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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 19, 2018 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a breakthrough in the battle against cancer — scientists find a potential "affordable" and "universal" blood test. the new trial detects eight forms of the disease. it's been described as a step towards one of the biggest goals in medicine. good morning, it's friday the 19th of january. also this morning: accused of holding their 13 children in shackles at their california home, david and louise turpin plead not guilty. to charges of torture, false imprisonment, and abuse. prisoners accessing drugs and a growing use of drones — a report into conditions at liverpool prison says it's "dirty, infested and hazardous". plans to shake up the uk's cash machine network could leave many remote areas with no access to cash. but with cards and contactless payments, do we still need them?
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in sport, edmund defies the heat to win in melbourne. he's through to the fourth round for the first time after a 5—set win. i want to be a pilot. i want to be a game designer. i want to be a maths teacher. from sports stars to social media icons, we'll find out what thousands of children said when they were asked to draw their future careers. and matt has the weather. good morning. i certainly am, i have come in search of snow and i have found it, what is of the showers again today across parts of north—west england, northern ireland scotla nd north—west england, northern ireland scotland and in southern scotland there could be some issues later. i will have all of the details in your full forecast in the next 15 minutes. maps, thank you. —— mat. good morning. first, our main story. scientists in the us are close
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to a major cancer breakthrough, after trials for a new universal blood test detected eight common forms of the disease. overall, the test found 70% of the cancers but researchers say more work is needed to verify its accuracy. here's our health correspondent james gallagher. love and 14 million people find out they have cancer each year worldwide. the sooner they are diagnosed, the more likely they are to survive. the test, called cancerseek, is a new approach that looks a mutated dna and protein that tumours release into the bloodstream. it was tested on eight common times of cancer including ovarian, pancreatic and lung, and in the study on more than 1000 patients, note have cancer, the test correctly diagnosed seven in 10 patients. the research is atjohn hopkins university in 0lesen will say more work is needed and a starting trials to see if the test can find cancers in seemingly healthy people. they say such test
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can have an enormous impact on cancer mortality. expert in the uk said the approach had massive potential. the research is's vision is an annual test that can catch cancer early and save lives. we'll be speaking to cancer research about this in just over half an hour. a couple from california who are accused of abusing their 13 children have pleaded not guilty to charges of abuse, torture and false imprisonment. david and louise turpin were arrested on sunday after one of their children escaped through a window of their home. police found them severely malnourished, with some in shackles. 0ur north america correspondent james cook reports. that is give up that right... david turpin appearing in court to deny torturing his own children and sexually abusing one of his young daughters. his wife, louise, also pleaded not guilty. prosecutors say
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—— prosecutors say the siblings endured the abuse for years as their parents plumbed the depths of human depravity. one of the children at age 12 is the weight of an average 7—year—old. several of the victims have cognitive impairment and neuropathy, which is nerve damage, as a result of this extreme and prolonged physical abuse. the children were supposedly schooled here in their home but the district attorney said they lacked basic knowledge. some didn't even know what a police officer was. they were reportedly allowed to showerjust once a year and were beaten, chained up and tormented. the 17—year—old who raised the alarm after climbing out of the home through a window had been plotting the escape for two years. one of her sisters made it out with her, but turned back out of fear. this case has sent waves of revulsion across the united states and beyond. the authorities say the siblings are doing well, but some of them at least have almost certainly suffered irreparable physical and mental damage. the parents are due in court again next month.
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if convicted, they face life in prison. funds earmarked to help transform the nhs have instead been spent on managing existing pressures — that's according to a report from the national audit office. in 2017, trusts received more than three billion pounds of additional cash injections, on top of already allotted funding, to help fund day—to—day activities. it isa it is a growing pressures and surging demand had caused a reallocation of resources. production in the historical rate of funding, the level of savings and efficiencies that local authorities are delivering isn't quite fitting that and then you have demands and pressures in terms of the amount of activity that patients are presenting with at hospitals and clinics. two fishermen are missing after their boat capsized off the coast of western scotland. lifeboats were launched after receiving a distress signal off argyll and bute
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yesterday evening. royal navy divers have been helping in the search. another man who was rescued is recovering in hospital. living conditions at liverpool prison are the worst that inspectors have ever seen, according to a new report. her majesty's prison and probation service said it's already taken immediate action by appointing a new governor and that cleanliness has also improved. 0ur health correspondent adina campbell reports. dirty, infested, and hazardous — these are conditions hundreds of inmates are facing at liverpool prison. according to a new report by the prison watchdog. as well as problems with rats, broken windows, and blocked toilets, it is also found two thirds of inmates had easy access to drugs. 0ften smuggled by the growing use of drones with more than one seized every week. and violence had also increased, more
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than one third of prisoners said they felt unsafe at the time of the inspection. i was horrified when i read this report. it is the worst report i have ever seen into a british prison and that is the assessment too of the inspectorate team, they said these were the worst living conditions for prisoners that they had ever experienced. her majesty ‘s prison and probation service acknowledged that the conditions at the prison were unacceptable. it said it has already taken immediate action by appointing a new governor and that cleanliness has also improved. it also says it has also improved. it also says it has put a huge amount of energy and money into trying to improve the prison healthcare service air. inspect and took place in september last year but last month, whistleblowers told the bbc that inmates at liverpool prison had died or been injured due to poor care.
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which lancashire care nhs foundation trust has apologised for. today's report comes after the government was ordered to make immediate improvements to nottingham prison over safety concerns. eight men there are believed to have taken their own lives in two years. borisjohnson has proposed building a 22—mile bridge across the english channel. he believes another link would further improve relations between the two countries. he made the suggestion at a meeting with the president of france, yesterday. he believes the fact that two countries are interconnected by one railway line in that is crazy, he proposed a new fixed link across the channel. increasing costs on the build of the uk's new aircraft carrier programme is putting the budgets of other defence projects at risk, according to mp5. a public accounts committee report said the programme, which includes two new carriers costing 6 billion pounds, is hugely complex and costly. the mod said that it was committed to keeping costs down.
