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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 13, 2018 11:00am-11:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11.003m. the african union demands an apology from president trump for derogatory remarks he reportedly made about the continent. we were quite appalled and infuriated, outraged, by the comments. the lib dems urge the government not to bail out construction company carillion, afterfears it's close to collapse. it currently employs about 20,000 people. it cannot possiblyjust bail out the company because then you have a position where the private sector is allowed to privatise profits but that the government nationalises the losses, that is a problem we have with the banks. warnings of a tooth decay crisis amongst children in england. a record 43,000 operations to remove rotting teeth were carried out last year. also in the next hour: tributes are paid to bella emberg, who has died at the age of 80. the comedy actress who became a household name on the russ abbot show is described as a huge comedy talent. les dennis said she was a funny, lovely friend.
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the dateline london panel focused on president trump and brexit. good morning, and welcome to bbc news. the african union has demanded an apology from president trump after he reportedly used a vulgar and disparaging term to describe nations on the continent. it was apparently made during an oval office meeting on immigration with members of congress. the union, which represents 55 african countries, expressed its shock, dismay and outrage and said the trump administration misunderstood africans. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports.
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it has been an extraordinary week, even by donald trump's standards. it ended with a medical, a routine checkup that all presidents undergo and word from mr trump's doctor is that the commander in chief is in excellent health. the past two days have seen the president mired in controversy. as donald trump arrives in florida to spend the weekend at his golf resort, the international community is still feeding over his alleged use of crude language to describe african countries. as the african union we were quite appalled and infuriated, outraged, by the comments. and for a country like the united states, which is a valued partner for the africans, this is quite a shock. from the united nations in geneva came the stiffest of rebukes. these are shocking and shameful comments from the president of the united states.
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i'm sorry but there's no other word one can use but racist. you cannot dismiss entire countries and continents. the allegation has gone unanswered by the president. he had an opportunity at this ceremony in celebration of martin luther king. but it was awkward. after signing a proclamation in honour of the civil rights leader, mr trump dodged the most uncomfortable of questions. mr president, are you a racist? the president left without responding. he earlier tweeted that he used tough language in a meeting with senators but not the derogatory language attributed to him. peter bowes, bbc news. despite the furore over the president's comments, the political analyst eric ham says mr trump's words will resonate with his republican base. we know how the president feels about courting his base and making sure that they stay in the fold. in fa ct a sure that they stay in the fold. in fact a very conservative provocateur has also said upon appearing ——
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hearing these comments that she feels validated and now she has a reason to turn back to president trump. we do know that his base will actually find solace in these comments, but, again, when you look at just how racially comments, but, again, when you look atjust how racially tense they were and how an entire continent is seeing these comments, it doesn't bode well for the united states, particularly when you look at africa and many of the emerging nations within africa, and now how china is engaged on the continent, itjust, i think, it is not a good look for the united states, particular when the united states, particular when the united states, particular when the united states sees china as a competitor and we know how actively engaged china is in africa. iran has said the us has crossed a red line by imposing sanctions on the head of itsjudiciary and vowed to retaliate. ayatollah sadeq amoli—larijani is among 14 individuals and bodies targeted. iran also rejected any
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changes to its nuclear deal with world powers. president trump has warned that he'll re—impose sanctions on iran in less than four months, a move that would undermine the agreement under which tehran curbed its nuclear programme. i've been getting some analysis from kasra naji from the bbc persian service, who said there is concern over suggestions president trump wants to renegotiate iran's nuclear deal. it isa it is a very serious situation. the europeans and the chinese and the russians are all against it and they wa nt to russians are all against it and they want to make sure that this nuclear deal survives and the european countries have been meeting a couple of days ago in brussels with the iran prime minister, reiterating that this is a very good deal for world security and this basically stops iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. at least until 2025. it is
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ten years. but obviously hardliners in the us and president trump are unhappy with this and they want to get rid of it. how far this might go i have no idea but things are getting pretty serious. president trump is saying that this is the last time he will waive sanctions on iran because of the nuclear deal and he wants to start re—negotiating the deal. renegotiating two things he wa nts deal. renegotiating two things he wants done. 0ne deal. renegotiating two things he wants done. one is to bring iran ‘s nuclear missile programme into this deal, which it isn't. it is a separate thing. and also he wants a lot of the limitations in the nuclear deal to be indefinite. at the moment they are ten years duration of 15 years duration for each part of this deal and so he once indefinite duration is for limitations on iran ‘s nuclear
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activities. irani and saying that this is not negotiable and that the missile is not part of this and they are not going to be drawn into this. but the fact is that the europeans are also unhappy about iran ‘s missile programme, for example, and they very much would like iran to come forward and start talking about it and find a solution to the missile programme so the europeans are ina missile programme so the europeans are in a difficult position really. the liberal democrat leader, sir vince cable, has said the government should not bail out the construction company carillion, after fears it's close to collapse. the group employs about 20—thousand people in the uk and is one of the government's key contractors.
