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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 2, 2018 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and rachel burden. back to work but at a higher cost. from today, rail passengers face the biggest fare—rise in five years. many season tickets have gone up by more than £100, as campaigners warned that people were "being priced out of getting to work". good morning from london bridge station, where i will speak with the boss of network rail and passengers about what the increases are going to mean for people. good morning. it's tuesday, january 2nd. also this morning: the foreign secretary borisjohnson calls for a "meaningful debate" as protests in iran flare for a fifth day. investigations continue into the seaplane crash that killed a british businessman and four members of his family. limit children to two low—calorie snacks a day —
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the latest advice to tackle obesity. in sport, there is no fairytale ending for one of the most successful sportsmen of all time. debutant rob cross outplayed phil "the power" taylor in his final world darts final. 16—time champion taylor retiring with a defeat. and matt has the weather. morning. good morning. lovely bright and frosty start in northern and eastern areas, but wet and windy weather in the west. even if you miss out on the rain today, there is going to be storms on the way tonight. i will tell you all about that in the next 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first our main story. the biggest increase in railfares in five years comes into force this morning, prompting protests at several stations as many commuters return to work after the christmas break. in some cases, travellers will find themselves paying more than £100 extra a year. campaigners warn the rise is pricing ordinary people off the railways. the government says they're
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investing more in faster, more reliable trains. here's our transport correspondent, richard westcott. cani can i please see your tickets? another new year, another fare rise. regulated season tickets go up 3.6% this year. it will add just shy of £150 to the price for commuters coming into london on the stripe riddled line from hove in east sussex. nearly £110 for a yearly ticket to liverpool to manchester. and commuters going to birmingham from gloucester must find £140 more this year. many now pay between £3000 and £5,000 to get to work with the most pricey tickets in the south of england. the government says it is spending record amounts on improving the network, with more seats provided on newer trains, and more reliable electrified lines. but campaigners argue that ordinarily
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people are being priced off our trains with the latest figures showing a drop in the number of journeys made using a season ticket. i think this fare rise really throws the spotlight on value for money. passengers want to see a reliable train service, a better chance of getting a seat and that information during disruption. and train companies can take sting out of this by offering direct debit payments for annual season tickets and helping the passengers pay for this lump sum. they say that fares have been outstripping wages for years and they are calling for a price freeze. steph is at london bridge this morning. morning. why is the fare rise controversial? any fare rise is controversial, to be fair. yes, morning. iam here controversial, to be fair. yes, morning. i am here at london bridge, as you say, this morning. not many here yet. it will be busy shortly. it is controversial because it comes ata time it is controversial because it comes at a time when we are still seeing
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lots of problems on the rail network. for example, if you look at punctuality. 0ne network. for example, if you look at punctuality. one in ten trains was late in 2016, which is a lot of trains, if you think our many are just running from the station every day. it is about punctuality, also about overcrowding on trains. people are about overcrowding on trains. people a re really miffed about overcrowding on trains. people are really miffed that they have to pay such an increase for the train fa re pay such an increase for the train fare when, at the same time, they are still overcrowded and they are still not running, a lot of them, to schedule. so there is that element. the other issue is how they work out how to put up the train says. so they use it based on what the inflation figure, the retail prices index, was in july last inflation figure, the retail prices index, was injuly last year. some people argue that this is not a good way to work it out because, at the same time, we are not seeing wages co—op as much as inflation is going up. and without going to into the mess, there are two met ways of working out the inflation, the rpi, which is higher than the other one,
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thatis which is higher than the other one, that is more commonly used to work out how much to pay ten out how much to pay benefits. that is more commonly used to work out how much to pay benefits. so they say it is too much given everything going on with the network. later i will speak with the boss of network rail and hopefully i can grab some passengers as well. i will be back with you in a bit. thank you very much. still very quiet. maybe you and me are the only once back at work today. that is a possibility. steph will be talking to the boss of network rail at around 6:40am this morning. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has called for a meaningful debate in iran, where 13 people have been killed in protests since thursday. demonstrators, who are angry about living standards, attacked police stations late into the night as they took to the streets in a number of cities. jon donnison reports. iran has not seen anything like this in almost a decade. the country's leadership underfire in almost a decade. the country's leadership under fire in in almost a decade. the country's leadership underfire in the biggest protest since 2009. people are angry
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about high unemployment, rising prices and corruption. police stations have been attacked. authorities say one policeman was shot dead on monday. three other officers were injured. at least 13 people have now been killed since the unrest broke out last thursday. the foreign secretary, boris johnson, called on the iranian authorities to permit debate about what he called "the legitimate and important issues raised by protesters". but in recent days of the country's collected president rouhani said they were being instigated. the victory against the regime is unbearable for the enemies. success in the region is intolerable for them. they are after revenge and they are trying to provoke people. but so far his words
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have done little to stem the protests. there have been large counter demonstrations organised in support of the country's leadership. but as the protests entered a sixth date, the message from many iranians is they want change. air accident investigators in australia say it may take months before they know why a seaplane carrying a prominent british businessman and his family crashed on new year's eve. richard cousins — who ran a multi—billion pound catering company — was killed along with his two sons, his fiancee, her daughter and the pilot. investigators say it could take several days to recover the wreckage of the plane, which is submerged under 40 feet of water. and we will get the latest on that investigation from our correspondent phil mercer in australia in around 15 minutes. more than 300 women from hollywood's entertainment industry have launched an initiative to tackle sexual
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harassment in workplaces. the campaign called time's up includes includes hollywood stars such as meryl streep and jennifer lawrence. it will provide legal support for women and men who suffer abuse. ever since the weinstein, harvey weinstein, story broke in october, there are hoping dozens and dozens of actresses, talent agents, lawyers, ceos in hollywood meeting every single week to save, what can we do to make sure this change is lasting, and what kind of initiatives can we put in place to make sure that things change? 80 people were stabbed to death in london last year, a rise of a third to 2016. the metropolitan police are investigating the murders of four young men in london who were stabbed to death in a 24—hour period over new year. police say the deaths are unrelated. the youngest victim was 17 years old. so far detectives have arrested six people in connection with their inquiries.
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parents are being urged to give their children just two low—calorie snacks a day, to help safeguard their health. public health england says the snacks should be no more than 100 calories each. the advice is being given after it's emerged primary school children are consuming three times more sugar than the recommended limit, as our health correspondent, james gallagher, reports. half the sugar us kids eat and drink each year comes from sugary snacks and drinks. kids get through a mountain of sugary snacks each year. cake, ice cream, pop, juice, biscuits, sweets, and chocolate. children eat three times more sugar than official advice, just over half of it comes from snacking between meals. it is one reason more than a quarter of children have rotten teeth by the time they turn five. this public health england campaign is warning that snacking has got out of hand and is increasing the chance of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. we are very concerned about snacking. our children have unhealthy diets,
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they are eating too many calories. they're eating too much sugar and snacking is part of the problem. we are encouraging parents to be aware of snacking and try to cut back and replace unhealthy snacks with better snack. so how do parents feel about snacking? i know that kids like sweets, and all of the sugar and stuff that you get from shops in mcdonald's and things like that, but it is for the parents to keep an eye on them and their intake. public health england is advising snacks are limited to just 100 calories and eaten no more than twice a day. it says fruit and veg are ideal, and crumpets are better than anything you will find in the confectionery aisles. more than 11,000 homes across the uk have been empty for more than a decade, according to research carried out by the liberal democrats.
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their findings also show very few councils in england and wales have made use of powers that allow local authorities to take over properties that have been empty for more than six months. but the government says the number of empty homes has fallen by a third since 2010 and is now at its lowest level since records began. millions of people are at risk of falling into debt this month as a result of christmas spending. research carried out by the money advice trust suggests one in six people across britain will fall behind on payments this month, with many saying they failed to budget properly for extra spending at christmas. while many of us may have spent new year's day sleeping off a late night of partying, others started 2018 with an icy cold plunge. hundreds of people in the american state of minnesota shrugged off temperatures of —15 celsius to jump into a frozen lake to raise money for veterans. but here's the silver lining, it's warmer in the water than it is on the ice. so going in isn't the hard part, it's getting out! he is loving it, that guy. once you
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are in the water, you are ok. she looked like she was happy to get out. —38 with the windchill factor in the open air, butjust, just —15 in the open air, butjust, just —15 in the water! something else that has gone out, power, yet it? the power cut. yes. the ‘power‘ is finally out. phil "the power" taylor has retired from darts in defeat, after being beaten by debutant rob cross in the world championship final. cross, who watched the tournament on tv last year, outplayed the 16—time champion to win by 7—2. taylor is one of britain's most successful sportsmen of all time with over 200 titles to his name. manchester united get their first win in four matches with a 2—0 victory over everton at goodison park. anthony martial and jesse lingaard with the goals. brighton twice took the lead but could only manage a 2—2 draw against struggling bournemouth. in the other premier league matches, there were wins for liverpool, leicester and newcastle.
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britain's johanna konta is in action again this morning against ajla tomljanovi in the second round of the brisbane international. the british number one beat us 0pen final madison keys in three sets yesterday. she is delighted to be back. phil taylor was having the chance to hold the trophy even though he didn't win. there has been a little bit of chat on social media about his behaviour in the match last night. he was a little distracting. that is one word you could use. a little bit of gamesmanship. playing to the crowd a little bit. he didn't make himself popular with the crowd last night. it didn't work for him, no. himself popular with the crowd last night. it didn't work for him, nolj night. it didn't work for him, no.|j still night. it didn't work for him, no.” still think he will come back. yes, me too. he will miss it. he has been around for so long. exactly. we will do the papers in a minute. the mood this morning was so bright, i
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thought someone had left the lights on outside. it was absolutely fabulous. it was a super moon, in fa ct, fabulous. it was a super moon, in fact, the closest it gets for the whole year, one of two full moons across the skies above us this month. this month's across the skies above us this month. this months is called a wolf moon as well. good morning. it is not a great week as far as rainfall is concerned, it is quite wet and windy across southern parts of the uk, asi windy across southern parts of the uk, as i will show you. this area of cloud will bring stormy weather tonight but already there is this mass of cloud from low pressure is building in producing rain across ireland quite extensively, spots into the west in the next hour, but many parts of mainland uk are dry to begin with on the tuesday morning commute, frosty in north—east scotla nd commute, frosty in north—east scotland and in fact this is where we will see the best weather this week. already by 8am we could see rain splashing into dumfries and galloway, or wet to commute in the morning on northern ireland, lots of
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eastern england should be dry with a clear skies, if you want to see the moon over the short—term in eastern coastal counties but cloud increasing elsewhere and over the south—west the rate is not heavy but it will be down this morning with heavy bursts from mid wales northwards and notice how the rain spells across most parts of the uk, tending to snow on the tops of the pennines and the scottish hills as well, never quite reaching the north—east, but after a wet morning, the afternoon should be bright perform rain arrives into wales later. temperatures not far where they should be for the time of year in the northern half of the country. reasonably mild in the south. there will be sunshine and falling rain later on. and then into tonight storm allen ault will come in and that will bring some strong wind, not as strong as storm dylan —— ellen. we have rain coming in, turning to snow over the hills. 70 mph expected over the first half of the night in northern ireland, which
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could cause damage and disruption and then for the second half of the night may be 70— 80 mph gusts and quite widely across southern scotla nd quite widely across southern scotland and north wales as well as we finished the night. the strongest of the wind tomorrow will ease off reasonably quickly. still quite a blustery day, a day of sunshine and showers across the country on wednesday. some of the showers heavy and thundery. some of the dry conditions across the north—east of scotland. and temperatures not1 million miles off what we will see to date though it will be cooler than the south. and then through wednesday night into thursday another spell of wet and windy weather set to push its way in, another area of low pressure, southern areas again bear the brunt of that whereas further north clear skies, frosty start to first aid for some of you —— thursday. no view. and i promise a quick picture of the lovely moon, rachel, here it is taken in
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lovely moon, rachel, here it is ta ken in eastern lovely moon, rachel, here it is taken in eastern biton share last night. it is the wolf moon. yeah, i know, it is fabulous. it was so bright and clear. it was nice to start the new year. it is the second of january, in case you're worrying. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: passenger groups are staging protests against the biggest increase in rail fares for five years. no more than two low—calorie snacks a day — the latest advice to parents in an attempt to tackle childhood obesity. the daily telegraph are leading with the story we mentioned about rail fa res the story we mentioned about rail fares going up. this announcement was made last year about prices going up, and it comes into effect from today. they call it a scandal of rip—off railfares from today. they call it a scandal of rip—off rail fares and they say the government are asking officials to look at whether there is a way to
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make sure future increases are not quite so steep, maybe linking them toa quite so steep, maybe linking them to a different type of inflation which would mean at the moment at least that there might be slightly less of an impact for commuters. that story about parents being advised to give their children know more than two low—calorie snacks a day makes the front page the mirror and the son, stop your kids from eating crisps is how they put it. —— sun. we will have an expert on labour to ask about what is meant by low calorie snack but it is something like 200 calories across the two snacks in a day. for many of us the two snacks in a day. for many of us that is fairly meaningless. i don't know what constitutes 200 calories. and there are different ways of measuring it. the sun are calling it mars balmy, that children will not be able to have a chocolate bar under this new advice. they also have a picture of a man above who
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looks like he has never touched or seen a mars bar in his life. i was asked to model for that but i was really busy over new year. you want to see what is underneath, believe me! i am glad the picture stopped. front page of the times has pictures of that terrible fire in liverpool over the last couple of days. the lead story is the cost to the nhs of patients missing their appointments. £1 billion a year is what they are saying time wasting patients are costing the health service at the moment. 0bviously health chiefs are urging people to think a little bit more about that if they have appointments, the actual financial implications. the daily mail's front page is the story of the tragedy which hit that family in australia, the fiancee and her daughter, and we know as well that her husband to be and his two sons from a previous marriage died, and they lead with the story of out fire crews being sent to deal with medical
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emergencies when paramedics can't get there in time. sally is here as well. what is happening in sport?‘ great well. what is happening in sport?l great interview today, a fabulous interviewer for the guardian, talking to elise christie about the winter olympics and a difficult time she had after sochi. she was disqualified and actually received death threats from koreans who suggested she had actually knocked out one of the ours, who was a favourite for a medal. she was terrified, basically, because of all the hate mail she received. she really has turned things around. she has had a brilliant year, hasn't she? she has had a brilliant year, and she faced her fear and went to south korea to train. it is one of the best things he could possibly have done, as she says, i wasn't myself, i felt like a have done, as she says, i wasn't myself, ifelt like a hideous human being, ifelt so bad. but she has managed to turn things around and has won the world championships this
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year. she is so aggressively competitive in an unapologetic way, which you have to be in that sport. and before i go i want to share this with you, from the front page of the daily telegraph's sports section. mourinho just daily telegraph's sports section. mourinhojust provides daily telegraph's sports section. mourinho just provides great value stuffer us to talk about. he suggests tv pundits are jealous of paul pogba. paul scholes, and he also says, manchester united, great and one of the legends of the game, is jealous of and one of the legends of the game, isjealous of paul and one of the legends of the game, is jealous of paul pogba because he earns so much cash. that is why he criticises him in his punditry. someone else who is always ruthlessly aggressive, and you have a dog, haven't you? dog lovers will like this piece in the guardian about this extraordinary invention. when you put your dog to bag in the bin, you leave it there to be taken away. this is using them ethane which emerges from the dog to to create energy, to create lights, and
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street lighting at a time when street lighting at a time when street lighting at a time when street lighting is being cut in many areas. “— street lighting is being cut in many areas. —— using the methane. street lighting is being cut in many areas. -- using the methane. so you deposit it in the bag, and the methane rises, and the light lights the street all night long. so if you see a particularly bright light, you might want to cross the road. we started and ended with power! let's look at a story which has dominated the headlines over the new year weekend. tributes have been paid to a british family who died when a seaplane they were in crashed into a river near sydney. businessman richard cousins, his two sons, his fiancee, emma bowen, and her daughter died along with the plane's pilot on new year's eve. mr cousins's brother—in—law spoke to the bbc about the shock he felt hearing the news.
