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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  November 21, 2017 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello, it's tuesday, it's 9am, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. our top story today, senior government ministers have agreed the uk should offer more money for its divorce from the eu, but only if talks about trade start soon. as brexiteer is on the backbenches threatened trouble over the bigger divorce bill, brexiteers in the cabinet give the thumbs up to more money for brussels. also on the programme — a group of outsourced workers at a london university are issuing what could be a landmark legal claim to establish the "joint employer" principle in uk law. the university is the entity that essentially decides what their pay and terms and conditions are going to be, and unless they can negotiate directly with the university, they can't really negotiate over their pay and terms and conditions. if successful, it could lead to improved terms and conditions for some 3.3 million workers in the uk. and three survivors of genocide join forces to stand up to extremism in an exclusive interview on this programme. we'll hear their stories
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in around 15 minutes‘ time. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11. we're going to talk about black friday later, which as you may know, is no longerjust a day but more like several days. christmas retailers are doing their utmost to lure you in. despite it only being the 21st of november, where i live, some houses already have their christmas lights out the front. fairy lights are on the front of their homes. why, is my question. it is the 21st of november. ru one of those households. please tell me you have done this. you are definitely in danger of beating too soon. you can send me photographs, too. use the hashtag victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.
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a little later in the programme, we'll hear from the british explorer benedict allen, who's back in the uk after being rescued from thejungle in papua new guinea where he was trying to reach a little—known tribe. watch his first tv interview after 10am. our top story today. the bbc understands that senior cabinet ministers have agreed britain should increase its financial offer to the eu as the uk leaves in 2019. but only of member states move on to discussing trade. theresa may met collea g u es discussing trade. theresa may met colleagues including michael gove borisjohnson colleagues including michael gove boris johnson last night colleagues including michael gove borisjohnson last night and is expected to make a new offer to the eu during talks later this week. let's get more from our political guru norman smith in westminster. so mrs may has managed to find some kind of compromise between the brexiteers in the cabinet and remains. there must be many mornings when she wakes up thinking, "0h, remains. there must be many mornings when she wakes up thinking, "oh, my gosh," but this morning she must be
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feeling chipper because she seems to have bound in the big beasts of brexit in the cabinet to agree her in backing for more money to leave the eu and that was by no means a given because the tory backbenchers are up in arms, describing it as a ransom and we should not be paying ransom and we should not be paying ransom money to leave the eu and it is possible borisjohnson and michael gove could have decided to ride the backbenches and torpedo mrs may's move to give more cash to get the trade talks going. instead, they have said ok, we will pay more money. a couple of conditions attached, though. one, they want it to be absolutely guaranteed that the eu will respond by saying, "fine, we will now move on in the brexit negotiations to discuss trade". secondly, they are saying that we must not agree a final sum until the last minute when we can actually see the sort of trade deal we are going to get and if we don't like it, we ta ke to get and if we don't like it, we take the money off the table. for
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mrs may, good results so far, she's got the brexiteers on board but in terms of the offer, still lots of conditions attached. norman, for the moment, thank you. more on that later. rebecca jones is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. the governing zanu—pf party in zimbabwe is expected to start impeachment proceedings against rober mugabe today. he is accused of failing to uphold the constitution and of giving his wife, grace, too much power. zimbabwe's former vice president, who was sacked by president mugabe, has warned him to resign immediately orface humiliation by zimbabweans. shingai nyoka reports. within days, the era of president robert mugabe could finally be over. zanu—pf already has the two—thirds majority required to remove him, but loyalty is not guaranteed here, and they've courted the opposition to support the motion just in case. we expect the motion
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to be moved tomorrow. the committee to be set up tomorrow. because the charges are so clear, we expect that by wednesday, we should be able to vote in parliament. the military, which took over the country last week, appears to have a parallel process under way. they say the long—time leader is holding talks with his sacked vice—president, emmerson mnangagwa, to map out an amicable way forward. the sacking of mnangagwa, a military ally, ignited the takeover. on sunday, zanu—pf fired mugabe as its leader and installed mnangagwa in his place. the zimbabwean defence and security services are encouraged by new developments which include contact between the president and the former vice—president, comrade emmerson mnangagwa, who is expected in the country shortly. thereafter, the nation will be advised of the outcome of the talks between the two. but the president remains in charge, even though he is still under military guard.
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whatever the outcomes of the two processes, his leadership is not likely to last much longer. shingai nyoka, bbc news, harare. teenager gaia pope had "struggled" with health issues before her death, according to her father. police are treating the i9—year—old's death as "unexplained" after her body was found in a field in dorset on saturday. police released three people who were arrested on suspicion of her murder. they will face no further action. iranian president hassan rouhani declared the end of islamic state on tuesday, in an address broadcast live on state tv. iran has been part of a coalition with the syria now the and russia in the fight against is for several yea rs. more than 1,000 members of iran's revolutionary guards have been killed in syria and iraq. the american talk show host,
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charlie rose, has apologised for what he called "inappropriate behaviour" after allegations of sexual harassment. his various shows have been suspended, following a piece in the washington post in which eight women accused him of harassment. staff employed by the outsourcing company cordant are asking a tribunal to rule that they have the right to negotiate better terms and conditions with the university of london, where they work. the landmark case has implications for more than 3 million workers in the uk's business services industry who are hired through facilities companies. the university says it does not employ any of the workers and does not accept their concept of joint employment. tv presenter paul hollywood has accused his former bake off colleagues — including fellowjudge, mary berry — of "abandoning" the show. mary berry, along with presenters mel and sue, left the programme when it moved to channel 4. in an interview with the radio times, hollywood said
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the criticism he received after his decision to stay with the show was "not fun" and that he felt he "became the most hated man in the country". finally, watch this. a camera operator who waited a0 minutes to film a stadium demolition has been thwarted at the last moment by some unfortunate bus scheduling. the georgia dome in atlanta, which hosted the super bowl and the olympics, was reduced to rubble by a controlled demolition, but one spectator missed the crucial moment. get out of the way, bath! you really couldn't make it up!
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that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9.30am. i'm amazed he only swore twice. he had onejob that i'm amazed he only swore twice. he had one job that day. on the brexit divorce bill and the factories may has agreed with her cabinet that britain should offer more money in order to get trade talks underway with the eu before britain leaves, ellie on facebook says," it should cost us. we have been taking more money than we have been putting in and then we turn around and tell them to do one? this referendum was a completejoke. them to do one? this referendum was a complete joke. it's them to do one? this referendum was a completejoke. it's never discussed these kind of conditions before they took it to the people". sean on facebook says, "freedom and new opportunities cost money". on christmas lights, lp says, "i can put my christmas decorations up any timei put my christmas decorations up any time i like or not even bother to
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ta ke time i like or not even bother to take them down. victoria, stop being a fascist in deciding what others should do because it pleases you". i think that's taking it a bit too far, just saying, where i live, in the suburbs, people already have their fairy the suburbs, people already have theirfairy lights the suburbs, people already have their fairy lights outside a house and i'm just confused. do get in touch with us throughout the morning, use the hashtag victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport. olly foster is with us this morning and it looks as though mike ashley has found a buyer for newcastle united. well, let's take it slowly! good morning. there is a bid on the table which is a start. remember, you put the club up for sale last month. he has been there ten years, a very divisive figure, the fans don't like him, not putting enough investment back into the club. they've been relegated twice they are currently just about keeping their heads above water in the premier league. but spotted in the crowd after he had put the club up to their was amanda staveley, who fronts pcp capital partners. she was in the crowd,
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she's incredibly influential, based in the middle east, and she brokered the dealfor sheikh in the middle east, and she brokered the deal for sheikh mansoor and the abu dhabi family to take over at manchester city about ten years ago. £210 million, they bought manchester city for and we know what they have done since then. the offer that is believed to be on the table is somewhere in the region of 300 million, some way short of mike ashley's asking price of about 380 million. he is looking to triple the money he paid to buy newcastle ten yea rs money he paid to buy newcastle ten years ago. remember, he was offering a deal to basically by the club on the never—never, kind of a hire purchase. he's that desperate to get rid of it. it could be amanda staveley and her pcp capital partners and possible middle east investors behind that as well. a bid is on the table but we are waiting to see what deal if any can be done. the first ashes test starts on thursday and lots of the pre—match
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chatis thursday and lots of the pre—match chat is still about ben stokes not being there for england. yes, the england players don't want to be talking about ben stokes, the match—winning all—rounder who is still in this country but he has been doing that, footage surfaced recently, in the last 2a hours, on social media, of him bowling and batting in the nets at durham. he is waiting for the police investigation into him to conclude the c if he will face any charges for his part ina will face any charges for his part in a brawl outside a nightclub in bristol. —— to c of e will face. they are trying not to talk about it but when ben stokes is doing that, seemingly ready to go and join them in australia should he get the chance, of course, there are questions about it and this is alastair cook's response. well, you're talking about it. it is a news line for us. of course, and we understand, i understand the game. it has been a while since the incident. certainly as a player, in
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the first couple of weeks after, it was what everyone was talking about, it was not great and we pretty much accepted it was unlikely that ben would be here. you can't always pin your hopes on one guy. if there is a bonus of him making the trip at some stage, that would be great but i can honestly say it has not been spoken about in the changing room. it's no good for us to talk about that. we will see, it is overnight wednesday into thursday that the test match sta rts into thursday that the test match starts and you will be able to follow it on the bbc. an early contenderfor follow it on the bbc. an early contender for goal of follow it on the bbc. an early contenderfor goal of the follow it on the bbc. an early contender for goal of the season scored by chelsea blair. brighton against oak was a draw and this chelsea player joined against oak was a draw and this chelsea playerjoined when he was 12, he is still on their books but he has been farmed out to the dutch first vision, playing for vitesse, has played all season, aged 22 and scored his first goal at the weekend. look at that. amazing goal! why doesn't he celebrate? because that was his goalkeeper, and that, victoria, is an own goal!
