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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 22, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin the chancellor philip hammond promises to use today's budget to secure a bright future for britain. the famous red box is expected to contain plans for housing and schools, but mr hammond is a man under pressure from all sides. i'm eleanor garnier, and i will have all the political analysis ahead of a key day for the residents of both numbers 10 and 11 downing street. i'll be looking at the economics. i've been finding out how members from one family are feeling the squeeze and what the chancellor can best do to help them, young and old. good morning, it's wednesday the 22nd of november. a new dawn for the people of zimbabwe after president mugabe's 37 years in power come to an end.
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how different types of alcohol bring out different emotions, a major study looks at the link between your drink and your mood. liverpool throw away a 3—0 lead in seville, meaning qualification for the knockout stages of the champions league will have to wait a little longer. and carol has the weather. good morning. a fairly cloudy day for many once again, we have heavy and persistent rain across the north—west of the country. the brighter skies will be in the south—east and east anglia and it will be pretty windy across england and wales. more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the chancellor philip hammond will present his budget in parliament later. he'll set out what he describes as his plans to seize the opportunities from brexit, while tackling deep—seated economic challenges in the country head on. mr hammond is under pressure to balance the books but also ease austerity amid significant tensions within the tory party. our political correspondent,
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eleanor garnier, reports. when the chancellor opens his red box to reveal his tax and spending plans, money will be tight as the government keeps saying. the chancellor's under huge pressure to loosen the purse strings to put more cash into public services like the nhs. but few expect the chancellor to go ona nhs. but few expect the chancellor to go on a big spending spree. brexit is the backdrop to everything in westminster. the tensions over the talks with brussels and division in government over the eu don't make the chancellor's job any easier. any controversial budget plans, like tax rises or spending cuts, will be a difficult sell without an overall majority in the commons. the tories hoped for a reboot at the general election and the party conference both failed. now many think it's up
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to the chancellor to deliver a big budget that will trigger the revival the party and the prime minister need. the stakes are high for the chancellor and with some in his own party wanting him sacked, any slipups and he could find himself out of a job. eleanor garnier, bbc news, westminster. and eleanorjoins us now from downing street. you mentioned it's a high—pressure day for philip hammond and on top of that we've had all this talk of last—minute changes forced upon him by the prime minister as well?” by the prime minister as well?|j think by the prime minister as well?” think the chancellor really does have very little room form an uber, politically but financially too. there are many conservatives in westminster who would want the budget to lift the post—election bloom they've been dealing with —— room form an uber. banish all memories of recent cabinet
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resignations and smooth over the external tensions with brexit but many know the chancellor is starting with a pretty weak hand. we can expect plans to target the housing crisis, there will be extra money for teacher training in england and cash to boost the number of students taking maths after 16, and for young people the discounted rail cards are extended from 26 to 30 —year—olds. but will there be any good news for paid off for public sector workers? what can the chancellor do to address concerns over the waiting time for universal credit? big questions and lots of pressure. labour is calling for the chancellor to call time on austerity and boost public services. the chancellor will try to improve the government's fortunes, but really the economic and political backdrop leave him with few options. eleanor, thanks very much, we will speak to you later. there have been euphoric scenes in zimbabwe following the resignation of robert mugabe as president.
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the sacking of emmerson mnangagwa earlier this month prompted military intervention a week ago, which brought to an end mr mugabe's 37—year grip on power. mr mnangagwa is expected to be sworn in as the country's new leader in the next two days. despite this, zimbabwe is waking up to an uncertain future. 0ur africa correspondent anne soy reports. zimbabweans from across the political divide united in celebration. it's been a long time coming. the end of an era many will remember for its repression and brutality. the man most of these people only ever knew as president leaves disgraced. this is history in the making. we never thought that this was going to happen in zimbabwe. yes! this is history, you guys. this is what we have been fighting for since independence.
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one man has been taking us back, and we are very happy that he has done, now. the announcement came from an unlikely venue. parliament was in the process of impeaching robert mugabe, but they did not need to, in the end. the speaker read out the resignation letter. hereby, i formally tender my resignation as president of the republic of zimbabwe with immediate effect. applause the ruling party plans to have the former vice president emmerson mnangagwa is warning to complete robert mugabe's term before elections are held next year. critics say the two men are cut from same cloth. so as zimbabwe celebrates the end of robert mugabe's rural, in the coming days, there will be reflections on the future of the country and whether this
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political transition is the change that they had hoped for. anne soy, bbc news. more on that through the morning for you as well. a un war crimes tribunal is due to deliver its verdict later this morning on a former bosnian—serb general ratko mladic, who's accused of orchestrating the worst act of genocide in europe since the second world war. mladic is charged with the murders of 8,000 muslim men and boys in srebrenica in 1995, as well as the four—year siege of sarajevo, in which 10,000 people died. now aged 7a, he's been on trial at the hague for more than five years. there are fears the crew of a submarine that disappeared in the southern atlantic could be running out of oxygen. 44 people are on board the sanjuan, which went missing last wednesday after it reported an electric breakdown. a spokesman for the argentine navy said the massive search operation would continue until the vessel is located. we will be speaking to someone who's been helping with the rescue effort
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and people involved in that a little bit later. the american actor and musician, david cassidy, has died in florida at the age of 67. he was admitted to hospital last week after suffering multiple organ failure. the ‘70s icon shot to fame in the sitcom the partridge family before going on to have a successful solo career in music. 0ur north america correspondent, peter bowes, joins us from los angeles. peter, very sad day, good morning. extremely sad. we knew he was ill, he went into hospital about a week ago and we were told he was suffering from multiple organ failure but at only 67, you're absolutely right, it is a sad loss and lots of people may be of a certain age will remember him in the 19705, certain age will remember him in the 1970s, the cartridge family, the show that catapulted him to stardom. you couldn't get much bigger than david cassidy as a pop star in those days —— partridge. it was bubblegum
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p0p days —— partridge. it was bubblegum pop that made him a star and the show went on for about four years, album after album and then it ended and he went on to a solo career, which wasn't quite as successful for him, and at one point he almost seemed to rebel against the times he was very successful. he had quite a troubled private life, a few run—ins with the law and drink driving offences, and towards the end of his life he wasn't particularly well. in fa ct life he wasn't particularly well. in fact earlier this year he will announced he would be ending his career after five decades. —— announced. there have been many tributes, led by brian wilson from the beach boys, who tweeted he is sad about david cassidy, they got together in the late 70s and they started writing a song together, he was very talented and a nice person. tributes have been paid to the comic actor rodney bewes, who has died aged 79. english girls abroad with appealing shoulders and flowery dresses, like
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wallpaper on the march! he found fame playing bob ferris in the bbc sitcom the likely lads alongside james bolam, although the pair eventually fell out in real life. he went on to enjoy other roles on stage and screen, including a sitcom he wrote called dear mother. . . love albert. one of hollywood's most successful animators and the co—founder of disney's pixar studio, john lasseter, is the latest high profile media figure to face allegations of inappropriate behaviour. lasseter, who worked on films such as toy story, a bug's life, and frozen, is taking a six month leave of absence and has apologised for what he called missteps, including giving staff unwanted hugs. uber has admitted that it concealed a massive global breach of the personal information of 57 million customers and drivers which took place in october last year. the ride—sharing firm confirmed it had paid the hackers responsible £75,000 pounds to delete the data, which included customer names, e—mail addresses and mobile phone numbers. different types of alcohol change
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and shape your mood in different ways, according to a major new study. researchers for the global drug survey have found major links between types of alcohol and the emotions they create. for example, spirits were associated with feelings of aggression, while red wine and beer were linked to feeling relaxed. james gallagher reports. how do you feel when you drink? sleepy or rowdy? excited, or maybe even tearful? the on—line global drug survey filled out by nearly 30,000 young adults suggests what's in your glass is linked to your mood. it showed spirits had the strongest link. more than half associated drinks like gin, rum, and vodka, with confidence and energy. but nearly a third also link those drinks to aggressive feelings. the survey said a feeling of relaxation was linked mostly to red wine or beer. the researchers say varying alcohol levels in the beverages might be having different impacts on the brain. younger people in particular
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were more likely to report a stronger emotional connection, both on the positive and the negative side. but also women were more likely than men to report different high levels of emotional outcomes, if you like, with different drinks, except for aggression, where men were more likely than women. the study shows only an association, it cannot prove different drinks alter mood, and it didn't assess our motions before they started drinking. the researchers describe their work as an initial exploration and say understanding the relationship between drink and emotion could help tackle alcohol abuse. james gallagher, bbc news. i think that's interesting but i probably could have guessed it depends on what you drink. the other thing, which will talk about this later, volume, whether that affects your mood, whether it is down to the type of drink that makes you feel a certain weight. and whether you mix them. you are taking things a whole
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new level there! —— a certain way. very early for us but it is 5pm somewhere! that is true! what have you got? liverpool, champions league, throwing away the 3—0 lead, a spectacular first 30 minutes and thenit a spectacular first 30 minutes and then it all went to pot. throwing away the chance to go through to the knockout stages for the first time since 2009. roberto firmino and sadio mane had put jurgen klopp's men 3—0 up inside half an hour. but a second half collapse was completed deep into injury time when guido pizarro equalised. but tottenham and manchester city know they'll finish top of their groups after winning last night. spurs beat borussia dortmund to finish above real madrid. england's women have secured a series victory over canada with a test to spare. they were 49—12 winners at twickenham. and the waiting's nearly over. this time tomorrow the men's ashes
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series will be well under way way in brisbane. today the captains face the media. we have matt prior coming on later. 0vernight did you see nathan lyon said that some englishmen were scared in the ashes, it ruined their career, he said he was looking forward to ruining more. matt prior isa forward to ruining more. matt prior is a good guess to have on today considering. he said it was rubbish, all words to that effect.” considering. he said it was rubbish, all words to that effect. i believe that's correct. —— or words.” all words to that effect. i believe that's correct. -- or words. i know i'mjumping ahead to that's correct. -- or words. i know i'm jumping ahead to the papers, but the sun has turned nathan lyon into the sun has turned nathan lyon into the cowardly lyon from the wizard of oz, and england have hit back saying he is talking rubbish. the time of year for that! we love a bit of buildup, all starts tomorrow at the gabba. midnight tonight. all the
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details tomorrow. let's look at some of the front pages, starting with the guardian. good morning as well, steph. mcga rvey mcgarvey family relinquishes power, celebrations taking place in harare and other parts of zimbabwe after robert mugabe stood down —— mugabe family. the daily telegraph with a pretty similarfront family. the daily telegraph with a pretty similar front page. another picture from zimbabwe. look at the sign he is holding up, mugabe go home and rest. and ahead of the budget, they are talking about the relationship between number ten and number11, relationship between number ten and number 11, talking about may's budget wall with —— war with hammond. the real reasonjack was
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booted out of the jungle is their front page, going back to some tweets sent in the past, and they have been found and he has been accused of various things. his representatives said he has come out thejungle to representatives said he has come out the jungle to resolve that. and representatives said he has come out thejungle to resolve that. and pm cuts police budget, that is the front page of the mirror this morning. 0n the front page of the sun, talking about angela merkel, and again, we were talking about the pictures of angela merkel yesterday, and how they very much tell a story. the way they put it is britain will $0011 the way they put it is britain will soon be out of your hair, cheer up. their main story is savers urged to boycott banks who have not passed on this month's rise in interest rates. i feel sorry for people that co nsta ntly i feel sorry for people that constantly have cameras. they take
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lots and lots of photos, and use the photo which fits the story. it is like when the former governor of the bank of england used to go to wimbledon and permanently set with a smile, so they didn't have any shots they could use. if you are very famous... well, you can't have one anywhere, including newsrooms, as we saw last week. there is a journalist somewhere jotting all this down. 0bviously somewhere jotting all this down. obviously i am covering the budget today, and innovative —— in a bit of good news, a surge in demand from overseas, and this is obviously the alternative to retailers that struggle with the fall in the value of the pound. for our manufacturers it is good news because it makes our