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the british author peter mayle, who wrote a year in provence has died, aged 78. the book, published in 1989, told the story of his first year as a british expat in a village in the south of france. in 2002, the french government awarded him a knight of the legion of honourfor his contributions to culture. the crew of an antarctic research expedition has a new team member. the scientists were out collecting water samples, when up popped an adelie penguin. the curious bird had a quick look around, decided it wasn't for him, and jumped back in to the icy water. the crew was from the australian antarctic program. why not? what a lovely visit! a temporary crewmember. it was like a bus in the old days, you jump on and youjump off again. bus in the old days, you jump on and you jump off again. yeah, that his
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fare. do you know what i'm talking about or not? it is going to be one of those mornings, isn't it? can you feel that? so you have got news for us, australia... and one extreme to the other into temperatures there. it has big news for great britain in tennis, kyle edmund 49 in the world has gone further than ever before, and what's more, in heat that when nudging a0 celsius. that is the sort of you currently set out in but to play a five set tennis match, while! how long did it take? 0ver play a five set tennis match, while! how long did it take? over two hours, a long—time out in the heat. despite the heat, kyle edmund is through to the fourth round of the australian open for the first time, beating the georgian nikoloz basilashvili. the 23—year—old came back from a mid—match slump to win in a match which lasted for 3.5 hours. sorry, not 2.5! it means he's now through to the last 16. england's second one day international against australia is underway in brisbane.
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the hosts won the toss and chose to bat. joe root‘s taken two wickets. a century from aaron finch and 36 from mitch marsh has helped australia to 213 — five at a0 overs. ronnie 0'sullivan says he's glad that he's out of the uk masters tournament at alexandra palace because he's been struggling with illness. he was beaten 6—1 by mark allen, and said he didn't feel physically strong enough to go on and win the tournament anyway. and there'll be eight uncapped players in eddiejones‘ england squad as they begin the defence of their six nations title away to italy on february a. the head coach says number eight billy vunipola is likely to miss the whole tournament with injury. ina in a moment in the papers, sports stars that have named after their sport or have similar names to the actual sport. it is quite funny, actually. thank you. i was just thinking of your surname. what you
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could do with sport. good on you. have a think. matt has the weather for is from the cumbrian village of shap, where there's been up to 15cm of snow. by by the end of the day, while we actually see you because you could well be buried by all of the snow coming down. good morning. good morning. ifully you coming down. good morning. good morning. i fully you will still see me, afew morning. i fully you will still see me, a few showers over me but good morning from cumbria. you come outside the village of shap onto the hills to find some sophie due this morning. for those who have not seen it so far this week, there have been plenty around. of course through wednesday night into thursday morning up here in cumbria we saw six inches of snow fall and that led to all sorts of trouble problems. a six was shot, closed for a time, an important route and in fact you for the m6 behind me was built in the 70s, the m6 behind me was built in the 705, it the m6 behind me was built in the 70s, it was the only route between north—west england and scotland, the main route, i should say. still a few problems this morning because of
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ice across the uk, both will become a little less problematic into next week as things turned that little bit more mild but certainly as far as today is concerned, if you take a look at the forecast for today, it is one that is still very, very wintry, a forecast today is one of sunny spells of some of you, particularly in the south and east of the uk but to the north and west we have lots of snow showers around once again. to of the uk but to the north and west we have lots of snow showers around once again. to those of the uk but to the north and west we have lots of snow showers around once again. to those of of the uk but to the north and west we have lots of snow showers around once again. to those of you of the uk but to the north and west we have lots of snow showers around once again. to those of you in south—west scotland in particular, the snow flurries could be quite nasty through this morning and during the day, because it up to 20 centimetres of snow across some parts of south—west scotland. eastern scotland should be fine, some snow flurries in north—west england but what eastern and southern england it is a fine and bright start. tom frost is around extensively after clear skies through the night. a chilly start here compared to what we saw yesterday but for the south—west, bills and showers in south—west england and wales, some snow mixed in with them over the high ground but the most of us it is rain, sleet
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and the odd rumble of thunder. some hail perhaps as well. heavy snow showers moving across the north of the moment and snow showers coming and going all day. scotland, north—west england, a big problem to you this morning will be the risk of ice. what an icy start to the day. the snow showers becoming more frequent across parts of northern scotla nd frequent across parts of northern scotland during the day, into north—west england and northern ireland, and because of the odd shower elsewhere across southern and eastern parts of the uk, the further south you are the more likely the rest of the rain, hail and sleep but in between, some sunshine around and like recent days, temperatures 2— seven degrees but with a bit more breeze further north, it will fill colder than that with an added windchill. into tonight, there will bea windchill. into tonight, there will be a few changes taking place. showers for a time across the north but if anything they become a little less strong, temperatures drop may be down to —10 in a few spots, in the south—west and the south of the uk some clubs are outbreaks of rain and sleet and snow pushing into take
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us and sleet and snow pushing into take us into the start of the weekend. the saturday it will be a way, cold start across many southern areas. it will be some rain and maybe some sleet and snow mixed in. further north, bright and crisp, very cold, one 01’ north, bright and crisp, very cold, one or two snow flurries but if anything a dry day to many with lots of fun anything a dry day to many with lots offun time anything a dry day to many with lots of fun time around but across—the—board once of fun time around but across—the—boa rd once more. of fun time around but across—the—board once more. to the southern areas after the restart you may see a little bit of afternoon sunshine. to take it into sunday, a com pletely sunshine. to take it into sunday, a completely different day for all of us. completely different day for all of us. a weather front will moving from the west, eventually bringing mild air across the south—west of the uk but is it hits, particularly in the hills of scotland, even to lower levels at times you could see and briefly a few worries in the hills of southern england before temperatures warm up as it turns back to rain later on. i know that is something that naga didn't want to see but it looks like sunday will turn but across the country and it ta kes turn but across the country and it takes us into milder conditions for next week. more details through the morning. at least you are appeasing
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me with the milder conditions. are they the gloves with the holes in them? i thought i couldn't wear them again, so they are safely stowed away for another time. we have been admiring them. they are very smart. see you later. let's take a look at today's papers. starting with the front pages. the sun showing prince william's new haircut. that did not cost £180. that's the story. it is also on the front page of the daily mirror. that's the kind of haircut my mum would say, i could have done that for you! the mirror reporting it could reach epidemic proportions, the flu epidemic. we will hear some of the details later. sticking with the royal theme, on
