaks of rain and drizzle. temperatures in the single... up a single figures. a fairamount of the single... up a single figures. a fair amount of cloud and patchy outbreaks of rain from northern ireland into northern england, highs of 11 in york. some breaks in the cloud in the midlands, 12 in london, just starting to see less whether weather front portion to the south of wales. south—westerly breeze in plymouth. tonight, some outbreaks of rain in the north west of scotland and we will see our next weather front working north and east. there will be heavy bursts across northern ireland into southern scotland and northern england into the early hours. temperatures are mist out saying in —— south staying in double figures. a wet start in the north, some outbreaks of rain pushing north and east. we will see our next weather from putting and east. we will see our next weatherfrom putting into northern ireland and then into the west of
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south—west scotland and wales, south—west scotland and wales, south—west england. to the east, more cloud and there will be breaks in that, highs of around 14. the wind is picking up. the next weather front is waiting as we move into weapons stay and will bring some outbreaks of rain. you conceive the isa buyers quite tightly packed, so another windy day as we move into weapons stay. particularly heavy bursts of rain for parts of northern england and for cumbria, across the pennines, particularly heavy. quite heavy showers for the south—west of england but temperatures creeping up a touch further, a maximum of 15. as we move through this week, we are looking at milder temperatures. there will be outbreaks of rain at times and the wind will start to pick up. so fairly changeable as we move through the next few days, temperatures creeping up today. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday: fresh protests in zimbabwe as moose
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begins to impeach president robert mugabe following his refusal to step down. the eu's chief brexit negotiator says an ambitious free trade deal with britain is on the table — but only if the uk meets its conditions. charles manson, the us cult leader who sent his followers to commit a string of brutal murders, has died in prison aged 83. german chancellor angela merkel is meeting the country's president after the collapse of coalition talks has thrown her future into doubt. also this hour, celebrating their platinum wedding anniversary — the queen and prince philip married in westminster abbey 70 years ago today. the bells are set to ring out in commemoration. and tributes to the former wimbledon champion jana novotna, who has died of cancer at the age of 49. a very good afternoon. i'm rebecca
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jones and welcome to bbc newsroom life. zimba bwe's jones and welcome to bbc newsroom life. zimbabwe's ruling party zanu—pf is set to meet to discuss impeaching president robert mugabe. let's get the latest from ben brown. there was shock and disbelief when president mugabe made that televised address and did not resign. many people expected him to leave office after a ll people expected him to leave office after all the pressure he had been
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underfrom the after all the pressure he had been under from the army, from the party zanu—pf who had sacked him as leader and from the people who had demonstrated in tens of thousands, but now the latest deadline for him to resign has come and gone to war is ago, he has still not resigned and it looks inevitable there will be impeachment proceedings in parliament. it would need a two thirds majority to impeach. meanwhile the war veterans who fought alongside robert mugabe in the war of liberation, their leader chris mutsvangwa has said there must be an impeachment and he said after 37 years in office mr mugabe cannot stay for another 37 seconds. we are saying, mugabe, go now. go now, mugabe, go now, go now. yourtime is up. please, leave state house and let the country start on a new page. you should have the dignity and decency to spare the country further turmoil by simply announcing your
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departure immediately. if he can't, and this is the call which we doing, we are repeating it again, and i'm glad you also disagree with the message when we came here on thursday last week, we are bringing back the people of zimbabwe to the streets. that is the leader of the war vetera ns that is the leader of the war veterans in harare. there have been more demonstrations today, students at the university in harare have been protesting against mr mugabe and a big demonstration is called for tomorrow. 0n and a big demonstration is called for tomorrow. on saturday we saw tens of thousands on the streets and war vetera ns tens of thousands on the streets and war vete ra ns say tens of thousands on the streets and war veterans say they will be an even bigger demonstration tomorrow. i've been talking one activist, dudu nyirongo, who said she was heartbroken by mr mugabe's failure to resign. i'm on the streets until he goes out.
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i cannot do anything else, i need to see him go, so we are in the streets today and sitting in african unity square until he goes. there is no other option. when you saw that speech last night on tv, how disappointed and angry were you that he barely mentioned all the pressure on him to go, never mentioned the demonstrations or the fact that people were against him in harare? yesterday before the speech i was ready to celebrate and then when i heard the speech i was disappointed. it was heartbreaking. i was actually in tears. it was heartbreaking. we expected him to resign, expected him to step down, to do the right thing and he said nothing. isn't that classic robert mugabe in a sense? that is classic robert mugabe. his sole ambition was to have power from the beginning.
