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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 26, 2017 6:00am-7:00am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with ben thompson and tina daheley. new regulations are announced to tackle rogue drone operators. people who use drones will have to take safety tests and the police will be given more powers to stop their illegal use. good morning. it's sunday the 26th of november. also this morning: mounting pressure to settle the question of the irish border after brexit. a senior official from the republic of ireland says his government will play tough to the end. a warning to airlines after ash clouds spew from a volcano on the indonesian island of bali. there are fears of a full—scale eruption. in sport, england are firmly up against it in the first ashes test against australia. with england all out for 195 in their second innings, the aussies need just 170 to win. the current score
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is 23 without loss. sailors from the royal navy prepare to take on the job of guarding buckingham palace for the first time. and ben has the weather. good morning. a chilly weekend of weather continues. a cold and frosty start. sunshine and showers. clouding over in the west. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. people who fly drones will be required to take safety awareness tests as part of a government clampdown on rogue operators. owners will be banned from flying them near airports, while the police will be given new powers to seize the machines. they are part of plans to crack down on criminal and unsafe use of drones, which have been used for smuggling, and have been involved in near—misses with aeroplanes. here's our business correspondent, joe lynam.
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they are getting bigger and like. they are getting bigger and like. they can carry items and can go in water and out again. the government wa nts to ta p water and out again. the government wants to tap into these new technologies but also prevent abuse of drones. the drone bill could make owners of drones weighing more than 250 g will need to register and do a test. they will be banned from airports and higher than 120 metres. police will have new powers to seize unmanned vehicles. and britain also wa nts to ta p unmanned vehicles. and britain also wants to tap into the wider benefits of drones. they can help in the construction, mining and offshore oil rig industries. they can dojobs which put people at risk. hopefully it will help with safety as well. and the safety concerns were highlighted in july when and the safety concerns were highlighted injuly when gatwick airport had to close when a drone was flown under a plane which had
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the land. there were a few near misses at other airports since the dot and 15 as well. joe lynam, bbc news. —— since 2015. after 7am, we'll speak to a representative of one of the world's biggest drone manufacturers about the changes. and now for some other news. ireland's european commissioner has urged the uk not to leave the single market and customs union. phil hogan told the observer that it would be the best way to avoid stringent border controls between northern ireland and the republic. theresa may hopes the eu will agree to move the brexit talks onto trade at next month's summit. but european negotiators say the border issue must be settled first, as our political correspondent, chris mason, explains. what do the government is desperate to move these brexit talks on to the future relationship to talk about trade. but, in orderto future relationship to talk about trade. but, in order to do that, they have three big issues they have to make significant progress on. talk of a divorce bill, talk of
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citizens rights, britons elsewhere and european citizens in the uk, and then this issue becoming a really big sticking point, the irish border, the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. at the moment it is almost invisible. but when the uk leads the european union that will be the frontier between the uk and the european union. it cannot be a hard border, something physical and obvious to see. but, how does the uk achieve that if it is leaving the single market and the customs union? they will be operating economies under different rules. there is a lot of talk trying to find a technological solution. but there is very little talk about a precise detail. ireland has a huge amount of power at the moment as they can veto and stop the uk being able to move
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on to the second stage of the brexit talks. and as if this was not all complicated and involved enough, there was even the potential for an irish general election before christmas because of political turbulence. and there is plenty of political turbulence here and happening elsewhere in europe, right at the heart of these brexit negotiation. —— negotiations. brett mason. a police officer has been seriously injured after a van was driven at him in liverpool. it happened in the norris green area of the city after a number of officers tried to stop the vehicle. merseyside police have called the incident a "despicable attack" and say a man has been arrested. egyptian officials say gunmen who killed more than 300 people during an attack on a mosque in sinai were carrying the flag of the islamic state group. no—one has claimed responsibility yet, but egypt's military says it's conducted airstrikes in response. here's our middle east correspondent, 0rla guerin. warplanes take to the skies bound
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for northern sinai. president al—sisi says this is a mission to avenge the martyrs. the army says weapons destroyed stockpiles and vehicles used by the militants who attacked the mosque. it still stands, but is now a monument to sorrow. in the general hospital, one of the young survivors. he is 13. he was shot twice in the hand and the lake. and he is not the only casualty in his family. —— leg. in the bed nearby, his 17—year—old cousin, also shot twice, once in the back. his mother is looking to god to punish those who brought such torment. translation: i hope their hearts will be burned just like ours. the women have all become widowed. there are no men left.