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it's run up £1.5 billion of debt, and is discussing a rescue plan with investors. sir vince said that taxpayers should not foot the bill. it has 43,000 employees, 20,000 in the uk and many more who work as subcontractors so a massive industry that has taken on a large amount of contracts. it has been losing money because of bad decisions made in the middle east and now the government has a very big dilemma. a cannot allow the whole of the supply chain to collapse and it cannot allow these contracts to be unfulfilled, but at the same time it cannot possibly just bail out but at the same time it cannot possiblyjust bail out the company because then you have a position where the private sector is allowed to privatise profits but then the government nationalises the losses, the problem we have with the banks, so the problem we have with the banks, so they cannot just the problem we have with the banks, so they cannotjust bail out out. they have to force the shareholders and creditors and the big banks to ta ke and creditors and the big banks to take losses so the government can ta ke take losses so the government can take responsibility for taking the contracts forward and making sure they are delivered. that was vince cable talking to breakfast a little earlier. dentists have accused the government of not doing enough to tackle tooth decay in children in england.
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new figures indicate there were nearly 43,000 operations to remove children's teeth last year, a i7% increase on four years ago. ministers say a new tax on sugary drinks from april will help to reduce the number of extractions, but the british dental association says england provides a second—class service compared to scotland and wales. 0ur health correspondent dominic hughes reports. tooth decay in children is distressing, painful and avoidable. dentists say sugary snacks and drinks are the biggest cause. british children drink more soft drinks than anywhere else in europe and the number of multiple extractions which have to take place in hospital under a general anaesthetic is continuing to grow. figures compiled by the local government association show there were nearly 43,000 multiple to the extractions among under—18s in england last year. that's around 170 every day of the working week. 0verall, there's been an increase of i7% injust four years. dentists say children in england are suffering and are being offered a second—rate service when compared to scotland and wales. we have seen in scotland
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and in wales that they have got national programmes to try and prevent this and they have actually got reasonably good results out of it. the government has not put any money into a national prevention programme for england and that's the reason why we are seeing so many children being put under general anaesthetic. the department of health in england says the introduction of attacks on sugary drinks is part of its plan to reduce the number of extractions and that more than half of all children have seen a dentist in the last year. and, with proper oral hygiene, good brushing and avoiding high sugar snacks and drinks, thousands of children could be saved from experiencing the pain of a rotten tooth. dominic hughes, bbc news. well, earlier, ispoke to claire stevens who's president of the british society of paediatric dentistry.
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i asked her if she was shocked by today ‘s figures. i asked her if she was shocked by today 's figures. i work as an nhs co nsulta nt today 's figures. i work as an nhs consultant in my dayjob and i am routinely removing multiple teeth, sometimes in children as young as two years old. dentures for teenagers? unfortunately so. when we are losing adult teeth in significant numbers sometimes the only treatment option we have available is to provide false teeth for 14—year—old children. available is to provide false teeth for 14-year-old children. that sounds quite victorian and something we would associate more with the 19305 we would associate more with the 1930s and the 1940s than the modern age. it shouldn't be happening in this modern day and age, a special we are talking about a disease that is almost always preventable. what other causes? it is simplistic to say it is down to sugary drinks and snacks. they certainly have a part to play and we know we over consume these, particularly our children and young people cost some so it is about reducing the consumption and
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keeping sugary foods to a minimum and certainly at a mealtime and not in the hour before bed but it is also about getting fluoride onto teeth, brushing twice a day and spitting out and not rinsing and the third component is about access. we need to encourage children into nhs dentistry as soon as that there's deep come through so the bridge society of paediatric dentistry is calling for that. talking to your collea g u es calling for that. talking to your colleagues in the profession, to what extent do children not go to the dentist because their children —— their parents are not going? there is evidence to support that statement so we would like to encourage the whole family into nhs dentistry. parents should remember that nhs dentistry for children is free and it is also free for expectant mothers and those in the first year after giving birth to a baby. observations there on those new figures about child dental
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health. nottingham railway station has now reopened. yesterday's fire at nottingham train station is now being treated as arson, police have confirmed. the blaze began early yesterday morning. ten fire crews tackled flames coming from the station's roof, as smoke filled the foyer, causing a full evacuation. east midlands trains now say that repairs could take months rather than weeks. historic areas have survived the fire. supporters of south africa's governing party, the african national congress, have gathered to hear cyril ramaphosa give his first major speech since being elected as leader of the party. the south african deputy president, who was voted as leader last month, has called for unity in the party to bring about social change. mr ramaphosa began his speech in the last hour, and said the party's new leadership will be dedicated to equality and democracy for south africa. we ta ke we take this opportunity to reaffirm the anc ‘s commitment to the values and the principles to which so many
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of our legends dedicated their lives. our organisation belongs to you, the people of south africa. the anc is the parliament of the people of south africa and it is our duty as members of the anc to safeguard and nurture this heritage that we we re and nurture this heritage that we were given by our forebears. and nurture this heritage that we were given by ourforebears. the core idea is the reason for the existence of the anc, is the creation of a united, nonracial, nonsexist democratic and prosperous and equitable society in our country. as its newly elected