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products cheaper for those buying them from abroad. there are always winners and losers when you look at what is happening in the currency market. and you have a busy day for budget day. you will be covering it on breakfast. you are the eye which never sleeps. apart from during the shifts. and the war of words. liam phillips, a former bmx world champion and 0lympian, finally retired. his last injury was the final one. his right wrist had to be plated, so it was all over. there is a nice illustration of how many injuries, more than a dozen over the course of his career. his clavicle has had to be plated three times on both sides, and he has said enough is enough. i rode a bmx around with him, in the build—up to the 0lympics, i think he beat me by about 15 minutes! it has been a bit
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ofa about 15 minutes! it has been a bit of a tough run. you know when you get stuff sent in the post and it is inappropriately rapped or covered in bubble wrap and has miles of cardboard around it, well, this guy called pauljacobs ordered a role of bubble wrap from amazon and look what it came wrapped in, 100 foot of paper. this is his role of bubble wrap, and when it turned up it was covered in this, to protect it. just in case something happens. just in case there was any sort of injury to the bubble wrap, which of course is used for that purpose. you can get a great role of it, put it on the floor and walk on it. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. and you and i have done the classic, gone to our different wardrobes and chosen almost exactly the same dress. you couldn't make it up, could you? dress. you couldn't make it up, could you ? this dress. you couldn't make it up, could you? this morning is quite mild. if we were to draw a line from
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north wales across the lincolnshire, all point out that are currently resting at 13 or 1a celsius. as we go past the middle part of this week, it will turn more mild. this morning, wet and windy weather. if you are in the west, you have got both. low pressure is driving our weather once again. we have a weather once again. we have a weather front in the west and the north, both producing rain, heavy and persistent rain, and the wind is really going to strengthen later in the morning and into the afternoon across england and wales. this morning is a quiet start, there is a lot of cloud around. temperatures in london, 7am, 1a celsius and one or two back brighter breaks here and there. across northern england we have some rain, and the most heavy and persistent will be coming in from the north—west. in southern scotla nd from the north—west. in southern scotland the heaviest rain from the south—west at this stage. a lot of dry weather, chilli in scotland and a wintry mix in the northern isles. for northern ireland, not as windy for you but we do have persistent
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rain coming across, heavy at times as well, and that is moving across the irish sea, across the isle of man, fringing in the north wales, the rest of wales at this stage staying mostly dry. through the course of the day the rain comes in. it will be heavy. they will be surface water and spray on the roads to co nte nt surface water and spray on the roads to content with, but the wind will bea to content with, but the wind will be a feature. strengthening in the morning, into the afternoon, and we will also have some snow. notjust the hills in scotland but possibly down to low levels and some of the roads north of the central belt, as well. inland, we are looking at gusts around a0 to 50, with exposure in the coast, 60 to 70. it will be windy tonight, not quite as strong, though. we still have the rain and increasingly the rain turning the snow, again notjust on the hills in scotland. here, it will be cold. the cold air is starting to filter further south as we go through the course of the night. tomorrow, we start off with this rain and snow in
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the north. increasingly through the day it will start to recede. we lose the rain from south—east england. in between, a lot of dry weather, some showery breaks as well coming through. but again, a blustery day. temperature—wise, look how this column ofair temperature—wise, look how this column of air is continuing to filter south. the far south of england hangs on to the double digit temperatures, and also south wales, as well. as we move into friday we still have low pressure to the north and the south of us, dragging this weather front, bringing and the south of us, dragging this weatherfront, bringing some rain in the southern counties. the wind comes to a more north and north—westerly direction, and that isa north—westerly direction, and that is a colder direction for us. the friday and into the weekend, it is going to turn colder as illustrated by the blue in the charts, some of us by the blue in the charts, some of us will see regular showers, some of us us will see regular showers, some of us winter showers, and some of us sunshine. at times it will be blustery as well, so it is all happening in the weather. isn't it? and a rainy day for some of us
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today. it is a big day for the chancellor, phillip hammond, who will deliver his budget later. its contents won't be a complete surprise, though, as we have already been given some insight about the government's plans for the coming year. steph is here. what can we expect? we getan we get an update, first, on the economy. yes, we get an update on the economy, how much we have been borrowing and the like. there is still a lot of detail to come, but here are some of the big things. first up, amongst all the numbers we will hear today, we will learn how much cash the government has to borrow to run the country. because we have a deficit, meaning the government spends more money every month than it has coming in, it thought we would have to borrow £58.3 billion this year to cover the difference. in fact, the government has spent a bit less and made a bit more in taxes than we thought this year. what can the cube and you tell us
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about homes? building homes is a big pa rt about homes? building homes is a big part of it. we already know that the government is committing itself to 300,000 new homes in england. that is around double what we are building at the moment. what we don't know is what that will cost, where he will get the cash from, nor where those houses will be built, or in fact what kinds of homes that will be. worth adding here that house—building decisions is devolved, so scotland and wales will be making their own choices, too. they are hoping new houses will attract young voters back to the conservatives. what else are they offering for young people from this budget? the other big announcement is extending the young person's railcard, currently only for those aged 16—25, but from next year will be available up to the age of 30. it is not free, it will cost £30, but will offer a third off most non—peak fares.
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this is one of a handful of policy announcements. he is also investing in skills and education for hi—tech jobs and courses designed to appeal to younger votes. the conservative government are worried they are losing ground to labour there. you must remember your young person's card, to take it with you, as well. and this public sector pay going to feature? and there is growing pressure to increase public—sector pay. police and prison officers have had modest pay increases, but teachers, nurses, doctors and others have had a cap on their wages for seven years. it would cost about £6 billion a year, but that squeeze
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on families is hurting. one of the big financial watchdogs said one in six households with a mortgage would struggle to absorb an extra £50 a month in bills. there is so much for the chancellor to try and do. thank you very much, andi to try and do. thank you very much, and i love your cubes. is that the special budget cube? i would like to get the cube back as a regular feature. what does the cube think of this? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad.
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a probiotic drink which was initially given to improve the health of cattle could be used on humans to fight infections including mrsa and e coli, after scientists carried out tests at the university of london. it was developed by a farmer in surrey who was impressed by the eit had on his cows. he then made a human version of the drink, called symprove, which has been found to contain properties which breaks down the resistance to antibiotics. so what we have found is it didn't really matter what the pathogen was, if we added symprove, the bacteria in symprove would grow. the cause they produce an acid, it drops the ph, and the ph kills the bacteria. so the mechanism is different. an antibiotic is designed to target one mechanism in the pathogen. a reduction in ph is essentially poisoning the environment, so all of
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the bacteria die. a teenager who was stabbed in northolt on saturday, by suspects who fled the scene on mopeds, has died. the 18—year—old was attacked by up to four people in what police described as a pre—planned attack. it happened on newnham close. police are appealing for information. people living near reading's new rail depot say they are outraged to discover a plant to treat the contents of train toilets is being built there. they have spent years campaigning against increased train noise and vibrations. well, great western railway says buildings on railway land fall under permitted development rights, but residents want the plant for human waste gone. we were informed about this, it has just appeared. and with that comes a lot of noise. you know, remove it. that is what we want network rail to do, to remove it. would you really wa nt do, to remove it. would you really want an effluent processing plant within100 yards of your house? no
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one would. a scheme to automatically pay compensation to tube and rail passengers when services are delayed has been proposed in parliament. the way passengers claim at the moment is said to be complex and cumbersome, which means many miss out, so conservative mp huw merriman has suggested a new law which would mean companies pay have to pay out without receiving a claim. passengers expect adequate compensation for these difficulties. to do so fully would incentivise the train operators and network rail to do more to prevent these issues from occurring in the first place. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, the a13 out of town towards the m25 has a lane closed between the ferry lane interchange and the wennington interchange. queues are building on the approach. and, in north london, seven sisters road is closed southbound near finsbury park station, because of a burst watermain. and, in south—east london, the usual delays for the blackwall tunnel heading northbound up the southern approach. a look at today's weather.
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and there'll be the odd spot of light rain or drizzle, but most parts will stay dry, with some bright or sunny spells in places. it will be mild but increasingly windy. top temperature, about 1a celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: he's accused of ordering the worst atrocities in europe since the second world war and today ratko mladic is expected to be found guilty of genocide. we'll get reaction from former bbc foreign correspondent martin bell, who gave evidence at the trial. the government wants driverless cars to be ferrying us around within three years. so we've taken one for a test drive to see whether they're on track. ifi
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if i could have the pleasure of your company... sweet, sweet... i'd stay on key and tried to say hello. you're doing great. praise indeed from bing crosby, who sir michael parkinson credits as one of the artists who helped shape his life. the chat show host will be here to tell us more about the soundtrack to some of his most special memories. that's wonderful! good morning, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: philip hammond will present his budget in parliament later today amid intense pressure to announce far—reaching measures to tackle the housing shortage, put more money into the nhs and he's austerity. mr hammond will be seeking to restore the government's fortunes after months of tory infighting over brexit and two cabinet resignations in recent weeks. zimbabwe's former vice president, emmerson mnangagwa, is expected to be sworn in as the country's
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new leader in the next two days. wild celebrations have been taking place overnight in the captial harare, following the resignation of robert mugabe as president. mr mnangagwa's sacking earlier this month prompted the military intervention last week, which brought to an end mr mugabe's 37—year grip on power. a un war crimes tribunal is due to deliver its verdict later this morning on a former bosnian—serb general, ratko mladic, who's accused of orchestrating the worst act of genocide in europe since the second world war. mladic is charged with the murders of 8,000 muslim men and boys in srebrenica in 1995, as well as the four—year siege of sarajevo, in which 10,000 people died. the 7a—year—old has been on trial at the hague for more than five years. there are fears the crew of a submarine that disappeared in the southern atlantic could be running out of oxygen. aa people are on board the sanjuan, which went missing last wednesday after it reported an electric breakdown. a spokesman for the argentine navy said the massive search operation would continue until the vessel is found. the american actor and musician
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david cassidy, has died in hospital in florida at the age of 67. he shot to fame in the sitcom the partridge family before having a successful solo music career. at the peak of his fame in the 1970s, his fan club had more members than those of the beatles and elvis presley. tributes have been paid to the comic actor rodney bewes, who has died aged 79. english girls abroad with appealing shoulders and flowery dresses, like wallpaper on the march! he found fame playing bob ferris in the bbc sitcom the likely lads alongside james bolam, although the pair eventually fell out in real life. he went on to enjoy other roles on stage and screen, including a sitcom he wrote called dear mother. . . love albert. some lovely tributes being paid to him and david cassidy overnight as well.
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uber has admitted that it concealed a massive global breach of the personal information of 57 million customers and drivers, which took place in october last year. the firm confirmed it had paid the hackers responsible £75,000 to delete the data, which included customer names, e—mail addresses and mobile phone numbers. alcohol can shape a person's mood according to the type of drink, according to a major new study. research from the global drug survey found links between types of alcohol and the emotions they create. for example, spirits were associated with feelings of aggression, while beer was linked to feeling relaxed. it's nearly thanksgiving and that means the annual november ritual of presidential turkey pardoning in the united states. president trump used his authority to grant a turkey freedom from the dinner table. it's a white house tradition which goes back to the 19th century. rather ironically, this year, the lucky bird's name was drumstick. drumstick will not be on a table or
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bea drumstick will not be on a table or be a drumstick this year.” drumstick will not be on a table or be a drumstick this year. i never find out what happens to them once they have been pardoned. some investigative journalism for next year. maybe they go on holiday somewhere. back to a farm? a lovely farm. maybe it's only a pardon for one year. is that bad? he could be next year's drumstick. good morning. do you rememberwhen next year's drumstick. good morning. do you remember when liverpool came back from 3—0 down and won the champions league in 2005.” back from 3—0 down and won the champions league in 2005. i was there in istanbul. it was on the other foot last night, not quite the champions league but they could have made it through to the knockout stages. well, last night the football boot was very much on the other foot. victory over sevilla in spain would have seen liverpool qualify for the knock out stages of the competition for the first time in nine years. they were 3—0 up after half an hour thanks to roberto firmino and sadio mane.