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they are all gone. here, doctors can sell this man who made it out alive without two of his brothers and two of their children. "there was shooting," he said. "people just started running. "some jumped out of the window. "it is like i fell into a coma. "god saved some of us, but others lost their lives." loss on this scale has brought shock, uncertainty, and fear. this town has been robbed of a quarter of its men. for now, at least, egyptians seem united in grief. 0ra—— 0ra —— 0rla guerin, bbc or a —— 0rla guerin, bbc news. a candlelight vigil has been
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held for the teenager, gaia pope, a week after her body was found. people gathered in prince albert gardens in dorset to light candles and leave flowers in memory of the 19—year—old, whose disappearance sparked a massive campaign to find her. police say they are treating her death as "unexplained." there's concern that a volcano on the indonesian island of bali may be about to erupt. mount agung, which is currently blowing a plume of thick ash into the sky, last erupted in 1963. around 25,000 people have been evacuated, and some flights have been cancelled. andrew plant has the latest. plumes of black smoke as people on the indonesian island of bali look on from a distance. the fear is that this volcano could be about to erupt. thousands have now been told to move away from the area. airlines have been warned about volcanic ash in the air from the billowing smoke more than 1,500 metres high. many flights here have now been cancelled.
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it's really kind of inconvenient, but there's not much you can do, it's a natural disaster. so, umm, yeah, it's... yeah, one of those things. it's kind of difficult. i lost my bag as well, so i have been waiting for my bag, but now i'm just going to go back to the hotel and come back tomorrow, i guess. the volcano has been showing signs of unrest since september, with many leaving their homes for temporary shelters. now, people within eight miles have been told to evacuate, with more than 120,000 displaced, scattered in camps across the island. the mountain is sacred to people here. the red warning, though, means experts believe an eruption could happen at any time, and no—one is taking any chances. it would be the volcano's first full—scale eruption since 1963 when more than 1,000 people lost their lives. andrew plant, bbc news.
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let's speak to elaine borges—ibanez, who is on holiday in bali and can see the volcano. you can see the volcano behind us. you can see the volcano behind us. you are outside the exclusion zone. it looks like you are close but you are out in safety. tell us what it is they are telling us. before i came to bali i took the precaution of having a mask with a carbon filter. i also have goggles which i can put on if ash is falling directly. it was mainly falling directly. it was mainly falling directly this morning. near the hotel, a large amount was swept up by the pool. they like to use it as
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fertiliser. since then, only a smattering has fallen, on my laptop, on my cellphone, and the ground. please explain. this volcano has been threatening to erupt for a while. many have decided not to go on holiday. in the last 48 hours we have seen a big increase in activity from the volcano is to be is that right? -- volcano. a week ago it threw up some smoke. from this morning i could see the cloud was very high in the sky. i came here knowing that the volcano might erupt. i wanted to support the people of bali because they need tourism even more now than they did before, because many of the people live basically on the poverty line,
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and every tourist, the power of the dollar, whatever currency, really helps them to keep going because they don't have the reserves that english people have. sub it is our duty actually to come to bali. absolutely. —— so it. what is the atmosphere? are people getting on with life normally? they are used to living and working in the shadow of the volcano. yes. they are happy to clea n the volcano. yes. they are happy to clean the room, they say. they are doing landscape gardening and preparing the place. a guest has arrived here at the restaurant. i saw some with big sacks of rice leaving the area, and some temporary
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residents in the area have also left, but the diehards have stayed because they are allowed to stay.“ the volcano doesn't erupt, what precautions are in place and what preparations are being made?” precautions are in place and what preparations are being made? i have not been told officially, but we will probably be notified by text. the people can then evacuate to various evacuation centres. it is quite safe further away. it is only in the exclusion zone, the immediate perimeter of the exclusion zone, there is likely to be a problem. it does not affect the whole of bali. it is very good to talk to you. she is on holiday. stay safe. that is an incredible image behind you with that volcano threatening to erupt. goodbye. let's have a look at this morning's papers. the sunday express. we have been talking about this intense speculation about prince harry and
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meghan‘s engagement which we thought would be announced early last week but we are still waiting. that is also on the front of the times. meghan keeps westminster waiting. a picture of them both. preparing to announce their engagement this week. many diaries being cleared across westminster, it seems, about now. brexit story on the front page of the sunday telegraph. don't betray the sunday telegraph. don't betray the eu court red lines according to theresa may. and, as you can see, a big photograph of victoria beckham, as herfashion big photograph of victoria beckham, as her fashion brand big photograph of victoria beckham, as herfashion brand is reportedly worth 100 million powered. nice work if you can get it. —— pounds. a story on the front of the sun. the present in announcing the end of her 17 year marriage to jackie robinson. —— presenter. 17 year marriage to jackie robinson. -- presenter. and an incredible
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headline here. we will have more on those stories later, but now, the weather. cold and frosty this morning? 0ur cold weekend continues today, a frosty start for many, you may need to scrape the car if you're heading out early and summarise in places early and initially at least a mixture of sunshine and showers —— some ice. that's where we have the potential for some ice. that's where we have the potentialfor highs some ice. that's where we have the potential for highs on untreated roads and pavements, bear that in mind, this is how we expect it at 9am. for wales and the south—west, some showers, but for the south—east and into east anglia, a dry start and into east anglia, a dry start and when the sun comes up there will be plenty of blue skies but surely, two or three by 9am. zero west england, northern ireland, showers and the ice risk and showers in north—west england —— north—west