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the times we have a picture of meghan markle and prince harry, who are getting married later this year of course. and britain's should consider building a bridge to france, says borisjohnson. he says to link britain and france. 0f course that would be on top of the channel tunnel. i don't know if you are looking at this story, what is happening here? they are looking at insider dealing which we know is when you act on share price movements because you've got an insight, you know what might be happening in that firm. this is a suggestion in the times that an insider deal is being overlooked and a city trader is not paying as much attention as they should be. they are saying it's a white—collar crime and very complicated, so maybe they aren't investing enough, what it's a very interesting story. especially given the pressure put on institutions in the wake of the financial crisis. on the front page of the telegraph, "we were saying about boris johnson
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of the telegraph, "we were saying about borisjohnson calling for a breach, he hasn't specifically said that's what he is talking about but he has said it is absurd that there is only one load of infrastructure linking europe with the uk. we will be talking more about that this morning. what are you looking at, mike? that sounded a bit rude, sorry. i was looking at the papers, honestly! the big transfer saga of the summer looks like it could come to an end today, with alexis sanchez possibly being announced as a manchester united player, joining from arsenal. you know it is on —— imminent when fans are getting hold ofan imminent when fans are getting hold of an official shirts with the name of an official shirts with the name of the player on the back. it is suggested in the express that manchester united hope to sign him in time to play burnley tomorrow. £180 million, by the way. isn't it
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usually the surname that's on the back of the shirts? yes, but i think with some south american names they used the first. the other one is sports stars that are named after their sport. yesterday at the australian open the number of... the 201a champion stan wawrinka was knocked out by a man named tennys. when he is out in public he has a different name. so if he is ordering coffee he doesn't say, for tennys, please. why not? i suppose it is embarrassing! looking at other sports stars, usain bolt, bolt of lightning. this is great. the award goes to the bulgarian hurdler whose name is
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stumbleover. that's fabulous! hats off for that one. there's no way i can follow that. but i really like this story in the guardian. this is waterston is. their profits are up 80%. everyone has written off physical books because of e—readers and kindles. well, they say they are now still after physical books. so their profits are 80%. so a revival on the high street and of course they are big high—street name, so things looking good because e—readers have come and gone, apparently. how happy to we feel when we entered the office in the morning? good. just the best... clearly it depends who you are working with. where is
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this going? a p pa re ntly this going? apparently open plan offices make as miserable and they affect employee job satisfaction and the reason is because you are surrounded by others, with other people comes accompanying noise and food smells, so accompanying noise and food smells, so it increases stress levels, sick leave, you are better off having your own office and researchers are calling this a way to better enjoy the working day. we often look very abandoned in our open offices. that's why we get on well. as was the ——i that's why we get on well. as was the —— i suppose it depends on individual. i would feel isolated in a own office. what with a door that won't open from inside? thanks! thank you very much. since 201a, uk employees have had the right to ask for flexible working, which can include cutting down hours, working from home
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orjob sharing. but less than half of parents feel flexible working is an option for them according to the charity working families, who is calling on the government to do more to help parents achieve a work—life balance. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent nina warhurst reports. should alljobs work around our families or should our families should alljobs work around our families or should ourfamilies be built around our jobs? families or should ourfamilies be built around ourjobs? for katie the crunch came when she had her daughter. in her global marketing role there wasn't an option to go part—time and stay in glasgow and after 12 years with the same company she took redundancy. it is hard because you have given an awful lot of who you are to this one job and suddenly you are out of that, almost cast out, not intentionally. it is difficult to know who you are, where you are going next, what do i do now? kaytie has now set up a craft shop and she loves it, but can't help wondering what might have been.
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since 201a if you worked for more than six months you would be entitled to ask for flex of working. so that might be few hours, maybe working from home or perhaps a job share. but your employer has been allowed to say no if they found it is detrimental to their business and that, combined with a slow cultural shift in some places, means not eve ryo ne shift in some places, means not everyone feels it is working for them. more than half of parents survey felt flexible working is in the gentle option for them. nearly two in five said their current hours mean they don't get to say good night to their kids. and more than 13% said they are working the equivalent hours of an extra day a week just to equivalent hours of an extra day a weekjust to get equivalent hours of an extra day a week just to get their equivalent hours of an extra day a weekjust to get theirjob done. but things are changing for some at least. five kids meansjohn needs of a job that works for him and he has founded. he starts at 9:30am every day and doesn't work school
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holidays. does that mean things are nice and carberry to an?|j holidays. does that mean things are nice and carberry to an? i wouldn't say that, but things are less stressful. less stressful for staff and thejobs stressful. less stressful for staff and the jobs is stressful. less stressful for staff and thejobs is betterfor the business. productivity has gone up by 30%. business. productivity has gone up by 3096. we found a lot of mothers and fathers at home have got unix skills and capabilities, but no access to childcare or it's too expensive and they've never thought about working for temp working. this way they can do both. the government told us: kaytie says getting to pick her children up every day is the best job she's ever had, but she hopes that if they become parents it won't come at the cost of compromising their careers.
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nina joins us now on the sofa. good morning. asking the question pa rt good morning. asking the question part of the process, our people worried about asking for it in the first place? whether or not he can happen or be approved, people worry about even asking the question? what the study shows is the legislation is in place and employers are ready, but there's not been a cultural shift. 0ften but there's not been a cultural shift. often people raise their eyebrows if people have a long lunch 01’ eyebrows if people have a long lunch or coming late and this is asking for a shift from flexi being the norm and the onus is on the employer to prove it is detrimental on the business, rather than you to prove it will be good for the business. maybe fulsome all businesses... i know you've tried. hr can prove quite expensive, but as we saw with company in glasgow overall productivity went up and people were
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allowed to squash their workload into four days. when people are happier they tend to stay longer, so you have the lower turnover. there's a lwa ys you have the lower turnover. there's always that barrier. you are a bit cautious when you ask. how do you ask positively? you almost feel like you have to sell it. absolutely. the first thing is to know your rights. if you have been a full—time employee for six months or more you can ask for it and then they have to prove that it is detrimental. if they want to do that they also have to offer you an appeals process and you can be that person in your office who makes a massive difference for everyone. but it is scary to be the first to be that pioneer, so maybe talk to your collea g u es pioneer, so maybe talk to your colleagues are you can approach your boss together. it is an important issue but it has put a seed in my mind just to ask. you never know! just too rattled cage! —— too rattled cage! time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. residents of flats in the shadow of grenfell tower say it's not fair that kensington and chelsea council plan to make them start paying rent and service charges again as of this sunday. people living in the walkway blocks on the lancaster west estate say there are still exposed gas pipes and they have issues with plumbing, rubbish chutes and intermittent heating and hot water. kensington and chelsea council say they will look at the issue. a family's bid for a fresh inquest into the death of their son, who's body was found at michael barrymore's home in essex, has been denied. stuart lubbock‘s body was discovered in the entertainer‘s swimming pool in essex in 2001. mr barrymore was arrested, but police later admitted his detention was unlawful and damages were paid. mr lubbock‘s father had believed new evidence could've overturned the original open verdict. a former boxing champion from south—east london has been