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astonishing. they lost 4—2. de boer is very well regarded by chelsea and vitesse but not for that. —— dabo is well respected. more sport throughout the morning. this morning, three survivors of genocide have joined forces to stand up to extremism in an exclusive interview on this programme. let me introduce you to kemal pervanic, who survived a concentration camp during the bosnian war. the former bosnian serb military commander ratko mladic will find out tomorrow whether he's convicted of crimes against humanity. he's accused of committing genocide during that conflict of the 1990s. eric murangwa eugene lost 35 family members in the rwandan genoicide. between april and june 1994, an estimated 800,000 rwandans were killed in the space of 100 days.
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most of the dead were tutsis, and most of those who perpetrated the violence were hutus. and ruth barnett, who fled nazi germany as a child on the kindertransport, an organised rescue effort that took place prior to the outbreak of the second world war, taking children from germany to britain. we're also joined by adam wagner, human rights lawyer and founder of rights info, who's bought the three of them together. the nature of what we're going to be discuss will be graphic and raw. let me begin with you kamal if i may. tell us about how you came to be in a concentration camp in the 19905? well, no one ever expects to end up ina well, no one ever expects to end up in a concentration camp. so, i had a
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normal life. my family lived in rural bosnia. the community was mixed. the relationships in the community were good. until the second half of the 19805 when former yugoslavia, the country that i was born in, that bo5nia wa5 yugoslavia, the country that i was born in, that bo5nia was part of from yugoslavia wa5 born in, that bo5nia was part of from yugoslavia was experiencing a serious unemployment and certain individuals turned up on the political 5cene individuals turned up on the political scene and started dividing u5. political scene and started dividing us. they were saying that we could no longer live together because we we re no longer live together because we were too different and then not many years later, we had terrible war5 and the bosnian war. i ended up in a concentration camp. my village was attacked by my neighbours. my former school mates. when i ended up in the camp, i recognised so many people,
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cla55mates, two teachers, it was unimaginable. and when you say you recognised so many people, do you mean fellow pri5oner5, or do you mean people who we re pri5oner5, or do you mean people who were in control of you and ultimately tortured you? well, whoever happened to be in the region ended up in one of the three camps in my town, but also the people who perpetrated that violence against us we re perpetrated that violence against us were our neighbours. so, it was very personal. we knew each other. and ju5t personal. we knew each other. and just a couple of years earlier, you know, when i was in high school, i could never imagine that one of my favourite high school teachers would end up being one of the interrogators and you know, my brother was almost killed on his order5. brother was almost killed on his orders. it is unbelievable and horrific. did you everfeel that orders. it is unbelievable and horrific. did you ever feel that you could say to him, "you were my
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teacher. i really liked you."|j wouldn't dare. no. iwouldn't teacher. i really liked you."|j wouldn't dare. no. i wouldn't dare look at him in that room because it could have ended my life, but i was able to go back to bosnia some years later and i had a chance to talk to him. i'm going to ask you about that ina him. i'm going to ask you about that in a moment, before i bring in ruth and eric and adam, what kind of things did you witness in that concentration camp? lots of gratuitous violence and that di5turbs me to this day. itjust, you never expect that fellow human being5, torturing and killing other fellow human beings for pleasure, for sport. and they were just ordinary human beings like myself and like yourself. and we're seeing p i ctu res and like yourself. and we're seeing pictu res of and like yourself. and we're seeing pictures of some of them now. i
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wonder if i could bring in you ruth ifi wonder if i could bring in you ruth if i may. you came to britain aged four on the kindertransport over to the uk from germany. you came from a jewish family. tell me what was happening to you and your family and your community back then? well, the jewish community were used to persecution time and again and they simply thought if they kept their heads down and didn't make waves, it would pass over, up until the night of november, 9th 1938 would pass over, up until the night of november, 9th1938 when in every city, right across germany and austria, the crowds rioted and smashed upjewish austria, the crowds rioted and smashed up jewish property austria, the crowds rioted and smashed upjewish property and jewish men were arrested and thrown into labourcamp. jewish men were arrested and thrown
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into labour camp. the writing was on the wall that it wasn't going to blow over and because of that terrible attack, my parents made the very difficult decision to send my seven—year—old brother and myself on the trains that were organised and later called the kindertransport to safety in england. we didn't see our parents for ten years. we were raised in three foster families and a hostel during that time. your brother, as you said was a few years older than you. do you think you would have survived if it wasn't for him? i don't think i would have coped in what felt like the world had been ripped away like a carpet
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from under my feet and i was floundering in a totally mad world that made no sense. if i hadn't had my seven—year—old brother to make sense of it, for me, even though, of course, he didn't know what was going on and a lot of it was nonsense , going on and a lot of it was nonsense, he had a knack of calming me down and of course, i was important to him as i represented a link with his parents who had told him to look after his little sister. that's how we survived because we had each other. eric, hello. welcome to the programme. thank you. you we re to the programme. thank you. you were an international footballer when you lived through genocide in rwanda. it claimed at least 35 members of your family, but you think it maybe more? yes, indeed. yes, when the genocide happened in
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rwanda i was a football player, playing for alclub which is the biggest football club in rwanda and on the first day of genocide on 7th april 1994, on the first day of genocide on 7th april1994, | on the first day of genocide on 7th april 1994, i escaped death because one of the soldiers who came into my flat where i was living with a friend of mine, to kill us recognised me through the photo of my football team and from that moment he spared my life and the life of my team—mate and then moved from that flat and went to stay with team— mates of from that flat and went to stay with team—mates of mine who were living about a mile away from where i was
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andl about a mile away from where i was and i spent about four, six weeks with this group of my former team— mates with this group of my former team—mates and... with this group of my former team-mates and... were you effectively trapped for that period of time? i could not even venture outside of the house. i could not do anything other than staying indoors because at that time the whole country had gone mad. and you were effectively waiting for a knock on the door are you, or the house to be attacked or to be under siege? that was life for the whole time. you we re always was life for the whole time. you were always waiting for someone to come in and take you away and kill you because you were also constantly hearing neighbours being killed,
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gunshots, going off here and there and when you hear that, you know what is happening and those who are able to go out would come and tell us able to go out would come and tell us what was going on outside and the first time i saw someone being killed was on the second day of genocide. at that time, we had not yet been confided into our house, we could still move around the neighbourhoods. so, one of the neighbours, a man was brought somewhere from around the corner and he was accused of having been seen wearing a t—shirt with a picture of
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our former pf leader and for that reason, the man was escorted a couple of yards from where we were and he was brutally killed. they we re and he was brutally killed. they were using whips and stones. you witnessed thi5? were using whips and stones. you witnessed this? i saw this with my own eyes. and what impact does that continue to have on you now?m own eyes. and what impact does that continue to have on you now? it has impacted me in many ways because for many years i could not speak about experience. i decided to leave my country and came into this country mainly because it was very hard to go on and live a normal life with all the memories around you, but
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tha n kfu lly all the memories around you, but thankfully i think the sort of survivor experience i had with the help of my team—mates and the role the sport had in that has been very helpful for me to overcome that type of trauma and today i think i find it normal to speak about my experience because i try to see the positive side of it and leave the negative side a little bit behind. 0k. negative side a little bit behind. ok. i had want to bring in adam, if i may. you have brought kamal and eric and ruth together. why? well, thank you very much for having us and thanks also to ruth and kamal and thanks also to ruth and kamal and eric for sharing their stories. we're trying to bring acro55 and eric for sharing their stories. we're trying to bring across the 5imple we're trying to bring across the simple message with the fight hate with right5 campaign which is that
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genocide doesn't happen overnight. it starts with the very basic cut5 to liberties, that happen usually over many months or years and we don't, we shouldn't wait for concentration camps and secret police to stand up. we have got to stand up now. stand up to basic di5criminations. stand up to breaches of human rights, not necessarily in other countries, but we need to do that too, but in our neighbourhoods. clo5e we need to do that too, but in our neighbourhoods. close to home in the small places and that's really what the campaign is about. are you saying that's happening, some rights are being whittled away in britain now for example? yes. we've reached a bit ofa now for example? yes. we've reached a bit of a turning point and one of the reasons this film had over 500,000 views in a few days, it's because it's strike ago cord this idea that across the world we are seeing the rise again of far—right movements in the united states... which is different to rights being whittled away. do you have examples of that? well, that's how it starts
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and you can see in the k uk an atmosphere, i'm not saying there is going to be concentration camps here ina going to be concentration camps here in a year's time, but you can see an atmosphere of withdrawing from these international institutions that we created after the second world war, we the brits created the european convention on human rights and the international court5, we used to lead tho5e international court5, we used to lead those institutions and now we're withdrawing. i don't think the prime minister said we're going to withdraw. a5 prime minister 5he prime minister said we're going to withdraw. a5 prime minister she has not said we are going to withdraw from the european convention on human rights? theresa may is the first prime minister ever of the uk to say i want, i think we should withdraw and i think they have put it on the back burner because of brexit and that's what she said. she 5aid brexit and that's what she said. she said it does nothing for our 5ecurity. said it does nothing for our security. as home secretary she criticised it? she criticised it as prime minister a5 criticised it? she criticised it as prime minister as well and i think the direction of travel is quite clear in the uk now is that we, there is public support for moving away from the international ideas as
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we see from brexit and there is moving away from human rights values and ideals which we have always led and ideals which we have always led andi and ideals which we have always led and i think that's what we are trying to get across, at right5 infoe with the fight hate with right5 campaign. infoe with the fight hate with rights campaign. kamal, you said you went back to talk to that high school teacher who had been effectively one of your, who you had witnessed forking turing others and who interrogated you. what did you say to that man? because i never left of my own will, i have this need to go back and one of the things i wanted to do is to find him and hopefully get some answers from him because he was such a nice guy, you know, i could understand thugs taking part in what happened in the concentration camp, but i couldn't understand how this very nice guy could become so nasty. and when i first saw him, he knew that we had some shared past because of my name.