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he got that power that is so dear to him and he wants to hold onto it for ever and it was expected of him. that was dudu nyirongo, an activist in harare. we will now speak to someone from human rights watch, a zimbabwean who is injohannesburg at the moment. perhaps you would give us the moment. perhaps you would give us your reaction as a zimbabwean to that speech from robert mugabe and also the fact this deadline has passed without him resigning. that was classic robert mugabe speaking last night, this is what we have become accustomed to in the last 37 yea rs. become accustomed to in the last 37 years. i did not expect them to resign, first because there was a lot of speculative news around the
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announcement, and secondly because i knew he would want to go out on his own terms, want to claw back from this difficulty he finds himself in. he has advantages in this discussion in that constitutionally he has to bring back emmerson mnangagwa and then step down if emmerson mnangagwa is to succeed him, so that talk in his speech last night that he is looking forward to the congress of zanu—pf next month and he is calling on all zimbabweans to come to work together and look forward to this agricultural season, that is vintage mugabe. it will take a while to get toa mugabe. it will take a while to get to a point worth the leaves and the generals know they need him and so are not pushing too hard. do you think there will be an impeachment process , think there will be an impeachment process, and if so will it push him out? the impeachment process will be
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difficult in the sense that there are some members of parliament is zanu—pf who remained loyal to mugabe and to the so—called g 40 faction which is wife grace was leading, and so it is unlikely that zanu—pf could command the required two thirds majority of the total membership of the two houses of parliament, and the two houses of parliament, and the mdc and opposition groups are now beginning to see that this military project is not about the people of zimbabwe but simply about the internal factional fights within zanu—pf and so they are likely to step back and refuse to vote for zanu—pf to remove mugabe, strange as it might seem. let me ask you about the man everyone assumes would take over if and when robert mugabe leaves, emmerson mnangagwa. he is
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the favoured candidate of the military but you are from human rights watch and he has a questionable human rights record in zimbabwe. absolutely, he has a terrible human rights record, he has been mugabe's enforcer, complicit in all the human rights abuses going back to the 1980s and also the widespread electoral violence of 2008 which was orchestrated by mugabe, as well as the violence ta keover mugabe, as well as the violence takeover in the east of the country, so this is no saint who was coming on board. this is one of the military guys who was with mugabe and is no different. him and mugabe are cut from the same cloth when it comes to human rights abuses. very
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good to talk to you, thank you for being with us from johannesburg. if that impeachment process does get under way it would need a two thirds majority in the two houses of the parliament. according to the zimbabwean constitution, section 97 says the president can be impeached if the parliament finds that he is physically or mentally incapacitated or has committed a serious dereliction of duty, those are the main categories by richie can be impeached, but all that looks far from certain and even if he is impeached, some mps tell us it could ta ke impeached, some mps tell us it could take weeks or months, so for now president mugabe is still president of this country, the oldest head of state in world at 93 and bizarrely he is still under house arrest. that is it from harare. theresa may meets members of her cabinet today to discuss the so—called "divorce bill" that eu leaders insist must be
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resolved before the talks can move onto trade. speaking in brussels this morning, the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier said the eu is ready to offer the uk "its most ambitious" free trade deal if the two sides can agree what he called an orderly withdrawal. those who claim that the uk could cherry—pick parts of the single market, they must stop this contradiction. the single market is a package with four indivisible freedoms, common rules, institutions and enforcement structures. the uk knows these rules very well, like the back of its hand. it has contributed to defining them over the last 44 years with a certain degree of influence. we took note of the uk decision
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to end free movement of people and this means clearly that the uk will lose the benefits of the single market. this is a legal reality. the eu does not want to punish, once again, it simply draws the political consequence of the uk decision to take back control. 0n financial services, uk voices told us that brexit does not mean brexit. brexit means brexit. that was michel barnier speaking this morning. let's get more on this from our
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brussels reporter, adam fleming. tell us a bit more about what michel barnier has been saying. first, you might be struck that that is the most english you may have heard michel barnier speak. normally he speaks in french and then when he wa nts to speaks in french and then when he wants to put a message to the uk he doesin wants to put a message to the uk he does in english but this whole speech an english. the first thing he was doing here was criticising some of the things he has heard coming from the uk and that was exemplified when he talked about financial services. michel barnier has seen and heard people like david davis and other supporters of brexit saying that financial services are so big that it's in everyone's interest for uk financial terms to
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have the same access to the eu that they have now, using that technical jargon of an eu passport. mr barnier says brexit means that is no longer possible and he is saying to london that they need to wise up about what is achievable for financial services. then he went into the more philosophical mode, talking about the future partnership between the eu and the uk, so he is starting to think about face two brexit talks, and he says the uk has to answer the question, does it want to stick to the eu model of rules or doesn't wa nt to the eu model of rules or doesn't want to diverge and do trade in a different way, and he said the bigger the divergence, the harder to sell that partnership agreement in the parliaments in other member states of the eu who will have to ratify it in the next few years, but