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charged with a terror offence. anthony small, seen here at the height of his boxing career, is accused of encouraging acts of terrorism in connection with a video posted on social media in september last year. 13 more tube stations are to be made more accessible for people with disabilities. it's all part of a drive to make a0% of the network step free by 2022. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there's a good service across all lines. 0n the trains, problems on c2c, where there is a replacement bus replacement service running between pitsea and grays because of a power failure. 0n the roads, this is the a13, which is slow moving westbound from dagenham to barking. in old street, the a501 city road is closed in both directions between the old street roundabout and britannia walk because a burst water main. let's have a check on the weather now. it's another fairly breezy day ahead
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of us and you will probably notice quite a drop in temperature this morning as well. maybe there's a little bit of frost in more rural spots, but we have sunny spells on the way and it's looking like it should stay dry for many of us. you can never rule out the odd shower year—end fair, but quite a good deal of sunshine on offer today. a bit of a westerly wind and it could feel chilly in the wind, with temperatures only reaching six or seven celsius. towards this evening we will see some cloud building ahead of the frontal system that is bringing some rather wet and windy weather in from the west. temperatures getting down to freezing in some spots. so it may be there's a little bit of wintriness associated with a rain. it continues into tomorrow morning and doesn't really clear until lunchtime for many, or certainly further eastern parts. temperatures getting up to five or six celsius. a fairly cloudy
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and to the day, although brighter in some spots. sunday we have more wet and windy weather on the way, but temperatures are starting to rise. quite unsettled for monday too, but as you can see for the next couple of days down in single figures, getting up to 10—11dc by monday. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with naga and charlie. it's 6:30. scientists in the us are close to a major cancer breakthrough after trial three you universal blood tested detected a common forms of the disease. the test found 70% of the disease. the test found 70% of the cancers. although results are promising, more work is being needed to verify the accuracy of the test. a couple from california who are accused of abusing their 13 children have pleaded not guilty to charges
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of abuse, torture and false imprisonment. david and louise turpin were arrested on sunday after one of the siblings escaped through a window. police found them suffering from severe malnutrition, and some children were in shackles. several of the victims have cognitive impairment and nerve damage as a result of this extreme and prolonged physical abuse. none of the victims were allowed to shower more than once a year. increasing pressures on the nhs has meant that funding intended for transforming parts of the service, has been spent on day to day services, according to a report from the national audit 0ffice. record levels of demand means that repeated bail—outs to help the nhs cope with pressure on services and finances could become the "new normal". in 2017, trusts received more than three billion pounds of additional cash injections to help fund day—to—day activities. the reduction in that historical rate of funding, the level of savings and efficiencies that local authorities are delivering isn't quite offsetting that, and on top of that, you've got demand pressures in terms
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of the amount of activity that is — that patients are presenting with at hospitals and clinics. living conditions at liverpool prison are the worst that inspectors have ever seen, according to a new report. inspectors say living conditions at the jail are the worst they've ever seen. however, her majesty's prison and probation service said it's already taken immediate action by appointing a new governor and that cleanliness has also improved. borisjohnson has proposed building a 22—mile bridge across the english channel, saying he believes another link would further improve relations between the two countries. he made the suggestion at the meeting with the french president macron yesterday. a source close to the foreign secretary said he believed the fact the two countries are only connected by one railway line was "crazy". increasing costs on the build of the uk's new aircraft carrier programme is putting the budgets of other defence projects at risk, according to mp5. a public accounts committee report said the programme, which includes two new carriers
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costing 6 billion pounds, is hugely complex and costly. the mod said that it was committed to keeping costs down. the british author peter mayle, who wrote a year in provence has died, aged 78. the book, published in 1989, told the story of his first year as a british expat in a village in the south of france. in 2002, the french government awarded him a knight of the legion of honourfor his contributions to culture. those of the main stories. mike is here with news from the australian 0pen. and we are buzzing, but in this morning for british tennis because kyle edmund who is only 23 have gone further than he has ever gone before at the australian open and andy murray indeed tweeted this was the biggest win of his career and lots more he did it in temperatures nudging a0 degrees, five sets. 3.5 hours, incredible. round
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of the australian open for the first time after a gruelling five—set win over nikoloz basilashvili. let's speak now to our tennis correspondent russell fuller, and russell can you put into context, just how big a win, this is for edmund. it is another significant moment in his career, it isn't the first time he has been in the fourth round of the grand slam, he did that in new york in the us open 15 months ago, that he had the misfortune to run into novak djokovic at that stage. this time he has an opportunity to go further because his opponent in the fourth round, we don't know who it will be yet but somebody who is ranked and it could be a man about 1039 in turn 39 in the giant croatian ivo karlovic, even more than that, today was impressive because of the way that he found himself to sets to one down, brutal heat, the same for both players, but heat, the same for both players, but he came through and it was one game, not set, one game that lasted 20 minutes early in the fourth set
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which edmond one, a pivotal bill before pivotal game, 15 deuces and he got the decisive breakthrough and after that, he looked marginally stronger but he was —— it was mighty tight and played over 3.5 hours in temperatures of 39 celsius. incredible. pretty cold around the uk, lots of snow we know the heat affected johanna konta yesterday — give us a sense for you and the players how bad and brutal it has been. it has been brutal but not quite brutal enough of them to call off play. they have a scientific formula, it depends on the air temperature and when it gets to a0 people talk about the sort of area where there may be a suspension of play that you also have to have high levels of humidity and the humidity is not that high today. there is a little bit of a nice breeze as well from the north, which is the hot wind in australia, it ultimately you
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put all of those figures into their computer and it was safe to play in the opinion. 0ther computer and it was safe to play in the opinion. other players have spoken out about it, pile wasn't too fast, he said it is one of those things, i accepted fast, he said it is one of those things, iaccepted isn't fast, he said it is one of those things, i accepted isn't ideal but we have to play, l monfils and novak djokovic said yesterday after their match in the heat of the day that they felt conditions were right on they felt conditions were right on the limit of all limits, l monfils bourdy had mild heatstroke and he accepted that players are putting their health on the line without competing in conditions like this. russell, thank you indeed. good to see you have found a spot of shades there. it has been much more calm and brisbane to the second 1—day international, australia and england 1—day international is under way, the match is already intriguing. australia won the toss and chose to bat and were piling on the runs with aaron finch making a century of the bowlers are putting pressures on australia who are 237— six off a5