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england. through the day like yesterday the best of the dry and bright weather will be in eastern areas, the showers in the west will tend to use as the day goes on. but only as this area of cloud starts to invade from the atlantic —— will tend to ease. 0utbreaks invade from the atlantic —— will tend to ease. outbreaks of rain by the end of the day. just a subtle lift in the temperatures out west, it won't feel much less cold but beginning to creep up and that's a sign of what's to come tonight. plenty of changes tonight, rain into northern ireland, heavy rain at that, snow for a time over the hills of scotla nd that, snow for a time over the hills of scotland and then there's rain sinks across northern england and wales, a lot of rain in some of these areas and that band of rain pushes further south by the end of the night. ahead of it, mild compared to what we've had recently, 11 to start monday morning in plymouth by cold air holds on in scotland. quite windy overnight. strong winds continues tomorrow ——
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but cold air. a heavy burst of rain likely for most areas. 0nce but cold air. a heavy burst of rain likely for most areas. once it clears away, the skies will brighten and we will seize spells of sunshine, plenty of showers coming southwards on the strong wind and those showers in scotland particularly will be wintry with some snow “— particularly will be wintry with some snow —— will see spells. those temperatures coming down in the north as the day goes on, 4—10 by tomorrow afternoon. 0n north as the day goes on, 4—10 by tomorrow afternoon. on monday night, the weather front that brought the rain clears away to the south, low pressure clears eastwards and follow the isobars to the arctic, a familiar tale. back into the cold airas we go familiar tale. back into the cold air as we go through the week ahead. after a brief milder spell tonight through to tomorrow, it won't last, a chilly week ahead, there will be some sunshine and showers and in the showers there could be some snow. snow? thank you very much! it's feeling really cold, isn't it? somewhere that isn't is to buy, the
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travel show team have been there and they're finding out how it's becoming one of the world's fastest growing tourist destinations —— is to buy. —— is dubai. now it's time for the travel show. we'll see you for the headlines at 6:30am. 20 years ago, dubai set out to become one of the most talked about towns in the world. since then this young city state, one of seven emirates in the uae, has largely succeeded. it's become one of the fastest growing tourist destinations on the planet. synonymous with spectacular skyscrapers, gigantic shopping malls and high—end hospitality and also the occasional stories of tourists who fall foul of local customs. but scratch deeper and there's much more to this place. no longer the brash new kid on the block, dubai is now an established hub and one of the world's few truly global cities. and although the impulse
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to impress is still here, there's now a more complex identity taking shape and i'm here to see how that's changing the look and feel of dubai, its people and its future. this is the creek, the real heart of old dubai, and gorgeous in this light. now, this used to be a real trading hub for the city and the kinds of boats you can see behind me bring in spices and other goods from countries like india, iran and much further afield. this is my personalfavourite part of dubai, the old town,
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where you get a real sense of the past. it's a contrast to the skyscrapers and shopping malls downtown. what is this? this is cinnamon. cinnamon, yeah, i recognised that. very good. this one is turmeric. turmeric, yeah, very good for cooking. this one is for cooking, and this is for the face massage. for the face massage? 0k. and what is this? this is a long piece of wood, what is it? this is more cinnamon! very good! you're testing me, aren't you! tell me the difference, that is bigger? this is bigger and this is smaller. is that it?! laughs frankly, if i hadn't stopped him i think he would've taken me through every single spice in the shop. this one is for smoking and for soup. of course if you're into bling you don't have to go too far to find that here too. but to find authentic
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arts and crafts 21st century style, then you'll need to venture even further from the glitz and skyscrapers, and head to be gritty al quoz industrial area, where a flourishing warehouse—based community arts scene has sprung up. this is "calligraffiti", a mixture of traditional arabic calligraphy and graffiti, and it's the signature style of a french—born artist of tunisian origin, who goes by the name of el seed. he'd taken his unique approach to street art around the world with astonishing results, including this monumental project he created in a working—class district of cairo. so what's he doing in dubai? for me, dubai is like, a new city. i look at it, i try to have a different view to it. a lot of people coming from outside say, "oh,
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it is fake, you are an artist, how could you be here?" for me, there is this kind of growing art scene, there is a growing art community. as an artist it's always good to see that i am part of this, i am part of making a change and making this movement. if i can question you on that, it is also a place that is glamorous and wealthy, you have a big expat population, you have some very rich people here. is that inspiring for you? we are here in the middle of the industrial zone that has been turned into this cultural and art community. like, when you cross the road you have still factories. this is the dubai that i want to see. i am not interested in the shiny things, that's not for me. but some people that they want it. i think at some point there is a switch, dubai will show people, this is what we do. some people love paris, i love paris, some people hate paris. some people love new york, some others hate new york. you cannot compare. some people love paris,
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i love paris, some people hate paris. some people love new york, some others hate new york. you cannot compare. for me it's too naive. but what i look? yes, what has been done here in less than 30 years is crazy. i think people should just salute that. while the artists there are busy feeding the soul, many locals and expats here in dubai are also now keen to exercise their bodies. some of them in the most quintessential emirati locations. now, you wouldn't normally associate dubai with cycling. in fact, riding through the dubai rush hour is definitely a no—no.