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he knew that i was his former students. so we agreed on a particular day, but when i went to his school, he wasn't there. but i ke pt his school, he wasn't there. but i kept going back. it was really, really uncomfortable for me and i eventually managed to catch him one day and he wasn't prepared to talk andl day and he wasn't prepared to talk and i grabbed his arm and he said, "don't do that." i said you integrated me too and hisjaw dropped and we started talking. he didn't feel comfortable. but at the same time, he didn't want to accept any responsibility for his involvement in what went on in the region and in the camp. what did you wa nt to region and in the camp. what did you want to know from him specifically? why him? i just why him? ijust wanted to understand, why is it that ordinarily, very nice people become terrible perpetrators?” ordinarily, very nice people become terrible perpetrators? i wonder... that is a profound question. bruce, what would be your answer to that?
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why do ordinary, nice people... change? well, i studied psychology andi change? well, i studied psychology and i think we all need to accept that we are born with the capacity to become perpetrators. we have demons in our human nature but we also have angels. the question really is, why do we tend to nurture the demons rather than the angels? so as far as i understand anybody can become a perpetrator, and anybody can become a rescuer. i think it depends hugely on the moral climate of the earliest upbringing infamily or climate of the earliest upbringing in family or wherever a child is rai5ed. in family or wherever a child is raised. i think what kemal describes
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is pretty much what i experienced and what went on in rwanda. the genocide there was committed by friends against friends, neighbours against neighbours, and to some extent, members of the same family. it is harder to understand how someone who grew up it is harder to understand how someone who grew up with —— you grew up someone who grew up with —— you grew up with, you spent all your time playing, going to school together and injust playing, going to school together and in just one playing, going to school together and injust one go, they turn and become a monster and want to kill you. looking at how that developed in rwanda, how it happened, it has something to do with education, with
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how society is educated, is treated. and especially the power of leadership, the power of leadership is so much important in how people tend to change and become something else. that is why i think writes info is so important because this is a feature of all the genocide i've studied, in the holocaust villages, particularly in eastern europe, set about neighbours murdering neighbours, long before the nazis actually reached. a5 neighbours, long before the nazis actually reached. as soon as they knew they were coming, it began. i think human rights and rights info i5 think human rights and rights info is the way forward but we need to focu5 is the way forward but we need to focus on right5 having
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responsibilities and we have a 5ociety responsibilities and we have a society which is very reluctant to ta ke society which is very reluctant to take responsibility. can ijust say? i wanted to understand, now i know, basically everything that happened to me was because there was a slow erosion of human rights over a period of time. propaganda was used extensively for many, many years. during that process, i was identified with a particular group and members of this group were demonised and then it became possible for my fellow human beings to see me as a monster and it is much easier to kill monsters than human beings. so this is why, you know, we need human rights to be enshrined in law, to protect everyone equally and right now, i can see some people can dismiss this, ican can see some people can dismiss this, i can see very strong parallels in what is happening in the west, when we have the most
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powerful man in the world demonising particular groups, calling mexicans rapists and what will his ordinary, fellow american citizens think? this is why we need things like the campaign to bring communities together, to stand up against this kind of dehumanisation and demonisation. human rights are in law. we do have human rights in law in this country, the human rights act enshrined the european convention on human rights into british law. but we need it enshrined in people's consciousness. adam, the use of the word genocide, human rights groups say there is a genocide going on right now in myanmar, in syria, in sedan. why is it important to use that word? —— in sudan. once you use the word, it creates a whole different international reaction and i know eric speaks very movingly about the failure to use that word in rwanda
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for a long time, including by britain. words do change behaviour and we have got to a point where 70 years ago, there was not an idea of crimes against humanity or about genocide and that is one of the i55ues genocide and that is one of the issues we have spoken about in this campaign. now we have at least the beginnings of an international system which identifies tho5e horrors, early and late, and tries to intervene but we need, the british people need to stand up and lead that system, or be beacons in the system, like we once were. ok, let me read some messages. emma 5ay5, let me read some messages. emma says, effectively, "thank you for sharing your stories". she says, "i can't even imagine, it is so sad to hear what you went through". this tweet says, "that guy just said brexit wa5 tweet says, "that guy just said brexit was the first step towards genocide. what?" and this tweet 5ay5, genocide. what?" and this tweet says, "much respect to you for
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speaking this morning". thank you for joining speaking this morning". thank you forjoining us. speaking this morning". thank you for joining us. thank speaking this morning". thank you forjoining us. thank you for coming on the programme. still to come: a group of outsourced workers at london university are launching a legal claim which could lead to improved terms and conditions for around 3million workers in the uk. we will talk about their case in the next few minutes. we'll be with the british explorer benedict allen who is now back in the country after going missing in a remote area of papua new guinea. time for the latest news with rebecca jones. the headlines this morning. the bbc understands that senior cabinet figures have agreed britain should offer to pay more money to leave the eu, but only if member states agree next month to move on to discussing trade. theresa may met colleagues including michael gove and borisjohnson last night, and is expected to make the new offer to the eu during talks later this week. robert mugabe is expected to face
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the start of impeachment proceedings today after refusing to step down as president of zimbabwe. the country's ruling zanu—pf party said the process could take just two days to complete. the 93—year—old, who remains under armed guard, is accused of allowing his wife to seize power illegally. last night, the military suggested a plan was emerging for the transfer of power. staff employed by the outsourcing company cordant are asking a tribunal to rule that they have the right to negotiate better terms and conditions with the university of london, where they work. the landmark case has implications for more than 3 million workers in the uk's business services industry who are hired through facilities companies. the university says it does not employ any of the workers and does not accept their concept ofjoint employment. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now with olly.
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england batsman alastair cook says they have pretty much accepted that ben stokes won't play a part in the ashes series which starts on thursday. the all—rounder posted pictures of himself in the nets at durham yesterday as he awaits the outcome of a police investigation into a brawl outside a nightclub. he was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm. the women's ashes series comes to an end today. australia have already retain the ashes, but england can level the series if they win the final t20 in canberra but they are up against it, beth mooney carrying the bat through the australian innings, hitting an unbeaten 117. england need 179 to win. unbeaten in five premier league matches after their 2—2 draw at home against stoke. they came from behind twice and they are still in the top top half of the table. a formal offer has been made by newcastle ——
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to buy newcastle united, three had million pounds from an investment firm, which is believed to be some way short of mike ashley's asking price. he put the club up for sale last month. i will be back with a full update after 10am. thank you. it is 9:40am, thank you for joining thank you. it is 9:40am, thank you forjoining us. teenager gaia pope had "struggled" with health issues before she died, herfather has said. police are treating the 19—year—old's death as "unexplained" after her body was found in a field near swa nage on saturday. our correspondent navtej johal can tell us more. what else did her father said? victoria, this has been such a sad story and yesterday the father of 19—year—old gaia pope, richard sutherland, who was understand be very emotional, said his daughter had had a lot of issues and clearly just could not cope with that. one of the issues was her severe epilepsy, with which he said she was struggling badly but he said his daughter had also had happy moments right up to the end of her life,
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despite health problems. last night on the bbc, paid tribute to his daughter. i think...| see it as, our beautiful bird has flown. she's not with us in body, but she remains in our hearts and with us for ever. so while the loss of her in one way is immeasurable, we will treasure her and honour her always. and i say, gaia, you're not in pain any more, my darling. we love you. i love you. victoria, your audience will remember that gaia went missing on the 7th of november and it took police 11 days before her body was found on saturday. hundreds of people volunteered in the search, searching the hills above the coastal town of swa nage searching the hills above the coastal town of swanage in dorset where she went missing. three people we re where she went missing. three people were arrested and released during the enquiry. they will face no further action, police have told us. but they also say now there is
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nothing to suggest anyone else was involved in gaia's death and they are treating it as unexplained. the family are distraught at the amount of time it has taken for police to find her body but dorset police have responded, saying it had an obligation to follow every possible line of enquiry. the force is now awaiting the results of a toxicology test and meanwhile, the family have now asked to be left alone to grieve. thank you. coming up, british explorer benedict allen is home after going missing in papua new guinea. we'll be live with him later this morning. a group of 75 workers, including porters and receptionists, are going to a tribunal to try to win more rights at work. as outsourced employees — in this case they're supplied to the university of london by an outside company — they don't receive the same benefits as those employed directly. they say the university should be a "joint employer", which mean they would get the same pension and holiday pay rights as those directly employed
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the university of london. the university disagrees. if the case is successful, it could affect around 3 million outsourced workers in the uk. our legal affairs correspondent clive coleman has been finding out about the case. henry chango lopez's day starts early, with the first of his two jobs. i woke up at four o'clock this morning, travelled one hour to southwark. and here i am to do my two hours of cleaning. henry is one of many workers who are outsourced. in other words, he's employed by a facilities company that can provide his services to another company or organisation. at 7.30, i'm at the university of london to do myjob as a porter. many big organisations outsource, which means that instead of employing cleaners, security guards and other often low—paid staff, they pay a facilities company to provide these workers.