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they collapsed in the second half and conceded an equaliser deep into injury time. a draw in theirfinal game against spartak moscow will see jurgen klopp's side through. 2/2 times, two different half times, fantastic first half from us, from my side, from my team, in the second half we made a mistake and we didn't carry on playing football. it's normal that you try to control the game but a team like we are, we have to control the game with the ball and we didn't play football any more. tottenham ensured they'll finish top of their group after they came from behind to beat borussia dortmund. harry kane equalised and then dele alli set up heung min son as spurs won 2—1. it means they'll definitely finish above champions real madrid whatever happens in the last round of games. and manchester city know they'll also be top of their group, though they left it late to beat feyenoord. raheem sterling's goal won it for them at the etihad. england strikerjodie taylor will leave arsenal women and sign
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for australian side melbourne city for six weeks before moving to seattle reign in the us on a permanent basis. taylor was the top goalscorer at euro 2017, scoring five goals for england in four appearances. she's been at arsenal since march 2016 but says she's looking for a fresh challenge. they've been probably the most dominant club. the core group of players, the core values of the team, the location as well, absolutely team, the location as well, a bsolutely love team, the location as well, absolutely love the pacific northwest. the thing i admire the most about seattle as well is the drive and motivation they've got to succeed and to keep pushing forward. england's women secured a series victory over canada with a test to spare with a comfortable a9—12 win at twickenham last night. captain sarah hunter led out her side on her 100th cap in a fixture that saw the red roses score eight tries, with rachel burford and 18—year—old ellie kildunne both crossing twice. england will secure a series whitewashwith victory in the final test on saturday. if you had a more productive night
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than wigan winger ryan corr cloth than wigan winger ryan corr cloth than let us know —— ryan colclough. i think ithinki i think i have gone ahead on the story! you can tell us about it later maybe tomorrow? it's fine. ryan colclough, scored two goals and then went off to see the birth of his baby. you can do it now, here we go. it isjust a photo. we have got a photo of the cricket crazy actually, we have got it! there we
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90, actually, we have got it! there we go, we have got it. the white house turkeys go off to a farm and live their life out in peace. between 2005 and 2009 they we re peace. between 2005 and 2009 they were sent to disneyland. that sounds a bit made up! it's been described as the most significant war crime trial since nuremberg. later this morning the un's international criminal tribunal for the former yugoslavia will deliver its verdict in the case of ratko mladic. the former bosnian serb warlord is expected to be found guilty of committing the last genocide in europe. in a moment we'll speak to martin bell, the former bbc correspondent who covered the conflict. first, let's remind ourselves of some of mladic's alleged crimes. his name is ratko mladic, but to most of the world he'll be remembered by his nickname, the butcher of lyon balkans. as commander of the bosnian serb forces
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when yugoslavia collapsed into brutal civil war in the early 1990s, he is accused of playing a leading role in two of the most notorious horrors of that conflict. the four—year siege of sarajevo claimed at least 10,000 lives, while the genocide of 8000 men and boys in the town of srebrenica was europe's worst atrocity since the second world war. when the conflict ended in 1995, mladic went into hiding but was captured after 16 years. now aged 7a, he's been on trial at the hague since 2012, charged with two cou nts hague since 2012, charged with two counts of genocide and nine of war crimes and crimes against humanity. the un tribunal will deliver its verdict later this morning. martin bell covered those events as a foreign correspondent for the bbc and was injured by shrapnel while reporting from sarajevo. we can speak to him now. in some ways this is an historic
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moment but let's take you back to those days when you were reporting on what was going on, and many of our audience will remember your reporting but some of this was horrific, wasn't it? it was an ordealfor horrific, wasn't it? it was an ordeal for everyone. horrific, wasn't it? it was an ordealfor everyone. the horrific, wasn't it? it was an ordeal for everyone. the siege of sarajevo lasted for 3.5 years. the war itself for that long. 98,000 people were killed in that war, not just muslims, what we now call bosnia acts, but serbs and croats as well. something like 2 million were driven from their homes in a country of only a.5 million so it was a long ordeal and a terrible conflict and i a lwa ys ordeal and a terrible conflict and i always argue we could have brought to —— brought it to an end earlier. you think britain could have played a role to make a difference? the western democracies were rather hands off from the start, believing this was the revival of ancient hatreds. i remember talking to a
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senior officer has it all ended and isaid, senior officer has it all ended and i said, major, senior officer has it all ended and isaid, major, actually, he was senior officer has it all ended and i said, major, actually, he was a colonel, you could have stopped this earlier, he said yes and. at the time of the srebrenica massacre, we all remember today, the deliberate killing of 8000 men and boys, there we re killing of 8000 men and boys, there were 3a,000 un troops in bosnia, the leading contributors contributors we re leading contributors contributors were the english and the dutch but there was in the political will to save those people. tell us about ratko mladic's role in this, you met him, what was his role and what was he like? we met him and he said he didn't need the press because he would be exonerated by history. in the eyes of the soldiers under his command he was a good soldier. he was a frontline soldier. he was a professional soldier. he saw himself as being correct. but something
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happened in the siege of sarajevo. srebrenica was meant to be a un declared safe area but it wasn't. the serbs took it on the 12th of july, 1995. there was no attempt by nato or the un force to save it, and what happened happened. it was a total tragedy. you gave evidence i know in the trial, what will happen today do you think? how significant is all of this, the fact he's been on trial? i think it's very significant. of course he was in hiding for a long time. these trials are immensely protected and his has been going on for five years, but this is the last case before the war crimes tribunal at the hague which started its first case, i was there, injune, started its first case, i was there, in june, 1990s started its first case, i was there, injune,1990s x, this is its last case and its biggest case and maybe it's defining case —— 1996. there is
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some pros is of international justice but it has been flawed. —— process. many war criminals who should have been brought before the tribunal happened been. what about the sentence, what would be appropriate in your view? it's for thejudge to decide. appropriate in your view? it's for the judge to decide. this appropriate in your view? it's for thejudge to decide. this is appropriate in your view? it's for the judge to decide. this is an old and sick man and even a short sentence in his case would probably bea sentence in his case would probably be a life sentence. but for the victims and the families of the victims and the families of the victims of the srebrenica massacre, it represents a kind of necessary closure. martin bell, we appreciate your time. thanks for talking to us on breakfast. we will bring you details on that judgement at some stage on the bbc today. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. i know it is not all about us, carol, but when i got out of bed it was raining the entire way this morning. how was it looking for the
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rest of the uk? you are right, there is definitely rain in the forecast, the heaviest in south—west scotland, northern ireland, northern england and north wales. but there is also rain elsewhere as well. a windy day across england and wales. gusts up to 70 miles an hour with exposure. inland gust, a0 to 50 mph. what is driving our weather is low pressure today. we have low pressure in the north and in the south. this is where the heaviest, most persistent rain will be, and you can see how the isobars squeeze together as we go through the morning, into the afternoon. so the wind is going to strengthen during that period. first thing this morning across south—west england there is a lot of dry weather around, a fair bit of cloud as well, and it is the same across southern counties, into east anglia and the midlands. the cloud is thick enough for the odd spot of rain, or indeed some drizzle, but the other thing you will notice is it is very mild. rain already coming across
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north—west england, heading into the north—east, the same southern england. in scotland it is chilly and we have some rain with a wintry flavour across the northern isles. you have the rain already in northern ireland. the wind here is lighter and you will have rain on and off for the day. the rain continuing to drift eastwards through the day and here as well this the wind will strengthen. the rain moves across southern and central scotland, it moves across northern england and all of wales. i had a bit there will be a fair bit of cloud, but we will some dull maxis some breaks around parts of the midlands, especially east anglia and the south—east. don't forget the wind is going to be a feature of the weather today across england, and also wales. very mild in england, wales and northern ireland, cooler in scotland with some hill snow. through the evening and overnight, although the winds will easy touch, it will be a windy night and a wet one, and by the end of the night we will not just be one, and by the end of the night we will notjust be seeing snow on the heels of scotland. some of that will be at lower levels as well. here it will be cold, as it will be in
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northern england and northern ireland. we are just northern england and northern ireland. we arejust hanging northern england and northern ireland. we are just hanging the milder conditions in the south. tomorrow we start off with the re m na nts of tomorrow we start off with the remnants of the rain eventually pushing away from the south—east. we will still have some snow for a time north of the central belt, but even at lower levels for a time, and a rush of showers coming in around the area of low pressure. in between, there will be a fair bit of sunshine. no heat wave because you can see the colder air already in the north is starting to push that it further south to all but the far south—east of england.” it further south to all but the far south-east of england. i don't think your dresses are that similar. i know you said that. don't you? the colours are the same, but a very different styles. yours is a bit more of a round neck, carol's is different. that was so observant, i didn't notice that. i didn't notice you had a haircut until our viewers pointed it out. i am trying to get better. at lunchtime today the chancellor, phillip hammond, will deliver a budget he hopes will appeal to many, from big business to students and parents
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to the retired. but it is not going to be an easy job to balance both public—pleasing policies with spending within our means. steph has been chatting to one family about the options, and how they might affect them. the fact that we now have a budget each year, rather than the budget, there is a lot of focus on it. he is trying to make sure he provides the services we need, and pays those providing them the right money, while also not spending too much money, it is that balancing act that to be honest we as households have to be honest we as households have to do as well. you have to make sure you are not spending more than you are bringing in as income. so, because it is putting a lot of pressure on families at the moment, with the cost of living going up and wait is not going up as fast, i went to talk to the richardsons, from
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darlington. nicola is a teacher, dave is a postman. they have a little boy already, and a new baby on the way. so ijoined them and nicola's mum, susan, fora brew. how old is alfie? here's two. and you have another one on the way? yes, another boy, just for fun. what would you say is the biggest thing that, like tom you worry about in terms of money? things like food prices going up, and petrol always seems to be changing. and it does make a difference, week on week. our wee kly make a difference, week on week. our weekly food bill has gone up, hasn't it, 10%, 20% more? the amount of money that's been added to our fuel bills has been quite phenomenal. we think twice about putting the heating on, sometimes, don't we? in the 1960s and 1970s you wouldn't have had the heating on all the
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time, if you have it. we probably didn't worry as much about fuel bills. fuel poverty is not a term that used to hear, you do now, people having to make choices between heating and eating. how is life as a teacher at the moment? have you seen your salary change at all? we have had 0.5% increases, have you seen your salary change at all? we have had 0.596 increases, but it has been frozen for the last five yea rs or it has been frozen for the last five years or so. we have had a lot of family and friends that have lost their jobs, family and friends that have lost theirjobs, and family and friends that have lost their jobs, and have family and friends that have lost theirjobs, and have had to find them with not much warning. a bit of a pressure point, isn't it, because there are not enough jobs to go around, is there? and if you do, it is part—time or have agency staff where you are not even getting minimum wage after all the fees. so it is tough. do you think it is tougher in the north—east? it is tough. do you think it is tougher in the north-east? yes, you feel a bit left home. people say, oh yes, wages are writing —— rising. this is the kind of area
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where jobs in the public sector we re were the bestjobs were the best jobs you were the bestjobs you could get. what about the future? they might be doing jobs that don't exist yet. going back to the 70s, things won't that easy, actually, anyway. and we did have a mortgage, and of course interest rates were in, like, double figures that you were paying back then. so i don't know whether we we re then. so i don't know whether we were better off then, but i think we felt things were improving. we are just trying to do our best for the next two, so to speak and have some fun on the way. as we have got a nice house, we have got some food on the covers, that kind of thing. and a lot of people don't actually have that, very often. say goodbye,
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steph. goodbye, goodbye, goodbye. they are very typical of lots of families, really. families very much living within their means but having to cut back on things because of cost of has been going up while at the same time that he hasn't. they have less money to spend on things they normally would have. they were telling me they don't really go abroad for holidays, and they are really frugal with their shopping, and things. and it is interesting because the financial conduct authority has done some research on families generally and how they would cope if ilves went up for them, and they worked out that one in six households with a mortgage would really struggle struggled to cope with a £50 increase in bills every month. it wouldn't take much for a family like that to be unable
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to get their head above water. so it will be interesting to see whether she gets a pay rise as a teacher, or local services in their areas, as well, and the job situation. local services in their areas, as well, and the job situationm local services in their areas, as well, and the job situation. if you are on that budget line, than those small changes can make a difference either way. staying with the budget, and the chancellor is due to announce regulation changes which would allow more driverless cars to be tested on britain's roads. but you might not be aware that some robotic vehicles are already on our streets. you might even pass one today. so would you trust a vehicle that controls itself? 0ur transport correspondent richard westcott has been for a test—drive. it is not just it is notjust humans that must learn to drive. computers need lessons as well, and they have to start from scratch. 0ne lesson the car has got to learn is that things look different in the autumn. so the leaves might be orange but not green, but it has got to know it is still a tree. it has also got to
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know what to do if a pedestrian doesn't this. this is what the computer store, and there is me, looking like a character in a videogame. what is extraordinary about this car is how ordinary it looks. it's going to be driving around the streets of 0xfordshire and london, you will barely notice any difference, apart from the writing down the side. but it is fully autonomous. sir alex, writing down the side. but it is fully autonomous. siralex, do writing down the side. but it is fully autonomous. sir alex, do you wa nt to fully autonomous. sir alex, do you want to get the computer driving. yes, it is just a single press of a button. i press that button on the car ta kes button. i press that button on the car takes over. and it isjust as button. i press that button on the car takes over. and it is just as we are coming to a roundabout, as well, so let's see how it copes with the first proper obstacle. we are on a test track, but this car has been driving on normal roads, dealing with the usual daily obstacles, cyclists, buses, and some unusual ones as well. you may have crossed in front of it without realising, or you may have seen this and wondered what was going on. the on—board computer has been learning all those things you can't really teach. honestly, the truly hard thing about
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living in autonomous car is all the unexpected crazy stuff that can happen on the road. you would never think to programme about, dropped shopping bags in the middle of the street, it could be a shopping trolley that is blowing in the wind. we were once somewhere and a whole bunch of pheasants flew in very quickly from the side. we were fine with that stuff, but those were things that you wouldn't script as pa rt things that you wouldn't script as part of your driving test. the government says it wants robotic ca rs government says it wants robotic cars driving us around within three yea rs. cars driving us around within three years. but for some that seems ambitious. they still need to sort the insurance, to work out what happens if the human driver has to suddenly take back control. and they have got to convince people that it is safe. i think it is really scary. look at some of the drivers nowadays, they go on the wrong side of the roads. so what computer driven cars would be like, i don't know. i heard someone say how does it make decisions like, say, it was going to crash into a kid or an adult? it make decisions like that, moral sort of stuff? i think it is a
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good idea, but obviously i have concerns good idea, but obviously i have concerns with regards to not having a human intelligence. it is a machine, at the end of the day. computer drives your power forward you. so what do you do? you are a passenger? can you get some sleep? it is up to you. no way. as long as i could steer it, maybe. britain is a front runner in driverless vehicle software, and that should be worth billions. think really big. think about all the vehicles that move. yes, autonomous vehicles are amazing, but think about all the forklifts, all the vehicles at airports, imports, in farms, forklifts, all the vehicles at airports, imports, infarms, in mines, these are all vehicles that had to answer questions, where am i, what is around me, what do i do? they are already answering those questions. robot cars are already driving on our roads but it will be a few years before you can go and buy one.