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having said that, he said if the uk can answer those questions and sort out the divorce issues he has put on the table, the eu will offer sophisticated free trade agreement to the uk. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. it is interesting, norman, michel barnier has made these comments on the dates theresa may is meeting her cabinet colleagues to do discuss the brexit divorce bill. the consensus at westminster is that when this brexit subcommittee meets later today, they will agree they have to stump up more cash beyond the £18 billion announced by mrs may in her florence speech, money which is needed to get the eu to move on to the next stage of trade talks, but already there are signs of growing unhappiness among many brexit supporting mps at the suggestion we could end up paying even more than
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£40 billion to meet all our liabilities to leave the eu, and earlier i spoke to the former brexit ministered david jones and i asked whether he would be ok with paying a sum like 40 billion. there would be great concern if the methodology of working out this figure were not explained and i would hope if the government is considering an additional payment, it explains how the sums are calculated and second we can be assured the eu would talk to us about future trade because in the absence of that it would be dangerous to do because the eu might just want to park the advantage of having the sum offered and then say we will still want to talk about citizens rights and the ireland border and a host of things before we get to the nub of the issue, our future trading relationship. so we could end up paying more? that is
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the danger, i'm sure the government is aware of this danger and i'm sure whatever offer it makes will be coached in big language, so that is a danger. how do you sell this to a public which was told we would get back £350 million to the nhs but we seem to be paying billions to the eu? that is why the methodology has to be set out, the prime minister said we would fulfil our obligations to you eu until the end of this financial framework but we seem to have something that goes beyond that and so the country and many conservative backbenchers will want to know how that sam was calculated. we was told this money would be for things like eu pensions and long—term projects. if we signed on the dotted line while we were a member, surely we still have to pay those doubts. that depends because
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the pension debts by the death of the pension debts by the death of the eu, not the uk. we already said we will maintain contributions until the end of this financial framework but this appears to go beyond that, so but this appears to go beyond that, so people will want to scrutinise this. do you think we should say we are offering £18 billion but that is it? we ought to say to the eu, you are not negotiating with us about the future trading agreement. we now believe you were kicking the calm down the road, we have little time left to put in place customs arrangements and so we should say we will suspend negotiations with you until such time you will talk to us seriously about that future arrangement. how quickly should we do that? the december council is the crunch time when the government
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should make its position clear. the eu have prevaricated, we have been more than generous and patient and now is the time for the eu to set out what its position is. adding to mrs may's difficulties are notjust the concerns are backbenchers like david jones but having to sell this to the public, all in a tight time frame because we note the eu want to move on to making a decision about whether to progress to trade talks, probably by the beginning of next month, and on top of that mr barnier this morning flagged up northern ireland as another sticking point around the issue of a hard border, saying its solutions were to be flown to the danger of a hard border, it had to come from the british government, saying to mrs may, it is up to you to provide a solution to the hard border
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scenario. norman, thank you. the headlines... mps from zimba bwe's the headlines... mps from zimbabwe's governing zanu—pf movement have been summoned to discuss the impeachment of robert mugabe after his refusal to step down. the eu's chief brexit negotiator says an ambitious free trade deal with britain is on the table — but only if the uk meets its conditions. charles manson, the us cult leader who sent his followers to commit a string of brutal murders, has died in prison aged 83. let's get the sports news now, and some very sad tennis news. it has been confirmed that the former wimbledon champion yelena novotna has died after a long battle with cancer. she won 17 grand slam
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titles including at wimbledon but it was her tears after her loss in the final that endeared her to the british public. in many ways that will be the abiding memory of young novotna among british brands, the emotion she was prepared to share. she couldn't help but share after losing to steffi graf in 1983. the great steffi g raf losing to steffi graf in 1983. the great steffi graf was her opponent. as she received her runners—up trophy from the duchess of kent, the duchess literally provided her with a shoulder to cry on. she was back in the finalfour years a shoulder to cry on. she was back in the final four years later, losing to martina hingis, and the duchess of kent said if you make the final again duchess of kent said if you make the finalagain i'm sure duchess of kent said if you make the final again i'm sure it will be third time lucky and so it proved the she came back in 1998 and this time novotna was victorious. those
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titles for just a singles level. time novotna was victorious. those titles forjust a singles level. she was a wonderful doubles player, winning a number of doubles titles, 16 grand slam doubles titles. she was a serve volley, a very athletic player, she won the fed cup team competition for her country, she won 0lympic medals in singles and doubles, she was number one in the world in doubles, number two in singles and we had the privilege of sharing a commentary box with at wimbledon and she was never ostentatious in her delivery but you could see her love the way the players conducted the points and that really shone through. tony pulis has been sacked as west brom head coach. pulis leaves the hawthorns with the club just a point above the relegation zone and without a win in ten top—flight games.