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so, while maintaining control over the way people work and often setting their pay and conditions, they can avoid some of the legal responsibilities of being an employer. that can mean far worse pensions, holiday and sick pay for the outsourced workers. now a group including henry, employed by the facilities company cordant and supplied to london university, are seeking a tribunal ruling that the university is recognised along with cordant as theirjoint employer. the union supporting the workers says that there is an important principle at stake. the outsourced workers at the university of london, for example the security guards, for all intents and purposes work for the university. the university is the entity that essentially decides what their pay and terms and conditions are going to be. unless they can negotiate directly with the university,
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they can't really negotiate over their pay and terms and conditions. uk law has never recognised the concept that workers could have joint employers for the purpose of negotiating their terms and conditions. if it did, the consequences could be huge. it would be enormous. there would be about 3.5 million outsourced employees whose terms and conditions would improve because now they would be on the same terms and conditions as the people they work alongside every day, but who are directly employed. and for the employers, of course, there would also be an impact because it would be more expensive to improve those terms and conditions. henry says that for him, it could be a game—changer. if the law recognised the university of london as my employer, my life would change massively, because i wouldn't have to do two jobs as i am doing at the moment, where i have to wake up at five o'clock in the morning every day in order to make ends meet. in terms of pensions,
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i would be able to retire with a good pension, not the one i have at the moment. in a statement, the university of london said: for henry chango lopez, for now at least, the early mornings and the long days continue. we can now speak to glenjacques, one of the subcontracted workers who is bringing this case. he works as a security officer for the university of london. danny millum is branch secretary of the university of london iwgb. he also works at the university of london as a full—time employee. melanie eusebe is a business analyst and professor
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at hull international business school. daphne romney qc is a barrister specialising in employment law who you saw in clive's film. you have been subcontracted by the university to provide security. have you always been in the subcontracted position? no, when i first started working at the university i was employed directly by the university and for the first two years i was employed by them, then the contract companies took over. soy was tunedied over to the contract company. we lost our pension and the university pay a good deal with the pension scheme so when that stopped we lost that so we had to make our own way with the pensions. that's one of the reasons i took the job because it was one i was going to hope to stay there for the rest of my days and get a good pension and that was out of the window and there we re that was out of the window and there were some people who had been working there for 30 years and they
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have lost that pension now. so for a number of years you have been in the position of working for the outside company, working alongside full—time employees of the university, but without the pension contributions, without the pension contributions, without the pension contributions, without the holiday pay, the sick pay, without the same rights. what does that feel like? well, to be honest, with my point of view i was tupeed over so some of the conditions were the same. it is mainly the pension, but it is the other contract staff they lost everything. they were getting sick pay and they had to fight for that, everything to match what the direct employees was getting was by the unions fighting for it because they had lost it all. the only thing is the contract company that first took over, we were treated pretty badly. we weren't treated, we were treated like second—class citizens to be honest. well, you don't have the same pension rights, that's one of them. it was even the treatment by them. it was even the treatment by the managers themselves that was pretty bad. danny, why isn't the a nswer pretty bad. danny, why isn't the answer here to campaign to protest,
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do whatever you want, with the contract company rather than the university of london? yeah, we were chatting about this before we started actually and i think the deal is that it's the university of london that decide all of these terms and conditions. so, for instance in the past, in 2011 when the university brought in the london living wage, again, that had contractors at the time and the university agreed that they would make up the difference. they would pay that to the contractors and they have done the same thing when we fought for improved terms of holidays and for sick pay. again the university stepped in and paid that. so, it's at everyjuncture, it is the university that's responsible here. they disagree. they say the university doesn't employ any of the workers and they don't accept that the relevant legislation recognises the relevant legislation recognises the concept ofjoint employment and therefore we have not agreed to the union's request for recognition. i wonder what you say from a business point of view in terms of an outsourced company giving the same rights as the full—time
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employees? we have to look at why companies outsource in the first place. so it is not necessarily about cost—cutting measures. sometimes it isjust about putting a capability in one place so for example, the university of london, they are an educational fal silt so they are an educational fal silt so they say ok, you know what, cleaning, accounting, it, tech, we outsource it to another organisation because we are not specialists, but there are people who are specialists, however, in regards to specifically outsourcing workers, we know for a fact that companies have done this to get away from the rights and obligations, the legal obligations that they have towards taking care of their employees and so, quite frankly i would say why are we not looking at cordent. that's the outsourced firm? why aren't we looking at that contract that they have with the individuals rather than looking at someone who is further down the supply chain? daphne, what chance of success in
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terms of this case? it's an interesting legal concept which is what clients hate hearing because so what? it is an interesting legal concept. it's not something that's recognised in the uk at the moment. what's been said here is that by reason of the degree of control, that's going on with the university, over these workers, they should be recognised as having some sort of control over them for the purpose therefore being recognised. control over them for the purpose therefore being recognisedm control over them for the purpose therefore being recognised. iejoint employer. the case in the is about whether or not they should be recognised, the union recognised as speaking for them. it is partly to do with the european convention on human rights which is not the same as the eu and therefore will apply after brexit and one of the conditions there, article 11, says there is freedom of association. so, it's partly being fought on that basis. it's quite exploratory and therefore, its quite important because if it's right, then anybody who is working as a contract worker could find themselves getting a
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whole raft of rights which they don't currently enjoy. the key thing here is these guys are total integrated with the work we do. sol work in the institute for historical research and glen works there. on a day—to—day basis we are using the same systems, we are providing training for him and he is providing support for us. people who will be coming into the institute would see glen as the face of the institute. he has been there for longer than i have. no one would dispute that. yet, the university essentially is determining everything about his day—to—day life. the manager is giving him instructions and university staff are giving him instructions as well, but at the same time he has no capacity to negotiate his terms and conditions with them. who is your line manager? that's another problem. i have got the manager of the institute, but thenl the manager of the institute, but then i have got the manager for the contract company as well so i have to answer to both of them. you have got two managers in a joint kind of way. yes. sometimes if you go to the university manager, the contract company will tell you you shouldn't
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be going to the client directly. what do do you there? it happened with the first contract company, maybe they should discuss it with each other and let me know what they wa nt each other and let me know what they want me to do because i was like a tennis ball hit from one place to the next. these things are about control and you are seeing this with the uber cases and the gig economy cases, who is giving the instructions? who has the capacity to say do this, do that and if people are working in the university side by side with direct employees, but their terms and conditions are less, their holidays are less, everything is less, then in effect you've got a second class layer of employment. so, there is a legal question and there is also a moral question and there is also a moral question and there is also a moral question and a morale question. final word from you. outsourcing is not a bad thing. it is something we use all the time. professional services, who do you listen to? the client or your own firm? but in the case where we are using it as a tool to take away the rights and the employment rights of our own people, that's when we have to look at it
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closely and go straight to the contracting company. closely and go straight to the contracting companylj closely and go straight to the contracting company. ijust wanted tojust say that contracting company. ijust wanted to just say that it's also massively discriminatory that 80% of the staff employed as contract staff are black, minority or ethnic. it is clear this is unfair on that basis as well. thank you, all of you. thank you very much. thank you for coming on the programme. collectively british women spend about £250 million a year on tampons and sanitary towels — £12 million of which goes to the treasury in vat, or what's known as the "tampon tax". the fact that such products aren't deemed a basic necessity, and thereby exempt from vat, has prompted a campaign to try and change that in the last few years. in 2018, it should change. the european commission says it's aiming to bring in a zero tax rate for sanitary products and the uk government has already legislated to allow this to happen as soon as rules change. today, the bbc has put up on our website a tampon tax calculator, that allows you to see how much you've spent so far in your life on sanitary products
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and so how much you've spent on the tax, too. have a look at this. let's talk now to laura croyton, who has campaigned since 2013 to end the tampon tax. rachel krengel has had times when she hasn't been able to afford to buy sanitary products. thank you for coming on the programme. laura £12 million in tax from the 5% vat on sanitary products, how do you react? it's a huge figure for individuals, but not that big for the government. so, it's not that much for them to sacrifice, but it's a lot for the individual person. you started this campaignafew individual person. you started this campaign a few years ago. how far do you think it has come and how much further is there to go?” you think it has come and how much further is there to go? i think it's come a long way in that the government have said they will end the tampon tax, it is a case of making sure they do it and that's going to take a while because of brexit and the eu situation which is very irritating. i am not sure it is to do with brexit. the government, as you rightly say, strongly support
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cutting the vat rate on sanitary products to zero. they can't under eu law, but the eu commission next year, before we've brexited is going to bring in this change in rules which means we can do it. so it is not to do with brexit. they said whichever comes first, whether that changes at the eu or we leave the eu. rachel, hello. hi. you have experienced period poverty. some of our audience will know what it is, but just our audience will know what it is, butjust explain. our audience will know what it is, but just explain. the our audience will know what it is, butjust explain. the definition we use is the inability to access menstrual products, we say menstrual. so that can be, for me it was in large part financial. we were in this horrible financial situation. very young children. we we re situation. very young children. we were both young. my partner lost his
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job. i was the birth control i was on, iwas job. i was the birth control i was on, i was bleeding for a long time and it wasn't something we could budget for. it's in large part because of taboo and because of stigma and because of lack of education. so, at this point i never we nt education. so, at this point i never went to a foodbank. i had amazing support networks. when we had no money, people would buy us food. people would lend us money for food, shopping, my sister bought my daughter a winter coat which was amazing. i never asked anyone because in my mind at the time this was something that was only about me, it wasn't about the rest of the family and it was something i could hide. it was something i could deal with privately and something in my heart of hearts i felt like i should be hiding. right, that's interesting, isn't it? i'm going to ask you how did you cope? what did you do? i was able to budget a little bit. so i would have some menstrual pads, not nearly enough for the month. so menstrual pads, not nearly enough forthe month. sol menstrual pads, not nearly enough for the month. so i would wear them for the month. so i would wear them for a very long time. not going to
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go, you know, it is national tv in the morning. just to say it is not pleasant. yeah. yeah. i had a diaphragm which was not comfortable and not safe, please nobody do it because i've just said it. sometimes i would not use anything. i wasn't leaving the house much, we didn't have money to go anywhere. fair enough. the government gives all funds from menstrual products, gives the tax to charities. to women's charities. last month it gave to an anti—abortion charity, but it did say that the £250,000 to the life charity could not be spent on funding counselling, education, publicity or promotion. how do you react to that, laura? it's an issue that it didn't need to go into and that it didn't need to go into and that if a charity has any bias towards an issue that women are very divided on, it shouldn't really get involved in that. right. ithink it
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was just unnecessary to do that with women's money. thank you both. thank you very much, laura. thank you, rachel for coming on the programme. let's get the latest weather update with simon king. hello victoria. it has been a really mild start to the day. it is going to turn colder by the end of the week. but in the meantime, despite the mild weather, it is cloudy. this is just one example in durham. some outbreaks of rain affecting northern parts of england, up into scotland. that rain will continue across scotland particularly western areas. a strong easterly wind developing here as well. drier spells elsewhere, easterly wind developing here as well. drierspells elsewhere, but further rain spreads into wales and the midlands and north wention later. temperatures, 13, 14, 15, but in brighter spells, we could see 16 or 17 celsius. tonight is breezy. outbreaks of rain at times for england and wales. that will become
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more confined towards northern parts of england and northern ireland by the early hours of wednesday morning, but again, a mild night with temperatures staying in double figures. during wednesday that rain will finance to move northward. the best of the dry and bright weather towards the south east where temperatures could be up into about 16 or 17 celsius. bye— bye. hello, it's tuesday, it's 10am, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. our top story, the government has agreed the uk government should offer more money for its divorce from the eu but only of trade talks begin next month. as the big b sub brexit backed mrs may over a bigger divorce bill, there is anger among tory mp5 for more money for brussels. we will get reaction from a leading brexit in the next half an hour. —— brexiteer. in an exclusive interview
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on this programme, three survivors of genocide join forces to stand up to extremism. he was such a nice guy. but i couldn't understand how this very nice guy could become so nasty. we all need to accept that we are born with the capacity to become perpetrators. the whole time, you were always waiting for someone to come and take you away and kill you. someone says, "such brave, brave souls, thanks for the coverage". another says, "thankfully impactful courage." gary says, "those guys we re courage." gary says, "those guys were unbelievable and to think we worry about what we have to deal with". the full interview is available on social media. and injust a moment, we'll be talking to the british explorer benedict allen, who is now back in the country after going missing in a remote area of papua new guinea. time for the latest bbc news with
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rebecca. good morning. the bbc understands that senior cabinet figures have agreed britain should offer to pay more money to leave the eu, but only if member states agree to move on to discussing trade next month. theresa may met colleagues including michael gove and borisjohnson last night, and is expected to make the new offer to the eu during talks later this week. robert mugabe is expected to face the start of impeachment proceedings today after refusing to step down as president of zimbabwe. the country's ruling party, zanu—pf, said the process could take just two days to complete. the 93—year—old, who remains under armed guard, is accused of allowing his wife to seize power illegally. last night, the military suggested a plan was emerging for the transfer of power.