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i think ithinki i think i would trust a driverless car. i like to be in control of my own destiny. what if you had a d riverless own destiny. what if you had a driverless car but you were able to ta ke driverless car but you were able to take over. so you could be there, but if anything went wrong. would you be concentrating at the right moment? that is not the point, is it? i am moment? that is not the point, is it?|ama moment? that is not the point, is it? i am a little bit sceptical. ten yea rs, it? i am a little bit sceptical. ten yea rs , we it? i am a little bit sceptical. ten years, we will all be there. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a probiotic drink which was initially given to improve the health of cattle could be used on humans to fight infections including mrsa and e coli, after scientists carried out tests at the university of london. it was developed by a farmer in surrey who was impressed by the affect it had on his cows. he then made a human version of the drink, called symprove, which has been found to contain properties which breaks down the resistance to antibiotics. if you have an infection, and you
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ta ke if you have an infection, and you take this, your good bacteria will go up. a teenager who was stabbed in northolt on saturday, by suspects who fled the scene on mopeds, has died. the 18—year—old was attacked by up to four people, in what police described as a pre—planned attack. it happened on newnham close. police are appealing for information. a scheme to automatically pay compensation to tube and rail passengers when services are delayed has been proposed in parliament. the way passengers claim at the moment is said to be complex and cumbersome, which means many miss out, so conservative mp huw merriman has suggested a new law which would mean companies have to pay out, even if there is no claim. passengers expect adequate compensation for these difficulties. to do so fully would incentivise the train operators and network rail to do more to prevent these issues
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from occurring in the first place. let's have a look at the travel situation now. piccadilly line has severe delays between acton town and cockfosters. that is eastbound, due to a signal failure. and ongoing work continues on the london 0verground by gospel 0ak. 0n the roads, the a13 out of town towards the m25 has a lane closed between the ferry lane interchange and the wennington interchange. queues are building on the approach. and, in north london, seven sisters road is closed southbound near finsbury park station because of a burst watermain. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning. now, we are waking up toa good morning. now, we are waking up to a rather windy wednesday, and the met office has issued a yellow weather warnings for the strong winds. now, it is going to be breezy all day to day, gradually strengthening through the afternoon. decent spells of sunshine, though, and numerically speaking the
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temperature will be mild, at 15 celsius. but that is perhaps not making it feel as mild as it could. now, the strongest of our winds arrive later on this afternoon and into this evening, becoming very gusty indeed. we could be getting just a0, maybe 50 mph through the night, and that wind is coupled with some outbreaks of rain. so really quite wet and windy, the temperature mild, 12 or13 quite wet and windy, the temperature mild, 12 or 13 celsius. serwa mild and damp start tomorrow morning. the windfall is a little lighter. it is still going to be breezy. it doesn't disappear completely on thursday, but it is not going to be as strong as today. decent spells of sunshine, though, but we start to notice the temperatures falling a little, and we will really notice that as we head into friday. it is getting much cooler for the weekend. va nessa vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london, and she is doing a budget preview. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the chancellor philip hammond promises to use today's budget to secure a bright future for britain. the famous red box is expected to contain plans
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for housing and schools, but mr hammond is a man under pressure from all sides. i'll be looking at the economics. i've been finding out how members from one family are feeling the squeeze and what the chancellor can best do to help them. good morning, it's wednesday the 22nd of november. also on the programme: a new dawn for the people of zimbabwe after president mugabe's 37 years in power come to an end. how different types of alcohol bring out different emotions, a major study looks at the link between your drink and your mood. liverpool throw away a 3—0 lead in seville, meaning qualification for the knockout stages of the champions league will have to wait a little longer. and carol has the weather.
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good morning. a fairly cloudy day ahead with heavy and persistent rain in the north and west. brighter skies in east anglia and the south—east and a windy day across england and wales. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the chancellor philip hammond will present his budget in parliament later. he'll set out what he describes as his plans to seize the opportunities from brexit, while tackling deep—seated economic challenges in the country head on. mr hammond is under pressure to balance the books but also ease austerity amid significant tensions within the tory party. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. when the chancellor opens his red box to reveal his tax and spending plans, money will be tight, as the government keeps saying. the chancellor's under huge pressure to loosen the purse strings to put more cash into public services like the nhs. but few expect the chancellor to go
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on a big spending spree. brexit is the backdrop to everything in westminster. the tensions over the talks with brussels and division in government over the eu don't make the chancellor's job any easier. any controversial budget plans, like tax rises or spending cuts, will be a difficult sell without an overall majority in the commons. the tories' hope for a reboot at the general election and the party conference both failed. now many think it's up to the chancellor to deliver a big budget that will trigger the revival the party and the prime minister need. the stakes are high for the chancellor, and with some in his own party wanting him sacked, any slipups and he could find himself out of a job. eleanor garnier, bbc news, westminster. and eleanorjoins us now from downing street. the papers are full of pre—
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analysis. you talked about in there, but there's a lot of pressure to get this right, isn't there? they're absolutely is. i think the chancellor has very little room for and over, both politically and financially. there are many conservatives in westminster who would like the budget to lift the pa rty's would like the budget to lift the party's post—election gloom, to banish those memories of recent cabinet resignations —— little room for manoeuvre. and his move over the internal tensions over brexit but they know the chancellor is starting with a week and —— and to smooth over. we know there will be plans for the housing crisis and how to tackle it. —— weak hand. there will be extra money for teacher training across england and more cash to boost the number of students taking maths after 16. for young voters, those discounted rail cards are being extended from 26 to 30
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—year—olds. but will there be any good news on pay for public sector workers and what can the chancellor do to ease those concerns over the waiting time for universal credit? he's really under a huge amount of pressure. labour is urging the chancellor to call time on austerity and to boost public services. but the chancellor will try to improve the chancellor will try to improve the government's fortunes, but he knows, and i think politicians here know, that the backdrop, both economically and financially, leave him with very few options. eleanor, we will be discussing this throughout the programme. thank you for the moment. there have been euphoric scenes in zimbabwe following the resignation of robert mugabe as president. the sacking of emmerson mnangagwa earlier this month prompted military intervention a week ago, which brought to an end mr mugabe's 37—year grip on power. mr mnangagwa is expected to be sworn in as the country's new leader in the next two days. ben brown is in harare this morning.
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it's been good to talk to you over the last few days, despite the celebrations we've seen this morning and last night, really uncertain in zimbabwe at the moment? absolutely right, dan. there are a few sore heads in harare this morning, people we re heads in harare this morning, people were partying in the streets right through the night. wild celebrations. as people wake up now to what they hope is a new dawn and a new era for zimbabwe, they will, as the euphoria subsides, the a bit wa ry as the euphoria subsides, the a bit wary about this man, emmerson mnangagwa, the former vice president —— bea mnangagwa, the former vice president —— be a bit wary. let's talk about him and who he was under the mugabe regime, he was one of mugabe's key henchmen, a man accused of brutal repression, rigging elections and human rights abuses, corruption, known as the crocodile, but he fell out with the mugabes, he fled for his life, he said he would be arrested and killed so he went into exile earlier this month. today he's
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coming back and in a few hours we think he will be sworn in either today or tomorrow as the new president. people here are hoping because he's an economic reformer, it is said, and potentially a pragmatist, he could be a much better ruler than robert mugabe. but no one is quite sure, they want to keep a close eye on him, and as one opposition leader said, we've replaced a tyrant but not mr serevi a tyranny. then, thanks for that, we will be back in harare later to get more reaction to that news —— ben —— but not necessarily a tyranny. a un war crimes tribunal is due to deliver its verdict later this morning on a former bosnian—serb general ratko mladic, who's accused of orchestrating the worst act of genocide in europe since the second world war. mladic is charged with the murders of 8,000 muslim men and boys in srebrenica in 1995, as well as the four—year siege of sarajevo, in which 10,000 people died. now aged 7a, he's been on trial at the hague for more than five years.
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baidu lawney is there this morning. people will want to know what his sentence will be and it's a significant day, isn't it? it is hugely significant. picking up the morning papers here in bosnia, we've got the headline, judgement for the blood letter. look over my shoulder and you will see the white to m bsto nes and you will see the white tombstones in the graveyard on the hill in sarajevo, many people who died in the siege of sarajevo, 10,000 are buried up there. there's a children's monument in the middle of town which is pretty heartbreaking. i've been there with a father who lost his teenage son during the siege and to be honest, it is hard not to be moved when he puts a photograph of it next to the monument and kissing it, the stakes are high for people and they are eagerly waiting what will happen with ratko mladic in the hague. thanks very much. . it will take
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about an hour to read the verdict. there are fears the crew of a submarine that disappeared in the southern atlantic could be running out of oxygen. aa people are on board the sanjuan, which went missing last wednesday after it reported an electric breakdown. a spokesman for the argentine navy said the massive search operation would continue until the vessel is located. we will be speaking to someone who's been helping with the rescue effort and people involved in that a little bit later. the american actor and musician, david cassidy, has died in florida at the age of 67. he was admitted to hospital last week after suffering multiple organ failure. the ‘70s icon shot to fame in the sitcom the partridge family before going on to have a successful solo career in music. at the peak of his fame in the 1970s his fan club had more members than those of the beatles and elvis presley. tributes have been paid to the comic actor rodney bewes, who has died aged 79. english girls abroad with appealing shoulders and flowery dresses, like wallpaper on the march!
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he found fame playing bob ferris in the bbc sitcom the likely lads alongside james bolam, although the pair eventually fell out in real life. he went on to enjoy other roles on stage and screen, including a sitcom he wrote called dear mother. . . love albert. if you have a look at the bbc website, there's glowing tributes to rodney bewes. one of hollywood's most successful animators and the co—founder of disney's pixar studio, john lasseter, is the latest high profile media figure to face allegations of inappropriate behaviour. lasseter, who worked on films such as toy story, a bug's life, and frozen, is taking a six month leave of absence and has apologised for what he called missteps, including giving staff unwanted hugs. uber has admitted that it concealed a massive global breach of the personal information of 57 million customers and drivers which took place in october last year. the ride—sharing firm confirmed it had paid the hackers responsible £75,000 pounds to delete the data, which included customer names, e—mail addresses and mobile phone numbers. did you know the type of alcohol you
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drink can affect your mood in different ways? research from the global drug survey found links between types of alcohol and the emotions they create. for example, spirits were associated with feelings of aggression, while beer was linked to feeling relaxed. that is good information to know. we will investigate that more later in the programme. let's go back to something we've been discussing over the last few weeks. the vice president in harare is expected to be sworn in following robert mugabe's resignation. the country is waking up to an uncertain
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future. in a moment, we'll speak to journalist rashweat mukundu, who's in harare. first though, let's talk to activist vimbai musvaburi, who's also in the country's capital. we heard the scenes of celebration and we heard from ben brown in harare this morning, has the news sunk in, how are you and other zimbabweans feeling this morning? thank you for having me on your show today. i must mention the fact i grew up today. i must mention the fact i grew up on today. i must mention the fact i grew up on the streets of southend in my teenage years so i'm excited to be on the show today. the excitement is still a pic. i must say it has begun to sink in. this is the time where we actually start to drill in the idea of having a new leader. —— dell epic. especially because we've got the reality to face in regards to who is actually taking power next. —— still epic.