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losing both my godson and his sibling and my brother—in—law as well has left a huge hole. it is very, very difficult to deal with death, and it's going to take me a long while to get over this. it's a huge shock. they had a lot of friends. they were very, very popular lads. and that's because they have had a fantastic up ringing, from both my sister and richard. they knew right from wrong, they worked hard. they were both on a successful path. i feel proud to have known them. i am proud to have known richard as well. it's very, very sad. and they will be... they will not be forgotten. they will not be forgotten. meanwhile, air accident investigators in australia say it could be months before they find out why the plane crashed. 0ur correspondent phil mercer is in sydney. phil, what will investigators have to consider? how unusual is it for an incident
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involving a seaplane like this to happen? well, we have been speaking to aviation experts today and they say this type of crash is extremely unusual. in the last hour or two we have heard from the australian air crash team saying that its work is meticulous and furrow. the wreckage of the seaplane remains at the bottom of the hawkesbury river, 30 feet down —— thorough. it has been examined by police divers in the last couple of days to examine what kind of shape it is in because the air crash team want to raise the wreckage by the end of the week and they are hoping to bring it up in as good a shape as possible. because, of course, the plane will be a fundamental clue in trying to establish how and why this crash occurred. so the aircraft's components will be examined, along with the pilot's background and
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witnesses as well, and mobile phone footage from witnesses could also be extremely important. what were conditions like at the time? pretty good, according to some eyewitnesses. and that aviation expert we were talking to set that it was almost certain in his opinion that the plane had stalled. he didn't know clearly will why it stalled, it may have been an unexpected gust of wind or an engine failure, or it could have been a mistake on behalf of the pilot. but remember, the pilot was extremely experienced. he had had more than 9000 hours flying the sorts of aircraft. so all of these things will be considered at a time, of course, that is, when we are hearing all these tributes to the british family who died in this crash on new year's eve, family who died in this crash on new yea r‘s eve, and family who died in this crash on new year's eve, and tributes also to the canadian pilot who was killed as well. thank you very much. we will be speaking more to ian thorpe, the uncle of edward and william cousins, just after 8:00am this morning. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has said he will work tirelessly in 2018 and beyond to stamp out what he called the scourge of knife crime. his comments come as the met continue to investigate the murders of four young men, including two teenagers, in unrelated attacks across london during the new year festivities. so farfive people have been arrested in connection with the incidents. plans by guildford borough council to build on the greenbelt has attracted criticism from some residents. the council's preference is to use brownfield land first, yet only a fraction has been earmarked to help build some of the 12,000 homes needed locally over the next 16 years. some campaigners believe the plans are unnecessary.
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i think it is essentially driven by development. it is driven by the incentive to provide land development. is no interest in maximising the number of affordable homes. there is no interest in urban regeneration. as you have been hearing in breakfast, rail fares are set to go up from today, and here in london that means an average increase of 3.4. but it is not all bad news for commuters this morning, as one of london's busiest railway stations will fully reopen for the first time after years of upgrade work. commuters using london bridge have faced disruption since 2013, as network rail spent millions building new platforms, a concourse, and replaced tracks. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning: 0n the 0verground, there is a no service from edmonton green to cheshunt, because of a staff shortage. there are also severe delays on the dlr. 0n the roads: the a1 is closed at highbury corner until next week, for major roadworks. the a404 is closed southbound from the m40 junction 4 to marlow, following a serious collision.
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let's have a check on the weather now, with georgina burnett. good morning. well, there is a lot of wet and windy weather in the forecast for the week ahead. this morning, first thing, chilly and largely dry. but the cloud will be thickening ahead of some rain that is coming in from the west. and that is coming in from the west. and that is going to be fairly heavy at times, as well, a southerly wind picking up with that as well. clearing in the afternoon, but it is probably only western part that will see some brightness, as i think most of the card will not clear until after dark. temperatures up around 11 celsius today. 0vernight we have the second band of rain and really gusty winds, 40— 45 mph. temperatures down to around six celsius tonight. fairly mild, really, under that cloud cover. and then tomorrow a few blustery showers around. we may get the odd sunny spell. but those winds gusting to 45, 50 mph spell. but those winds gusting to 45,50 mph in some spots, with temperatures up to about 10 celsius.
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0n temperatures up to about 10 celsius. on thursday it is a bright, chilly start to the day, but there are some further rain coming in from the west later on. and as we head towards the end of the week, though, temperatures are starting to take a bit of a dip. the winds are really strengthening once more for friday and saturday, and we are seeing further wet weather in the way of showers, more than rain, really. but some sunny spells at least. just feeling a bit more chilly. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to john and rachel. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and rachel burden. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: it was an idyllic holiday that ended in tragedy. we'll speak to the brother—in—law of the british businessman who was killed, along with the rest of his family, in a seaplane crash on new year's eve. also this morning, this picture of dawn nisbet finishing a parkrun —
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she came last, and ten minutes behind everyone else — became a social media sensation. she'll tell us why it's inspired her to sign up for her first half—marathon. she will tell us about her plans. and, after nine, they've had millions gripped with some of soaps‘ biggest storylines, now actors christopher harper and john middleton are swapping the screen for the stage. and they are doing it together. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the biggest increase in railfares in five years comes into force this morning, prompting protests at several stations as many commuters return to work after the christmas break. in some cases, travellers will find themselves paying more than £100 extra a year. the government says they're investing more in faster, more reliable trains. campaigners warn the rise is pricing ordinary people off the railways.
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i think this affair rise really throws the spotlight on value for money. passengers want to see a more reliable train surfers, they want to see a better chance of getting a seat and better information during disruption and the train companies can help to take the sting out of this by offering direct debit payments for annual season tickets and help passengers pay for this big lump sum. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has called for a meaningful debate in iran, where 13 people have been killed in protests since thursday. demonstrators, who are angry about living standards, attacked police stations late into the night as they took to the streets in a number of cities. president hassan rouhani call the protests an opportunity, not a threat but vowed to crack down on lawbrea kers. more than 300 women from hollywood's entertainment industry have launched air accident investigators in australia say it may take months before they know why a seaplane carrying a prominent british businessman and his family crashed on new year's eve. richard cousins, who ran a multi—billion pound catering company, was killed along with his two sons, his fiancee, her daughter and the pilot.
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aviation experts believe the planed stalled before crashing into the river. more than 300 women from hollywood's entertainment industry have launched an initiative to tackle sexual harassment in workplaces. the campaign called time's up includes includes hollywood stars such as meryl streep and jennifer lawrence. it will provide legal support for women and men who suffer abuse. ever since the weinstein, harvey weinstein, story broke in october, there have been dozens and dozens of actresses, talent agents, lawyers, ceos within hollywood meeting every single week to say, what can we do to make sure this change is lasting, and what kind of initiatives can we put in place to make sure that things change? parents are being urged to give their children no more than two sugary snacks a day, to help safeguard their health. public health england says the snacks should not exceed 100 calories each. the advice is being given after it's
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emerged primary school children are consuming three times more sugar than the recommended limit. and we will be speaking with public health england about their new advice in about five minutes' time. 80 people were stabbed to death in london last year, a rise of a third compared to 2016. the figures come as police investigate the murders of four young man as police investigate the murders of fouryoung man in as police investigate the murders of four young man in the capital who we re four young man in the capital who were stabbed in unrelated incidents over a 24—hour period. the youngest victim was 17 years old. so far detectives have arrested six people in connection with their enquiries. an investigation's under way into the cause of a fire which destroyed up to 1400 vehicles in a car park in liverpool. the blaze at king's dock, next to liverpool's echo arena, is said to have spread after one vehicle caught fire on new year's eve. firefighters worked through the night and many people were forced into temporary accommodation as nearby buildings were evacuated. no—one was injured. none of the horses competing at an
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event nearby were injured. more than 11,000 homes across the uk have been empty for more than a decade, according to research carried out by the liberal democrats. their findings also show very few councils in england and wales have made use of powers that allow local authorities to take over properties that have been empty for more than six months. but the government says the number of empty homes has fallen by a third since 2010 and is now at its lowest level since records began. millions of people are at risk of falling into debt this month as a result of christmas spending. research carried out by the money advice trust suggests one in six people across britain will fall behind on payments this month, with many saying they failed to budget properly for extra spending at christmas. and that is the main news stories this morning and, well, the end of an era in the world of darts. and it was not a fairytale ending, u nfortu nately. there was no fairytale
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ending for the 16—time darts world champion phil ‘the power‘ taylor, as he retired with a defeat in this years final to first—time winner rob cross. the former electrician from hastings was sensational throughout, and went 3—0 ahead with this 153 checkout. taylor nearly sealed his last appearance with a 9—dart finish but missed out by the smallest of margins. but there was no let—up from cross, he took the title at alexandra palace in london by 7—2. cross was born in the very same year taylor won his first world title, in1990. manchester united are back up to second in the premier league table after their first win in four matches. a 2—0 victory over everton at goodison park. it was decided by two special finishes as well, the opener from antony martial, who combined with his france international teammate paul pogba. man of the match pogba was also involved asjesse lingard scored an excellent solo goal to hand sam allardyce a second defeat of the week. jose mourinho being
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uncharacteristically quiet. yes, we will hear from uncharacteristically quiet. yes, we will hearfrom him later on. uncharacteristically quiet. yes, we will hear from him later on. a lot of football fa ns will hear from him later on. a lot of football fans would like it like that every week! yes, exactly! liverpool stay fourth after earning a dramatic 2—1win over burnley at turf moor. forward sadio mane scored a superb opener forjurgen klopp's side and while burnley scored a late equaliser, ragnar klavan bundled in a dramatic stoppage time winner. burnley was not at their best, i am sure. it is an open game and you need to be concentrated. you need to be there. we have this massive setback with the equaliser. and otherwise we would not have drawn so often. but we could change it once again and so it feels really good. bournemouth have edged further away from the premier league relegation zone after scraping a late draw at brighton. the home side were much the better team and twice took the lead through anthony knockaert and this from glenn murray.