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the government's borrowing level rose by £500 million last month, reaching a total of £8 billion. that's up 6.9% compared with october 2016, according to the office for national statistics. our business presenter susannah streeter has more. how unexpected is this rise? actually, a poll of reuters economists forecast it would be around £7 billion for october 2017 but as you say, it is actually standing at £8 billion, more than expected, up 6.9% in bed to october 2016. -- expected, up 6.9% in bed to october 2016. —— compared to october 2000 16. it is thought to be specifically because of a rise in the cost of government borrowing. those costs we re government borrowing. those costs were up 25% and that is all linked to rising inflation because the cost of index linked bonds is going up.
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this certainly gives chancellor philip hammond less room for manoeuvre in his budget that he is unveiling tomorrow. he wanted to try to allocate more money towards house—building, for example, but it certainly seems as though he will have less money to play with. however, he will say that he is still on track to reduce the deficit because in the first seven months of the financial year, the deficit had fallen by 9.6%. susannah streeter, there. staff employed by the outsourcing company cordant are asking a tribunal to rule that they have the right to negotiate better terms and conditions with the university of london where they work. the landmark case has implications for more than 3 million workers in the uk's business services industry, who are hired through facilities companies. the university says it doesn't employ any of the workers and doesn't accept their concept of "joint employment". finally, watch this.
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a camera operator who waited 40 minutes to film a stadium demolition... missed it. the georgia dome in atlanta, which hosted the super bowl and the olympics, was reduced to rubble by a controlled demolition, but something got in the way... you couldn't make it up! that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. i love the way he's having a conversation with the bus, like it can hear him. get in touch with us. on christmas lights, eleanor said she has got them up inside. "we don't have lights outside but i love to start decorating ellie. why not? the lights make my home so much nicer and warmer". and another says "people put their christmas digressions up early to get into the spirit, it is a good thing and it makes people happy, end of". but
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someone else is with me, "fairy lights in november? no." do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. you can use whatsapp and facebook for free. here's some sport now with olly. england batsman alastair cook says they have pretty much accepted that ben stokes is going to play no part in the ashes series. the all—rounder is awaiting the outcome of a police investigation after a brawl outside a nightclub in september. he was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm. stokes posted this on instagram yesterday, keeping himself trim in the nets at durham, bowling, batting, seemingly ready to join up with his team—mates if he is cleared. here are his team—mates, training in brisbane, where australia have not lost a test match in almost 30 years. the first test match starts on thursday, well, overnight wednesday our time.
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england hold the ashes but the last time they were in australia almost four years ago, they lost 5—0, whitewashed. they are certainly a wea ker whitewashed. they are certainly a weaker side without ben stokes. well, you're talking about it. it is a news line for us. of course, and we understand, i understand the game. it has been a while since the incident. certainly as a player, in the first couple of weeks after, it was what everyone was talking about. it was not great and we pretty much accepted it was unlikely that ben would be here. you can't always pin your hopes on one guy. if there is a bonus of him making the trip at some stage, that would be great, but i can honestly say it has not been spoken about in the changing room. it's no good for us to talk about that. england's women have already lost their ashes series but they can level the series if they win the final t20 match in canberra. it does not look likely. australia have posted a formidable target, open a beth mooney unbeaten on 117, her
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maiden century coming off 70 deliveries from australia finishing on 170—2 from their 20 overs. the chase has started, england have already lost three wickets. natalie sciver the last to go, run out, 36—3 is the latest scores so it looks like they will lose the series as well. brighton are now unbeaten in five matches in the premier league, coming from behind twice to earn a point against stoke at home. izquierdo made it 2—2 at the amex stadium. they are ninth and stoke remained 15th, four points above the relegation zone. that is all for now. the headlines in the next half an hour. the british explorer benedict allen is back in britain. he went missing in a remote area of papua new guinea as he tried to reach a little known—tribe. he's been diagnosed with strains of
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both malaria and dengue fever after getting stranded in remote mountains. he's a friend of frank gardner, our security correspondent, who is with him now for his first tv interview this morning. hello, gentlemen. hello, frank and benedict, welcome home. good morning. he can't hear you but thatis good morning. he can't hear you but that is nothing to do with malaria. hejust can't that is nothing to do with malaria. he just can't you. i have got you in my ear but says good morning as well. as you can see, benedict allen is beside me. i'm going to take it away. he is beside me here, at little disorientated by the fever that he has had but he hasjust stepped off a plane. benedict, i'm afraid i'm going to have to start by asking you, what were you thinking, going trekking without a satellite phone or a gps locator when you have got a young family back home who we re got a young family back home who were worried sick about you? well, it does not look very good but i'm not... i'm known as an explorer but the fact of the matter is, i'm a
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specialist at going to very remote places. i've spent three decades doing this kind of thing and i know papua new guinea very well. i used to live there. are you still witnessing, essentially. yes because a lot of circumstances combined against me. there was a huge amount of unexpected rains, one of the grapevine bridges we had to cross to get across a raging torrent was swept away by floods. then as we climbed higher, iwas swept away by floods. then as we climbed higher, i was trying to track down some people are used to live with and as it went on, i began to feel chills, began to feel uncomfortable at night and i knew i might well have malaria. i've had it five times, almost died of it twice so that. into the problem, it slowed me further down and then the final blow, there was a war going on between two different communities ahead of me so i suddenly found my way out of the forest was blocked. what do you mean by a wall? there's a lot of intercommunity fighting in papua new guinea, it's the most linguistically diverse place in the world, there's a huge number of
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languages, 850 language groups so people are fighting all the time and i was trapped. just to be clear, you we re very i was trapped. just to be clear, you were very well looked after by eve ryo ne were very well looked after by everyone you were with, you were never threatened. you were asking, why go without a phone? part of the reason is i have a back—up, my back—up is not being able to summon a helicopter or something like that, it is to use local resources and be friends with people who can help you. the forest is not a threat to them, it is they home and give them food, medicine and shelter so i had resources and the local people are a lwa ys resources and the local people are always friendly to me without exception, i was passed through the forest by different local groups. it was great until the malaria kicked in. what was your worst moment? the realisation that that time it did not look good at all. i was dropping into fever and out of it and i had to make a statement to my family... you made a farewell video message? yeah, bearing in mind i'd never gone
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on an expedition, a tough solo endeavour like this while a parent before. it had just been me as a young man before and now i have three children, who are ten, seven and two, and it was heartbreaking, talking to the camera about... well, saying, don't worry, i won't value but in my heart, i thought i might well fail so i had to say that if anybody found the footage, they should take it to the high commission because i might be dead and this is my family and i showed the cameraman my children and my wife and said, "maybe you have a family". i was speaking in pigeon. —— in pidgin. the local lingua franca, trying to get people to understand that they could get the footage out and give it to my wife. like me, you are a father with the young family, a lovely family, i've met them. why do this? why put them
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through this? some people will say this is a midlife crisis. my wife loves me for the person i am, i'm not a risk taker, i'm a risk calculator, and a challenge take—up. i calculate risks all the time. did you miss calculate this time? maybe idid but you miss calculate this time? maybe i did but i was not on my last legs. i was almost on my last legs, i had one big chance to get out and i was gathering myself ready for that went totally out of the blue, unexpectedly, this helicopter arrived and saved me from having to do what might have been a fatal stroke. paid for by the daily mail which is why some people are saying, "isn't this just a publicity stunt?" if it had been, it was certainly a shock to the journalist, seeing my condition because they took me to hospital, they realised that i was not well. i greeted them even though
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i was confused. it was on camera, they are filming me, i'm confused and elated and i can't believe that these people, it was like they came from nowhere and i was not going to have to make a last bid for freedom through the forest by myself. but once the adrenaline had worn off, they took me to hospital as soon as they took me to hospital as soon as they could. you can't fake that kind of thing, and you can't fake war, it is ridiculous. could you just say what it is like to be in thatjungle in that area. it is hard for us to kind of understand sitting on a sofa in west london. it's an extraordinary place that can work to pull you apart. i knew when i was walking along with five local people, as we went from community to community more people we re community to community more people were helping me, helping me. i knew i was the weakest, even though i am fit and strong and i'm used to the rainforests, fit and strong and i'm used to the ra i nforests, i fit and strong and i'm used to the rainforests, i lived there. i was the one that was going to be pulled apart. i gave myself three weeks and
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i thought if i get out in three weeks, i will be safe, but my legs we re weeks, i will be safe, but my legs were stripped. the leaches, the rain, the trees that would thump down in the night in the rain storms, my moss qet owe net that was protecting my from malaria ripped apart. we were sleeping in a swamp as the water levels rose. i knew i was gradually falling apart, but it can be glorious too. it's a splendid place. my last question because we're running out of time. next trip, if yourfamily we're running out of time. next trip, if your family let you go we're running out of time. next trip, if yourfamily let you go on another trip, i'm not sure mine would, after this, are you going to ta ke would, after this, are you going to take a satellite phone with you as emergency? we're going to have to a little discussion about this. i am not, i'm not saying, i have got to review my safety procedures, i think. i'm going to fight it all the way, but in the end, i have to take my wife's view into account and do the right thing by my family.” my wife's view into account and do the right thing by my family. i hope she is listening and watching. i hope you get over the malaria and the dengy. thank you very much,
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that's benedict allen back from his slightly ill—fated track, some would say ill—advised, but he has survived and he is in one piece. cheers, frank. frank gardner talking to ben fict allen and he looks very well considering what he has experienced, doesn't he? senior cabinet members are understood to have agreed that the uk should offer the eu more money as part of what's known as the divorce bill, but only if talks move on quickly to a trade deal. our political correspondent norman smith can tell us more. 0k, ok, so, how is mrs may managed to swing this? well, it is quite an achievement because boris johnson and michael gove leading brexiteers have been amongst the most sceptical about giving more cash to brussels. remember boris johnson just back about giving more cash to brussels. remember borisjohnson just back in the summer said brussels could go and whistle if they wanted a large slab of money to pay for us leaving the eu. last night, they backed mrs may and in effect agreed that we are