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albion were thrashed 4—0 at home by chelsea on saturday. gary megson has been placed in temporary charge. sussex have appointed jason gillespie as their new head coach. the former australia fast bowler, who led yorkshire to the county championship title in 2014 and 2015, has agreed an initial three—year deal at hove. gillespie spent time on the coaching staff at kent last season, and will take up his role in early 2018. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. jess, thank you. germany's president is to make a statement this afternoon about the country's political crisis after coalition negotiations to form a new government collapsed last night. angela merkel‘s centre—right christian democrats blamed other parties for falling out of talks. the president has the power to call snap elections. 0ur correspondent in berlin damien mcguinness said mrs merkel is now involved
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in crucial talks with her party colleagues. right now angela merkel is talking to her party, the centre—right christian democrats, to see what party members want to happen, then she will meet the president because it depends what he wants to do, and together once they have talked and the president has given a statement we will be clearer about whether new elections will take place. none of the various options we heard in the reports are good ones because if there are fresh elections it will take months before they are held, we could end up in a similar position because there could be difficult coalition talks which could be just as acrimonious as the ones in the past four weeks, or if there is a minority government, that is seen as quite unstable because mrs merkel would have to decide to get agreement on a policy by policy basis,
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so that means she will have to try and talk to other political leaders and they will all have to come up with creative solutions to ensure that germany reaches a stable government because this is the largest and most powerful country in europe and with the eu facing numerous crises right now and having to make decisions about reforms, it is crucial that germany is economically and politically stable. what could this mean for brexit? i don't know if it means much for brexit directly because all parties agree on brexit, there is no difference in opinion there but it means there is a certain amount of political uncertainty in germany but so far germany has already been behind brussels and any attempts by british politicians to negotiate with berlin had been rejected anyway because berlin refers
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everything to brussels, so directly there will not be impact but there may be a wider impact because instability in germany does not mean things are going well in the eu in general. let's get more now on the political situation in zimbabwe, as the country's president robert mugabe has ignored a deadline to quit as head of state. his former party are preparing to meet to discuss his potential impeachment. our world affairs editor, john simpson, is in our 0xford studio. john, what do you expect to happen to robert mugabe in the coming days? i think what he's doing is trying to work out a future, presumably not a very long future but for himself and his wife grace. i think he's
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determined if he can not to be sent into exile but to live in one of his many properties. he and grace have both amassed quite a few, both in harare and the countryside outside, andi harare and the countryside outside, and i think this is all about negotiating with the different groups and there are three different groups, there is the army, there is zanu—pf, his party, but there's the wider society in zimbabwe. i think he is being quite clever in how he's playing one side against another, thatis playing one side against another, that is what he has always done in his career and even at the age of 93 when he can't quite get the pieces right in his speech, he still at it. what in your view happens in the
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next few days? we can be pretty certain that the impeachment process will be started off tomorrow because thatis will be started off tomorrow because that is part of the pressure on mugabe to force him out. i think at the same time we will see him being prepared to give ground. the ground he has entirely created, typical of him, is the business of whether he should preside over next month's party congress, the zanu—pf congress. he said he would in the speech and he made it clear that was an important thing. i think he's using that to say to all his various critics and enemies, and remember these are people who were slavish to him untiljust a few weeks ago, he
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is saying to them, here's something, you have to give me something if i'm going to give you something and not preside over the zanu—pf congress. if this transfer of power goes ahead, how confident are you that it will be peaceful? you have to remember that contrary to whatjust about everybody everywhere thanks, zimbabwe is a very peaceable country. there are people who were not peaceable, as we have seen, some pretty horrendous types that have taken over white farms, for instance, ina taken over white farms, for instance, in a brutal way, taken over white farms, for instance, in a brutalway, but basically zimbabwe is a peaceable country and people want to have, i think everybody wants a government they can respect and a better economy, and while those are the
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games, i think really people like emmerson mnangagwa has got all the cards in his hand. the one card he's missing is for mugabe simply to say all right, i'm out of here, i see your point and i'll go quietly. john, good to hear your thoughts and insights. thank you. let's catch up with all the weather news and on the other side of the newsroom, ben has the forecast. you will have noticed that changed in the feel of the weather, much milder but more cloud and rain, and that will continue although the rain will turn light and patchy, then ten night it stays cloudy, the wind feeding the cloud and rain in our direction, some heavy rain for northern ireland, northern england