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but bournemouth pegged them back each time, the final goal — have a look at this — the definition of a goalmouth scramble. the pressure will increase on stoke city manager mark hughes after their 1—0 defeat at home to newcastle. perez got the winner in the second half. stoke drop to 16th, two points above the relegation zone, having won only two of their last 12 games. the key is, is everybody sits together and we get on with it. it is no good feeling sorry for ourselves and looking to blame people. i think we just need to take it on board, take responsibility for what we are doing here and don't be cowed by it. get on with it. and are you confident that you can do it quickly? well, who else is going to do it? in terms of the knowledge of the group, the time i have been here, that i am best to do that, so we just need to be allowed to get on with ourjob. that is what we will
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do, we are getting back together and we will go again. britain's johanna konta is in action again this morning against ajla tomljanovi international. the british number one came back from a set down against madison keys in the first round yesterday to take the decider. it's her first tournament with new coach michaeljoyce. in rugby union's pro 14, ulster made a great comeback to take a bonus point win over munster yesterday. munster had been comfortable, leading 17—0 at one stage, but the match turned when their centre sam arnold was red carded for a high tackle, and ulster fought back with three late tries, the 24—17 win was sealed by robert lyttle in the final moments. leinster narrowly beat connacht in the day's other game. that it from me. interesting, those comments from phil taylor, he wasn't even professional? no, he watched it on tv last year. phil taylor said it was a complete mismatch because of his youth against his age, and he
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said he was completely outplayed.” think what we saw last night was the future of darts. the end of one era... yes, the beginning of another. thank you very much indeed. lots of people watching, you are probably on your way out the door to walk to work, catch the bus or maybe go walk to work, catch the bus or maybe 9° by walk to work, catch the bus or maybe go by train. if you go by train, you may face a big increase in the fa res, may face a big increase in the fares, the biggest in five years coming into effect today. steph‘s at london bridge station with the details. it is still fairly quiet, to be fair,. yes, still quiet, rachel. every now and again a flurry of people come in when the train comes into the station. this station has had a massive revamp, london bridge, the fourth busiest train station in the fourth busiest train station in the uk. i am sure you will see through the morning lots of people coming here and also having a look, a couple of people arriving this morning, just having a look because
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it has been a construction site for quite sometime. a lot of money has been invested in it. this is money that comes from us purchasing train tickets. as you have said, rail fa res have tickets. as you have said, rail fares have gone up this morning. some people think they have gone up by too much. other ministers say that we need it for rail modernisation. here is the chief executive of network whale. i know that you are happy to see this —— network rail. a lot of money has been spent on it. it is an extraordinary achievement and i am really proud of the team that have delivered this huge station project over the last five years, opening today on schedule, bang on schedule, but i am also really grateful to the passengers who have had to put up with this construction work over the la st with this construction work over the last five years. and i thank them for their patients. and i hope that they start to get the benefits from this huge investment. and when you say rail passengers having to put up with this, they are having to put up
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with this, they are having to put up with it across the network. lots of overcrowding, lots of problems with punctuality. is it ever going to change? we are working so hard at making these changes to the railway network. in the next year you are going to see a huge change. these projects take years. in the next year we are going to see not only the thameslink programme but the upgrade of services into the great rail network, the great north run project, edinburgh— glasgow electrification project, crossrail ina year's electrification project, crossrail in a year's time, fundamental changes to the economic arteries of the country, and it is going to make a huge difference to passengers. 5000 new railway carriages which are going to transform the journeys for people. can you understand why people. can you understand why people are miffed at seeing rail fa res people are miffed at seeing rail fares go up so much at a time when wages are not going up as much? absolutely, and we all share the desire to try to keep fares as low
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as possible. myjob, i do not set the fares, it is to try to run the network as efficiently as possible and to deliver amazing projects like this as well as we can. that is why i think today is such an important day. 0ver i think today is such an important day. over the christmas period we deliver 260 projects up and down the country. we had 32,000 people at working on the railway. they were improving it for the benefit of passengers. at the same time there are problems, like punctuality the worst in a decade in 2016, so for people it is hard to stomach when they pay so much to get to work so then they see the season tickets between £3000 and £5,000 for lots of people, it is hard to stomach it with overcrowding trains and problems with punctuality.” absolutely sympathise with that. the kind of changes we are making will make a difference and they take years to come through. the numbers of people travelling by train has increased enormously in the last 20 years. more than double, actually.
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in the next year we are going to start to see the benefits really coming through. thank you very much for your time this morning. you can see the sudden flurry of people as a train has just see the sudden flurry of people as a train hasjust come in see the sudden flurry of people as a train has just come in this see the sudden flurry of people as a train hasjust come in this morning. i will be here talking to passengers as well about how they feel about the rail increases. thank you so much. i think there are a good few people coming in and there are some lounging around in slippers eating chocolate for breakfast — lucky them! we can only dream. we have a big tin under the desk here, though, steph, you are missing out. oh, nice. i thought the whole nation oversle pt, nice. i thought the whole nation overslept, though i am pleased to say something will have got off the train. we have had quite a dry yesterday day in most places...” don't know where you were, it was tipping it down! it was nice in the morning. it doesn't look good in many places, does it, matt? some wet and windy weather on the
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way. mainly dominating the southern half of the uk. it will be a little bit wet at times further north as well but there is lots of cloud over the atlantic. this will be a particular it stormy area of low pressure heading in the night but at the moment you can see the cloud pushing into the west. still some showers in eastern areas, so some sunshine this morning but cloud running in from the west. while it isa dry running in from the west. while it is a dry and frosty start towards the north—east of scotland, towards the north—east of scotland, towards the west by the time we hit 8am in be rain starting to fall. wet morning commute in northern ireland, some of that rain heavy at times, as it will be towards the north of wales and mid wales as well. try to begin with, the best of any sunshine towards easternmost counties. in the far south—west there will be some rain but damp and drizzly here. not a huge amount of rain across southern counties of england and wales through the day. from the mid
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wales through the day. from the mid wales northwards, some heavy rain. the scottish mountains given a covering in places but the rain band shifting through. quite gusty winds on it. it means the sunshine will be back for many for a time although rain will return to wales and eventually northern ireland later. temperatures today around six to 11 degrees. not1 million miles from where it should be at this time of year. that is as storm lenore pushes its way in. that will bring some strong winds through the first half of the night in northern ireland —— eleanor. 70 mph gusts possible, damage and travel disruption and rain spread acrossjust damage and travel disruption and rain spread across just about all parts. from midnight onwards, we will see the strongest of the winds and the far south of scotland, mainly cumbria, lancashire, 70 to 80 mph gust. widespread severe gales spreading into the east of the pennines in the early hours of the morning as well. quite a blustery
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sta rts morning as well. quite a blustery starts tomorrow morning, the exception being northern scotland where it should be a dry and day for quite awhile. the northern rain quickly clears and then a day of sunshine and showers, some of those heavy with hail and thunder. some will spend a good part of the day dry. a few showers that further south you are. it will fill a touch cooler tomorrow compared with today. then through wednesday night into thursday it remains windy across the south. another area of low pressure moves its way in but to scotland and northern england, we start with a frost on thursday evening before the wet and windy weather gradually pushes through yet again. in southern areas on thursday we will see some of the wettest conditions. for now, thank you very much indeed. reading more books is a popular new year's resolution. but how about reading an entire bookshop, while running it at the same time? that is what holidaymakers are being given the chance to do in wigtown, in scotland. it is proving so popular, it is booked solidly until 2020, and the concept could soon be branching out into asia. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon has been to take a look.
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between the hills and the city in south—west scotland is a small town where they like them looks a lot —— the sea. wigtown is scotland's national book count and among the many shops here, one is available to rent for a week at a time. it is run by enthusiasts who want to be surrounded by books while trying their hand at selling some as well. right, helen mcdonald... alison drury is a police officer, but not this week. instead she is stacking bookshelves and shifting stock. you are paying for the privilege of running a bookshop for a week. what do yourfriends running a bookshop for a week. what do your friends make of it? a bit of a mixture. ithink do your friends make of it? a bit of a mixture. i think some of them think that i am a bit eccentric and think that i am a bit eccentric and think it is a very strange thing to do. by the same token i have some friends who think it is extremely
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exciting and are excited for me and a bit envious. have you been enjoying it? i have. you can tell, can't you ? enjoying it? i have. you can tell, can't you? the temporary book store boss has free rein. displays can change. so can the promotions. the chance to run a bookshop for a week or two has proved popular. people have come from as far away as new zealand, north america and south korea to run this place. there was a couple in their 80s who came on honeymoon. and others who liked the town so much that they stayed. this shop, which once came close to closure, turned around by those who have a dream of running a bookshop and want the chance to test it out. i think and want the chance to test it out. ithink in and want the chance to test it out. i think in everyone's life you have that what if voice. what if ijust owned a bookshop by the sea in scotland. we want to give people the chance to do it. this is actual, real virtual reality. where you can come and be in a bookshop and feel the cold and read the books and enjoy the community, and the kind of have little surprises and an
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adventure along the way. and if those who have come on their bookshop holiday are looking for ideas, with wigtown boasting 14 bookshops, there is plenty here to inspire. we love our bookshops here, we love our books. and we have even got people coming from far and wide to runa got people coming from far and wide to run a bookshop in wigtown. imagine that. it sounds crazy idea but what a fantastic thing for wigtown, opening wigtown up to the world and encouraging people to come and share our love for books. that passion for selling books may be spreading. there is interest from a chinese firm looking to open its own version of the open book holiday business. so successful has this scottish one being, it is booked up for the next two years. would you fancy that?” would you fancy that? i don't know, i think would you fancy that? i don't know, ithinki would you fancy that? i don't know, i think i like a holiday where you have a holiday. you don't have to do any work! and serving people, and working long hours, that is not a
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holiday. but let us know what you think about that this morning, if thatis think about that this morning, if that is something you would fancy. 400 biscuits, 100 portions of sweets, and nearly 70 chocolate bars — that is how much the average child in england eats in a year, according to public health england. it has got a new campaign to help parents to buy healthier snacks, and fewer of them. so is it realistic? we spoke to one family to find out how they manage their children's snacking habits. snacks, if they go to the shop on their own and buy their own snacks with their own money, so you can't really stop them from having their little snacks. when she was little she didn't have any sugary products, so she was about three. but then
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this one, all changed. and i think she's having bit too much.” normally i not as many snacks as my sister does. but most of them are probably healthy. we do monitor their intake of sugar, as it is. as well, the serial, but they eat, and the swedes that they have.” well, the serial, but they eat, and the swedes that they have. i don't eat, like come to many, because sometimes ijust don't like them. you even see food that you don't think that there's much sugar in, and when you do actually take a look, you know, it is full of sugar. i know kids like sweets, at all the sugary stuff you get from shops and mcdonald's and things like that, but it is for the parents to keep an eye on them, and their intake. at when they go out, then we might have somebody saying she wants some sweeties, so sometimes it is easier tojust give in to it, to keep her
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quiet. because she is quite noisy when she gets going. we have assembled in front of us the amount of sugary snacks which a child will eat in one month. it looks a lot when you put it together. you have sugary drinks in the bowl, and cakes, chocolate, sweets, it is here. when you see it like that it is a bit of an eye opener. to talk us through the minefield of options out there is drjenny harries, the deputy medical director of public health england. good morning, thank you for coming in. does that shock you? well, it is not a good site, really, is it? we know that children are eating on average three unhealthy snacks and sugary drinks a day. and these obesity levels are bad for children going forward. it is not a good sign, and we know that 51% of the
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sugar that children take in our coming from these snacks. is this a new thing? i remember having sweets once a week, on friday, and that was about it. i don't know if i am looking back with rose tinted glasses. you may well be. when people do look back, they often don't remember everything they eat, which is a crucial part of this. when we do think of snacks, we think that children are having an odd treat, and an odd treat is not going to matter in their lifetime but children are snacking readily through the day. most children will be eating three unhealthy snacks or sugary drinks in a day, and they are therefore consuming about three times the sugar intake which is recommended. and by sugary snack you meana recommended. and by sugary snack you mean a kick or a biscuit? exactly, the sorts of things. —— cake. drinks with added sugar are contributing significantly. so to tackle this you are saying have two snacks a day of about 100 calories each. i don't
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know if you have seen the front page of the sun today, they are calling this mars army, that you can't even have a mars bar or a bar of chocolate of any sort as part of that sort of calorie counting.” think what the papers there are doing is underestimating the care and concern most parents have. they are coming to us and asking for support, really, to manage the pester power of children that you often experience. i have had four kids myself and you know when you go through the supermarkets children are looking at things to get. what we are trying to do is not alter policy at all but give them a rule of thumb which says 100 calories for a snack and two a day, max. so what isa a snack and two a day, max. so what is a 100 calorie snack? here is my problem. the children come home from school and they are absolutely starving. what is a 100 calorie snack? what is a healthy snack? so we would always a start with things like fresh or frozen fruit or vegetable. so an apple would be 50 calories. those sorts of things,
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these are natural sugars. what we are trying to get across is the added sugar which goes into product, which children arejust added sugar which goes into product, which children are just consuming. soa which children are just consuming. so a lot of people say what is 100 calories? if you look on the food packs, you will often find labelling. we are notjust looking for the calories, but the green colour coding of that. because people tend not to calorie count these days. so the focus here is about healthy nutrition. but also we know that the higher sugar food tends to have higher calories as well. our campaign has a food app called the food scanner.” well. our campaign has a food app called the food scanner. i have it, it is very disturbing. you can look at your favourite food and it shows you that fat and sugar content. but we have talked a lot over the last few years about eating disorders, particularly young people. anorexia and bolivia, and i wonder if making families obsessed with calories,
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whether that could backfire. so this isn't about obsession. eating disorders are an exception... but 100 or 200 calories is very prescriptive, isn't it? what we're saying is this is not a prescription, it is a of thumb. pa rents prescription, it is a of thumb. pa re nts wa nt prescription, it is a of thumb. parents want to know some kind of guideline, and the food scanner has noises to go with it. you can send the kids off with the phone to scan, a bit likea the kids off with the phone to scan, a bit like a treasure hunt in a supermarket, and you can find which are the healthy foods to have. thank you very much indeed. would you like a biscuit? no, thank you. i will go for my apple. there is only 100 calories in that one. we will have to remove them from the table before we get stuck into them. i will remove them, don't worry about it. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has said he will work tirelessly
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in 2018 and beyond to stamp out what he called the scourge of knife crime. his comments come as the met continue to investigate the murders of four young men, including two teenagers, in unrelated attacks across london during the new year festivities. so far six people have been arrested in connection with the incidents. experts believe it could be down to an acute sensitivity to low—frequency noise. the head of the database which tracks reported incidents of the hom says the number of sufferers in london could be higher than expected. the actual number of people who under the right conditions might be able to detect it could be much higher, simply because of the massive level of noise and vibration that london itself produces. as you have been hearing in breakfast, rail fares are set to go up from today,
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and here in london that means an average increase of 3.4%. but it is not all bad news for commuters this morning, as london bridge fully reopens after years of upgrade work. commuters using the station have faced disruption since 2013, as network rail spent millions building new platforms, a concourse, and new tracks. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning, there is a good service on all lines. 0n the roads, the a1 is closed at highbury corner until next week for major roadworks. the a404 is closed southbound from the m40 junction 4 to marlow, following a serious collision. let's have a check on the weather now, with georgina burnett. good morning. well, there's a lot of wet and windy weather in the forecast for the week ahead. this morning, first thing, chilly and largely dry. but the cloud will be thickening, ahead of some rain that's coming in from the west. and that's going to be fairly heavy at times, as well, a southerly wind picking up with that as well. clearing in the afternoon, but it's probably only western parts that will see some brightness, as i think most of the cloud will not clear until after dark.