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going to have to up our divorce bill from the current offer of around £18 billion. why have they done that? a number of reasons, one is the realisation if we are going to move on to trade talks then we are going to have to up our offer. there is no other way around it. it is the political reality. but, they have also got amed in of strings attached to this extra money. one is that the eu won'tjust to this extra money. one is that the eu won't just bank to this extra money. one is that the eu won'tjust bank this money, prevaricate and demand more money, so we will only give them the money if they promise to move on to meaningful trade talks and will only settle on a final figure once we can see in black and white that the trade deal is going to be. all of which said, quite an achievement for mrs may because there is all sorts of trouble brewing on the backbenches and borisjohnson and michael gove wanted to cut up rough they too could have said no, we are not going to pay any more. quite the reverse , not going to pay any more. quite the reverse, they have said ok, we're ready to go along with the bigger divorce bill.
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let me ask you about some other issues, two european agencies are leaving britain and moving to other european capitals. despite the fact that the brexit secretary, david davis, said that wouldn't happen? well, i think in the end the sort of brutal truth is these are eu agencies. they are part of the infrastructure of the eu and with us leaving then other eu countries take the view well, itjust leaving then other eu countries take the view well, it just wouldn't leaving then other eu countries take the view well, itjust wouldn't make any sense to leave some of our institutions in a third country and a country that was no longer part of the eu, but the consequence of it, the eu, but the consequence of it, the european medicines agency, that goes to amsterdam, that's what around 800 or so jobs, goes to amsterdam, that's what around 800 or sojobs, often specialised, hi—tech valuable jobs. they are all lost. and we're also going to lose 190 banking jobs because the banking agency is also off to paris which is a strange reversal because remember just off to paris which is a strange
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reversal because rememberjust five yea rs reversal because rememberjust five years ago, we used to boast that all the fraench bankers were coming here. now it seems the flow is the other way, but i guess that is just pa rt other way, but i guess that is just part of the shake out from our departure from the eu. cani departure from the eu. can i ask you about this investigation into by the electoral commission into the vote leave campaign and where they directed quite a lot of money? well, the vote leave campaign put a lot of effort into the social media campaign. a huge amount of their resources went into that. i think i read something like 40% of their total budget into that, but of course, there are strict rules about who you can give money to and they are alleged to have given money to a student who was running a sort of digital brexit campaign, called believe, but to get the money, he had to be entirely independent of the main vote leave campaign and there are suggestions
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he wasn't so the electoral commission are looking into this. there are all sorts of allegations flying around about the referendum. remember, the accusations about sort of russian cyber bloggers using twitter and social media to try and back the brexit campaign all of which haven't really been firmed up yet, but there is a lot of allegation going around about whether people stuck strictly to the rules during the referendum campaign. we will see what happens. thank you very much, norman. conservative mp andrew bridgen for north west leicestershire, campaigned to leave the european union. hejoins me now from westminster. hello. good morning. borisjohnson and move have agreed that we should —— michael gove have agreed that we should pay more to brussels, do you feel betrayed by them? any shift in our negotiating position would be premature... well, it's happening. we're going to pay them more, almost double? well, that's disappointing with that's the case. i think it's
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premature and on the eve of a budget, i think the timing is also not very clever. do you feel betrayed by boris johnson and michael gove who have agreed to this? we have the principle that nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. let's see what sort of trade deal the eu are willing to give us, but again, i think that's premature the fact is... we are expecting mrs may to make this offer in eu talks to donald tusk? let's wait until we hear it. i think you might be in denial? well, you can think what you want. what i think is that the fact is we have full regulatory equivalence with the european union. so, a trade deal with the european union is not going to be anywhere near as complex as a trade deal with canada or anywhere else because we don't need to have a level playing field, we've got a level playing field. it's a matter of if i'm the uk, we don't want tariffs on cars, what do you want? and just go through the list because if we have
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full regulatory equivalence at the moment. so a trade deal with the will to do one can be, a very short thiem time, a matter of weeks and we area thiem time, a matter of weeks and we are a long way from the end date of us are a long way from the end date of us leaving the european union. when you look at the amount of taxpayers money there, is two years of transition, that's probably £20 billion, possibly another £20 billion, possibly another £20 billion, £40 billion, you're talking about an billion, £40 billion, you're talking aboutan amount billion, £40 billion, you're talking about an amount of money the size of the education budget for a year, more than the defence budget, i'd like to see us fight a little harder and also we have the situation that there is absolute, well, confusion in germany who are the main driver behind the european union. angela merkel can't form a government. she is probably going to have to go for another general election in germany. she may not be the chancellor. her ratings are falling. there could be no meaningful negotiations with the european union going forward for a couple of months at least. so, why
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would you want to make concessions now when you don't have to? you have described it as disappointing if it's true. next time you bump into borisjohnson or michael gove what will you say to them? what language will you say to them? what language will you say to them? what language will you use to them? let's see if there will be a statement in the house of commons, but i would remind your viewers that any deal that's negotiated has got to get through the house of commons and at the end of the day to vote for a deal, and not go to wto which is a deal we could have for free, not go to wto which is a deal we could have forfree, i've not go to wto which is a deal we could have for free, i've got to be able to look my constituents in north west leicestershire who voted to leave, 61% to 39%, in the eye and say that i believe this is a good way to spend taxpayers money. well, if it's true, it is around £38 billion which is what we're hearing from, you know, people in the know. will you be able to say that to your constituents? let's see what we get in return. we don't know what we're going to get in return and what
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trade deal they might offer us and it is bizarre that we're going to pay £40 billion or offer to pay £40 billion to allow the eu to have a 90 billion to allow the eu to have a 90 billion euros trade surplus with us. that's not a great deal. but let's see where we get to. ijust that's not a great deal. but let's see where we get to. i just worry that because, if we're giving ground at this stage, with so much time left before we leave the european union, that the eu will come back for more. in my book you can't feed a monster. should the eu give money to britain to gain access to the british market? well, if this is a divorce and we are having to pay a lump sum payment, there is going to be a division of assets. well, to start with, i think there is a few surveys out there that will say the eu probably owes us about £23 billion for the infrastructure that we've paid into. and also we've got 8 or 9 billion in the european development fund which is a bank that we need to have that money back as well. let's
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see how all this pans out. thank you very much. thank you very much. thank you. nine care homes in west sussex are under investigation by the police for the possible mistreatment and neglect of dozens of residents. one of them is beech lodge near horsham. two years ago, before the current investigation opened, two other residents, both vulnerable adults suffered serious, unexplained injuries at that home. the men's families are calling on the police to re—open their cases. our reporter sangita myska has been looking into this. tell us a bit more about gary lewis and matthew bates and what happened to them. i need to take you back to 1st april 2015. it was on that day they were taken to the same hospital within hours of each other suffering the same injuries. those injuries were brea ks to same injuries. those injuries were breaks to their thigh bones. mr lewis was 64 at the time. matthew
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bates was just 30 years old at the time. both of them have cerebral palsy. both of them have a great deal of difficulty communicating and both of them have differing degrees of osteoporosis because they couldn't explain what happened to them, there was a safeguard inquiry led by the county council and they concluded that the injuries were likely to have been caused when the men were rolled or turned, at that point, there was a police investigation, but there were no arrests and no charges. now, you have seen some of the men's medical records including x—rays. you have shown some of the men's medical records including x—rays to three independent orthopaedic surgeons. what did they have to say? so the families never had the opportunity to get a sort of third party view of what was going. we decided to approach three independent orthopaedic surgeons as you say and effectively they all concurred. they said it's not impossible, but it is highly unusual
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to see two such similar breaks in two men on the same day from the same care home. both breaks they said had a twisting element to them and it was 30—year—old matthew's injury that caused a little bit more concern than the other. and i was told that that would have required an element of energy to sustain that break. all of the surgeons suggested that rough handling or poor hoisting of the men may have been a possible cause of those breaks, but they couldn't be sure. they also went on to say that in their opinion they too would have suggested that the a very serious investigation took place to find out what happened. what do the families want now then? so, this summer, beech lodge became one of nine care homes to be put under police investigation into relation to the possible ill—treatment and neglect of a total of 43 residents, 12 of whom have died. all nine of those care homes including beech lodge are owned by a
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single company called sussex health care. in the light of this big new inquiry, which seems to be a major inquiry, which seems to be a major inquiry, about 17 police officers involved, gary and matthew's families are asking the police to re—open their old cases just in case more evidence can be unearthed, but so far sussex police said no, the families say that's not fair and they are campaigning hard to get those cases included in the new inquiry. have the police explained why they aren't tin clined to include gary and matthew's cases in the bigger investigation? we were careful to put every allegation in this report and others i've done, today to sussex police. they came back and said in 2015, they carried out a thorough investigation and they could not bring charges. they went on to say that the county council is bringing a serious case review that will be carried out by social services, aduu carried out by social services, adult social services team. we then went to sussex health care, the company that owns all nine care homes and they said again that they fully cooperated with the