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overs. ronnie 0'sullivan says he's glad to be out of snooker‘s masters tournament. he was knocked out in the quarterfinals yesterday by northern ireland's mark allen, who won by 6 frames to 1. 0'sullivan, who has won the tournament a record seven times, revealed he was suffering with dizzy spells and double vision. and he may not feature at the world championships. he hasn't put thousands of miles on my clock, i like to book time on my clock and open to pressure and stress too well so there is other opportunities out there and i enjoy it and it is good fun and buy life is never been better because of it so you know that is just the way it is you know and if they want to play a tournament that they have to come knocking on my door if they want me that pat come and knock on my door talked to me if you don't be that bad and the other people that do stuff on my door talked to me if you don't want me that bad and the other
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people that do stuff for me as well you know? you know when to a feeling poorly you just want someone to an arm around your shoulder and get you to play in the world. it is nice to be wanted. quite unusual for a sports car to say that they were glad they were knocked out but if he was a footballer he wouldn't have been able to play but a snooker of courses and individual sport. he a lwa ys courses and individual sport. he always is what he means, doesn't it? we like that. and england's kyren wilson has joined mark allen in the last four. the world number 1a had a straightforward win against two times world champion mark williams. like allen, he won by six frames to one, and will play either judd trump or shaun murphy in the semis. arsenal manager arsene wenger says alexis sanchez is now likely to join manchester united. sanchez is close to signing a four—year deal at old trafford reportedly worth a staggering 180 million pounds. the deal could see united's henrikh mkhitaryan, move in the other direction. i have worked on transfers of 30 yea rs, i have worked on transfers of 30 years, you know, it is likely to happen at any moment, any minute, things can break down. it is how the
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transfer market is. so as long as it isn't over the line, due have to accept that it could not always happen, these kind of things are never guaranteed. rory mcilroy‘s back from injury and on a competitive golf course for the first time in three months. he shot a first round of 69 at the hsbc championship at abu dhabi yesterday, that was three shots behind england's tommy fleetwood, who shot a bogey free round of 66 to ta ke thejoint lead after the first round. some of the players are out on the course now, both fleetwood and mcilroy tee off just after 8 opclock this morning. —— o'clock this morning. now, an odd issue for a premier league football manager to have to deal with in a press conference, but burnley boss sean dyche has been forced to deny that he eats worms during training sessions. one of dyche's former team—mates said he often saw him eating earthworms and it was one of the reasons for dyche's gravelly voice, but the manager says it's all a bit of a misunderstanding. you get one of those nice, big juicy
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worm is hanging down the edge of your mouth and then, as if you are chewing it and, of course, wash your mouth out with water. a bit of ba nter mouth out with water. a bit of banter which was probably taken a bit too far, he is probably squealing and turning away but for the record i definitely do not eat worms. there you are, forced to deny. how could they make your voice gravelly though? good point. i don't imagine them to be squishy and, you know? are you going to try eating worms? in certain parts of the world you can eat deep—fried earthworms. i have only ever eaten a earwig. i have only ever eaten a earwig. i have eaten a locust. that is quite common. crunchy! should we stop now? stop it now? it is 6:a0 am. charlie has told us to stop talking! let's go back to the main story. scientists are a step closer to solving one of the biggest tests in medicine — a universal blood test for cancer diagnosis. doctors in the us say they've
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successfully trialled a method able to detect eight of the most common types, including breast, liver and lung cancers. the research is still at an early stage. professor richard marais is from cancer research uk. he can tell us more about this potential breakthrough. take us through the basics, what is the new and exciting part of this exciting discovery? we know that if we can detect and find cancer, we can save lives and so we have made this a priority and are investing in it. the problem is, the general population, how do you decide or detect who has his early cancers? so we need a blood test and a blood testis we need a blood test and a blood test is great because it is minimally invasive, cheap, and the idea here is with a blood test you can actually detect a broad range of cancers. so what is the latest identified because at the moment if you have a blood test you look at
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the white blood cell count and you see if you are sick. which may indicate cancer but it doesn't tell you which cancer. yeah. how is this different? when you have cancer, the cells die and release their dna into the blood and the dna is the genetic code of our life we is a genetic disease and so that dna in the blood can be detected and if you find the dna that has come from the, is it different from normal cancer so you can work out whether the patient has cancer. the other thing that this group did was looked at eight proteins that are commonly associated with cancer and measure does and the clever thing is that the only looked at the most common pieces of damage in the dna so we have 3 billion genetic letters, they only looked at 2000 and from those 2000 they were able to detect cancer in 7096 2000 they were able to detect cancer in 70% of the people they looked at. so looking forward from this point, and it is early stages because this
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isa and it is early stages because this is a trial ofjust over 1000 people, looking forward with this, how do you imagine that this change, the discovery they have made to be used in practice, say, in 10 years time, if it is proved to work? it will ta ke if it is proved to work? it will take a length of time. we need to prove that it does work. they looked at healthy people. if you have a cold or flu at healthy people. if you have a cold orflu or some other underlying condition, how will it affect the test? i look forward to a time in 10 yea rs test? i look forward to a time in 10 years when we all go to the pharmacy, we buy our shampoo, to give a blood test, and we get on with our lives. and the nhs is spending more money diagnosing and treating disease because if we can diagnose it early then we can treat it soon and we can save people ‘s lives. you say a length of time, what time period are you looking at, really? some of the tests, the blood test, already available to some cancers that they, there were only a few of them and they are specific, a
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particular kind of cancer, and it isn't early diagnosis, it is the measuring how people are responding to treatment. so we already know that these can work in the cancer setting and i think proving this early diagnosis will take probably five, six years at least. but then it looks like every year someone having...? it looks like every year someone having. . . ? every year or six months, you go and see your gp or ideally you go and see your gp or ideally you have done at the pharmacy. and you have done at the pharmacy. and you say it is cheap? $500, it is american barosso you say it is cheap? $500, it is american ba rosso £a50 you say it is cheap? $500, it is american barosso £a50 but it seems to me money well spent. in terms of nhs funding, how would you think...? about £a00 for a test and it may not total ca ncers about £a00 for a test and it may not total cancers but if it can cut 80% of them, it would be fantastic. very interesting. thank you very much your time this morning. pretty cold for most of us across
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the country. there are yellow warnings. and, northern ireland and northern england. lovely in the studio, but not where you are! a pretty cumbrian village where there has been 15 centimetres of snow? it just stopped snowing half an hour ago. good morning. we've come over to this village up on the hills. we saw 15 centimetres of snow on wednesday night. a few flurries this morning. we are trying our best here. let's call it a work they fear weather warnings in place. we've just had a met office and the weather warning issued, so be aware that could be problems to the south and east —— amber. we could see up to 30 centimetres, about 12 inches, of fresh snow. that could cause problems for the m77, m73 and m7a.