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the rumours do say that emmerson mnangagwa is being sworn in. but i must say that there is a lot of uncertainty with zimbabweans. a lot of people are thinking, 0k, is this going to be better? but i believe that zimbabweans will not allow anybody to put them through what they've been put through by robert mugabe over the last three decades. we need change. emmerson mnangagwa maybe mr b or c, but he is someone different and zimbabwe is aware of their surroundings. inaudible they need to get to a point where
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democracy is taking place in our country. we are having a few sound issues but we will press on, we could also speak to rashweat mukundu in harare. you spend time in the uk and you moved back to zimbabwe ten yea rs and you moved back to zimbabwe ten years later, how did the country change in the time you were awake and what did you see?” change in the time you were awake and what did you see? i can safely tell you that the country went down. i went back to zimbabwe in 2009 during the time where there was no food in the shops, people would queue up for anything because there was absolutely nothing, there was no maze, no, the trees, there was absolutely nothing to hold on to —— no commodities. compare to 1999 when i left, the country was in a better
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state of them as compared to 2009 —— compared to. then at least there was still good education, there was still good education, there was still food and there were still jobs. the industries were still functional. the economy was still at a discussion phase. now there's nothing to discuss. eight years after i came back to zimbabwe, it has deteriorated. there was an inclusive government at one point and we are now hopeful things will be better in our country. now is an historical moment, zimbabweans have a hope. they will be more active to make sure their country leads them toa make sure their country leads them to a better place. listening to our correspondent that, and the change
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she saw in zimbabwe, i wonder whether you think there will be real change? yes, mugabe may have gone, but zanu pf is still there, and will the new man be any different? well, we still have the same political situation with zanu pf, and there is a high expectation that once the new leader pens his signature to the oath of office, he will begin to tackle the many challenges that zimbabwe has been facing, especially for the past two decades. there is likely to be a crisis of expectations, in that there are enormous challenges, be they political or social, that emmerson mnangagwa has to tackle. the good thing is that a break with the past in mnangagwa gives a chance to start
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ona in mnangagwa gives a chance to start on a clean slate, to introduce a new political approach to zimbabwe, to introduce a new set of economic and socio political reforms. so he has the opportunity to be a reformist. he has the support of the people of zimbabwe to start a new movement in zimbabwe, but the challenge is that the system that has been so used to patronage and corruption, that has been so used to impunity, may not allow him to reform the system. but what has happened is the people of zimbabwe, they have a new—found confidence to confront the challenges that they have faced in the past 20 years. and i suppose one of the first week tests that will be next year, if mr mnangagwa gets into power, that there are free elections that he allows to take place next yearin that he allows to take place next year in zimbabwe. that is the biggest challenge for mnangagwa, that he has to organise an election according to the constitution. he has been giving the right statements
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up has been giving the right statements up until now. he is expounding on the need for democracy, for unity, to focus on service delivery and reviving the economy. so he has to be held accountable by civil society and the opposition, so he can deliver on a free and fair election. whereas i think there is an a cce pta nce whereas i think there is an acceptance that this may not necessarily happen according to our expectation, i think the civil society in zimbabwe is now emboldened to challenge the political elite, including mnangagwa himself, should he fail to deliver on some of the promises he has made up on some of the promises he has made up until now. really good to talk to you, a fascinating insight into what is happening in zimbabwe this morning. i suppose the next question is what happens to robert mugabe himself, and hopefully we will find that out in the days and weeks to come. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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iam i am guessing from the picture it is going to be stormy. for some of us, it certainly is. we are looking at dales with exposure in the west and south of england and wales. if you are in the west, you have a combination of the wet and windy weather. we have been watching the rain gathering across northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england and west wales as we go through the early hours of today. that process will continue as it journeys northwards and eastwards. so pretty wet day ahead for northern ireland, but a so pretty wet day ahead for northern ireland, buta mild so pretty wet day ahead for northern ireland, but a mild one. breezy ahead, the rain across northern scotland. brighter skies and a wintry mix across the northern isles. coming south in the northern england, we have heavy and persistent rain across cumbria, lancashire, heading over the pennines to the east. coming south again, over the midlands and east anglia, a fair bit of cloud around, thick enough for the of rain. the
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same the south—west england. 0ne thick enough for the of rain. the same the south—west england. one or two brighter breaks, mild, a lot of cloud around, and the wind continuing to strengthen. the wind will continue to strengthen across wales, and the wind will continue as well. the rain will clip south—west england, heading up towards sheffield, derbyshire, northern england and scotland, following the snow in the hills. the wind strengthening this morning. it will be very windy by this afternoon across england and wales. as i mentioned, gusts to gale force, severe gales with exposure but even inland we will have gusty winds. the brightest conditions will be in the sunshine in east anglia and the south—east. as we head on through the evening and overnight, it will still be windy, just not quite as windy as during the day. it will still be wet and by the end of the night that rain will be readily turning to snow. notjust in the hills in scotland but also at lower levels, north of the central belt. cooler air pushing south, milder conditions in the south. tomorrow we
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have the remnants of the rain clearing away from the south—east. then there will be a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine around tomorrow, and increasingly as this band of rain edges northwards, it will tend to break up and fragment generally. around the area of low pressure which is dominating our weather, we will see bands of showers. tomorrow, you will notice the cool air starting to filter that bit further south. into friday, low pressure to the north and south, the front taking a swipe at us, introducing some rain, but the wind will be the salient thing once again as we head to friday and the weekend. it has more of a northerly component to it, which is a cold direction for us, and into the weekend we can see how we are all bathed in cooler conditions. into sunday, the weather is all over the place at the moment. it isa it is a day when we get out the most famous man bag in the country.”
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never thought of it as a man bag.” suppose the interesting thing is the contents and what will be in there. and before we get to the details of the budget today, we get an assessment of where we are as an economy at the moment. yes, because before they give us where the money will be spent on the taxes put up, they will talk about what the forecasts are for the future. the chancellor has to try and make sure this budget is as balanced as it possibly can be, so we are not spending more than we are actually bringing in from money we get from things like taxes. plus, we have a deficit, meaning the government spends more money every month than it has coming in. yesterday, we learned that the government did have to borrow more last month, mostly due to paying more interest on those debts. we can expect a bit more detail
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on how that will pan out later today. ido i do love the graphics you have here. yes, the cube. tell us about homes. off and policies are leaked beforehand, because there is so much to get through in one day, they like to get through in one day, they like to drip feed us a bit before. we already know that the government is committing itself to 300,000 new homes in england. worth adding here that house—building decisions is devolved, so scotland and wales will be making their own choices, too. what we don't know is what that will cost, where he will get the cash from, nor where those houses will be built, or in fact what kinds of homes that will be. so watch out for that,
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plus possible changes to stamp duty, and help forfirst—time buyers. this is one of a handful of policy announcements. he is also investing in skills and education for hi—tech jobs and courses, designed to appeal to younger votes. the conservative government are worried they are losing ground to labour there. the other big announcement is extending the young person's railcard, currently only for those aged 16—25, but from next year will be available up to the age of 30. it is not free, it will cost £30, but might make a difference to those who do a lot of travel for work. it is interesting is off—peak, because you can't necessarily use it to go to work. and this is unlikely, but unions, campaigners and politicians have been arguing to ease
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the cap on pay for five million public—sector workers. police and prison officers have had modest pay increases, but teachers, nurses, doctors and others have had a cap on their wages for seven years. it ain't cheap. it would cost about £6 billion a year. but that squeeze on families is hurting. one of the big financial watchdogs said one in six households with a mortgage would struggle to absorb an extra £50 a month in bills. there is some hope there will be a lift, and pay will go up, but it will cost an awful lot of money. you just mentioned the pressure, the front page of many of the papers is all about the budgets and stories about zimbabwe as well. the wall with hammond, pressure on the man
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himself, but also on the prime minister, she wanted information about schools in the budget. there will be so many eyes on what he says today. and it is interesting, i was talking to a minister last week who was saying we all want a bit but at the end of the day, it is the treasurer who will decide, and he will tell us exactly where the money is going to be going. there will of course be analysis across the bbc, and you are back here on breakfast tomorrow to explain. possibly with cubes, i quite like this little cube. it is a monday to thursday exclusive! you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: whether it makes you relaxed or aggressive, it is no secret alcohol affects people's moods. but new research suggests our feelings are actually related to what we drink. we will be speaking to the man behind that study to find out why. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. my
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my mum banned me from wearing orange squash, it turned me into a crazy child! there is water in this one. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a probiotic drink which was initially given to improve the health of cattle could be used on humans to fight infections including mrsa and e coli, after scientists carried out tests at the university of london. it was developed by a farmer in surrey who was impressed by the affect it had on his cows. he then made a human version of the drink, called symprove, which has been found to contain properties which breaks down the resistance to antibiotics. if you've got an infection, and you take symprove, the testing showed your pathogen numbers will go down, and all of your good
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bacteria will go up. a teenager who was stabbed in northolt on saturday, by suspects who fled the scene on mopeds, has died. the 18—year—old was attacked by up to four people, in what police described as a pre—planned attack. it happened on newnham close. police are appealing for information. a scheme to automatically pay compensation to tube and rail passengers when services are delayed has been proposed in parliament. the way passengers claim at the moment is said to be complex and cumbersome, which means many miss out, so conservative mp huw merriman has suggested a new law which would mean companies have to pay out, even if there is no claim. passengers expect adequate compensation for these difficulties. to do so fully would incentivise the train operators and network rail to do more to prevent these issues from occurring in the first place. let's have a look at the travel situation now. piccadilly line has severe delays between acton town and cockfosters, due to a signal failure.
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and ongoing work continues on the london 0verground by gospel 0ak. 0n the roads, the a13 out of town towards the m25 has a lane closed between the ferry lane interchange and the wennington interchange. queues are building on the approach. and, in north london, seven sisters road is closed southbound near finsbury park station because of a burst watermain. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning. now, we are waking up to a rather windy wednesday, and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the strong winds. now, it is going to be breezy all day today, gradually strengthening through the afternoon. decent spells of sunshine, though, and numerically speaking the temperature will be mild, at 15 celsius. but that breeze perhaps not making it feel as mild as it could. now, the strongest of our winds arrive later on this afternoon and into this evening, becoming very gusty indeed. we could be getting gusts of a0 mph,
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maybe 50 mph through the night, and that wind is coupled with some outbreaks of rain. so really quite unpleasant, wet and windy. the temperature mild, 12 or 13 celsius. so a mild and damp start tomorrow morning. the windfalls a little lighter. it is still going to be breezy. it doesn't disappear completely on thursday, but it's not going to be as strong as today. decent spells of sunshine, though. but we start to notice the temperature falling a little, and we'll really notice that as we head into friday, and things getting much cooler for the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: philip hammond will present his budget in parliament later today amid intense pressure to announce far—reaching measures to tackle the housing shortage, put more money into the nhs and he's austerity. mr hammond will be
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seeking to restore the government's fortunes after months of tory infighting over brexit and two cabinet resignations in recent weeks. zimbabwe's former vice president, emmerson mnangagwa, is expected to be sworn in as the country's new leader in the next two days. wild celebrations have been taking place overnight in the captial harare, following the resignation of robert mugabe as president. mr mnangagwa's sacking earlier this month prompted the military intervention last week, which brought to an end mr mugabe's 37—year grip on power. a un war crimes tribunal is due to deliver its verdict later this morning on a former bosnian—serb general, ratko mladic, who's accused of orchestrating the worst act of genocide in europe since the second world war. mladic is charged with the murders of 8,000 muslim men and boys in srebrenica in 1995, as well as the four—year siege of sarajevo, in which 10,000 people died. the 7a—year—old has been on trial at the hague for more than five years. there are fears the crew
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of a submarine that disappeared in the southern atlantic could be running out of oxygen. aa people are on board the sanjuan, which went missing last wednesday after it reported an electric breakdown. a spokesman for the argentine navy said the massive search operation would continue until the vessel is found. the american actor and musician david cassidy has died in hospital in florida at the age of 67. he shot to fame in the sitcom the partridge family before having a successful solo music career. at the peak of his fame in the 1970s, his fan club had more members than those of the beatles and elvis presley. tributes have been paid to the comic actor rodney bewes, who has died aged 79. english girls abroad with appealing shoulders and flowery dresses, like wallpaper on the march! he found fame playing bob ferris in the bbc sitcom the likely lads alongside james bolam, although the pair eventually fell
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out in real life. he went on to enjoy other roles on stage and screen, including a sitcom he wrote called dear mother. . . love albert. one of hollywood's most successful animators and the co—founder of disney's pixar studio, john lasseter, is the latest high profile media figure to face allegations of inappropriate behaviour. lasseter, who worked on films such as toy story, a bug's life, and frozen, is taking a six month leave of absence and has apologised for what he called missteps, including giving staff unwanted hugs. uber has admitted that it concealed a massive global breach of the personal information of 57 million customers and drivers, which took place in october last year. the firm confirmed it had paid the hackers responsible £75,000 to delete the data, which included customer names, e—mail addresses and mobile phone numbers. alcohol can shape a person's mood according to the type of drink, according to a major new study.
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research from the global drug survey found links between types of alcohol and the emotions they create. for example, spirits were associated with feelings of aggression, while beer was linked to feeling relaxed. i suppose red wine affects you in a slightly different way as well?m makes you relaxed. not you. i'm not saying you! you are swigging red wine every morning, louise, i'm not sure that affects you... she doesn't by the way! i'm digging myself into a horrible hole here! you need to be pardoned! it's nearly thanksgiving and that means the annual november ritual of presidential turkey pardoning in the united states. president trump used his authority to grant a turkey freedom from the dinner table. it's a white house tradition which goes back to the 19th century. rather ironically, this year, the lucky bird's name was drumstick. we found out earlier it goes to a
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farm and spends the rest of its life fluttering around and enjoying itself. lucky drumstick. lucky drumstick! carol has the weather in about ten minutes. sonali is talking here with reflections on the champions league and less than a day before the ashes? shall we say it is today technically tomorrow but it is overnight. jake ball has been picked over 0verton. england went confirmed the batting order until the toss. they are being pretty secretive about that. captainsjoe root and steve smith have been posing with the big prize that is the little urn this morninng. england were beaten 5—0 the last time they toured australia, and the aussies haven't lost a test match at the gabba since 1986.