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authorities in 2015 and the home was interestingly rated good in 2015, the year of the injuries and was again rated good in 2017, just before this bigger inquiry opened up in the summer. you also have an independent review of the police did not read and gary and maggie's cases, who did you speak to? we decided to try to get another legal opinion about whether these cases we re opinion about whether these cases were reasonable, whether the families requests were reasonable, so we approached nazir afzal, the former head of the cps in the north—west who has dealt with thousands of cases like this in his time. he told us the families' requests in his were not unreasonable, and he said it maybe you'll benefit to the police to see if there are, —— there are common patterns, individuals and practices from gary and matthew's cases which may impinge on their present investigation. both families have
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told us that they will carry on campaigning to get those cases reopened and they are pursuing other legal routes as well to see what more they can find. thank you for joining us. still to come. the family plea for a former uefa executive to get in touch after he disappeared from his home five weeks ago. and with shoppers expected to spend £10 billion this week as the infamous black friday extends beyond the one—day—only sale, we'll be looking at how genuine the deals really are. time for the latest news, here's rebecca. the headlines this morning. the bbc understands that senior cabinet figures have agreed britain should offer to pay more money to leave the eu, but only if member states agree to move on to discussing trade next month. theresa may met colleagues including michael gove and borisjohnson last night, and is expected to make the new offer to the eu during talks later this week. the government's borrowing level
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rose by £500 million last month, reaching a total of £8 billion. that's up 6.9% compared with october 2016, according to the office for national statistics. economists had been expecting a lower figure of £7.5 billion. robert mugabe is expected to face the start of impeachment proceedings today after refusing to step down as president of zimbabwe. the country's ruling party, zanu—pf, said the process could take just two days to complete. the 93—year—old, who remains under armed guard, is accused of allowing his wife to seize power illegally. last night, the military suggested a plan was emerging for the transfer of power. the competition and markets authority says the drugs company conor coady abused its position. ——
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the drugs company concordia abused its position by overcharging the nhs for thyroid medicine. a decade ago, it costs £4.36 per packet, it has since risen to £258 per packet, an increase of almost 6000%. that is a summary of the latest bbc news. stephen on facebook says, "i have four christmas trees up in my pub already. the celebrations start in the heart. enjoy today and live for tomorrow". i absolutely concur with the latter half of that statement, it is just putting the christmas trees up so early is not for me. here's some sport now with olly. these are the headlines. alastair cook says england have pretty much accepted that ben stokes won't play accepted that ben stokes won't play a part in the ashes series that sta rts a part in the ashes series that starts on thursday. the all—rounder posted pictures of himself in durham
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yesterday. that is actually england's training in brisbane. stokes is awaiting the outcome of a police investigation into a brawl outside a nightclub, he was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm. the women's ashes series comes to an end today, in a next hour or so, australia have already retain the ashes but england could level the series if they win the final t20 today, but they are up against it, beth mooney hitting an unbeaten 117 as australia posted 178-2, unbeaten 117 as australia posted 178—2, and england are 107—3 in reply but over is running out. brighton r&b duminy five premier league matches after drawing 2—2 at home against 0, coming from behind twice to remain in the top half of the table. one of great britain's most successful female drivers, tonia couch has retired. the former european champion and commonwealth silver medallist is going to pursue a career in coaching. that is all for me. i will be back after 11 on bbc news. the family of a former uefa executive who disappeared
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from his home five weeks ago shortly after being diagnosed with bipolar disorder are appealing for him to get in touch. 51—year—old bernie ross, who had previously been responsible for putting on some of football's biggest tournaments, left his wife and four children in oxfordshire, saying he was travelling to visit his sister in london. he never visited his sister and never returned home, leaving behind his wallet, phone and extra clothes. jacinta ross, bernie's wife who is desperate for him to return home safely is here. how are you doing? it is difficult. each day is difficult. i can't believe it has gone on for so long. we arejust believe it has gone on for so long. we are just counting the hours every day. how are the kids? they are ok, they are quite resilient, and they are trying to carry on as normal, they have got busy lives, lots of
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activities and their schools have been great. the first few weeks were 0k been great. the first few weeks were ok but now they are looking towards christmas and wondering whether he will be back by then. it is difficult. they are trying to be strong for me, i think. they are aged between 11 and 18 so i suppose they have the capacity to be strong for you when they need to be. yes, i mean, the eldest did not go to university because of this. the second one down is doing his a—levels, so it has been quite disruptive. tell us about your husband. he's lovely. i'm biased, obviously but he is a lovely, gentle man, universally popular with his colleagues. he's got a reputation for being very calm under pressure. that is why he is so good at live tv. the just giving that is why he is so good at live tv. thejust giving page that is why he is so good at live tv. the just giving page says that is why he is so good at live tv. thejust giving page says it all, when he fell ill, his collea g u es all, when he fell ill, his colleagues rallied round and they raised money and the comments they
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made were really uplifting and helped bernie a lot. he is very funny and fun loving, relaxed kind of guy. just ordinary. when you say he fell ill, you are referring to the diagnosis of bipolar which came in january. what the diagnosis of bipolar which came injanuary. what impact did it have on him? i think actually come he was relieved to have the diagnosis at that point because he knew he was ill, we all knew he was ill but we did not know what exactly was wrong. so to get the treatment and to be hospitalised actually probably was a relief as much of anything else. and the effect on the rest of you? oh... it has been a very tough year. nothing really prepares you for it. being hospitalised, falling ill, losing yourjob... we arejust being hospitalised, falling ill, losing yourjob... we are just an ordinary family whose life has been
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turned upside down and inside out. i didn't think it could get any worse but his disappearance as... yeah. when was the last time you saw your husband, tell us about it? it was on the 18th and i did not see him leave the 18th and i did not see him leave the house because i went upstairs and he was going to leave while i was up there. but you know, he seemed normal, happy, the medication he was taking was having a good effect and he seemed to have a new kind of clarity, actually, about his situation. so i would say generally, he was fairly up. and he said he was going to visit his sister in london. you live in oxfordshire. there would be no reason for you to doubt that, presumably. no, no. and also, it would not have been that unusual for him to do that and stay the night which is what he said which is why we did not really pick up he had not gone there until the next day. what
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did he take with him and leave behind? he took very little with him, he left his phone and wallet and he left all of his clothes as far as and he left all of his clothes as farasi and he left all of his clothes as faras i can and he left all of his clothes as far as i can see. even his wash bag is still at home. he did not take much with him which was why we thought he would not be a way very long initially. but he did take his passport. yes. and the post office card. so when you think about somebody taking their passport, what does it lead you to think? well, he clearly was intending to travel. he did notjust find clearly was intending to travel. he did not just find himself clearly was intending to travel. he did notjust find himself in france. i think he had the intention of travelling when he left that day and when he left and went to london. i have had to come to terms with the idea that this was preplanned, actually. because there have been sightings in france? yeah. what do you think might be going on? well,
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the doctors think that in bipolar patients, anniversaries are very significant and the anniversary of what went on this time last year at hisjob will be what went on this time last year at his job will be a trigger, a what went on this time last year at hisjob will be a trigger, a huge trigger, for him and that might have triggered this episode, that they think he may be in some kind of manic state in some way. the big worry is that it might turn into a depressive state. he has got mixed affective states which is when you can be manic and depressive simultaneously. i don't know about you but i find that almost impossible to imagine what it must be like, how confusing, very the will bring. —— very bewildering. the doctors think that this is all related, his disappearance is linked to the unresolved issues he has got with his employers. this interview will be put on social media. if your
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husband happens to see this, what would you say to him directly. get in touch, please, please get in touch. immediately. you know, we need him back. somebody started bernie back home for christmas and my heart sank because it seems like a long time away to me. but we need him home and we can solve anything together so he needs to come back. thank you forjoining us. thank you for your time. let me bring you this news. i'm just reading it myself the time from durham police, seven former members of staff are being prosecuted over alleged abuse and misconduct at a detention centre. this is the medomsley detention centre, following claims made by almost 1500
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former inmates. detectives in durham are launching an investigation, sorry, launched the investigation of yea rs sorry, launched the investigation of years ago and they have now interviewed former members of staff. almost 1500 men have claimed they we re almost 1500 men have claimed they were abused at this detention centre during the 19705 and 19805 and seven former members of staff are now going to be prosecuted over alleged abuse and misconduct there. that is from durham police. zimbabwe's ruling party plan to impeach president mugabe today on charges that include allowing his wife "to usurp constitutional power". in other words, he allowed her to have too much power. it was only six days ago that the armed forces took control of a tv station and put mugabe under house arrest. we wish to make it abundantly clear
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that this is not a military takeover of government. everyone is feeling this enormous sense of anticipation. they know, they believe that president robert mugabe, the only man they have ever known in charge of this country, really is on the cusp of stepping down and so there is this anticipation, this feeling that people want to celebrate. what does this mean for you?l what does this mean for you? a new zimbabwe, freedom has finally come! cheering they are saying this is their second
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independence. there has to be a net return to the guiding principles of our party. tomorrow, the committee will be set up tomorrow, the committee will be set up tomorrow and hopefully by wednesday, we expect that by wednesday, we expect that by wednesday, we expect that by wednesday, we should be able to vote in parliament. shepherd yuda is a former civil servant and government worker, who says he suffered at the hands of the mugabe regime by being tortured. his uncle was murdered for supporting the movement for democratic change. jasper maposa works with young people in zimbabwe who he says are manipulated and bribed into committing crimes such as beating up political opponents, and ben freeth whose land was seized by the mugabe regime.