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temperatures up around 11 degrees celsius today. 0vernight we have this second band of rain, and really gusty winds, 40—45 mph. temperatures down to around six degrees celsius tonight. fairly mild, really, under that cloud cover. and then tomorrow, a few blustery showers around. we may get the odd sunny spell. but really those winds gusting to 45—50 mph in some spots, with temperatures up to about 10 degrees celsius. on thursday, it's a bright, chilly start to the day, but there's some further rain coming in from the west later on. as we head towards the end of the week, though, temperatures are starting to take a bit of a dip. the winds are really strengthening once more for friday and saturday, and we're seeing further wet weather, in the way of showers more than rain, really. but some sunny spells, at least, just feeling a bit more chilly. we should also mention there is a met office yellow warning for high
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winds until 10pm tomorrow evening. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and rachel burden. back to work but at a higher cost. from today, rail passengers face the biggest fare—rise in five years. many season tickets have gone up by more than £100, as campaigners warned that people were "being priced out of getting to work". good morning from the newly revamped london bridge station. ministers say the increases are important for the
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modernisation of the network. i will speak with the passengers about what they think. good morning. it's tuesday, january 2nd. also this morning: limit children to two low—calorie snacks per day, the latest advice. the foreign secretary borisjohnson calls for a "meaningful debate" as protests in iran flare for a fifth day. and a seaplane that crashed and killed six people, including five britons, will be raised from the sea bottom for frenzied examination. in sport, there is no fairytale ending for one of the most successful sportsmen of all time. debutant rob cross outplayed phil "the power" taylor in his final world darts final. 16—time champion taylor retiring with a defeat. and matt has the weather.
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not quite super. we have a dry start for many but if you don't see wet weather today you certainly will tonight and for some to know some stormy winds as well. full forecast coming up in around 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first our main story. the biggest increase in railfares in five years comes into force this morning, prompting protests at several stations as many commuters return to work after the christmas break. in some cases, travellers will find themselves paying more than £100 extra a year. campaigners warn the rise is pricing ordinary people off the railways. the government says they're investing more in faster, more reliable trains. here's our transport correspondent, richard westcott. can i please see your tickets? another new year, another fare rise. regulated season tickets go up 3.6% this year. it will add just shy of £150 to the price for commuters coming into london on the stripe riddled line from hove in east
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sussex. nearly £110 to a yearly ticket from liverpool to manchester. and commuters going into birmingham from gloucester must find £140 more this year. many now pay between £3000 and £5,000 to get to work with the most pricey tickets in the south of england. the government says its spending record amounts on improving the network, with more seats being provided on newer trains, and more reliable electrified lines. but campaigners argue that ordinary people are being priced off our trains, with the latest figures showing a drop in the number of journeys made using a season ticket. i think this fare rise really throws the spotlight on value for money. passengers want to see a more reliable train service, they want to have a better chance of getting a seat and better information during disruption. and train companies can take sting out of this by offering direct debit payments for annual season tickets
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helping the passengers pay for this big lump sum. they say that fares have been outstripping wages for years and are calling for a price freeze. parents are being urged to give their children just two low—calorie snacks a day, to help safeguard their health. public health england says the snacks should be no more than 100 calories each. the advice is being given after it's emerged primary school children are consuming three times more sugar than the recommended limit, as our health correspondent, james gallagher, reports. half the sugar us kids eat and drink each year comes from sugary snacks and drinks. kids get through a mountain of sugary snacks each year. cake, ice cream, pop, juice, biscuits, sweets, and chocolate. children eat three times more sugar than official advice, just over half of it comes from snacking between meals. it is one reason more than a quarter of children have rotten teeth by the time they turn five. this public health england campaign
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is warning that snacking has got out of hand and is increasing the chance of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. we are very concerned about snacking. our children have unhealthy diets, they are eating too many calories. they're eating too much sugar and snacking is part of the problem. we are encouraging parents to be aware of snacking and try to cut back and replace unhealthy snacks with better snack. so how do parents feel about snacking? i know that kids like sweets, and all of the sugar and stuff that you get from shops in mcdonald's and things like that, but it is for the parents to keep an eye on them and their intake. public health england is advising snacks are limited to just 100 calories and eaten no more than twice a day. it says fruit and veg are ideal, and even maltloaf and crumpets are better than anything you will find in the confectionery aisles. the foreign secretary,
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borisjohnson, has called for a meaningful debate in iran, where 13 people have been killed in protests since thursday. demonstrators, who are angry about living standards, attacked police stations late into the night as they took to the streets in a number of cities. president hassan rouhani call the protests an opportunity, not a threat but vowed to crack down on lawbrea kers. iran has not seen anything like this in almost a decade. the country's leadership underfire in the biggest protests since 2009. people are angry about high unemployment, rising prices and corruption. police stations have been attacked, authorities say one policeman was shot dead on monday in najafabad. three other officers were injured. in recent days the country's elected president, rouhani, has sought to downplay the protests and their significance saying they were instigated via iran's enemies. translation: our victories
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against the us and the zionist regime are unbearable for our enemies. our success in the region is intolerable for them. they are out for revenge and trying to provoke people. so far his words have done little to stem the protest. in the past, to do that, the government has used force. there have been large counterdemonstrations organised in support of the country's leadership. but as the protests enter a sixth day, the message from many iranians is that they want change. south korea has offered high level talks with north korea to discuss
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participation in the 2018 winter olympic games. the south korean president says it's a "groundbreaking chance" to move towards peace, and has suggesting meeting as early as the ninth of january. it would be the first time the sides have met in more than two years. more than 300 women from hollywood's entertainment industry have launched an initiative to tackle sexual harassment in workplaces. the campaign called time's up includes includes hollywood stars such as meryl streep and jennifer lawrence. it will provide legal support for women and men who suffer abuse. ever since the weinstein, harvey weinstein, story broke back in october, there have been dozens and dozens of actresses, talent agents, lawyers, ceos within hollywood meeting every single week to say, what can we do to make sure this change is lasting, and what kind of initiatives can we put in place to make sure that things change? 80 people were stabbed to death in london last year — a rise of a third compared to 2016.
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the figures come as police are investigating the murders of four young men in the capital who were stabbed in unrelated incidents during a 24—hour period. the youngest victim is 17 years old. so far detectives have arrested six people in connection with their inquiries. and a seaplane that crashed and killed six people, including five britons, will be raised from the sea bottom for forensic examination. richard cousins, who ran a multibillion pound catering company, was killed along with his sons, fiancee, her daughter and the pilot. aviation experts believe the plane stalled before crashing into the water. millions of people are at risk of falling into debt this month as a result of christmas spending. research carried out by the money advice trust suggests one in six people across britain will fall behind on payments this month, with many saying they failed to budget properly for extra spending at christmas.
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this will wake you up if you are thinking about having a shower this morning! while many of us may have spent new year's day sleeping off a late night of partying, others started 2018 with an icy cold plunge. hundreds of people in the american state of minnesota shrugged off temperatures of —15 celsius to jump into a frozen lake to raise money for veterans. but here's the silver lining, it's warmer in the water than it is on the ice. it is all relative. the air temperature was —30 eight. the water was only — 15. temperature was —30 eight. the water was only - 15. that is going to wake you up —— —38. you would feel amazing after that! either that or standing around waiting for a train. some rail commuters are having to pay £100 extra on season tickets
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from this morning. we've sent steph to london bridge station to bring us the details. newly revamped london bridge station this morning. those affairs are problem what people are focusing on, rather than the surroundings, i guess, steph? yes, good morning. there is a bit of that. people are not shy to talk to me about train fa res, not shy to talk to me about train fares, it is fair to say. this is the revamped london bridge station, the revamped london bridge station, the fourth busiest in the uk. £1 billion has been spent on this in the last five years. and when you talk to ministers about why we have these increases with the rail cost they say it is for things like this, they say it is for things like this, the modernisation of the network to try to get the trains more punctual, less overcrowded and generally with the high demand that they have, and lots of people have an opinion about this, sojust from lots of people have an opinion about this, so just from the people lots of people have an opinion about this, sojust from the people i have chatted to this morning they have lots to say about whether they think this is fair. at the beginning of every year most
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commuters don't get a pay rise, therefore it is totally unfair that we get an increase in train fares. it has gone up every year religiously but it is not too bad considering all of the money they have spent here and you can see it, so it is going somewhere eventually. it is not value for money. it is simple as that. what you are paying forfor the railfares simple as that. what you are paying for for the rail fares don't represent what you're actually getting. there is always delays and hardly any seats, so if they are going to extend the carriages then, yes, it would make sense. so some mixed thoughts from the passengers i have been chatting to this morning. when i talk about train fares people say, where does the money go? if you look at the pie chart it breaks it down quite well. you can see the majority of the costs for things like staffing, not a surprise, but also the modernisation of the network and people ask me about the profits for
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the company as you can see on the pie chart, representing three p in the pound on a train ticket. lots of people with lots of thoughts this morning, not least bridget from the campaignfor morning, not least bridget from the campaign for better transport. what do you think? it is a kick in the teeth for commuters coming back after christmas and rail fares going up again. and far above the increase is most people see in pay packets and that is the problem. it is interesting how they work it out because of the specific way that they calculate the increases, which is how the bosses then say that it has nothing to do with them stop loop it is not down to the rail companies but down to the framework set by the government. half of the fa res set by the government. half of the fares are regulated. the whole point of regulated fares is to stop the unfair rises. because they are based on the retail price index which outstrips people's pay rises it is a very unvested you are in. some of the unregulated fares are going up less and we think it is time the
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government changes things. when i was talking to the boss of network rail he was saying that this is really important money to make the service better. it doesn't take long to find people who have had a nightmare getting in with the overcrowded train or a delayed train. is it fair to say that they need this money? we need investment in the railways. we are in a modern station today and across the country people are benefiting from trains and stations. there are too many people suffering with old stock and inaccessible stations. and now i'm fa re inaccessible stations. and now i'm fare rises in fares. there is no railway on —— in the world, which ru ns railway on —— in the world, which runs on fares alone, there has to be subsidies. we have seen fuel duties frozen year—on—year and yet trains are better for the environment, frozen year—on—year and yet trains are betterfor the environment, so why don't commuters get a break? how can we compare with other countries? some of the most expensive fares in
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the world. it is good that investment is being made but it has to be done on a fair basis and that is all -- to be done on a fair basis and that is all —— all we are asking for. thank you for your time this morning. i will be through the morning. i will be through the morning. it is one of the typical things when you do live tv. moments before you come the station is packed with people and then soon as go live everyone is gone and it looks like it is empty. it has been busy with the flurry of people coming and going. i am told it will get very busy as we move on this morning. i will chat with more people about what they think. here we go. a train is coming out. steff would be great panto, it's behind you! we will be back with you and tons more people later in the programme. the real world has come back to us with a bang, one way or another. you are watching breakfast from bbc news.