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the hosts by the way have called up all—rounder glenn maxwell as cover for opener david warner, who has a neck problem, and shaun marsh, who has a sore back. i think we're about to, aren't we, to win here. it's a reason why australia play the first test of a series here all the time because they've got such a good record here. but what a way to start the series. if we can go 1—0 up here it really u psets if we can go 1—0 up here it really upsets the apple and can give us a lot of going into the rest of it. -- a lot of momentum. now many of you will remember liverpool coming from 3—0 down to win the champions league in 2005. well, last night the football boot was very much on the other foot. victory over sevilla in spain would have seen liverpool qualify for the knock out stages of the competition for the first time in nine years. they were 3—0 up after half an hour thanks to roberto firmino and sadio mane.
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they collapsed in the second half and conceded an equaliser deep into injury time. a draw in theirfinal game against spartak moscow will see jurgen klopp's side through. two half—times, two different half—times, fantastic first half from us, from my side, from my team, in the second half we made a mistake and we didn't carry on playing football. it's normal that you try to control the game but a team like we are, we have to control the game with the ball and we didn't play football any more. tottenham ensured they'll finish top of their group after they came from behind to beat borussia dortmund. harry kane equalised and then dele alli set up heung min son as spurs won 2—1. it means they'll definitely finish above champions real madrid whatever happens in the last round of games. and manchester city know they'll also be top of their group, though they left it late to beat feyenoord. raheem sterling's goal won it for them at the etihad. england strikerjodie taylor will leave arsenal women and sign for australian side melbourne city for six weeks before moving to seattle reign in the us on a permanent basis. taylor was the top goalscorer at euro 2017, scoring five goals for england in four appearances. she's been at arsenal since march 2016 but says she's looking for a fresh challenge.
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they've been probably the most dominant club. the core group of players, the core values of the team, the location as well, absolutely love the pacific northwest. the thing i admire the most about seattle as well is the drive and motivation they've got to succeed and to keep pushing forward. england's women secured a series victory over canada with a test to spare with a comfortable a9—12 win at twickenham last night. captain sarah hunter led out her side on her 100th cap in a fixture that saw the red roses score eight tries, with rachel burford and 18—year—old ellie kildunne both crossing twice. england will secure a series whitewashwith victory in the final test on saturday. and i don't know what you guys were doing last night but whatever it was i bet it wasn't as eventful as the night wigan winger
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ryan colclough had. playing against doncaster rovers, he scored two goals before being substituted so that he could see the birth of his second child. colclough had already scored to put wigan 2—0 up at half—time, when he found out his partner had gone into labour. but not content with dashing off to hospital he scored again but was taken off three minutes later. he made it to hospital still in his full kit. wigan's chairman tweeted this picture after the game. cutting it fine if you go back on the pitch! at least he made it, my husband never did for the birth of our second. and it isn't still sore, is it? give me time! for the birth of our second i was in wimbledon watching the first game ever under the roof, murray against wawrinka, the roof, murray against wawrinka, the roof, murray against wawrinka, the roof had been closed and i called my mother—in—law, she said my wife had gone into labour. that game we nt wife had gone into labour. that game went on until 11pm. i had to go early, i was the only person that left early. you won't let anybody forget that! i mention it now and again but obviously it was important
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to be there for the birth of our child! 0h, sonali, how funny! these things happen! from unwinding at home with a glass of red to getting teary after one too many gin and tonics, different types of alcohol affect your mood in distinctive ways, according to a major new study. the research, which is due to be published in the british medicaljournal, found that spirits were associated with feelings of aggression, while red wine and beer were linked to being relaxed. we visited a bar in salford to ask locals whether they agreed. i think that spirits make you feel like you're having a bit more fun but it's like you're having a bit more fun but its white wine, i do normally end up in a taxi in tears. i think it depends on the way you feel before you drink as well. it obviously has a dependent. also you assume things like red wine make you more sleepy, but maybe you have red wine because you are more sleepy and maybe you drink gin and tonic because you may be feeling a bit
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unhappy. the main alcoholic beverages that i ever touch our wine or cider, and they don't make me feel any type of way because i don't drink enough for it to change my, kind of like, feeling in that moment. run works out, it gives me, like, a lot of party energy. it feels silly to say that i feel a bit like a pirate. yeah! we're joined now by professor mark bellis, director of policy, research and international development for public health wales and co—author of the report. i expect people watching today will have guessed different types of alcohol affect their mood, but what have you found ? alcohol affect their mood, but what have you found? they do but particularly spirits have a stronger relationship with all sorts of emotions, feeling energised, confident, people might expect that but when you add into that it also makes people feel aggressive more often then we need to be more concerned about that. that's one
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thing with spirits. red wine is more relaxed and more tired, and beer is somewhere in between about the sorts of emotions people expect when they drinking it. how did you do the test, how many people were in it and what was it a case of doing, taste this and tell us how you feel?m was a survey of 30,000 people. a big number? a big number of people from 21 countries. to answer those questions, they had to drink all the different types of alcohol in the last 12 months so they could comment on the different sorts of emotions each drink gave. was there a difference in different countries? there were differences between the countries but we haven't focused a lot on that because there are other differences. certainly there will be cultural elements in there as well as the strength of the alcohol and the settings people drink in. how does that tally in terms of the different alcohol affecting people differently with the sort of volume consumed?
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differently with the sort of volume consumed ? surely that differently with the sort of volume consumed? surely that is a factor as well? it's going to be a factor as well. spirits may give you a bigger rush because they've got a higher alcohol concentration but people actually drink them in shops specifically to get drunk quickly, whereas red wine might be drunk with a meal quite slowly —— shots. it's a combination of the setting and the expectation people get from advertising. you found a difference between the way women and men feel about having drunk different types of alcohol? we get stronger emotional relationships with women across emotional relationships with women a cross every emotional relationships with women across every type of emotion, except for aggression. we saw a stronger relationship with aggression in men. i'm not trying to be... i'm trying to dig a little, could the emotions be connected to the way people feel naturally? is it the drink that brings out that emotion? if you are naturally aggressive then the drink might exacerbate that a little? we
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we re might exacerbate that a little? we were careful we asked people who drank all those different types of alcohol, it wasn't someone who specifically drunk one type, it was someone who tried all of them. that should have effectively cancelled itself out. what can we learn from this? you work in public health, this? you work in public health, this is why you're interested, what could we learned that might make a difference? especially at this time of year we expect people who are well—informed drinkers to make sensible choices about drinking and they see positive choices about alcohol at the moment, making sure people understand the negative sides of the thinking especially stronger drinks to push them to a point where they have a bad night is an important message. the more people drink the more they report positive emotions, but we see a rapid increase in heavy drinkers with negative emotions. aggression for example. thanks very much. a few comments here, too much gin can make mea comments here, too much gin can make me a aggressive says emma, whiskey makes me feel happy and relaxed.
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cheap spirits make me a emotional. beer makes me sick and not calm. wine, are used to strip the paint off the walls. this is rubbish, your choice of drink reflects your mood, not the other way round —— are used to. thanks very much indeed and thanks for all your here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. this morning it is pretty wet for some of us. it is also windy, the wind continuing to strengthen. and if you are in the west you will have both of those things as we go through the course of the day. we have been watching the rain coming in across northern ireland, parts of wales, northern england, and the odd splash of rain here in there. the main bulk of it will be across northern ireland, northern england, southern scotland and wales, and that will be moving northwards as we go through the course of the day, leaving behind at afair bit course of the day, leaving behind at a fair bit of cloud, some brighter ra kes a fair bit of cloud, some brighter
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rakes here and there, but the wind strengthening, that will be a feature of the weather across england and wales today. for northern ireland, the rain will be with you for much of the day, on and off. as the rain engages with cold air across scotland, you will find it in higherground, air across scotland, you will find it in higher ground, north of the central belt, and it will be falling as snow. as we come towards northern england, there will be a lot of surface water and spray on the roads today. but a lot of cloud coming around that band of rain. brighter skies with some sunny spells. alone's share will be across east anglia and the south—east, with temperatures easily into double figures. as we drift west, we run back into the cloud. strong winds again, and that rain cribbing south—west england. to give you an idea of the strength of wind with exposure in the south, gusts of 60 mph, inland, a0 to 50 mph. it will be windy and wet as our rain moves northwards and eastwards, and by the end of the night we will be seeing
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snow not only in the hills of scotland, but also at lower levels, again this is north of the central lowlands. tomorrow we start with that scenario are increasingly through the day, as this band of rain moves northwards it will start to fragment and become more patchy in nature, but low pressure is in charge of our weather, though all the showers are rotating around that area of low pressure. as we lose the rain around the south—east there will be a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine, but it is starting to feel colder. those lower temperatures starting to seep further south. the far south of england and wales hanging on double—figure temperatures. as we move on into friday, low pressure to the north of us, low pressure to the south, various fronts taking a swipe at us, introducing some rain, but if you look at the air coming around the low pressure, it is coming from more of a northerly direction. that isa more of a northerly direction. that is a colder direction for us, illustrated quite nicely here as we go through friday and into the weekend. it penetrates the whole of
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the uk but by the end of the weekend something a bit milder by the looks of it coming in from the west. so it is all change once again. thank you very much for that, precious information, the cold will bite this weekend. at lunchtime today the chancellor, phillip hammond, will deliver the budget. steph has been looking at what it might mean for families. we have just seen we havejust seen ministers going on for the prebudget meeting, but so much pressure on him today. and pressure on families, as well, you have been looking at that particular year. it is, we have been in a time of austerity for years now. for lots of austerity for years now. for lots of people, their cost of living has been going up while they have not seen their pay go up. that means it feels like, in real terms you have less money to spend on the things you might have done in the past. that has put a lot of pressure on people. at the same time you have a government which is real in a lot of
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debt. we still have something like £1.8 trillion worth of debt. that is a totally unimaginable number, isn't it? and we haven't been able to pay down that debt, because we are still spending more than we are bringing in from taxes, so we are still in what we call the deficit. so what the chancellor has to do is try and work out how to make sure the country can keep running, and we can keep providing the services we all need, and we'll have a nice life, and the same time not make that deficit any bigger. so eventually we can get rid of it and start paying off the debt. there is also pressure forfamilies, themselves, off the debt. there is also pressure for families, themselves, with off the debt. there is also pressure forfamilies, themselves, with their own household budgets to run. so i went to chat to the richardsons, from darlington. nicola is a teacher, dave is a postman. they have a little boy already, and a new baby on the way. so ijoined them and nicola's mum, susan, fora brew. how old is alfie? he's two. and you have another one on the way? yes, another boy, just for fun. what would you say is the biggest thing that, like, you worry about, in terms of money? things like food prices going up, and petrol always seems to be changing.
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and it does make a difference, week on week. our weekly food bill has gone up, hasn't it? 10%, 20% more. the amount of money that's been added to our fuel bills has been quite phenomenal. we think twice about putting the heating on, sometimes, don't we? in the 1960s and 1970s, you wouldn't have had the heating on all the time, if you had it. we probably didn't worry as much about fuel bills. fuel poverty is not a term that used to hear. you do now, people having to make choices between heating and eating. how is life as a teacher at the moment? have you seen your salary change at all? we've had 0.5% increases, but it's been frozen for the last five years or so. we've had a lot of family and friends that have lost theirjobs, and have had to find them with not much warning. a bit of a pressure point, isn't it, because there are not enough jobs
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to go around, is there? and if you do, it's part—time or have agency staff, where you're not even getting minimum wage, after all the fees. so it is tough. do you think it is tougher in the north—east? yes, you feel a bit left out. people say, oh, yeah, wages are rising. this is the kind of area where jobs in the public sector were the best jobs you could get. what about the future? they might be doing jobs that don't exist yet. going back to the '705, things weren't that easy, actually, anyway. and we did have a mortgage, and of course interest rates were in, like, double figures that you were paying back then. so i don't know whether we were better off then, but i think we felt things were improving. if we need a hospital we have to
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travel at least 20 miles. the hospital in town is being changed because of cutbacks, they are going to close the maternity wing and everything. we have never have envisaged that a town the size of darlington would lose theirs. we're just trying to do our best for the next two, so to speak, and have some fun on the way. as we've got a nice house, we've got some food in the cupboards, that kind of thing. and a lot of people don't actually have that, very often. say bye, steph. bye — bye, bye — bye, bye — bye. that was the best goodbye i have ever had. that family very typical of lots of families under pressure.