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and southern scotland, and these are your overnight temperatures, 12 the overnight low in the west, still some cold air across northern isles. for much of scotland tomorrow will get off to a very wet start, heavy rests of rain, another band swinging in from the west, central and eastern areas mostly dry, that's where we are most likely to see any brightness and temperatures generally mild in the south, a little colder further north, wednesday looks like bringing some heavy rain across central and north western areas but on thursday from the north things will begin to turn colder again. this is bbc newsroom live, our latest headlines... zimba bwe's crisis deepens. mps from the ruling party are summoned to discuss impeaching president robert mugabe after he again refuses to step down. the eu's chief brexit negotiator says an ambitious free trade deal with britain is on the table, but only if the uk
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meets its conditions. german chancellor angela merkel is meeting the country's president, after the collapse of coalition talks has thrown her future into doubt. the country could face fresh elections. the queen and prince philip married in westminster abbey 70 years ago today. the church's bells will ring out. the couple will celebrate at a private dinner in windsor castle. and — the notorious us cult leader charles manson has died in prison, aged 83. we'll be analysing how he will be remembered. mps are calling for a crackdown on the so—called gig economy. delivery riders and minicab drivers for firms like deliveroo and uber are being exploited by loopholes in employment law, that's according to two committees of mps. they say they face an "unacceptable
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burden" of having to prove they are "workers" rather than self—employed. the government says it's already considering the findings of a review of working practices. let's talk to the labour mp rachel reeves — chair of the business, energy and industrial strategy committee... she has compiled one of these reports. thank you so much for joining us. can you fill me in a little bit on what you think is wrong with employment law as it stands? it is very difficult for people who are self—important to get the rights and protections that most of us take for granted at work. the truth is many of these people are not genuinely self—employed. they turn up every day, they do the same job, working for the same business and yet they don't get the basic rights that many people take for granted. what are report sets out is
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the causes of a bill that the government can get through parliament with cross party support to ensure that people were actually workers get those rights that they deserve. for example, the minimum wage to be paid and sick pay to be paid. these are basic reforms that would make a huge difference to many people. one in six are now self—employed. implement laws needs to catch up with the changing reality of the workplace. to be clear, there are three different categories of workers, if you like? got employed, self—employed people and workers. and you want to categorise everyone is workers.|j would like more people were self employed to be categorised as workers because they are workers. and court cases are already finding this. we have seen courtjudgement for example on workers for uber uber
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says are self—employed, but the courts have said twice that actually they should be classified as workers. and what this draft bill would do would be to enshrine a legislation those rights for more people and ensure that fewer people have to take their cases to court and instead put the onus on the employer to give people those rights that they deserve by vercher of the work they are doing. to pick up on the point, is that your view that the point, is that your view that the onus will be completely on the employer or are you expecting more enforcement from government?” employer or are you expecting more enforcement from government? i think you need both. you are always going to have unscrupulous employers. the vast majorities do the right thing, pay their workers a decent rate and give them the rights they are entitled to, but others are undercutting. and there is a risk of a race to the bottom for many sectors. that is why we need this legislation. we took evidence from
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the director of labour market enforcement and he said you have a chance of being inspected once every 500 years. that is really not good enough. that means some of those unscrupulous employers know that they can get away with exploiting their staff with impunity because they are not going to have those inspections. we would like higher fines on employers who break the laws and use that money to employ more enforcers so that people are not exploited in the workplace. when we go out to work, we expect to be treated with decency and that includes being paid the minimum wage and getting some of those basic entitlements. that doesn't happen for some employees today. and this d raft for some employees today. and this draft bill will ensure that more people get that dignity in the workplace. staying with employment law, but speaking broadly, iwanted to know what you thought of the comments today of the need for
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britain to sit closely to the eu's regulations on a range of questions including employment law in order to secure favourable trade deals. is that something you would favour? we benefit today as employees in the uk from a whole lot of eu legislation, maternity and paternity, leave, for example. 0n the right to paid holidays. i don't want to see any of that water down. i think the government have been clear that they are going to enshrine in uk domestic legislation those rights. i thought it made sense that they were backed up it made sense that they were backed up by it made sense that they were backed up by european legislation, but we need to ensure that the uk is not engaged in his own race to the bottom in terms of employment laws. it is again, the people to lose out ourordinary it is again, the people to lose out our ordinary working people who are already struggling because of not having a pay rise. the american example would like us to do verge from them —— from the eu. to make