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ben is with us. his land was seized. you are tried to sue mugabe for seizing your land. what happened as a result of you trying to sue him? well, we did sue him and two weeks before the actual main hearing of the case we ended up being abducted and taken off to one of the torture camps where there were a lot of young people who were being indock tinnated into hate and indoctrinated into beating up the opposition violently and we were taken out to that camp that and they wanted us to signa that camp that and they wanted us to sign a bit of paper to withdraw from the court and obviously, the court which the hearing was coming up in two weeks' time, at that stage, my faerl and myself were unconscious, my mother—in—law was still compus
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mentus, and with a gun to her head and they had already broken her arm very badly. they thrust a burning stick into her mouth, they had beaten her around the head, they got her to sign that bit of paper to say that we would not carry on with this legal case. right. can i ask you ben, what you think of the prospect of mugabe's vice—president, taking over? a man who was part of the system that mugabe created and some say is every bit as nasty as his ex—boss? say is every bit as nasty as his ex-boss? well, i think we are all extremely concerned about him taking over. he was minister of state security during the time when mugabe murdered about 20,000 people in the south of the country earlier on in
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his reign. he has presided over many of the violent things that mugabe has done to remain in power right the way through and we are very circumspect and worried about what he might do if he was able to take power. shepherd, thank you for talking to us. i wonder what your feeling about the prospects of impeachment of mr mugabe and his right—hand man, his vice—president, potentially taking over? hello. hi shepherd, can you hear me ok? yes. yes, i can hear you now. yes. can you come back again? yes, of course, what are you thinking about, about what might happen over the next few days and weeks, president mugabe being impeached and his vice—president potentially taking over the running of the country? it's a very
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unfortunate situation for zimbabweans to say look, that there is certainly no change. whether we have got mugabe, whether we have got the vice—president, these people have been there for too long. everything that happened in zimbabwe it was through these two guys. there is no change at all. so you don't think there is any chance of reform, but there is potentially a chance of free and fair elections for the first time, isn't there or not? that would be impossible. we are not going to have any free and fair elections because ifi any free and fair elections because if i take you back to 2008, if you don't mind. right, in 2008, it was the vice—president in the military. he will not run in an election that
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he loses except if the election is run by the united nations or monitored by the united nations. that will have a fair chance of a fair election. you work with young people who sayer bribed into beating up political opponents. tell our british audience more about this? the issue is cam pant and the factors that have led to this unfortunate situation is the continued economic meltdown. we remember from the 19905 our economy has always been on the doldrums. it has always been on the doldrums. it has been poorly performing and
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through the lend reform programme until now. so the young people who we re until now. so the young people who were born have not known another life which can give them access to employment. it is a life of struggle and they find themselves and the syste m and they find themselves and the system is realised that this is ready for political abuse and they really do whatever they told to do so they can have access to natural resource and gold. let's assume mugabe is impeached and the vice—president takes over. that may, of course, not happen, we will have to see how things unfold over the next few days and weeks. what impact
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would that have on young people in zimbabwe? that would be a sad development. people are happy to have change. as a person working with young people, i have seen in the aftermath of the vice—president, i have seen the youth were alined. they ransacked the towns and cities and they started to take everything belonging to the youth alined to mnangagwa. mnangagwa is bouncing back. so, the politics are the one that's
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the problem and if the young people continue to fight each other on the basis of who is on the top of the game. this is not good news for the young people. we need a clean sheet. a clean transition. it would be better if we have free and fair elections and whoever wins, wins. ifi elections and whoever wins, wins. if i come back to ben. the subject of free and fair elections it would be the first time in a long time, but president mugabe won an election legitimately in 1980, but does not, imean legitimately in 1980, but does not, i mean doesn't emerson mnangagwa know that in order to get for example, funds from imf to help your economy, that a condition would be to have free and fair elections. he is pragmatic in that sense, isn't he? well, i think absolutely. we need to push very hard first of all
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for the constitution to be followed and in this case, i don't think emerson mnangagwa can end up on top if the constitution is followed. we need to go for a transitional authority which will then end up with free and fair elections at the end of it, with possibly mnangagwa or tsvangirai end of it, with possibly mnangagwa ortsvangirai and end of it, with possibly mnangagwa or tsvangirai and someone who would ensure that things were done properly an internationally run election could happen. we will not get a free and fair election so long as mnangagwa is running the election. so what has to happen then? i believe that there has to be a transitional authority established where those that the coup leaders if you like get together with the opposition, they thrash out a plan whereby we are working towards a free and fair election and we run with that. it's obviously going to
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bea with that. it's obviously going to be a big risk for mnangagwa to do that, but they pulled it off last time in 2009 and i believe that they will believe they can pull it off again. all right. thank you all very much. we appreciate your time, thank you. shoppers are expected to spend £10 billion this week as black friday extends beyond one day only, friday, to try and lure in shoppers between now and christmas. i have started already. i was eyeing up a laptop two weeks ago to see what the prices are now to when the black friday hits so yeah, it makes you hold out for the sales if you are a month in between it. having black friday prompts you to look for deals. throughout the year you are trying to save money and not be so frivolous. if there's something that i like then yeah, but i'm not going to go out searching which deals are out there because it's never really a significant deal. sometimes they double the prices
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and then just half them and then you're paying what you would pay the rest of the year anyway. i tend to wait until boxing day because the deals tend to be better on boxing day rather than black friday. but we can't wait until boxing day, can we? joining us now, kate hardcastle, a consumer expert at insight with passion. kerenza richards runs the coupon mama uk facebook page. hello both of you. kate how is black friday changed since it first made its way across the atlantic? it changed things for retailers because commonly at this time which we call the golden quarter, between september and december, when you would want to sell most of your merchandise, we have got a heavy discounting period, but what came across as a bit of a surprise to key retailers because this is an
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american promotion has now been something they have caught up with. so as you have been hearing from your vice viewers a lot of the promotions are not as again went as they seem. i haven't got much time left. what are the best deals out there at moment? tell our viewers? l655 inch 4k tv, down to £549 in curry's. a bottle of calvin klein reduced from £68 to £29. we have got 6hds, reduced from £68 to £29. we have got ghds, they are £75.99 down from £129. 99. ghds, they are £75.99 down from £129.99. is this the kind of stuff that you will be buying orjust recommending to people on your facebook page? i bought the xbox bundle for my daughter for christmas. how much did you save? £100 i saved on that. when do you start shopping for christmas then?
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january. do you? yeah. you get the best deals in january.” january. do you? yeah. you get the best deals in january. i am a bit late then? it is really good to shop out of season. i buy my winner wardrobe in summerand out of season. i buy my winner wardrobe in summer and winter wardrobe in summer and winter wardrobe in summer and winter wardrobe in summer. you have got it sorted. thank you very much. iam sorted. thank you very much. i am sorry about the short amount of time. thank you, we appreciate it. thank you. we are back tomorrow at 9am. have a lovely day. good morning. it has been a really mild day start to the day. temperatures have been up in double figures across most parts of england and wales and also northern ireland, but we have got lots of cloud around at the moment. outbreaks of rain in the forecast too. that's a across northern areas of england and across scotland. this afternoon turning heavyin scotland. this afternoon turning heavy in western scotland.
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accompanied by a strong easterly wind here. some drier spells elsewhere, but further rain spreads into wales, the north—west of england, during this afternoon. some brighter skies here and there and where you get the brighter skies, temperatures could be as high as 16 or 17 celsius. through tonight, it will stay mild, but we will see a stronger wind developing across many areas, rain at times across wales, the midlands and into northern areas of england and maximum, minimum temperatures tonight down to about 11,12, temperatures tonight down to about 11, 12, 13 celsius. chillierfurther north. during wednesday, we will see that rain spread its way further north and eastwards, but towards the south and the east of england, it is looking dry and bright. again, pretty warm. temperatures up to 16 celsius in the sunshine. further north and east, chillier. bye—bye. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories
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developing at eleven. zimbabwe mugabe is warned his impeachment is imminent — his former vice—president tells him to resign orface humiliation. albiol reporting live from harare, where some people are saying the impeachment of robert mugabe could be completed within days, ending his 37 year rule. more money on offerfor the eu — cabinet members agree to increase the divorce bill, if trade talks begin next month. the british explorer benedict allen, who was flown out of a remote part of papua new guinea, says he did not get lost and didn't need rescuing.
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