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the chancellor is also due to announce that driverless cars to be tested on britain's roads, but you might not be aware that some robotic vehicles are already on our streets. perhaps you will even pass one today. so would you trust a vehicle that controls itself? 0ur transport correspondent richard westcott has been for a test—drive. it is notjust humans that must learn to drive. computers need lessons too, and they have to start from scratch. 0ne lesson the car has got to learn is that things look different in the autumn. so the leaves might be orange, but not green, but it has got to know it is still a tree. it has also got to know what to do if a pedestrian does this. this is what the computer saw, and there is me, looking like a character in a videogame. what is extraordinary about this car is how ordinary it looks. it's going to be driving around the streets of 0xfordshire and london. you will barely notice any difference, apart from the writing down the side, but it is fully autonomous. so alex, do you want to get the computer driving? yes, it's just a single press of a button. i press that button, and the car takes over.
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and it is just as we are coming to a roundabout, too, so let's see how it copes with the first proper obstacle. we're on a test track. but this car has been driving on normal roads, dealing with the usual daily obstacles, cyclists, buses, and some unusual ones, as well. you may have crossed in front of it without realising, or you may have seen this and wondered what was going on. the on—board computer has been learning all those things you can't really teach. honestly, the truly hard thing about driving an autonomous car is all the unexpected crazy stuff that can happen on the road you would never think to programme about. dropped shopping bags in the middle of the street. it could be a shopping trolley that's blowing in the wind. we were once somewhere and a whole bunch of pheasants flew in very quickly from the side. we were fine with that stuff, but those were things that you wouldn't script as part of your driving test. the government says it wants robotic cars driving us around within three years. but, for some, that seems ambitious. they still need to sort the insurance, to work out what happens if the human driver has to suddenly take back control.
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and they have got to convince people that it is safe. i think it's really scary. look at some of the drivers nowadays. they go on the wrong side of the roads, so what computer—driven cars would be like, i don't know. i heard someone say, how does it make decisions like, say, it was going to crash into a kid or an adult? how will it make decisions like that — moral sort of stuff? i think it's a good idea, but obviously i have concerns with regards to not having a human intelligence. it is a machine, at the end of the day. the computer drives your car for you, so what do you do? you are a passenger? can you get some sleep? it is up to you. no way. as long as i could steer it, maybe. britain is a frontrunner in driverless vehicle software, and that should be worth billions. think really big. think about all the vehicles that move. yes, autonomous vehicles are amazing.
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but think about all the forklifts, all the vehicles at airports, in ports, infarms, in mines. these are all vehicles that have to answer questions. where am i, what is around me, what do i do? they are already answering those questions. robot cars are already driving on our roads, but it will be a few years before you can go and buy one. so many questions. that is fascinating. carl says doesn't the government think our roads are dangerous enough, without backing self driving cars? jenny says if you are able to throw a transparent ping—pong ball at a carfrom behind and it stops, she would consider buying one. and rob makes the point, i never cease to be amazed that people are happy to take a long haul flight, people are happy to take a long haul flight, the majority of which will
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be computer—controlled, yet worry about driving in a car in a similar fashion. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a probiotic drink which was initially given to improve the health of cattle could be used on humans to fight infections, including mrsa and e coli, after scientists carried out tests at the university of london. it was developed by a farmer in surrey, who was impressed by the effect it had on his cows. he then made a human version of the drink, called symprove, which has been found to contain properties which breaks down the resistance people have to antibiotics. if you've got an infection, and you take symprove, the testing showed your pathogen numbers will go down, and all of your good bacteria will go up. a teenager who was stabbed in northolt on saturday, by suspects who fled the scene on mopeds, has died. the 18—year—old was attacked
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by up to four people, in what police described as a pre—planned attack. it happened on newnham close. police are appealing for information. a scheme to automatically pay compensation to tube and rail passengers when services are delayed has been proposed in parliament. the way passengers claim at the moment is said to be complex and cumbersome, which means many miss out, so conservative mp huw merriman has suggested a new law which would mean companies have to pay out even if there is no claim. passengers expect adequate compensation for these difficulties. to do so fully would incentivise the train operators and network rail to do more to prevent these issues from occurring in the first place. let's have a look at the travel situation now. piccadilly line has severe delays between acton town and cockfosters, due to a signal failure. and ongoing work continues on the london 0verground by gospel 0ak. 0n the railways, a signalling problem is causing delays on great northern services between finsbury park and moorgate.
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0n the roads, the aao is slower into town than usual after a breakdown at hillingdon circus. and, in north london, seven sisters road is closed southbound near finsbury park station, because of a burst watermain. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning. now, we're waking up to a rather windy wednesday, and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the strong winds. now, it is going to be breezy all day today, gradually strengthening through this afternoon. decent spells of sunshine, though, and numerically speaking the temperature will be mild, at 15 celsius. but that breeze perhaps not making it feel as mild as it could. now, the strongest of our winds arrive later on this afternoon and into this evening, becoming very gusty indeed. we could be getting gusts of a0 mph, maybe 50 mph through the night, and that wind is coupled with some outbreaks of rain. so really quite unpleasant, wet and windy. the temperature mild, 12 or 13 celsius. so a mild and damp start tomorrow morning. the windfalls a little lighter. it is still going to be breezy.
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it doesn't disappear completely on thursday, but it's not going to be as strong as today. decent spells of sunshine, though. but we start to notice the temperature falling a little, and we'll really notice that as we head into friday, and things getting much cooler for the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it's make or break budget for the chancellor, philip hammond, as he promises to secure a bright future for britain. the famous red box is expected to contain plans for housing and schools, but mr hammond is a man under pressure from all sides. i'll be looking at the economics. i've been finding out how families are feeling about their household budgets and what the chancellor can best do to help them. good morning.
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it's wednesday, 22nd, november. also this morning: a new dawn for the people of zimbabwe after president mugabe's 37 years in power comes to an end. and how different types of alcohol bring out different emotions, a major study looks at the link between your drink and your mood. good morning. in sport, england pick jake ball for the first ashes test which begins at midnight. #ifl which begins at midnight. # ifican which begins at midnight. # if i can have the pleasure of your company, sweet, sweet. # and the legendary chat show host sir michael parkinson, who you can see duetting with bing crosby, will be here to tell us about some of the great musicians he's met and how their songs have influenced him. you may well be singing in the rain
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because there is rain in the forecast across the north and the west of the uk. some of that's heavy and persistent. there is a lot of cloud as well. the brightest skies in east anglia and the south east and it will be a windy day across england and wales. but i'll have more in 15 minutes. thank you, carol. we will see you at 8.15am. good morning. the chancellor, philip hammond, will present his budget in parliament later. he'll set out what he describes as his plans to "seize the opportunities" from brexit, while tackling deep—seated economic challenges in the country "head on". mr hammond is under pressure to balance the books but also ease austerity, amid significant tensions within his party. 0ur political correspondent, eleanor garnier, reports. when the chancellor opens his red box to reveal his tax and spending plans, money will be tight, as the government keeps saying. the chancellor's under huge pressure to loosen the purse strings to put more cash into public services like the nhs. but few expect the chancellor to go
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on a big spending spree. brexit is the backdrop to everything in westminster. the tensions over the talks with brussels and division in government over the eu don't make the chancellor's job any easier. any controversial budget plans, like tax rises or spending cuts, will be a difficult sell without an overall majority in the commons. the tories' hope for a reboot at the general election and the party conference both failed. now many think it's up to the chancellor to deliver a big budget that will trigger the revival the party and the prime minister need. the stakes are high for the chancellor, and with some in his own party wanting him sacked, any slip—ups and he could find himself out of a job. eleanor joins us now from downing street. the ministers have been arriving at
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downing street. now, you say he is under pressure, and it's how he performs as well which will be coming under the spotlight today as well? that's right right, dan, not just what he says, how he says it, how it is interpreted and how well all the measures he announces stack up all the measures he announces stack up as all the detail of the budget is unpicked. now we havejust up as all the detail of the budget is unpicked. now we have just seen all the ministers arriving for their special cabinet meeting ahead of the budget this morning. i think we have seen the brexit secretary, david davis, the education secretary, just teen greening, the new defence secretary gavin williamson who has only been in the past a matter of weeks and we have had the business secretary, the northern ireland secretary, the northern ireland secretary, borisjohnson, as well, the foreign secretary, they have all been going in this morning to get their first been going in this morning to get theirfirst glimpse been going in this morning to get their first glimpse of the budget, but as you say the chancellor really does have very little room for manoeuvre, politically, but financially too and there are many
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conservatives here in westminster who would like this budget to lift the party's post election gloom, to banish any memories of the recent cabinet resignations and also smooth over those internal tensions over brexit. but they know the chancellor is starting with a very weak hand. we can expect in this budget announcements on housing, tackling the housing crisis and also new money for schools, to get more pupils to study maths to a—level. labour is calling on the chancellor to end austerity and put more into public services. the chancellor will try to improve the government's fortunes, but the political and economic backdrop don't leave him many options. eleanor, thank you very much. a busy day for eleanor and steph as well. you can see what's going to be said in the budget at 12.30 throughout the bbc over the course of the next few hours. there will be in—depth
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analysis on breakfast tomorrow. there have been euphoric scenes in zimbabwe, following the resignation of robert mugabe after 37 years as president. the vice president, mr mnangagwa, who he sacked earlier this month, is expected to be sworn in as the country's new leader in the next two days. our correspondent, ben brown, is in harare this morning. what is the future, is it sill uncertain, ben? it is louise. i think as that euphoria begins to subside people are asking a lot of questions, this new man, emmerson mnangagwa, the former vice—president, he fell out with the mugabes, he will be sworn in as president probably today, but he's got a very dodgy past. he was the strong man in the mugabe regime. he was known as the crocodile. he is alleged to have masterminded massacres in the 1980s. a lot of human rights abuses. he is alleged to have rigged elections as well. so, is zimbabwe just swapping one
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tyra nt so, is zimbabwe just swapping one tyrant for another? i think this country is going to have to be very careful. there are questions today about the mugabes and what will happen to them. what about grace mugabe? a very reviled figure across this country, could she be prosecuted perhaps? she is accused of corruption on a large scale. all have the mugabes been given private assurances about their safety and also immunity from prosecution. some that we will have to wait and see. a un war crimes tribunal is due to deliver its verdict later this morning on a former bosnian—serb general, ratko mladic, who's accused of orchestrating the worst act of genocide in europe since the second world war. mladic is charged with the murders of 8,000 muslim men and boys in srebrenica in 1995, as well as the four—year siege of sarajevo,
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in which 10,000 people died. our correspondent, anna holligan, is at the hague, where the trial has been taking place for more than five years. what more do we know about whether he is going to be present for the verdict today? because there were rumours that he might not be there? indeed. his lawyers have been trying to delay this on the grounds of his ill—health. we understand he is expected to be in court today and it's very difficult to predict how he will behave because we have seen a whole range of antics over the past five years. he has been defiant throughout, despite the fact that he isa throughout, despite the fact that he is a very frail old man now, 7a yea rs is a very frail old man now, 7a years old. i want to show you the scene around here because it is pretty chaotic. this is probably one of the most significantjudgments to be handed down by this court which is closing at the end of the year. i wa nt to is closing at the end of the year. i want to show you one image from the camp. this the victims want it to be about
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them. for so many he is the man who they feel is most responsible for their suffering. he was the commander of the army and two of the most notorious crimes, srebrenica and the siege, the three year siege on sarajevo, the most serious charge on sarajevo, the most serious charge on the indictment is genocide and that's also the hardest to prove. thejudges here have to be that's also the hardest to prove. the judges here have to be convinced that he acted with intent to create an ethnic pure estate. we were speaking to our correspondent earlier and he was saying how interested and how important this judgment is for so many people across europe? indeed. it was the worst atrocity committed in europe since the second world war. i want to show you around here we have some of the mothers. they were telling us it is partly this judgment is important partly because of history.
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it's will legacy. it's about how mladic will go down history as a war hero as he is remembered by so many back home still or as a war criminal. a mass murderer, but it's also about the future. they say they're hoping that people who are in their 20s they're hoping that people who are in their20s and they're hoping that people who are in their 20s and 30s today are watching this and learning the lessons from the past. anna, thank you very much for that. there is a lot going on around you this morning, but it is really interesting to see what is taking place at the hague. i remember clearly that picture which was on the front page of time magazine. amazing to see that man there as well. there are fears the crew of a submarine that disappeared in the southern atlantic could be running out of oxygen. aa people are on board the sanjuan which went missing last wednesday after it reported an electric breakdown. a spokesman for the argentine navy said the massive search operation would continue until the vessel is found. in the next half an hour, we are
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speaking to someone who is helping with the rescue effort and they will be explaining how they are trying to find the submarine. 0n find the submarine. on every half—hour, everyone goes silent and you bang on the walls of the submarine and everyone is quiet. hopefully they will be able to hear them. fascinating detail. hopefully we will get more on that rescue later on. the american actor and musician david cassidy, has died in hospital in florida at the age of 67. he shot to fame in the sitcom the partridge family before having a successful solo music career. at the peak of his fame in the 1970s, his fan club had more members than those of the beatles and elvis presley. tributes are being paid to the comic actor, rodney bewes, who died yesterday aged 79. english girls abroad with appealing shoulders and flowery dresses like wallpaper on the march!