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the main stories this morning: passenger groups are staging protests against the biggest increase in rail fares for five years. no more than two low—calorie snacks a day — the latest advice to parents in an attempt to tackle childhood obesity. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. i saw isawa i saw a glimpse of blue sky, but i have to say, there wasn't an awful lot around. this morning i got up on the whole place was lit up the light of the moon. it was amazing. wasn't it just. 0ne of the moon. it was amazing. wasn't it just. one of of the moon. it was amazing. wasn't itjust. one of our weather watchers managed to capture moon last night. 0f managed to capture moon last night. of course, scotland has a bank holiday today, but it was the wolf moon. the first full moon of the year and the closest full moon of the year, which is why it looked so big and so bright. the clear skies which allowed the viewing of that earlier are disappearing quite quickly. satellite imagery reveals what is coming our way in the next
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few days. this area of cloud will bring stormy weather tonight. the clearest of the skies down the eastern fringes of scotland and england, so you might if you are lucky get a little bit of sunshine, the best chance of that in 0rkney and shetland but cloud edging its way in and by 9am the rain will get close to glasgow. the argyll & bute, but some very wet weather across northern ireland at the moment which will start to ease off by the time we get to nine a.m.. north—west england turning wet during the latter pa rt england turning wet during the latter part of the morning rush hour, the same across the midlands. the further south we are in the south wales in south—west england, the rain lighter and patchy and that will be the case across southern areas. the heaviest rain in the north midlands northwards. turning to snow in the north pennines and through the afternoon across the higher ground of scotland. but it is going to shift on, some gusty winds to go with it so many places will see sunshine return for a time before yet more wet weather returns across parts of wales. driest and
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brightest will be shetland. 40 degrees, nothing unusual for the time of year. a mild day across the south. some stormy weather tonight, storm eleanor named by the irish weather service will cross through southern scotland for the night. to ta ke southern scotland for the night. to take you through the night, outbreaks of rain developing quite widely this evening, and the wind strengthening in northern ireland. 70 mph gust is enough to cause some problems. rain rattles through quite quickly, lingering across southern scotla nd quickly, lingering across southern scotland but towards the far south of scotland, north—west england through the second part of the night will see the strongest and most damaging parts of the wind. 70, maybe 80 mph gust. elsewhere, in northern scotland and southern scotland, extensive gales into the first part of tomorrow morning. a blustery day for many of you during wednesday, the exception being the north—east of scotland. a fine day, with some sunny spells. elsewhere, some sunshine and showers for tomorrow. some of those heavy with hailand
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tomorrow. some of those heavy with hail and thunder, a little bit fresher than it would be today, given the wind direction. wednesday night into thursday a frost for some in scotland but another way weather system set to work its way in and that will bring more wet weather the thursday, especially across the southern half of england and wales. wet and windy around in this channel, rain spreading its way northwards and eastwards later in the day. and a quick heads up the end of the week. it is set to turn colder once again, especially as we head into the weekend. thank you both. so how bad is storm eleanor going to be, do you think? luckily most of it goes through during the night but it is set to cause some transport disruption. some good cross winds overnight across the m6 on the a1. there will be some problems and damage around in the morning. nothing overly severe or u ntowa rd for morning. nothing overly severe or untoward for this time of year. will we see any clear skies and sunshine, bright winter weather soon? this weekend, it looks like. some pretty cold winds will return, and some
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snow flurries around to the north and east of the country. so one thing to watch. thank you very much, we will hold out for that. the trouble is, it is only tuesday. and it is the second ofjanuary. thank you forjoining us on bbc breakfast as life returns to normal. lots of people going back to school, going back to work today. but there is one story we have covered in the last days or so, which is all too familiar. it is an all—too—familiar story which sadly resonates on the streets of london. while thousands of people celebrated the new year, four young men were stabbed to death in unrelated attacks. a fifth remains in a critical condition after a separate incident on new year's day. it brings the total number of deaths from knife crime in the capital last year to 80. 0ur reporter ben ando has more. late morning, enfield, north london — the victim aged 18. early evening, west ham — the victim 20 years old. three hours later, tulse hill, south london — a teenager of 17.
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and then, in the early hours of new year's day, a 20—year—old man killed in old street. all four stabbed to death, but according to the police, none of the murders are linked. the three murders before midnight take the total number of fatal stabbings in london for 2017 to 80. that compares with 60 in 2016. police say the reasons for the increase are complex, but it underlines the importance of stop—and—search. my mum needs me alive. she needs me alive. in november, a campaign to convince teenagers not to carry knives was launched. london needs me alive. 0ne campaigner who lost a son to knife crime says youngsters need more help to make the right choice. so i don't carry a knife. they are living in total fear. they weren't born killers. they didn'tjust become like that. it's a process. and now, what we've got to do is unravel that process, stage by stage by stage, to get to the core of the individual, which is the state of their heart
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and the state of their mindset. as work goes on at the scene of the first knife killing of 2018, the question is, will this worrying trend continue? ben ando, bbc news, south london. joining us down the line from our london newsroom is leroy logan, a former superintendent with the met police, and who now runs the knife crime charity voyage youth. thank you so much forjoining us this morning. and what depressing figures to have two put to you. i mean, four deaths over the weekend, 80 across the year in london. does that surprise you in anyway? no, sadly not. and ijust want to offer our condolences for the people have lost loved ones in the last couple of days. no, it is not. it has been going for a number of years, and of days. no, it is not. it has been going fora number of years, and i think it is a cause, you know, there isa think it is a cause, you know, there is a definite shift in how young people get numbed to all sorts of injuries and stabbings. they fear
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that they are better protect did if they carry a knife, and they are not. and they need to be educated, and they need to be at the centre of any partnership work to prevent anyone just any partnership work to prevent anyonejust thinking any partnership work to prevent anyone just thinking that, you know, they can arrest their way out of this problem. those in authority are in denial. they need to understand that prevention is better than cure. there has to be very specific, culturally sensitive, culturally intelligent, intervention and prevention programmes, and notjust believing they can arrest their way out of this problem. culturally sensitive intervention programmes, what does that mean practically? what sorts of things are we talking about? give me an example of something which is happening which you are involved in which can address this? well, it means knowing the young people you are dealing with, not making assumptions. there isa with, not making assumptions. there is a big narrative about anyone involved in gangs has got to be involved in gangs has got to be involved in gangs has got to be involved in violence. not necessarily. it could be all sorts of issues that are happening in the
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home. they might be all sorts of issues on the streets, how they have been groomed. so it is knowing the target group of young people you are working with. and don't assume it is one size fits all. it has to be working in a sustainable way. we need to fund those grassroots organisations that know the young people, those youth workers. and we also need to beef up the number of officers used to be on safe labour teams, those officers who are ring—fenced to know their community and work closely with them. and move away from this crime model and more to the public health approach. i am chairing a london board that works with the youth violence commission to look at how we do this holistically, define the problem, proper needs analysis, proper surveys , proper needs analysis, proper surveys, to look at how we develop strategies which are sustainable and releva nt to strategies which are sustainable and relevant to get the impact we all
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want. it seems there is an absolutely desperate need. it is not just london, this is happening in towns and cities across the country, but the figures in london are so stark. i come back to them, 60 deaths in the capital in 2016, eight he deaths in 2017. why the jump? deaths in the capital in 2016, eight he deaths in 2017. why thejump? how can you get an increase that big year—on—year? what is going on?” think it is because we are not getting to the heart of the problem. those in authority at responding from one critical matter to another, one crisis to another. they are not really getting to the heart of the issue and that is why the youth violence commission i am working with is doing a survey starting this month in partnership with warwick university to see what are those real issues. is it trauma at home, trauma in the street? are they being groomed to believe they can use a knife, not realising they are more at risk of being a victim of a knife crime than using the knife. an understanding the impact of policing. if young people don't have
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trust in contact with police and not the right kind of police officers in their neighbourhoods, they can be susceptible to grooming by those people who are haters, who get people who are haters, who get people to say use a knife and don't worry about the authorities, we will deal with it streetwise. and that sort of street justice. you were deal with it streetwise. and that sort of streetjustice. you were a police officer for 30 years on the streets, and seeing this for real. i mean, it seems like we talk about surveys , we mean, it seems like we talk about surveys, we are talking about interventional trying to come up with a new plant. it sounds like you feel that we just don't know how to deal with this as a society. we haven't got a plan at the moment. —— plan. i think there are models which can be used, glasgow have a violence reduction unit and are working with statutory organisations. it is a public health approach, notjust an enforcement approach. you have to recognise that it can't be just enforcement agencies on the road. they have to work closely with social services, educational services, health services. working with the community, with grassroots
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organisations. we got to build our proactivity to understand where these things are happening, and not just reacting. we have got to be pa rt just reacting. we have got to be part of the community, where young people start to trust offices, and making sure that the officers are there for them, not when. .. making sure that the officers are there for them, not when... you know, it is not a 9—to—5, weekends off. they have to be there for them, especially when they are being groomed on a day—to—day basis. especially when they are being groomed on a day-to-day basis. and queue forjoining us on breakfast this morning. —— thank you. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: this picture of dawn nisbet finishing a parkrun, last and ten minutes behind everyone else, became a social media sensation. she will tell us why, after being inactive for 17 years, she has signed up for her first half—marathon. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard.
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the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has said he will work tirelessly in 2018 and beyond to stamp out what he called the scourge of knife crime. his comments come as six people have been arrested in connection with the murders of four young men, including two teenagers, in unrelated attacks across london during the new year festivities. some londoners are reporting being disturbed by low—frequency noises, a phenomenon known as the hum. it is not known why some people hear it, but experts believe it could be down to an acute sensitivity to low—frequency noise. the head of a database which tracks reported instances of the hum says the number of sufferers in london could be higher than expected. the actual number of people who under the right conditions might be able to detect it could be much higher, simply because of the massive level of noise and vibration that london itself produces. as you have been hearing in breakfast, rail fares are set to go up from today by an average of 3.4%.
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but it is not all bad news for commuters this morning, as london bridge fully reopens after years of upgrade work. commuters using the station have faced disruption since 2013, as network rail spent millions building new platforms, a concourse, and new tracks. remodelling the capital's oldest mainline station is a key part of the thameslink upgrade, which will eventually see twice the number of trains running north—south under central london. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning, there are minor delays on the victoria line. a good service on all other lines. 0n the roads, the a1 is closed at highbury corner until next week for major roadworks. the a404 is closed southbound from the m40 junction 4 to marlow, following a serious collision. let's have a check on the weather now, with georgina burnett. good morning. well, there's a lot of wet and windy weather in the forecast for the week ahead. this morning, first thing, chilly and largely dry. but the cloud will be thickening, ahead of some rain that's coming in from the west. and that's going to be fairly heavy at times, as well, a southerly wind picking up with that too. clearing in the afternoon, but it's probably only western parts that will see some brightness,
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as i think most of the cloud will not clear until after dark. temperatures up around 11 degrees celsius today. 0vernight we have this second band of rain, and really gusty winds, 40—45 mph. temperatures down to around six degrees celsius tonight. fairly mild, really, under that cloud cover. and then tomorrow, a few blustery showers around. we may get the odd sunny spell as well, but really those winds gusting to 45—50 mph in some spots, with temperatures up to about 10 degrees celsius. on thursday, it's a bright, chilly start to the day, but there's some further rain coming in from the west later on. as we head towards the end of the week, though, temperatures are starting to take a bit of a dip. the winds are really strengthening once more for friday and saturday, and we're seeing further wet weather, in the way of showers more than rain, really. but some sunny spells, at least, just feeling a bit more chilly. we should also mention there is a met office yellow warning for high winds from midnight tonight until 10:00pm tomorrow evening. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to john and rachel. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and rachel burden. here it is a summoning of the main stories from bbc news. the biggest increase in railfares in five years comes into force this morning, prompting protests at several stations as many commuters return to work after the christmas break. in some cases, travellers will find themselves paying more than £100 extra a year. the government says they're investing more in faster, more reliable trains. campaigners warn the rise is pricing ordinary people off the railways. i think this fare rise really throws the spotlight on value for money. passengers want to see a more reliable train service,
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they want to see a better chance of getting a seat and better information during disruption and the train companies can help to take the sting out of this by offering direct debit payments for annual season tickets and help passengers pay for this big lump sum. parents are being urged to give their children no more than two sugary snacks a day, to help safeguard their health. public health england says the snacks should not exceed 100 calories each. the advice is being given after it's emerged primary school children are consuming three times more sugar than the recommended limit. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has called for a meaningful debate in iran, where 13 people have been killed in protests since thursday. demonstrators, who are angry about living standards, attacked police stations late into the night as they took to the streets in a number of cities. president hassan rouhani call the protests an opportunity, not a threat but vowed to crack down on lawbrea kers. south korea has offered high level talks with north korea to discuss participation in the 2018 winter olympic games. the south korean president says it's a groundbreaking chance to move
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towards peace, and has suggesting meeting as early as the ninth of january. it would be the first time the sides have met in more than two years. more than 300 women from hollywood's entertainment industry have launched an initiative to tackle sexual harassment in workplaces. the campaign called time's up includes includes hollywood stars such as meryl streep and jennifer lawrence. it will provide legal support for women and men who suffer abuse. 80 people were stabbed to death in london last year, a rise of a third compared to 2016. the figures come as police investigate the murders of four young man in the capital who were stabbed in unrelated incidents over a 24—hour period. the youngest victim was 17 years old. so far detectives have arrested six people in connection with their enquiries. a seaplane that crashed and killed six people, including five britons, is expected to be raised
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from an australian river this week so it can be forensically examined. richard cousins, who ran a multi—billion pound catering company, was killed along with his two sons, his fiancee, her daughter and the pilot. aviation experts believe the planed stalled before crashing into the river. an investigation's under way into the cause of a fire which destroyed up to 1400 vehicles in a car park in liverpool. the blaze at king's dock, next to liverpool's echo arena, is said to have spread after one vehicle caught fire on new year's eve. firefighters worked through the night and many people were forced into temporary accommodation as nearby buildings were evacuated. no—one was injured. it was a challenging incident, let's be under no illusions about that,
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the crews worked very hard indeed to prevent the spread of this fire. we protected the arena and the surrounding hotels, so i am very proud of the actions of our crews. millions of people are at risk of falling into debt this month as a result of christmas spending. research carried out by the money advice trust suggests one in six people across britain will fall behind on payments this month, with many saying they failed to budget properly for extra spending at christmas. saul wallets to start the year with. 0ver christmas and new year. over christmas and new year. over dark. yes. there was no fairytale ending for the 16—time darts world champion phil ‘the power‘ taylor, as he retired with a defeat in this years final to first—time winner rob cross. the former electrician from hastings was sensational throughout, and went 3—0 ahead with this 153 checkout.