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deals with them. so if there is a risk of tying our hands. leaving the european union shouldn't be an opportunity to dilute our labour laws or our environmental laws or consumer protection or animal protection legislation. yes we want to do trade deals, free trade deals with a range of countries. first of all we need to secure one with our european partners. that cannot be on the basis of diluting the rights that are forwarded to uk workers today. rachel reeves, thank you for your time. while theresa may is in the midlands where she has talked about investing more money in technology research. here is what she had to say. i set out in my florence speech that we would honour our commitments. i was very clear about that. no other eu country
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needs to fear that they will have to receive last or pay him more. we have been very clear that we'll honour our commitments. what i want to see is developing that deep and special partnership with big european union for the future and i wa nt to european union for the future and i want to see is moving together. because what i've always said is a deal that is good for the uk will be a deal that is good the rest of the european union. the owner of british gas, centrica, has announced it will scrap standard gas and electricity tariffs for new customers. it says this is part of a series of measures which will be significantly more effective than the government's proposed cap on energy bills. the which? managing director of home poducts and services, alex neill, talked us through the changes. it could be quite a significant step forward. i say could be because i think the devil will be in the details. it will be about the prices of these tariffs. also how well can
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british gas engaged with their current customers. today they are introducing this change, but it only goes through to new customers. there are going to be contacting their existing customers, but they need to get them to actually engage in the market. and for many of them it is something they may not have done for a number of years. so 5 million customers who are on the standard tariff, what we need to see is they move off it actually engage in the market and switch either to another british gas tariffs or away to another printer supplier. because there are a lot of cheap deals in there are a lot of cheap deals in the marketplace. is a fixed rate deal always a better option, a cheaper option? a can move around. this is how it is different from the mortgage. a lot of the prices you see now, generally that the six deals are better. i think what british gas is trying to do is that they want a bit of time where you
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are actively prompted to think about switching your energy deal. what they are saying is that perhaps there has been less incentive for customers and also i would say suppliers to really prompt their customers to think about whether they are paying the right price for their energy. i think that is a good move that people will have to start to think about it. it should hopefully mean there is more switching around which then increases competition and then eve ryo ne increases competition and then everyone should benefit from it. but i say should. would there be anything to stop reduce gas or any other ones to make their fixed—rate rate works pensive? absolutely not. even with a price cap, that is not going to affect the price of six deals. any tear of whether it is called a standard tariff or not, it doesn't matter what you call it, the price cap should extend to them as well. what it should mean is that if more customers are prompted to think about their energy, they should consider at that moment in time and
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you should see more people moving and more competition. even those who don't switch should give the benefit of keener prices. british gas is also think they need to focus on being more efficient. the more the energy companies can do to lower their cost, it should affect the prices. again we need to see that happen. you explain that extremely well, but it doesn't sound —— it still sounds complicated. is that just me? it is complicated. i think if we're honest, we don't want to think about it. we just want it to be there. there is a balance to be struck between constantly having to think about switching suppliers also making sure that you are getting a good deal. so, fix tariffs can help in that sense because they are therefore a quantified moment of time. it is not something we all think about, but at least if you get that letter or e—mail, to say you
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now need to think about it you have this long and you can go away and do some research. it should help us all. it works at well in the car market and that is what we're looking for here. what happens if you don't have access to the internet or perhaps you don't want to put your details online? how easy is it to switch? you can still bring up is it to switch? you can still bring up your supplier. there is a phone line where you can discuss the whole of the market. is that free? yes. there are options available. it is not all just there are options available. it is not alljust online, but suppliers will cater for those online. it is not as complicated as people think and there are safety nets in place because it is the energy market and it is essential. generally, things don't go wrong as much as people think they would. we would urge people to have a look and think about switching. i want to update you with news
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coming out of zimbabwe. if you have been with us during the morning you will remember is that mps from the zanu—pf ruling party are meeting to discuss impeaching president mugabe after he refused to step down. we are now getting news about on what grounds he will be impeached. those mps are saying that he is to blame for the unprecedented economic tailspin in zimbabwe for the last 15 yea rs. tailspin in zimbabwe for the last 15 years. zanu—pf has also said in its impeachment motion that robert mugabe has shown disrespect for the rule of law. so as i say, we're starting to find out on what grounds robert mugabe will be impeached. we will bring you more on that as we get it. the convicted cult leader charles manson — who orchestrated a series of notorious murders in the 1960s — has died in prison in california. he was 83.