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but the sport is becoming increasingly popular here, thanks to facilities like this, a cycling track. it's long, smooth, purpose built and flat as a pancake. in a country not famed for its exercise culture, these days many locals are now getting into a whole range of sports. and in case you're wondering, i'm going to leave this one to the experts. hi, i'm a wakeboarder in dubai. i'm all about board sports, so snowboarding, wakeboarding, kite surfing, all accessible in dubai. living in the desert, the closest mountain is in lebanon or georgia or something. you have the best instructors, you learn how to snowboard here and when you go into any mountain from the alps
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to colorado, it's simple. the younger generation's actually crazy here in dubai. they're crazy when it comes to extreme sports. they're trying to compete more internationally. it's actually really nice to see. the vibe of the city is all about work hard, play hard. you put in so many hours at work, so the little time you have left, you don't want to waste it just lolling around. keen to get another fix of the great outdoors, i'm now heading out to the desert early in the morning to experience something new that i'm told you can only see here in dubai. it's a new twist on traditional
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arabian falconry. i hear it's going to be truly breathtaking. 2,500 years ago, people relied on the falcon the way you and i rely on the supermarket. falcons put food on the table. traditionally the way it worked, birds from europe and asia migrated from the middle east to africa. on that migration they would trap them from the wild and then use them in the winter months. at the end of winter they would untie them and release them into the wild. it is a beautiful system of borrowing a bird from the wild and then giving them back. we are about to release 0beron from the basket and i'll untie him. you'll see he's wearing a transmitter on his tail,
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that's so i can find him if he flies away. i'll pop his hood off in a second. this device is called a hood, and this is keeping him calm and relaxed. that comes off. 0k. ready, guys? five, four, three, two, one... wow! amazing. hey! good boy. do you want to have a go? i would love to, let's try. oh, yes.
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peter has helped to hand rear these birds from birth and the bond of trust between them is vital. it's clear that to him the falcon's welfare is paramount, and months go into training the birds to get them used to the sights and sounds of the baloon and its passengers. if practised correctly these birds are in good shape. so the bird is not suffering. absolutely not. what more could you ask for? a unique experience and a beautiful animal. hello. this is breakfast, with ben thompson and tina daheley. good morning to you. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. people who fly drones will be required to take safety awareness tests as part of a government clampdown on rogue operators. owners will be banned from flying them near airports, while the police will be given new powers to seize the machines. they are part of plans to crack down
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on criminal and unsafe use of drones, which have been used for smuggling and have been involved in near—misses with aeroplanes. ireland's european commissioner has urged the uk not to leave the single market and customs union. phil hogan has told the observer that it would be the best way to avoid stringent border controls between northern ireland and the republic. theresa may hopes the eu will agree to move the brexit talks onto trade at next month's summit. but mr hogan warns ireland will use its veto to stop progress if it is not satisfed. a police officer has been seriously injured after a van was driven at him in liverpool. it happened in the norris green area of the city after a number and say a man has been arrested. egyptian officials say gunmen who carried out an attack on a mosque in sinai were carrying the flag of the islamic state group. more than 300 people were killed,
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including at least 30 children. no—one has claimed responsibility yet, but egypt's military says it's conducted several airstrikes in response. pakistan's government has asked the army to deploy troops to restore order in the capital, islamabad, after clashes between police and islamist protesters. nearly 200 people have been injured. the demonstrators are demanding the removal of a government minister they accuse of blasphemy. violence has also spread to other cities, including lahore and karachi. a candlelight vigil has been held for the teenager gaia pope a week after her body was found. people gathered in prince albert gardens in dorset to light candles and leave flowers in memory of the 19—year—old, whose
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