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taylor nearly sealed his last appearance with a 9—dart finish but missed out by the smallest of margins. but there was no let—up from cross, he took the title at alexandra palace in london by 7—2. cross was born in the very same year taylor won his first world title, in1990. manchester united are back up to second in the premier league table after their first win in four matches. a 2—0 victory over everton at goodison park. it was decided by two special finishes as well, the opener from antony martial, who combined with his france international teammate paul pogba. man of the match pogba was also involved asjesse lingard scored an excellent solo goal to hand sam allardyce a second defeat of the week. they were very good, and in this christmas period we didn‘t win every match, but we didn‘t lose one, and i
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think that shows the character of the players. criticism is criticism. the pressure will increase on stoke city manager mark hughes after their 1—0 defeat at home to newcastle. perez got the winner in the second half. stoke drop to 16th, two points above the relegation zone, having won only two of their last 12 games. the key is, is everybody sticks together and we get on with it. it is no good feeling sorry for ourselves and looking to blame people. i think we just need to take it on board, take responsibility for what we are doing here and don‘t be cowed by it. get on with it. and are you confident that you can do it, and quickly? well, who else is going to do it? in terms of the knowledge of this group, the time i have been here, that i am best to do that, so we just need to be allowed to get on with ourjob. that is what we will do, we are getting back together and we go again.
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he really does want to get on with it, doesn‘t it? kyle abbott and is through to the second round of the brisbane international tournament. andy murray has pulled out of the last couple of minutes. he is still troubled by a hip injury. johanna konta does play in second—round action later this morning in the women‘s tournament. that news about murray just women‘s tournament. that news about murrayjust coming in the last couple of moments. i will bring you more on that in the last hour. thank you very much. it‘s a new year and for rail passengers that means a new ticket price. the largest average fare increase in five years comes into effect today. steph‘s at london bridge station with the details. what effect will that have for commuters? there are plans that maybe people will be put off going by train because prices have gone so
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high. you have been speaking with commuters. what is the sense among people? good morning. there is a mixed view, actually. some say that they really noticed the fares going up they really noticed the fares going up every year. some have said that they can see why it is important. this train station has been revamped. £1 billion has been spent over the last year. it is the fourth busiest train station in the uk. 0ther busiest train station in the uk. other passengers have said i have just come in on an overcrowded train and it was delayed. very mixed views. people are not sure —— short of talking to me. we have paulfrom the rijal delivery group, so tell us about commuters chatting to us this morning —— rail. quite a lot of them are miffed. do you understand why the prices are going up? good morning. it is great to be here
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today. you see people wandering around looking up and seeing how fantastic it is. no one wants to pay more fares, obviously. what we can do in the industry, everyone working together, is make best use of money from fares, from taxpayers, so fares are leveraging more money, much—needed investment, from the private sector, from government to deliver the improvements everyone wants so we can have this sort of thing here is that you see today across the country. it is all very well to have a nice train station but if it is always overcrowded and late then it means nothing nothing to anyone. it next communities from the north of london, the south of london, totally transformed the reliability, it has regenerated part of london completely and all of that contributes to the customers' experience and to the economy
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because it is so critical for the nation. what about the rest of the country? a lot of money is spent in the south. what about areas of the north where they struggle with the service? well, the great north run to act, and new trains introduced everywhere across the country. the we st everywhere across the country. the west country, scotland, the north, everywhere is going to see new trains coming in to deliver a fantastic, better experience, and more services that is provided from the infrastructure as well. it is the infrastructure as well. it is the whole country that will see this improvement. and this example today shows it can actually happen. so it is notjust saying it will shows it can actually happen. so it is not just saying it will happen shows it can actually happen. so it is notjust saying it will happen in future. this is really happening now. trains are on order and people will see the difference. it feels like we have been talking for years about things getting better and then if you look at the stats with punctuality than it was the worst it has been in a decade in 2016. so when will people see a difference? this example is showing it really is
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making a difference. you are right. we have been saying things are coming and they are. this is one of the first symbolic changes. those are the changes coming over the next 18 months really an unprecedented period of improvement. people are going to see. it is going to change customer experience and not just promises for the future. it is hard to stomach when you see train prices going up more than wage increases. for lots of people it means they have less money in their disposable income because they are spending so much on travelling. all we can do is to make best use of the money from fa re payers to make best use of the money from fare payers or taxpayers and the best use to make the improvements. we have had decades of an —— lack of investment. what about train companies, people would say, can‘t they take a hit? you show the figures. 97p in the pound goes into
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improving the railway and also the growth we have seen means it enables further investment. it is more than just that direct contribution. there was further investment from taxpayers to deliver the sort of thing you see today. thank you very much for your time this morning. we will speak with some passengers later on in the programme to get the different views on this topic this morning. thank you so much. steph, live in london bridge today, the fourth busiest in the country. we we re fourth busiest in the country. we were worried that no one was going to go to work today. it was very quiet. it is getting busier now. it is the second of january and you are watching breakfast on bbc news. and as we have heard, passenger groups are staging protest in some places against the biggest increase in rail fa res against the biggest increase in rail fares in five years. no more than two low—calorie snacks a day, the latest advice to parents to attempt to tackle childhood obesity. if the railfare
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to tackle childhood obesity. if the rail fare increases don‘t get you, the weather might, because it is not looking very good for the next few days. happy thoughts. happy new year. happy new year, everybody. yes, it isn‘t looking brilliant. if it isn‘t raining today, it will tonight. this is the scene in luton. the cloud breaks are going the wrong way because this is what‘s coming in off the atlantic. this area of cloud will bring in stormy weather. a cloud in the west producing grain extensively across ireland edging mainland uk. at the end of the morning rush it will be into the south—west of scotland. north—east scotla nd south—west of scotland. north—east scotland begin strike with a bit of sunshine to start the day. it will last longer so cross 0rkney & shetland. a frost for one or two. at the moment in northern ireland it is easing off to clear spells and showers at nine o‘clock and turning wet across north—west england, the midlands. eastern england should be
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dry, but increasingly cloudy. the rain will be heavy in north wales. light and patchy. nothing heavy as far as light and patchy. nothing heavy as faras rain is light and patchy. nothing heavy as far as rain is concerned in the south. heavy further north. snow for a time across the tops of the pennines and into the afternoon across the scottish mountains. with the gusty winds today the rain pushes through reasonably smartly. we will see sunshine in merry areas —— many areas in the afternoon. by which time more rain is pushing into the west and temperatures 4—6 degrees across scotland, up around 12 or 13 degrees across scotland, up around 12 or13 in degrees across scotland, up around 12 or 13 in the south. when i say it is stormy weather, it is courtesy of storm eleanor first in is stormy weather, it is courtesy of storm eleanorfirst in northern ireland with rain spreading across all areas except the far north of scotland. there are just developing this evening across southern parts of northern ireland and the stronger winds will transfer eastwards. maybe the far south of scotland, but more especially cumbria, lancashire, damaging winds of 70 to 80 mph and
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elsewhere we will see severe gales anywhere from north wales, north midlands into the borders of scotland. snow on the hills, rain elsewhere at a windy start to tomorrow morning. the worst of the winds get out of the way quickly thenit winds get out of the way quickly then it is a broster —— blustery day. not too many showers across the south. the north—east of scotland again, largely fine and dry. a little on the cool side. temperatures not far from the day‘s values elsewhere. then frost returns to scotland in particular. further south another west is —— weather system is set to push in. it has been one of those weeks for wales and northern ireland. wet and windy weather through the day. the strongest went through the english channel. north and east will be dry and bright through much of the day. a little bit call here. from thursday onwards it is cooler still with most places seem temperatures drop. thank you very much. lots of weather which is always a
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good excuse not to go out for a run and do any exercise. if you have made a new year‘s resolution to do any exercise, that is the excuse. lots of us will have made a new year resolution to do more exercise, but actually taking the first steps can be daunting. so, if you need a bit of inspiration, how about this picture? this is dawn nisbet celebrating as she completed her local parkrun. she came last, and ten minutes behind everyone else, and was shared thousands of times on social media. dawn has now run more than 500km over the last year, and she is taking part in a new initiative from the mental health charity mind called run every day, which tries to encourage people to take up some form of daily exercise. shejoins us now. it is actually called redjanuary. so how did it all began for you? when did you get out and on your
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feet and start to run? so my stepmum was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in march of last year, and at that point i had been inactive for a long time and was seven stone overweight but i wanted to do the race for life. it wasn‘t about getting more active or getting thin, it was just about supporting her. so i started running usually in the dark, where people couldn‘t see me. it wasn‘t easy, i will be honest. so i started from there, really. and the photograph which has made you famous around the world, that was just a chance moment, wasn‘t it? around the world, that was just a chance moment, wasn't it? yes, it was my six park run, and as i crossed the finish line, the marshall said put your arms up, be proud. i put my arms up and laughed, and it has been a bit mad, really. i am now very and it has been a bit mad, really. i am now very proud of that photo. when i first saw it i was a bit embarrassed, because it is... you
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know, i am a big girl, embarrassed, because it is... you know, iam a big girl, and it is sweaty. but i am pretty proud of it now, that it shows what i have achieved. it is my profile picture on twitter and facebook, because i look at it and it reminds me what i have done. it is so important to see positive images like that of women of all shapes and sizes. and it is about the kind of sweat and accepting our bodies as they are. but finding the joy in it. accepting our bodies as they are. but finding thejoy in it. and obviously you did find thatjoy. how long did that take? before you thought i am really enjoying this? probably a couple of months, really. to start with it was really hard, from having done nothing. just tell us from having done nothing. just tell us how you then started for the first time, literally getting off the sofa, putting on a pair of trainers. do you walk it? do you have a slowjog? trainers. do you walk it? do you have a slow jog? so the biggest thing is actually getting out in your activewear, being in public, where people can see you. it very much started as a walk, but then i would look for the next lamppost and
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run to that, and you get to that and you think i have achieved that, got a carry on a little bit longer. it gives you something to map your improvement each time. it can be a bit boring, but if you take the same route as you start out, you can see your own improvement. lamppost to lamppost. yes, yes. and so knowing that that picture of you has not just inspired you to keep going but has inspired so many other people to run around the block or around the world, it is quite a responsibility you have got, isn‘t it? world, it is quite a responsibility you have got, isn't it? i am quite a shy person, so it has taken a lot for me, like i say, when i first saw the picture i was a bit embarrassed by it, but i saw the facebook group of like—minded women out there trying to find ways to fit running around their busy lives, and it was them who said if you can be brave and share that picture, the impact it can have on other people... so i have had to park my shyness to come and chat to my yourselves, and be on
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the radio, and things like that. when i see the messages from people about how it has inspired them and the impact it has had on them, that makes me want to do more as well.” can‘t believe that having celebrated the fact that you have got up off the fact that you have got up off the sofa we have brought you back on the sofa we have brought you back on the sofa. so you are now in this run, red january, if the sofa. so you are now in this run, redjanuary, if you take yourself back to where you were when yourself back to where you were when you started this, running every day could be a bit dangerous, couldn‘t it, for people if they have not exercised for a while? it can be exerting, it can put pressure on your body. i think it is called run everydayjanuary, your body. i think it is called run everyday january, and a your body. i think it is called run everydayjanuary, and a lot your body. i think it is called run everyday january, and a lot of people are running every day, but mind are promoting the impact that physical activity can have on your physical activity can have on your physical and mental well—being. so i will run a lot, but there are other days when i am going horseriding, all my daughter does jr days when i am going horseriding, all my daughter doeer park run and we walk a lot of that, so it will be a mixture of a lot of physical activity. anyone interested in doing
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it, it isjust activity. anyone interested in doing it, it is just about getting out there every day. it might be running after the kids for 20 minutes, for example. things that you didn't do before, in december when we are eating too many mince pies, it has massive benefits for your physical and mental well—being. massive benefits for your physical and mentalwell-being. thank massive benefits for your physical and mental well-being. thank you for sharing your story with us, and i am sure you have inspired a lot of people. do you like a holiday? when iamon people. do you like a holiday? when i am on holiday i find the local park runs, the first thing i pack now is by trainers, which again, this time last year... i might have an alternative for you. we were talking about holidays, lots of people thinking about sunshine and lying on the beach. what about this for a holiday? running a bookshop. a p pa re ntly for a holiday? running a bookshop. apparently it is what some holidaymakers are being given the chance to do. it is proving so popular, the shop is booked solidly until 2020, and the concept could soon be branching out into asia.