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leadership we connect ourselves to you, that we shall remain faithful and diligent custodians of this glorious vision and heritage of our people. cyril ramaphosa. the headlines on bbc news: the african union demands an apology from president trump for derogatory remarks he reportedly made about the continent. the lib dems urge the government not to bail out the construction company karelian that employs about 20,000 people. dentists are warning of a tooth decay crisis amongst children in england. a record 43,000 operations to remove rotting teeth were carried out last year. consumers can no longer be charged extra for paying by credit or debit card under new laws from today. it is hoped the ban will benefit shoppers and holidaymakers who buy goods online or in small stores, but some retailers have already said
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they will raise overall prices in response to the change. joe lynam reports. we've all seen them. the extra little fees added at the very end of the buying process. in percentage terms it may not sound like a lot, but card surcharges add up, until today. under a new eu directive retailers on or off—line can no longer charge customers for paying with a credit or debit card. the treasury says this surcharges cost uk consumers £166 million annually, but some companies, such as concert venues, can still charge a booking or service fee. this is a significant win for consumers. no longer will they be penalised just for paying by credit or debit card. not all companies will increase prices. we have to wait and see how they react to the law that is being introduced and see whether or not prices go up. if prices do go up consumers can vote with their feet, and shop around and find the best deals for them. some retailers, such as this delivery firm just eat, say they will impose new costs on customers who pay by card. others may simply raise prices.
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so not all consumers will be better off. tributes have been paid to the comedy actress bella emberg, who has died aged 80. she became a household name in the 1980s on the russ abbot show, playing characters including blunder woman, the sidekick of hapless superhero cooperman. russ abbot called her a huge comedy talent, while les dennis said she was a funny, lovely friend. a number of celebrities and friends of bella emberg have taken to twitter to pay their respects. the author and comedian, michael moran, described her as one of a kind. gone, but not forgotten, posting a picture of her alongside russ abbot as blunderwoman. the actor and songwriter, bobby crush, tweets, such sad news. we've been chums since appearing together in a summer show with russ abbot at the princess theatre, torquay in 1981. a genuinely nice woman, and despite her fierce
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on—stage characterisations, a truly gentle soul. actor and comedian, jon challis, joins the tributes with a picture of bella as blunderwoman and the caption, sad news. goodbye to bella emberg. and the actor and comedian, bobby davro, tweets, so sad to hear of bella emberg's passing. she was such a wonderful lady. a true comedy talent and a friend. rip bella #comedylegend. bella emberg appeared alongside the actor and comedian les dennis in the russ abbot show. four british friends have broken the world record and become the fastest ever to cross the atlantic ocean in a rowing boat. the amateur crew, dubbed the four 0arsmen, made history when they reached the island of antigua just after 1.30am this morning, having spent 29 days at sea and beating the previous record
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by six days. and here they go! shouting the end of an epicjourney road in record time, four man who had not even been in a rowing boat 18 months ago not only challenge winners but the first to cross the atlantic in less than 30 days. it feels overwhelming. the challenge as we said before is just relentless, never ending pain, just rowing, the whole thing, but coming first is something that is beyond our wildest dreams. they left the canary islands 3,000 miles away and faced 40 foot waves, scorching sun and howling winds, not quite the apocalypse but a test of endurance for the four 0arsmen. surviving on rations, producing their own water,
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taking it in turns to eat, to sleep, and to row. it is amazing to complete the row. we set out as a charitable initiative, for two charities, mind, and spinal research. the mind element is commemorative of my mum and her struggle with her health. to do it suchjustice and do it in such style and with such great support and great success is amazing. just making it to the caribbean is a fantastic achievement but they have raised more than £0.25 million and have rowed their way into the record books. dan johnson, bbc news. good morning, and great news for british tennis, today, because, johanna konta says she has recovered from the hip injury that disrupted her preparations for the australian open which starts
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on monday in melbourne. the british number one, who is seeded ninth, plays american madison brengle in the first round, and is aiming to reproduce the form that took her to the semifinals two years ago. iam coming i am coming into this year with slightly different challenges than i was at the end of last year so i feel actually very conscious of really appreciating being back playing and almost, almost being grateful for the challenges that i have now and almost working through the challenges that i faced at the end of last year and trying to really just get end of last year and trying to reallyjust get back into the match routine of things and trying to get back at playing at the level i want to be playing at consistently. the players steered clear of the controversy about a controversy around a name of a court. controversy about a controversy
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around a name of a courtlj controversy about a controversy around a name of a court. i will play or what ever caught they put me. idid play or what ever caught they put me. i did not even think about it so lam not me. i did not even think about it so i am not even thinking. the last thing i will be thinking about is this issue. you cannot ask me this question. that is up to the tournament. it is not up to me, whether i say yes or no it will still not be up to me so i have to deal with the hand you are dealt. still not be up to me so i have to deal with the hand you are dealtlj just love this tournament and i will play on any court that they schedule me on. i am just happy to be hearing to this opportunity. novak djokovic says his elbow injury, has not yet healed 100%, but is at the level where he can hand out sweets to the media, as is his tradition and compete at the tournament. the six—time champion, who has not played since wimbledon, has been assured he will cause no further damage by competing.