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in august 1969, members of his group killed seven people. manson believed the murders would start a race war, allowing him to seize power. james cook reports. charles manson — the name itself is synonymous with evil, a killer who did no killing, but whose crimes shocked the world. in august 1969, followers of his cult broke into the hollywood home of sharon tate. the pregnant actress, who was married to the director roman polanski, was brutally murdered, along with four of herfriends. the next night, the so—called manson family killed again, tying up and murdering a wealthy couple. manson was arrested during a raid last night in a camp where he and his followers were living. this was the ramshackle ranch in death valley where manson lived in a commune with his young, runaway fans. they apparently used lsd, and saw the guitar—playing ex—convict as a kind of saint, or perhaps a devil. charles manson was charged not with wielding a knife or firing
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a gun, but with controlling and directing the killers. i don't accept the court, i don't accept the whole situation. like, i was in the desert, minding my business. this confusion belongs to you. it's your confusion. i don't have any confusion. i don't have any guilt. i know what i've done, and no man canjudge me. ijudge me. what have you done, charlie? and why had he done it? apparently, to spark a race war. it would be called helter—skelter, and he would use it to seize power. in 1971, manson was sentenced to death on seven counts of murder, later commuted to life in prison. over the years, charles manson applied for parole are you scared to die? sometimes i
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feel i'm scared to live. living is what scares me. dying is easy. over the years charles manson applied for perot over and over again. but he died in prison. but he died a prisoner, having shattered the peace and love of the 1960s with diabolical violence. james cook their reporting from america. daniel kane is professor of american literature and culture at the university of sussex. how do you think charles manson will be remembered? i think you will be remembered as the person who showed america that the utopian promise of the 1960s was a fantasy. i think charles manson reflected the shift from innocence of the hippies into
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the militant weather underground. the value of the counterculture to stop the vietnam war. in a sense, charles manson was the phase for the death of the dream. the dream that was intended to wood attributed to many people. lsd was the drug that would save us all, just as a sacrament in his case. use to manipulate young teenage runaways into committing horrible acts. yet, charles manson has the face of the death of the hippie. would it be fairto death of the hippie. would it be fair to say that in some way he used that utopian promise that you were talking about, that counterculture, to emerge as a cult leader? absolutely. let's remember, manson was a part of a larger narrative. by the late 1960s, so many popular
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culture figures were announcing their conversions to various eastern religions. the beatles, were sitting at the feet of a yogi. the rolling stones have their gurus and leaders. charles manson in a sense really wa nted charles manson in a sense really wanted in on that. he did, by the way, and i think it is important to point out, he wanted to be a rock ‘n roll star. i think in a sense he copied a lot of moves and looks that we associate with bands like the stones and the beach boys. at least iteration of the beach boys in the late 60s. he used those kind of looks to draw on these honourable people to him. manson was one grew among many. do through —— a lot has been made about the beach boys in particular dennis wilson. there is a
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great interview from 1967 were dennis wilson describes living in the countryside in 1967 with 17 girls. this was stated with no embarrassment. it was something to be proud of. i think charles manson saw this rock ‘n roll lifestyle and saidi saw this rock ‘n roll lifestyle and said i want that. i see how easy it will be to gather people around me ifi will be to gather people around me if i can transmit that kind of irresistible charisma to the hippies of san francisco and los angeles. irresistible charisma to the hippies of san francisco and los angelesm is so interesting because in some way you could save the killings he instigated came at the end of the era of peace and love in the 1960s and signalled the end of it. we also have to remember that woodstock came after that which in some ways is the pinnacle of that whole era.|j wouldn't think of woodstock when i say charles manson. i think
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woodstock in a way... woodstock is not by design, it is by accident. the people who organised it wanted to make lots of money. the fact that it was a money losing proposition was by accident. that aside, things had turned uglier, more generally speaking in the counterculture by late 1967, 1968. by the end of that year, the zodiac killer in california claimed his first victims. the chicago democratic national convention witnessed a full—scale police ride which was recorded for the whole world to see. lsd was the drug of choice and was replaced by methamphetamines, speeds. so manson moved to sever
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cisco in 1967, it was the year of the summer of love, but the fall of that year had already seen neighbourhoods transformed from relatively welcoming, open places where one could feel safe to no go zones. where one could feel safe to no go zones. in large part because people we re zones. in large part because people were exploiting young teenagers. to get in on the free love train. really good to talk to. we must leave it there. thank you. months of high temperatures and virtually no rain has caused drought in spain and portugal. more than 80 % of portugal is officially classified as enduring "severe" or "extreme" drought. now there are concerns for the country's population of bees — which are crucial for pollinating crops. beekeeping is serious business. luis correira's 600 hives should be bringing in eight tonnes of honey each year.