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0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon has been for a browse. between the hills and the sea in south—west scotland is a small town where they like their books a lot. wigtown is scotland‘s national book town, and among the many shops here, one is available to rent for a week at a time. it is run by enthusiasts who want to be surrounded by books, while trying their hand at selling some as well. right, helen mcdonald... alison drury is a police officer, but not this week. instead, she is stacking bookshelves and shifting stock. you are paying for the privilege of running a bookshop for a week. what do your friends make of it? a bit of a mixture. i think some of them think that i‘m a bit eccentric, and think it‘s a very strange thing to do. by the same token, i have some friends who think it‘s extremely exciting, and are excited for me, and a bit envious.
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have you been enjoying it? i have. you can tell, can‘t you? the temporary book store boss has free rein. displays can change, so can the promotions. the chance to run a bookshop for a week or two has proved popular. people have come from as far away as new zealand, north america and south korea to run this place. there was a couple in their 80s who came on honeymoon, and others who liked the town so much that they stayed. this shop, which once came close to closure, turned around by those who have a dream of running a bookshop, and want the chance to test it out. i think in everyone‘s life you have that "what if" voice. what if ijust owned a bookshop by the sea in scotland? we want to give people the chance to do it. this is actual, real virtual reality, where you can come and be in a bookshop, and feel the cold and read the books and enjoy the community, and kind of have little surprises and an adventure along the way. and, if those who have come on their bookshop holiday are looking for ideas, with wigtown boasting 14 bookshops, there is plenty here to inspire.
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we love our bookshops here, we love our books. and we‘ve even got people coming from far and wide to run a bookshop in wigtown. imagine that. it sounds crazy idea, but what a fantastic thing for wigtown, opening wigtown up to the world, and encouraging people to come and share our love for books. that passion for selling books may be spreading. there is interest from a chinese firm looking to open its own version of the open book holiday business. so successful has this scottish one being, it is booked up for the next two years. it looks like a very beautiful village. yes, the bookshop which is fully booked. would you do it? no. i think if i go on holiday ijust want
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to sleep and relax. read a book, not sell books. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sara 0rchard. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has said he will work tirelessly in 2018 and beyond to stamp out what he called the scourge of knife crime. as you have been hearing on breakfast this morning, his comments come as six people have been arrested in connection with the murders of four young men, including two teenagers, in unrelated attacks across london during the new year festivities. some londoners are reporting being disturbed by low—frequency noises, a phenomenon known as "the hum". it is not known why some people hear it, but experts believe it could be down to an acute sensitivity to low—frequency noise. the head of a database which tracks reported instances of the hum says the number of sufferers in london could be higher than expected. the actual number of people who under the right conditions might be able to detect it
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could be much higher, simply because of the massive level of noise and vibration that london itself produces. as you have been hearing in breakfast, rail fares are set to go up from today by an average of 3.4%. but it is not all bad news for commuters this morning, as london bridge fully reopens after years of upgrade work. commuters using the station have faced disruption since 2013, as network rail spent millions building new platforms, a concourse, and new tracks. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning, there is good service on all lines. 0n the roads, the a1 is closed at highbury corner until next week for major roadworks. the a404 is closed southbound from the m40 junction 4 to marlow, following a serious collision. let‘s have a check on the weather now, with georgina burnett. good morning.
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well, there‘s a lot of wet and windy weather in the forecast for the week ahead. this morning, first thing, chilly and largely dry. but the cloud will be thickening, ahead of some rain that‘s coming in from the west. and that‘s going to be fairly heavy at times, as well, a southerly wind picking up with that too. clearing in the afternoon, but it‘s probably only western parts that will see some brightness, as i think most of the cloud will not clear until after dark. temperatures up to about 11 degrees celsius today. 0vernight we have this second band of rain, and really gusty winds, 40—45 mph. temperatures down to about six degrees celsius tonight. fairly mild, really, under that cloud cover. and then tomorrow, a few blustery showers around. we may get the odd sunny spell as well, but really those winds gusting to 45—50 mph in some spots, with temperatures up to about 10 degrees celsius. on thursday, it‘s a bright, chilly start to the day, but there‘s some further rain coming in from the west later on. as we head towards the end of the week, though, temperatures are starting to take a bit of a dip. the winds are really strengthening once more for friday and saturday, and we‘re seeing further wet weather, in the way of showers more than rain, really.
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but some sunny spells, at least, just feeling a bit more chilly. we should also mention there is a met office yellow warning for high winds from midnight tonight until 10:00pm tomorrow evening. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it is back to john and rachel. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and jon kay. back to work for many of us, but at a higher cost. from today, rail passengers face the biggest fare rise in five years. many season tickets have gone up by more than £100. campaigners warn that people are being priced out of getting to work. good morning. from the newly revamped london bridge station, ministers say that increases needed to help modernise the network. i
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will be talking to passengers about whether they agree. good morning, it‘s tuesday, 2nd january. also this morning... limit chldren to two low—calorie snacks a day — the latest advice to tackle obesity. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, calls for a meaningful debate as protests in iran flare for a fifth day. it‘s reported that nine more people have died overnight. a seaplane that crashed and killed six people, including five britons, will be raised from an australian river to be forensically examined. in sport, there is no fairytale ending for one of the most successful sportsmen of all time. rob cross outplayed phil taylor in his final match. the 16—time champion retired with a defeat. a fabulous bright moon last night
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but next weather today? it certainly is. if you have not got rain yet, you will do some time. wet and increasingly weather to come tonight. the full forecasters in the next 10—15 minutes. good morning. first our main story. the biggest increase in rail fares in five years comes into force this morning, prompting protests at several stations as many commuters return to work after the christmas break. in some cases, travellers will find themselves paying more than £100 extra a year. campaigners warn the rise is pricing ordinary people off the railways. the government says they‘re investing more in faster, more reliable trains. steph is at london bridge station for us this morning. is it isita is it a necessary evil to try to get the trains and stations up to scratch? good morning. there are
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mixed views. it is not difficult to find people who will talk to you about train fares because this morning at london bridge, £1 billion has been spent over the last five yea rs on has been spent over the last five years on modernising this and ministers say we need the fare increases to modernise the whole network and to make sure they are not overcrowded, not late, but it is ha rd to not overcrowded, not late, but it is hard to stomach when at the same time people are facing big increases and not see in wages go up. this morning i was chatting to some commuters regularly using the station to find out what they think. at the beginning of every year, most commuters do not get a pay rise, therefore it is totally unfair that we get an increase in train fares. it is going to happen every year relentlessly, but it is not too bad. considering all the money they have spent here, you can see it, it is going some revere ntially. you can see it, it is going some reverentially. it is not value for money, as simple as that. —— it is going somewhere eventually. there
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are always delays, hardly any seats. if there are going to extend the carriages, it would make sense. some mixed thoughts on the train fare increases. but the reason the train bosses say we need them is because we need to improve the network and earlier on i spoke to someone from the rail delivery group representing the rail delivery group representing the train operating companies. all we can do is make the best use of the money, from fare payers and taxpayers, to make the improvements. we have had decades of underinvestment that we are beginning to address now and making real improvements and we need the money from either of those sources to make improvements. of course, the prices, the increases we have, they are regulated in the majority of cases, but whenever i talk about train fares, people say, where does the money go, does it go into profit for the train companies? this breaks it down. how much in every £1 spent
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on the train ticket, but it goes on. the redevelopment needed in the network... what is really tough for people to stomach is the fact there are still people coming here today who have said to me, i was on an overcrowded train, i did not get a seat, i am overcrowded train, i did not get a seat, iam paying overcrowded train, i did not get a seat, i am paying over £2500 a year, that has gone up today, i still do not get a seat, and looking as well as the punctuality figures, the annualfigure for 2016, as the punctuality figures, the annual figure for 2016, it shows it was the worst in a decade. i have had a lot of the bosses talking to me this morning about things improving, we promise things will get better, but it does take a while. later on i will be talking to the boss of network rail about all of this, what it means, and talking to passengers again too. thank you, steph, and london bridge station for us this morning. 0ur
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other main story this morning... parents are being urged to give their children just two low—calorie snacks a day, to help safeguard their health. public health england says the snacks should be no more than 100 calories each. the advice is being given after it‘s emerged primary school children are consuming three times more sugar than the recommended limit, as our health correspondent, james gallagher, reports. half the sugar us kids eat and drink each year comes from snacks and sugary drinks. kids get through a mountain of sugary snacks each year. cake, ice cream, pop, juice, biscuits, sweets, and chocolate. children eat three times more sugar than official advice, just over half of it comes from snacking between meals. it‘s one reason more than a quarter of children have rotten teeth by the time they turn five. this public health england campaign is warning that snacking has got out of hand and is increasing the chance of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. we‘re very concerned about snacking.
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our children have unhealthy diets, they‘re eating too many calories. they‘re eating too much sugar and snacking is part of the problem. we‘re encouraging parents to be aware of snacking and try to cut back and replace unhealthy snacks with better snacks. so, how do parents feel about snacking? i know kids like sweets, and all of the sugar and stuff that you get from shops and mcdonald‘s and things like that, but it is for the parents to keep an eye on them and their intake. public health england is advising snacks are limited to just 100 calories and eaten no more than twice a day. it says fruit and veg are ideal and even malt loaf, fromage frais that‘s low in sugar, and crumpets are better than anything you will find in the confectionery aisles. south korea has offered high—level talks with north korea to discuss participation in the 2018 winter olympic games.