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let's have a look at the forecast. dry and sunny, if rather cold, especially further south and east. most of the showers will come to the north and west. more frequent in the morning rush—hour on the west of scotland. further east of scotland, clearer conditions and frosty. a sunny start. in scotland and north—east england, showers and icy conditions to start the day. much of the midlands, eastern and southern england, frosty start to friday morning. temperatures drop further last night than in recent nights and where there were showers yesterday the ground is damp. the prepared for icy conditions. to the south—west we have few showers at the moment. rain, sleet and hail through the day. a bit of snow at times, especially on higher ground. the northern ireland, frequent snow
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showers which could cause problems through the morning rush—hour. again leading to some pretty icy conditions on some of the roads and pavements. through the day, western scotland, northern ireland, north—west england most likely to see is no flurries. showers in wales and south—west england. the breeze will pick up through the day, so a couple of showers moving further east. many in eastern half of the country staying dry. temperatures about 2— seven degrees. colder in northern areas thanks to the strength of the wind. tonight we continue to have snow showers for a time in the north and west, but it will become less frequent and with clearer skies it will be a much colder night. parts of scotland could get down to minus ten. a difference to the south. cloud spreading in and bringing rain, sleet and maybe some snow to the higher ground. for saturday southern counties of england and wales start off grey and cold. quite damp as well, with patchy rain, sleet and
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maybe snow over higher ground. it will brighten up later. the couple of isolated showers after a very frosty start for not mostly dry, with sunshine. in the sunday and are more noticeable change across the country. a weather front pushing in off the atlantic which will bring widespread heavy rain towards the south—west of the country. cold air after a very frosty start. parts of scotland, northern england could be extensive snow for a time, turning back to rain later and further south we could have snow on the tops of the hills before it turns back to rain. what you will notice is temperatures in double figures quite widely as we finish sunday and that mild airwill widely as we finish sunday and that mild air will gradually take over the sunday night and into monday to ta ke the sunday night and into monday to take us into next week. for today, still cold and wintry and the amp weather warning has been issued through parts of south—west scotland —— amber weather warning. who is a little friend?
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it's a work in progress. isn't it just? it isn't ideal snowmaking stuff. seriously, you are blaming the snow? it's the wrong type? it's the wrong type? it is the wrong type. trust me. honestly. we are trying! it can only get better! get busy working on that. is it getting harder to find a cash machine? a p pa re ntly apparently it is increasingly difficult. a lot of people have got in touch to say cash machines have disappeared from their town or village. some of this is down to the closure of bank branches themselves and the cash machines attached to them close as well. this is particuarly a problem in more rural areas. at the moment, there are over 70,000 atms in the uk. the vast majority of them are free to use, but in some areas it's difficult to find one. new research shows over 100,000 people dont have one nearby.
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and it's rural areas that are worst hit. postcode pe32 in norfolk is the most populated area, home to 15,29a people, that doesn't have a cash machine. you can see the rest, somerset, kent and north yorkshire also badly affected. but why? david cavell is a retail banking consultant and joins me now. let's touch on free cash machines. we ta ke let's touch on free cash machines. we take them for granted, they aren't free at all. no, you have to buy the machine, maintain it, keep it replenished with cash, periodically it might go wrong. so there is a running cost, but traditionally most of that has been recovered through fees and third—party transactions through the machines. interchange fees are the amount they can charge the location.
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so with that cash machine is in a shop, they would pay a little sea to the shop to have there? the interchange really is the charge thatis interchange really is the charge that is made by the person handling the transaction to the bank that issued the card. i touched the fact that a lot of this problem is down to rank branches themselves closing —— bank. and that will only get worse? absolutely. we have the thinnest branch network in europe. we really have been closing branches ata we really have been closing branches at a rapid rate over the last 5— ten yea rs at a rapid rate over the last 5— ten years and of course the atms were an alternative, so they started to disappear, or a charge is levied for the use of atms, we have a double whammy that we don't want. how do we make sure those cash machines stay in the places where they are needed? as we touched on a aren't free, so who will bear that cost, to keep them in rural areas, for example? who will bear that cost, to keep them in ruralareas, for example?” understand that but you have to step back and the biggest you hear is an
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announcement was made and we don't fully understand the implications of it. you talked about 200 locations identified by which, where there would be real difficulties. we could be opening the floodgates. the fact is that the alternative methods of making payments, small payments, at the moment are not that widely used. there are still a8 million people using cash machines. nine out of ten of those used them once a month. link gave us those videos. so with that level of popularity and demand, i think there's got to be some really ha rd i think there's got to be some really hard thinking and evaluation before we can detract the existing network. just on those alternative payments, we are changing the way we pgy- payments, we are changing the way we pay. contactless, through our mobile phone. is this cash machine providers getting ahead of the game? i think it is. link are a world —class i think it is. link are a world—class organisation and they've done a lot of great work on
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financial inclusion in the last 12 yea rs. financial inclusion in the last 12 years. i think they've just made a mistake on this one and are moving too soon. we do have those alternatives, but they haven't yet insufficiently widely adopted. good to talk to you. thanks for explaining that. i will have more for you after 7am. thanks. "what do you want to do when you grow up?" grow up?" that was the question asked of 13,000 seven to 11 year olds in the uk, in the largest ever study of its kind. the charity education and employers asked children to draw their favoured future profession. they say the pictures offer a fascinating insight into early career aspirations, and how they are changing. tim muffett reports. # you can be the greatest...” # you can be the greatest... i want to bea # you can be the greatest... i want to be a pilot because it is really fascinating and i can explore the world. i wanted to be a surgeon
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since i was small? wire? because i wa nt since i was small? wire? because i want to help people. drawing their future. these pupils at a primary school in wembley were amongst 13,000 in the uk who took part in a remarkable survey. we wanted kids to draw their future aspirations. what they want to become. we wanted to understand what's going on in their heads, the ideas about the future. across the uk the most popular dream job amongst 7—11 the roles was a sports man or woman. more than a fifth of children through them, followed by teacher, then a vet, then a job in social media or gaming. i want to be a game designer because it seems like fun and i play a lot of games and i want to see how they are made. some might say this is very young to be thinking about a future career. what do you think? i think they are never too young. it's