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i haven't had this long of a break everin i haven't had this long of a break ever in my career so i haven't had this long of a break ever in my career so i am just glad to be back playing tennis and having the opportunity to compete yet again ina big the opportunity to compete yet again in a big tournament. i have missed it. at the same time i had a good time playing with my family and also ican take time playing with my family and also i can take a different look at my game and my body and just an overall strategy on howl game and my body and just an overall strategy on how i want to move forward. after their thrashing in the ashes, england have a chance of revenge, in the one day version of the game. starting tomorrow in melbourne, and captain eoin morgan, says the specialist one—day players, will lift the rest of the england side as they face australia again. understandably they have been, i suppose, down with the fate of the test tour which is disappointing but happy with the energy a lot of the quys happy with the energy a lot of the guys have brought in from coming from big bash at home or playing in
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bangladesh previously i think it is very important for the squad in the series and i suppose it has always been given that you play on the back of such a significant test match series and guys know the responsibility that they carry. you know, if they are feeling fresh, to pick eyes up along the way. defending champions europe trail asia by a point going into sunday's singles. they had been ahead after winning the first three foursomes this morning. but the asian team came back strongly and when bernd wiesberger and ross fisher missed this putt at the 17th, asia went ahead six and half points to five and a half. that is all your support for now and 110w that is all your support for now and now it is time for the weather. the great and cloudy theme that has been with us for several days is sticking around during the course of the week. there will be glimpses of
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brightness here and there. this has been sent in from the isle of wight and shows the extent of cloud there. for the rest of the weekend we will keep the cloudy conditions and there is rain around in the north west in particular later today. we have had that rain working into western parts of the country. we have this east/ west split because high—pressure holds on which is sitting across scandinavia at the moment and it keeps things largely dry and the bump —— the front bumps into that area of a high pressure but it is not getting further east. many areas will continue to see rain into the afternoon whereas further ease it will stay dry. still pretty cloudy and grey and breezy were you are. particularly breezy way you have the rain as well. temperatures 5—9 degrees. it stays rather cool,
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special wave had the breeze. tonight the breeze starts to die away and also the rain fizzles away towards the west as well. with a combination of lighter winds and some clear spells, it could be colder than it was last night and our towns and cities are down at three and four and it is a touch colder than that in the countryside. 0n and it is a touch colder than that in the countryside. on sunday another mostly dry day for many parts of the country and a lot of cloud once again but some brighter spells on sunday afternoon but things turn wet and windy in the north—west in the afternoon. it is still met relatively mild on sunday. things change on the working week as the colder conditions gradually move in through the course of next week. 0n in through the course of next week. on monday we see the front heading south and east across the country. a speu south and east across the country. a spell of wet and windy weather, followed by clearer spells with sunshine and showers. temperatures still relatively mild on monday but it starts to turn colder from the
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north—west later on. a different thing to our weather next week. watch out for ice and snow next week. hello, and a very warm welcome to dateline london. this week we discuss the future of the iranian nuclear deal, as president trump says he'll tolerate it forjust a few more months. what impact will that have inside the country, where xxx are in prison? and as two key british cabinet ministers made brexit pleas in germany, was anyone in the eu listening? my guests this week: the french journalist agnes poirier, from the magazine marrianne, the american writer and broadcaster jeffrey kofman, the iranian writer, broadcaster, and journalist amir taheri, and the british political commentator and writer adam raphael. welcome to you all. the iran nuclear deal survives, at least for a few more months. president trump has declared
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he will extend sanctions relief for iranjust once more, giving european countries what he called ‘a last chance' to fix ‘terrible flaws' in the 2015 deal. for example, the white house wants signatories to agree permanent restrictions on iran's uranium enrichment — currently they expire in a sunset clause in 2025. and the administration has announced 14 new targeted sanctions against individuals and entities. amir, all other signatories say this deal is working, ...so so what does this stance from president trump mean, do you think? years trying to link the deal to two other
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