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the south korean president says it‘s a groundbreaking chance to move towards peace and has suggesting meeting as early as the 9th of january. it would be the first time the sides have met in more than two years. more than 300 women from hollywood‘s entertainment industry have launched an initiative to tackle sexual harassment in workplaces. the campaign, called time‘s up, includes hollywood stars such as meryl streep and jennifer lawrence. it will provide legal support for women and men who suffer abuse. a seaplane that crashed and killed six people — including five britons — is expected to be raised from an australian river this week so it can be forensically examined. richard cousins,who ran a multi—billion pound catering company, was killed along with his two sons, his fiancee, her daughter, and the pilot. they believe the plane stalls before
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crashing into the river. we will be speaking to the brother—in—law of richard cousins in a few moments time. 80 people were stabbed to death in london last year — a rise of a third compared to 2016. the figures come as police are investigating the murders of four young men in the capital who were stabbed in unrelated incidents during a 24—hour period. the youngest victim is 17—years—old. so far, detectives have arrested six people in connection with their inquiries. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has called for a meaningful debate in iran where its being reported that nine more people have died overnight in more protests demonstrators, who are angry about living standards, attacked police stations late into the night as they took to the streets in a number of cities. jon donnison reports. iran has not seen anything like this in almost a decade. the country‘s leadership under fire in the biggest protests since 2009. people are angry about high unemployment, rising prices and corruption. iranian state media says nine people
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we re iranian state media says nine people were killed overnight, including two members of the security services. the foreign secretary, boris johnson, has called on the iranians authorities to permit debate about what he called the legitimate and important issues raised by protesters. but in recent days, the country‘s elected president, hassan rouhani, has sought to downplay the protests a nd rouhani, has sought to downplay the protests and their significance, saying they were being instigated by iran‘s enemies. translation: 0urvictories against the us and the zionist regime are unbearable for our enemies. our success in the region is intolerable for them. they are out for revenge and trying to provoke people. so far his words have done little to stem the protest. there have been large counter demonstrations organised in support of the country‘s leadership. but as
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the protests and to the sixth day, the protests and to the sixth day, the message from many iranians is they want change. jon donnison, bbc news. more than 11,000 homes across the uk have been empty for more than a decade, according to research carried out by the liberal democrats. the study also suggests very few councils in england and wales have made use of powers that allow local authorities to take over properties that have been empty for more than six months. but the government says the number of empty homes has fallen by a third since 2010 and is now at its lowest level since records began. millions of people are at risk of falling into debt this month as a result of christmas spending. research carried out by the money advice trust suggests one in six people across britain will fall behind on payments this month, with many saying they failed to budget properly for extra spending at christmas. these are the six people who died when a small aircraft plunged into the hawkesbury river
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near sydney on new year‘s eve. they include five members of the same british family, and the pilot of the plane, gareth morgan. 58—year—old richard cousins was the head of the global catering company, compass. his colleagues said he was respected for his great humanity and a no—nonsense style. his sons also died in the crash. william cousins was 25 and head of press for open britain. labourmp chuka umunna described him as an absolute pleasure to work with, dynamic and full of enthusiasm. 23—year—old edward cousins had just graduated. his friend paid tribute to his sense of humour and bright personality. richard‘s fiancee, emma bowden, was an arts editor at 0k! magazine. a former colleague described her as the grace kelly of the office, saying she was regal, serene and could stay calm under pressure. her 11—year—old daughter, heather, was also in the crash. we are joined now by the uncle of william and edwards cousins, ian thorpe, from his
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home in leicestershire. good morning. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. how are you and the family coping at the moment? good morning. it has obviously been a huge shock. i am pleased to say at least i am feeling a little bit more positive this morning than i was yesterday at this time, having just found out what had happened. it has been terrible news. but i am pleased to say the support i have had from my friends, people have been texting and ringing me since i appeared on the television and also did some interviews yesterday, it has been fantastic, absolutely fantastic, and i would like to thank everybody who has supported and helped me. that is really good to hear. you talk about the shock when you find out, how did the shock when you find out, how did
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the news first to you? it first came down to me, i got up at about 8am yesterday morning, walked down the stairs, my sister would have been 58 yesterday, i made a cup of tea, i sat in the front room and the phone rang and a friend of mine, lisa, have you heard the news? what news? i was just about to put the television on and she told me the plane accident which i had heard about on the friday night but there we re about on the friday night but there were no names disclosed, but it was involved my brother—in—law and my two nephews. that is basically how i found out, the real shock to start 2018 with. a terrible tragedy for the family. you lost your sister a number of years ago, she died of cancer, and your brother—in—law went on to find new love again and you got to know him and his new fiancee very well, hadn‘t you? got to know him and his new fiancee very well, hadn't you?” got to know him and his new fiancee very well, hadn't you? i have known
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richard since 1979 when caroline met him at sheffield university. i have never met emma but i know they were very happy together and i was very pleased for him and he also really adored their 11—year—old which is the first time in richard‘s life he had to deal with a young lady other than my own daughter. i know he was very thrilled at his future with emma and it is such a tragedy. they we re emma and it is such a tragedy. they were looking forward to a happy future together, as you say. what about your nephews, tell us about them? a bright future lying ahead for both of them? yes. i spoke to ed midway last year and he had just left edinburgh university and he was applying for the police, his future looked fantastic. william was working for open in britain, loving
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it, thoroughly enjoying it. i would pull his leg on many occasions about brexit, we had a laugh about it. the future was very bright for both of them and it is an absolute tragedy, an absolute tragedy. very hard for the family to be exposed like this because it is such a public event, a great deal of media interest, but on the other hand, the number of tributes we have seen being paid to yourfamily tributes we have seen being paid to your family members on social media, in the press, some very warm words said about all of them, does that provide some comfort? it provides a lot of comfort. it is wonderful to know they were so popular and so loved by many. yes, it has made it easier. it‘s not easy, but it has made it easier and i‘m very proud of all three of them. very, very proud. it's going to be a difficult road ahead. coming to terms with the loss, but of course you have got the accident
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investigation to follow as well. have you been kept informed about any of that or what‘s likely to happen next? i know nothing at the moment. i‘ve seen what‘s on the news. the police in australia are moving quick which i‘m delighted about. i think that‘s a very positive thing and the sooner that all the bodies are brought up, it will be for benefit for everybody including myself. well, we will be thinking of you over the next few days and weeks. many thanks for your time this morning. we greatly appreciate it. thank you very much, rachel, i really appreciate that. that‘s very kind, thank you. it‘s 8.16am and you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories: passenger groups are staging protests against the biggest increase in rail fares for five years. no more than two low—calorie snacks a day — the latest advice to parents in an attempt to tackle childhood obesity.
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here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. a stunning sunrise, matt. good morning. red sky in the morning, there are some storm clouds on the way. you can see them ganging up in the atlantic. this particular area of cloud which is going to become stormy weather for tonight. this of cloud which is going to become stormy weatherfor tonight. this is what we have got at the moment, producing heavy rain in northern ireland and across wales. that‘s on the move. whilst we get through most of the morning dry, with sunshine around the north—east of scotland, turning wet from here on across the south—west and there will be snow over the higher ground too. but it does mean northern ireland, by the time we get to mid—morning, the skies should brighten. there will be showers, but drier weather too. drier weather and bright weather. turning wet over the next couple of
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hours across north wention. the rain turning lighter and patchier for wales, but it will turn wetter through the midlands and the south east and all the light and patchy rain across the south. gusty winds accompany the rain band. never quite reaching parts of caithness, 0rkney and shetland before the end of the afternoon. elsewhere, you will see the sunshine come out for most this afternoon. parts of east anglia, kent, in particular, maybe a bit of a struggle, but then later, more rain back into wales. so it‘s a day of everything today. not especially warm and not especially cold either, but tonight, stormy weather is on the way. storm eleanor will push axros from west to east quickly. gusty winds across the country as rain sets in and pushes its way northwards and eastwards. the strongest winds across the republic of ireland, southern parts of northern ireland, we could see damaging gusts, 70mph here, but as we head into the second half of the night, it‘s southern parts of
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scotland, northern england and potentially north wales where those damaging gusts of wind could be north—west england, cumbria and lancashire bearing the brunt. and the stronger winds will transfer to the stronger winds will transfer to the north—east of england and across the north—east of england and across the borders by the time we start wednesday morning. it doesn‘t last too long before the winds ease down, but there could be ongoing travel disruption tomorrow morning. tomorrow is a blustery day with sunshine and showers. showers most frequent in the west of scotland and northern ireland and north—west england and north wales. least frequent across southern england and driest of all, north—east of scotla nd driest of all, north—east of scotland where it will be another chilly day. temperatures down a little bit on today‘s values and quickly, looking to wednesday night and thursday. some frost for parts of scotland, maybe northern england. this area of low pressure is set to spin its way in for thursday. any early brightness giving way to lots more in the way of cloud and rain, strongest of the winds look like they will be in the south. the driest weather again parts of northern scotland. not too bad a week for you here, but it will turn
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colder and rachel and jon turn colder and rachel and jon turn colder as we finish the week and head into next week. would you like a biscuit? we have got 33 biscuits. we have got ten cakes. we‘ve got eight bags of sweets. we‘ve got six chocolate bars, 20 sugary drinks, two turtle doves! skip the partridge. this is how much the average child eats, according to public health england, in snacks, this isn‘t meals, this is snacks between meals in a single month! in january your child could eat all of that between meals. health england have a campaign. we spoke to one family to find out how they manage their children‘s snacking habits. snacks, well, if they go to the shop on their own and they buy their own
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little snacks with their own money so, you can‘t really stop them from having them little snacks. when she was little she didn't have any sugary products until she was about three and then this one, all changed and i think she is having a bit too much. i normally eat not as many snacks as my sister does, but most of them are probably healthy. we do monitor their intake of sugar as it is as well, the cereal, that they eat and the sweets that they have. i don't eat like too many because sometimes ijust don't like them. you even see food thaw don't think that there is much sugar in and when you do actually take a look it's full of sugar. i know kids like sweets and all the sugary stuff you get from shops, but it‘s for the parents to keep an eye on them on their intake. but when we go out then, we might have somebody mithering
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that she wants some sweeties. so, you know, sometimes it'sjust easier tojust give in to it keep her quiet because she is quite noisy when she gets going. it isa it is a minefield for parents. to talk us through the minefield of options out there is doctorjenny harries, the deputy medical director of public health england. you are suggesting two snacks a day for children, each one about 100 calories? exactly. you heard there that families, there is a lot of pester power from children when you go out shopping. i have had four of my own. i know what it feels like and what we are trying to do is make it easy for parents to choose healthier options and put some guideline, a rule of thumb around it. we are just hearing it is not easy for a parent to say to a child,
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"you can‘t have the chocolate bar. here is a rice cake." we are trying to set up children and families with healthier eating options for life with lots of diabetes coming in young children now, obesity and even highest rates of admission to hospital five to nine highest rates of admission to hospitalfive to nine is highest rates of admission to hospital five to nine is around teeth extraction. it is important we do something. for making it easy, what we have created is an app so anybody can go online and download it, join in the change for life website. one is a food scanner. this makes it helpful for children. website. one is a food scanner. this makes it helpfulfor children. you can go out and scan food in the supermarkets and get rid of the problem which you have described. you can scan in, find out which snacks hit the bar are around 100 calories and are green for all of the fat, sugar... . you could take a
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biscuit. now, that might be what, you were saying earlier 40, 50 calories? they vary individually by company and producer. it‘s important that people are aware of the variation because there are hidden sugars. the one that people go for isa sugars. the one that people go for is a fruitjuice drink. you have to be careful if it has got added sugar it will be a considerable amount of sugar. what are the healthy alternatives that hit the button? children come home from school and they are starving. we might give them toast. is a slice of toast acceptable? is that more than 100 calories if it is giving them fuel? so, a piece of toast, it depends what you are putting on top of it. if you put butter and jam and things, then you are going to increase it. the sorts of things we might recommend, rice cakes are popular and easily accessible and low—calorie and they are quite crunchy and crisp so children can
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use them, they have got a texture about them which is engaging for a children. so a rice cake would be a good thing. if children like something sloppy, jelly. you say a rice cake is engaging? that won‘t cut it with a ten—year—old? rice cake is engaging? that won‘t cut it with a ten-year-old? if you start with them when they are two or three. malt loaf, rice cakes, there are three. malt loaf, rice cakes, there a re lots of three. malt loaf, rice cakes, there are lots of good ideas on the website. i love the idea that rachel used a biscuit as a prop and left it for me! michael says that calorie counting apps was the down fall for his daughter suffering with anorexia. he said he made her delete the app because it mader too conscious of the calories. we talked about eating disorders in kids before. it is risky? we need to
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disassociate those two. a child with an eating disorder needs specialist care. people need to be generally aware of what they‘re eating. care. people need to be generally aware of what they're eatingm you‘re saying to a six—year—old, that‘s 50 calories, that‘s 100 calories. we are saying to the pa rents, calories. we are saying to the parents, not to the child. we are saying to the parent this is a rule of thumb, roughly 100 calories because we know that the highest sugar content snacks will have more calories, but if they download the food scanner, it will automatically come up food scanner, it will automatically come up as a food scanner, it will automatically come up as a positive food or not. it's come up as a positive food or not. it‘s a great thing for kids. you can go around the supermarket and together with parents work out which the healthier options are without worrying about the counting. you could see his point it could make a child unduly obsessing? a food scanner means. . . child unduly obsessing? a food scanner means... so child unduly obsessing? a food scanner means. . . 50 the child unduly obsessing? a food scanner means... so the app doesn't count calories. it will give a positive score for a snack which is around 100 calories with green
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indicators. thank you very much for resisting the temptation as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. the week ahead looking to be a pretty windy affair. we will come back to the wind in just a second because it is relevant in the next 24 hours and it will be quite wet at times as well. the first combination of wet and windy fare is in the western parts of the british isles. a belt of rain will gradually push ever further east and ever further north although it probably will not get into the northern isles until well on towards the end of the day. there will be a conversion of some of the rain to snow on ground further north of the central belt above 200 metres. an interval of dry weather breaking up quite widely through the heart of the british isles. temperatures in the north, five, six, seven. in the south,
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could possibly be 11, 12. the dry weather will not last. we will see storm eleanor coming in from the atlantic, an ever deepening area of low pressure, bringing strong winds, initially to northern ireland, gusts up initially to northern ireland, gusts up to 70 miles an hour, a great belt of wet and windy weather across england and wales, taking time close to the centre of the pressure gully —— the low—pressure. we could be looking at 60 miles an hour gusts in the north of wales. strong winds transferring to the eastern side of the pennines and into the north sea. wednesday is shaping up to be really blustery, a lot of squally showers, a bit of brightness especially in the south. take care. bye—bye. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and samantha simmonds. china stops taking
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the world‘s recycling — so where will it go and what it will it mean for the packaging we all use? live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday, 2nd january. struggles to keep up with china‘s alibaba.
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