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never too early. primary school is the right time for children to be forming good habits. they need a game plan. 0ne forming good habits. they need a game plan. one of the main conclusions from this study is that gender is very typing does begin early. four times as many boys chose an engineer as early. four times as many boys chose an engineerasa early. four times as many boys chose an engineer as a dream job compared to girls. twice as many boys drew a picture of a scientist. why this gender stereotype? why does it happen as young as devon?” gender stereotype? why does it happen as young as devon? i think that's when your assumptions and ideas start to shape. the kids who heard jobs through family and friends, that seems to be the biggest influence, basically. —— on their decisions. but those who didn't have the family access, they mainly heard about the jobs on the tv and social media. the school prides itself on challenging stereotypes and encourages pupils to think differently. this picture really sta nds think differently. this picture really stands out to me. simply because if they were 100 professions that you would say that rihanna would pick you would never think she
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would pick you would never think she would select being in the navy.” wa nt would select being in the navy.” want to try something new and i thought it would be interesting.” wa nt thought it would be interesting.” want them to have the skills and knowledge and the kind of... we can do attitude, so they will be able to pride themselves to lead the professions that are coming through. we will be talking a little more about dreams and what you want to —— wa nted about dreams and what you want to —— wanted to be when you were younger later. did you know that one in ten men between the ages of 18 and 3a now take their wife's surname when they get married? we will talk to a school teacher who has done just that. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. residents of flats in the shadow of grenfell tower say it's not fair that kensington and chelsea council
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plan to make them start paying rent and service charges again as of this sunday. people living in the walkway blocks on the lancaster west estate say there are still exposed gas pipes and they have issues with plumbing, rubbish chutes and intermittent heating and hot water. kensington and chelsea council say they will look at the issue. a family's bid for a fresh inquest into the death of their son, who's body was found at michael barrymore's home in essex, has been denied. stuart lubbock‘s body was discovered in the entertainer‘s swimming pool in essex in 2001. mr barrymore was arrested, but police later admitted his detention was unlawful and damages were paid. mr lubbock‘s father had believed new evidence could've overturned the original open verdict. a former boxing champion from south—east london has been charged with a terror offence. anthony small, seen here at the height of his boxing career, is accused of encouraging acts of terrorism in connection with a video posted on social media in september last year. 13 more tube stations are to be
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made more accessible for people with disabilities. among the stations to benefit include wimbledon, north ealing and northolt. it's all part of a drive to make a0% of the network step free by 2022. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there's a good service across all lines. 0n the trains, problems on c2c, where there is a replacement bus service running between pitsea and grays because of a powerfailure. 0n the roads, this is the a13 which is slow moving, westbound from dagenham to barking. in old street, the a501 city road is closed in both directions between the old street roundabout and britannia walk because a burst water main. let's have a check on the weather now. hello, there. it's another fairly breezy day ahead of us and you will probably notice quite a drop in the temperature this morning as well. maybe there's a little bit of frost in more rural spots, but we have sunny spells on the way
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and it's looking like it should stay dry for many of us. you can never rule out the odd shower here and there, but quite a good deal of sunshine on offer today. a bit of a westerly wind and it could feel chilly in the wind, with temperatures only reaching six or seven degrees celsius. towards this evening we will see some cloud building ahead of a frontal system that's bringing some rather wet and windy weather in from the west. temperatures getting down to freezing in some spots. so it may be there's a little bit of wintriness associated with that rain. it continues into tomorrow morning and doesn't really clear until lunchtime for many, or certainly further eastern parts. temperatures getting up to about five or six celsius. leaving a fairly cloudy end to the day, although brighter in some spots. sunday we have more wet and windy weather on the way, but the temperatures are starting to rise. quite unsettled for monday too, but as you can see for the next couple of days we're down in single figures,
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getting up to 10—11 by monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a breakthrough in the battle against cancer — scientists find a potential "affordable" and "universal" blood test. the new trial detects eight forms of the disease. it's been described as a step towards one of the biggest goals in medicine. good morning, it's friday the 19th of january. also this morning: accused of holding their 13 children in shackles at their california home, david and louise turpin plead not guilty. the worst flu season for seven years. public health england will tell us how they're planning to tackle it. but reform prisoners accessing drugs
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and the growing use of drone, a report into conditions at prisons said they are dirty, and hazardous. do loyalty cards have a future? changes to tesco's club card scheme provoked an angry response from customers. i'm looking at whether carrying all that plastic is still worth it. in sport, kyle edmund defies the heat to win at the australian 0pen. he's through to the fourth round for the first time after an epic win in a0—degree heat. i want to be a pilot. i want to be a game designer. i want to be a maths teacher. from sports stars to social media icons, we'll find out what thousands of children said when they were asked to draw their future careers. and matt has the weather. good morning, i've come up to the hills of cumbria in search of stone andi hills of cumbria in search of stone and i have found it. more wintry weather to come today. we kick off with an ever weather warnings are parts of south—west scotland. be
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prepared for further disruption and heavy showers. full details coming up heavy showers. full details coming up in15 minutes. first, our main story. scientists in the us are close to a major cancer breakthrough, after trials for a new universal blood test detected eight common forms of the disease. overall, the test found 70% of the cancers but researchers say more work is needed to verify its accuracy. here's our health correspondent james gallagher. more than 1a million people find out they have cancer each year worldwide. the sooner they're diagnosed, the more likely they are to survive. the test, called cancerseek, is a new approach that looks for mutated dna and proteins that tumours release into the bloodstream. it was tested on eight common times of cancer, including ovarian, pancreatic and lung. in the study, on more than 1,000 patients known to have cancer, the test correctly diagnosed seven in 10 patients. the researchers atjohns hopkins university in baltimore say more work is needed and are starting trials to see if the test can find cancers in seemingly healthy people.