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but portugal has suffered its driest weather for more than 20 years — so bad, in fact, it meant farfewer flowers and so less food for the bees, causing the honey yield here to crash to a quarter, just two tonnes this year. translation: it was a bad year because we had a very dry spring and hot summer and for three months the bees could not collect any nectar. it's been a year of hunger, and very weak for beekeepers. the lack of food means beekeepers have to buy in pollen substitutes. he needed a whole tonne just to keep his hives alive. it is the same story across the country. translation: spring this year didn't have humidity to give plants enough nectar for bees to produce honey. after prolonged drought, late spring and forest fires, production decreased 80%.
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the honeybee population worldwide has been in serious decline due to pesticides, parasites, changing climates and loss of habitat. in portugal, every part of the agricultural industry has been affected but, for beekeepers, the driest weather for two decades has pushed their colonies close to collapse. the queen and the duke of edinburgh are celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary. they have been married longer than any royal couple in history. the queen and prince philip will celebrate privately with family and friends at windsor this evening, as our royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. in the gloom of postwar britain, their marriage was in the words of winston churchill a flash of colour.
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he was a dashing naval officer, she the future queen. in the 70 year since, there's has proved to be a relationship which has truly stood the test of time. it has worked because their personalities and their characters complement one another. they are quite different in many ways, but prince philip is the first to make the queen laugh. and he is probably the only person who can tell her to shut up. pictured in 1939, 18—year—old philip first caught elizabeth's i am a field trip to dartmouth college. a group into a long life partnership. the queen has referred to him as her rock. the queen has added that... 70 years after the royal couple exchanged their vows here, the bells of
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westminster abbey will bring form their honour. these images have been released to mark their milestone anniversary. they will celebrate at anniversary. they will celebrate at a private party in windsor castle this evening. in a moment ,the news at one with reeta chakrabarti. first the weather. good afternoon. temperatures are on something of a roller coaster ride at the moment. rewind to sunday morning, many of us saw touch of frost in temperatures below freezing. monday morning, this morning, a very different feel to the bother. double digits in some spots. with that a lot of loud and outbreaks of rain. the satellite picture shows the cloud coming in from the southwest. pushing across the atlantic. brought in on south—westerly winds. those winds are feeding some mild air across the country for the next few days. something colder holding on across the far north. this evening and
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tonight, it is going to be cloudy. 0utbreaks tonight, it is going to be cloudy. outbreaks of rain. later in the night, rain will turn heavier across northern ireland and scotland. heavy rain developing in northern scotland. across the far north it will be cold. in the south very mild. ten or 11 degrees. tuesday, on a chilly note across the north. further self across scotland, a lot of rain. many areas starting with heavy bursts of rain. not as wet across here. there will be a lot of cloud. further south there will be a cloudy start the day. but a mild one. temperatures 11 or 12 degrees. as you go on through the day, the rain will go north across scotland are further south we will see another band of rain from the west. central areas will probably stay dry. perhaps in sunny breaksjust coming through the clouds.
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temperatures mild in the south still quite chilly further north. tuesday night, we say goodbye to this area of low pressure, but there is another one here. this pending weather front will bring some rain with it. it could cause one or two issues. to the south and east largely dry. further north, still something a little bit colder and actually, as we head towards the end of the week, that cold air will stay delete make a comeback. northern arya ns delete make a comeback. northern aryans will be chilly on thursday and friday. something a little bit milder further south. the crisis in zimbabwe continues as the deposed president robert mugabe ignores today's deadline for him to resign. more protests on the streets, as moves begin to impeach the president, who's led the country for nearly four decades. we'll have the latest from our correspondents in zimbabwe.
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also this lunchtime: the eu's chief brexit negotiator says an ambitious free trade deal with britain is on the table but only if the uk meets its conditions. angela merkel holds crisis talks with germany's president after the collapse of negotiations to form a coalition government. jana novotna, the winner of the 1998 wimbledon women's singles title, has died at the age of 49 from cancer. the scene live at westminster abbey where the bells are ringing to mark
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