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he found fame playing bob ferris in the bbc sitcom the likely lads. he went on to enjoy other roles on stage and screen, including a sitcom he wrote called dear mother, love albert. uber has admitted that it concealed a massive global breach of the personal information of 57 million customers and drivers, which took place in october last year. the firm confirmed it had paid the hackers responsible £75,000 pounds to delete the data, which included customer names, e—mail addresses and mobile phone numbers. let's return to our main story. the chancellor, philip hammond, will be under pressure to announce far—reaching measures to tackle the housing crisis, boost public sector pay and ease austerity when he presents his budget in parliament later. brexit is also likely to weigh heavily on his mind, following months of uncertainty and tensions within the tory party. let's speak to thejustice minister,
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dominic raab, who joins us from westminster. good morning to you. thank you very much forjoining us. we know the chancellor is under britishure from all sides including his own party. what is he going to offer today to families under pressure? we are focussed on building britain for the future and you're right about the pressures . future and you're right about the pressures. so i expect the chancellor to take a balanced approach. we've cut the deficit, the government deficit, by £100 billion, we've got to maintain responsible public finances otherwise we're heaping more debt on the next generation, but we've tried to keep taxes low. that's what helps business fire up the job creation that we have seen over the last eight years and provides the revenue to invest in our public services. i don't know the details, but i would expect focussed on two things. one investment in skills and infrastructure, things like rail and road because that's what boosts real wages for your viewers and secondly, we built 200,000 new homes last year. we want to do more on that, to deliver on the home owning democracy
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that's a conservative vision and the british dream and we will hear more about that at 12.30. is that enough to really make a difference? we know he botched the last budget. the national insurance hike on self—employed having to reign back on that and he botched the preannouncement on this budget saying there are no unemployed. are you confident at this moment, this important moment for the country and for the party, he can get it right? absolutely. i don't think a lot of voters and certainly a lot of your viewers care a lot about the westminster drama and pantomime, what they care about is having a sta ble what they care about is having a stable economy that's fit for the future and the percentage of workers in low paid work according to the resolution foundation is the lowest since the 80s, income equality is at the lowest since the 80s, as well as making sure we do the things that people expect, the incredible record ofjob creation people expect, the incredible record of job creation under this government is notjust meant people can look after themselves and their
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families, but has meant a massive increase in revenue that we can put into schools, into the nhs, and into other precious public services. but we know that the cost of living, for example, is going up. wages are not keeping up. you're certainly right about the pinch on lower middle income families, but we know from the bank of england inflation peaked at 3% in october and is now starting to come back down. you know, i might just say it reached 5.a% under gordon brown, but that's why we've introduced the national living wage and cut income tax for the basic rate taxpayer so their ta ke—home and cut income tax for the basic rate taxpayer so their take—home pay is £1,000 more each year and that's the record we want to build on, but ultimately you need a strong economy, creating jobs, creating revenue and that's the foundation for all the other things we want to do in relation to public services and social justice. i want to know as well, you talk about the westminster bubble, but people will be interested for example, the front page of the daily telegraph, "may's budget war with
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hammond." is that true or not? no, it's tittle—tattle and people discounted large chunks of what they read in the media. i'm focussed on the team effort. building a country that's fit for the future. we can't let the public finances run out of control the way the labour party did under gordon brown and president way they certainly would underjeremy corbyn and john mcdonnell, but we need to make sure we've got that strong economy, creating jobs. we've had three million newjobs and for all the attack on the gig economy, three—quarters of those three million newjobs have been full—time and at the same time, we want to make sure people have got quality public services and increase people's confidence in the schools and the nhs. cancer survival rates are at record high. that's the record we want to build on to make this country fit for the next generation. you talk about building and jobs and investment, but the fa cts and jobs and investment, but the facts a re and jobs and investment, but the facts are productivity, for example, in this country, is still low compared for example to other cou nterpa rts compared for example to other counterparts in europe?
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i agree with that, productivity has been a long—standing problem that has afflicted successive generations... what do you mean by that? i think, if generations... what do you mean by that? ithink, if you generations... what do you mean by that? i think, if you ask a lot of economists, on the left or the right, they would say that we have an issue here which is that we are not as productive, which means the output per unit of the workforce in this country, compared to some of the leading international competition, but the way you deal with that, and that is why i said at the beginning of the interview, i think you will see a renewed focus on skills, investment in road and rail infrastructure, because that boost productivity. it is important because it is the biggest driver of increasing wages. inflation has been high, wages have not caught up with that. we know inflation is coming down, we want to boost productivity so wages go up, so alongside the extra revenue so wages go up, so alongside the extra reve nu e we so wages go up, so alongside the extra revenue we have got by keeping taxes low and the job creation we have got by encouraging businesses to hire more is the key to a
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balanced approach to make sure this country is fit for the future. do you think the chancellor can do love this and effectively save the party, which has had a very difficult six months? the election did not go the way we wanted, but i am fresh here from helping to steer the brexit bill through the house of commons, we are only eight days through the committee stage, but we have won every vote. people have talked about rebels bringing us down, but we have had a constructive approach, and now we are moving on to the budget, and i think you will see that balanced approach, dealing with productivity, but also making sure that we, for example, we build 200,000 new homes last year, and we need to do more on that front. from the bread and butter, the nuts and bolts of the economy, to the british team, the desire for the next generation to get on the housing ladder. you will
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see a concerted effort... can i...? cani see a concerted effort... can i...? can i say just see a concerted effort... can i...? can i sayjust one thing? we have got greater opportunities in this country, it is important we grasp them. we are running short of time, but another question about the budget and planning for brexit, front page of the financial times today, talking about the divorce bill - today, talking about the divorce bill — they say there may be a deal within three weeks, how much will it cost? have you signed up to this £a0 billion now? the figure that has been put on it isjust billion now? the figure that has been put on it is just prospective asian and tittle—tattle, but i certainly think, you know, people we re certainly think, you know, people were saying the thing was in the balance, but we are making good progress on the money, on northern ireland, on citizen's rights. but ultimately there is no deal in these negotiations until we have got the whole deal, and people at home on to see the package in the round. sooner rather than later, we need to talk
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about the wider issues — trade, security, and we are going for a win—win deal with our european friends, good for britain and for our european partners. thank you for your time on breakfast this morning. good morning, that does not look pretty, i don't know where that is, but i wouldn't like to be stuck there! quite right, it is going to be windy across england and wales, up be windy across england and wales, up to 70 mph with exposure in parts of the west and south. inland, a0—50 mph. and we have got some rain as well. not all of us will see some conditions, but in the west you will see both. no pressure is governing the weather, to the north and south of us, look at those isobars, they will squeeze together, hence we are going to see the wind strengthening, afair bit going to see the wind strengthening, a fair bit of rain around as well. we have already got that, actually,
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across northern ireland, wales, northern england and southern scotland, moving northwards through the course of the day, falling snow on the hills in scotland. the other side of that band of rain, some brighter skies. into the afternoon, windy across south—west england, especially with exposure, the rain clipping the north devon, cornwall and the somerset. wet and windy across wales, especially so with exposure, but breezy across northern ireland, the rain easing off a touch. but extending through northern scotland, snow on the hills, not getting indicated and sutherland, still cold across the northern isles with wintry mix. a lot of cloud in the north, but brighter skies in east anglia, even in the midlands we could see glimmers of sunshine before the cloud builds. through the evening and overnight, a band of rain pushes towards the east and south, and one
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towards the east and south, and one towards the east and south, and one towards the north. it is going to be a windy night, and increasingly through the night snow notjust on the hills north of the central lowlands, but also, by the end of the night, at lower levels as well. it will be a cold night except for in the south. that is how we start tomorrow morning at four, so we lose the rain from the south—east through the rain from the south—east through the day, still windy for a time. the rain and snow across scotland will push northwards, fragmenting as it does so. no pressure still dominating our weather, everything rotates in an anticlockwise direction across the low pressure, so showers coming from the west. there will be a lot of dry and sunny conditions. but note the temperatures, look out below temperatures, look out below temperatures are pushing further south, the far south of england and wales will hang on to double figures, but it will not last. low pressure to the north and south will bring rain during the course of friday, but the wind is salient because it has another component, a
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cold direction, so friday to sunday especially, it will feel cold and then change again as milder conditions start to show their hand from the west. it has been a week since the argentine submarine disappeared in the southern atlantic, and there are growing fears that the crew may soon run out of oxygen. it is a really desperate story. we are joined by stewart little, a former royal navy submariner. we were just talking to you before we came to you, they are ina you before we came to you, they are in a desperate situation, tell us what this might be like for them right now. we have had no contact, what will they be doing? it has been approximately six days now since the submarine was last heard from. there is almost a 100% chance that it is on the bottom. the depth of water, i don't know what it is, nobody has found the submarine, that is the first thing. for the people on
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board, it is a desperate situation, they will be running out of a electrical supplies, controllable atmosphere, and the big problems will be oxygen, which will be reducing as they breathe it in, and carbon dioxide, as they breed it out. those at the two big problems, and the atmosphere. they will have seven days of life—support stores on board, enabling them to control the on board atmosphere for that period. seven days will be approximately tomorrow or the day after. it is a serious problem. it paints a clear picture of what they will be going through, and in terms of conserving oxygen, what will they be doing? they will be minimising oxygen consumption, which is very simple, they send everybody to bed. minimise all activity, reduce the amount of air that people are breathing. just go to bed and do nothing. there are certain things that they will have
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to do, they will probably still have some damage control activities going on, because something has forced that submarine to the bottom, it did not go there of its own accord, and they will be trying desperately to be found. i know you are feeling quite a mistake, but if they were to find it, how would they get them out of this situation? well, a submarine rescue is a well practised and well—known event for submariners and rescue teams. there are a lot of submarine rescue teams around the world, and the one involved in this one is the us submarine rescue service based in san diego, and they are deployed to be seen. there is an rov, the provisional emergency life—support stores, which will provide the submarine the capability of controlling its atmosphere. and we we re of controlling its atmosphere. and we were saying earlier, we mentioned to our viewers when you are coming
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on, it is recognised that in this situation, every half—hour and on the hour, everything goes quiet and you listen carefully for one of the submariners banging on the wall of the submarine, because sound will travel a long way, doesn't it? the submarine, because sound will travel a long way, doesn't mm does, and that is a standard response to this sort of thing, submariners know it, the surface search forces know it, so on the hour and search forces know it, so on the hourand a search forces know it, so on the hour and a half hourfor search forces know it, so on the hour and a half hour for five minutes everybody goes quiet, and somebody will make as much noise as they can. the best way to do that is to bang on the hole with a hammer, a saucepan, anything metallic. bang on the hull or one of the frames inside to generate noise through the water. the hope is that will happen in the next 2a hours, because oxygen supplies are running out, it is desperate times. it is getting very critical for these people, desperate times. it is getting very criticalfor these people, a3 men and one woman on board that submarine, and it is coming down to the very critical times. the search force will be doing their utmost to
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find it, and the rescue forces themselves are doing their utmost to provide what is required once the submarine has been found. but until it is found, they cannot do anything. gosh, thank you so much for that insight. we hope for the best, obviously. time to get news, travel and weather wherever you are watching. good morning, a lot of weather in the next a8 hours, it will get cold going into the weekend but in the short term heavy rain and strong winds. this morning the strongest winds. this morning the strongest winds will be across western areas then we'll move east, heavy rain across parts of wales particularly north—west wales, north—west england and south—west scotland. brain in northern ireland. snowfall over the higher ground in scotland, pity
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chilly there but in the south and east dry and bright, it will feel quite mild again. temperatures 16 celsius. tonight strong winds will move east accompanied by heavy rain at times into the early hours of tuesday morning, again pretty mild across england and wales, turning colder across scotland and for the first thing tomorrow we are looking at 2-5 first thing tomorrow we are looking at 2—5 centimetres of snow falling to low levels, that is one thing to be well aware of. elsewhere on thursday, we have rain first thing which will clear away to the south—east, still quite a breezy day on thursday, some showers coming into wales, northern areas of england again, some wintry of a higher ground, much of this note over northern scotland will ease into the afternoon, brighter spells there, temperatures 6—9 in northern and western areas, through thursday
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into friday, we have north westerly air streams into the uk, this weather system coming into the south could complicate things a little, there could be rain but generally speaking this cold air digging down for many of us into the weekend, it will be more about frosts in the morning and the risks of wintry showers. more details on the website. that is it from me. bye bye. this is business live from bbc news with susannah
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streeter and david eades. it's budget day here in the uk, but what measures will the chancellor of the exchequer present to bolster britain's low productivity? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday 22nd november. growth in the uk is flagging behind germany and france. we'll look at what solutions are likely to be announced later and ask if they go far enough. also in the programme — personal data on 57 million uber customers and drivers were breached in a hack attack that uber concealed for more than a year.

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