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they say such tests could have an enormous impact on cancer mortality. experts in the uk said the approach had massive potential. i look forward to a time in 10 years will be all go to the pharmacy and by shampoo, we get a blood test, and we get on with our lives will stop and the nhs is spending more money diagnosing and treating disease because if we can diagnose it early then we can treat it sooner. the researchers' vision is an annual test that can catch cancer early and save lives. james gallagher, bbc news. we'll be speaking to cancer research uk about this in just over half an hour. if you have questions, perhaps about the research, e—mail us. all you can use the hashtag bbc breakfast and get in touch with us on social media. a couple from california who are accused of abusing their 13 children have pleaded not guilty to charges of abuse,
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torture and false imprisonment. david and louise turpin were arrested on sunday after one of their children escaped through a window of their home. police found them severely malnourished, with some in shackles. 0ur north america correspondent james cook reports. ..give up that right. david turpin appearing in court to deny torturing his own children and sexually abusing one of his young daughters. his wife, louise, also pleaded not guilty. prosecutors say the siblings endured the abuse for years as their parents plumbed the depths of human depravity. one of the children at age 12 is the weight of an average 7 year old. several of the victims have cognitive impairment and neuropathy, which is nerve damage, as a result of this extreme and prolonged physical abuse. the children were supposedly schooled here in their home, but the district attorney said some didn't even know what a police officer was. they were reportedly allowed to showerjust once a year
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and were taunted with food that they were forbidden to eat. the 17—year—old who raised the alarm after climbing out of the home through a window had been plotting the escape for two years. one of her sisters made it out with her, but turned back out of fear. this case has sent waves of revulsion across the united states and beyond. the authorities say the siblings are doing well, but some of them at least have almost certainly suffered irreparable physical and mental damage. the parents are due in court again next month. if convicted, they face life in prison. james cook, bbc news, riverside in california. money that was supposed to be spent on long—term improvements to the nhs in england has been spent on day—to—day services instead, according to the spending watchdog. the national audit office says increasing pressures on the health service means it is struggling to manage higher patient demand and stay within budget. the department of health said the report recognised that the nhs
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had made significant progress towards balancing the books. the reduction in that historical rate of funding, the level of savings and efficiencies that local authorities are delivering isn't quite offsetting that, and on top of that, you've got demand pressures in terms of the amount of activity that is — that patients are presenting with at hospitals and clinics. two fishermen are missing after their boat capsized off the coast of western scotland. lifeboats were launched after receiving a distress signal off loch fyne in argyll and bute yesterday evening. royal navy divers have been helping in the search. another man who was rescued is recovering in hospital. living conditions at liverpool prison are the worst that inspectors have ever seen, according to a new report. her majesty's prison and probation service said it's already taken immediate action by appointing a new governor and that cleanliness has also improved. 0ur health correspondent adina campbell reports. dirty, infested and hazardous — these are conditions hundreds
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of inmates are facing at liverpool prison, according to a new report by the prison watchdog. as well as problems with rats, broken windows and blocked toilets, it has also found two thirds of inmates had easy access to drugs, often smuggled by the growing use of drones, with more than one seized every week. and violence had also increased. more than a third of prisoners said they felt unsafe at the time of the inspection. i was horrified when i read this report. it's the worst report i have ever seen into a british prison and that's the assessment, too, of the very experienced inspectorate team. they said these were the worst living conditions for prisoners that they had ever experienced. her majesty's prison and probation service acknowledged that the conditions at the prison were unacceptable. it said it's already taking immediate action by appointing
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a new governor, and that cleanliness has also improved. it also says it has put a huge amount of energy and money into trying to improve the prison healthcare service there. the inspection took place in september last year, but last month, whistle—blowers told the bbc that inmates at liverpool prison had died or been injured due to poor care, which lancashire care nhs foundation trust has apologised for. today's report comes after the government was ordered to make immediate improvements to nottingham prison over safety concerns. eight men there are believed to have taken their own lives in two years. borisjohnson has proposed building a 22—mile bridge across the english channel. he believes another link would further improve relations between the two countries.
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he made the suggestion at a meeting with the president of france yesterday. full is close to the foreign secretary says —— a source close to the foreign secretary says he believes the fact that two countries are interconnected by one railway line in that is crazy. increasing costs on the build of the uk's new aircraft carrier programme is putting the budgets of other defence projects at risk, according to mp5. a public accounts committee report said the programme, which includes two new carriers costing 6 billion pounds, is hugely complex and costly. the mod said that it was committed to keeping costs down. the duration of adolescence is increasing, and now lasts from the age of 10 until 2a, according to scientists. they say that young people continuing their education for longer, as well as delayed marriage and parenthood, which has pushed back popular perceptions of when adulthood begins. writing in the lancet health journal, the researchers argue a change in the definition of adolescence is needed to ensure
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laws and government policy stay appropriate. the crew of an antarctic research expedition has a new team member. the scientists were out collecting water samples, when up popped an adelie penguin. the curious bird had a quick look around, decided it wasn't for him, and jumped back in to the icy water. the crew was from the australian antarctic program. the sea is better than the boat. but the sea is better than the boat. but the news. but story tickled me. —— that story tickled me. the uk is in the grip of the worst flu season for seven years. officials say hospitals are seeing "very high" rates of admissions, and there are four separate strains of flu circulating. the latest figures show that the number of people who went to their gp in england rose by a0% in the past week, with similar numbers in other parts of the uk. almost 600 people were admitted
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to hospitalised last week, 200 of which had to be treated in intensive care or high dependency units. since early october, 120 people have died of flu—related symptoms since early october in england, 21 in scotland and 8 in northern ireland. joining us from our london newsroom is professor paul cosford, medical director at public health england. thank you for your time this morning. ijust wonder if thank you for your time this morning. i just wonder if you thank you for your time this morning. ijust wonder if you could first try and establish, having heard some of the statistics, is the flu crisis, it is that has been dubbed, is it getting worse? the latest information as you say is that, we are seeing increases in flu again in the last week particularly in people who are going to their gps with flu all people who are u nfortu nate with flu all people who are unfortunate enough to have convocations that mean they need admission to hospital. the most severe end, people needing intensive care, those numbers are staying roughly the same in the past week. so there are some indications that the rate of increase is slowing at
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when we hit the height of the flu season, the height of that season usually last about one month we are no means through the woods yet. the newspapers are using the word epidemic, typically, is that the right term? how close is it to that? we are seeing the most severe flu season for many of our indicators of activity, like people going to the gp, since 2011, but with the last most severe one which just followed the pandemic, but if you look at the mortality figures, the number of deaths, actually, we're not seeing the levels yet that we saw in 201a-15 - 16, the levels yet that we saw in 201a-15 -16, it is difficult to talent at the end of the season exactly how severe it has been at there is something we can all do here and we are being very clear to urge anyone who is in one of the eligible groups for a vaccine to go and get out if you haven't already. we are giving the catch it, bin it,
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kill it message that we launched again last week, it is the basic stuff about if you have a sneeze or a cough up captured in a tissue, through the tissue away and wash your hands. when those things can help us to bring the flu season to a close as soon as we are able to. why is it so many people have been affected this year? flu is unpredictable every year and what we are seeing this year is three different strains circulating. usually we see one in the early part of the season and another in the later part but those seem to have come together and of course it is just a matter of what happens to the flu strains, the flu virus each year, to see exactly how things are going to predict —— hit us, we can never predict that it what we can make sure is we are prepared with a vaccine that people no how to protect themselves from flu in terms of the catch it, bin it, kill it
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message, and of course the nhs has done work to prepare for it. what about healthcare staff because as i understand that only 60% of healthcare workers in england over the flu vaccine. why is that so low? it is clear that the vast majority of healthcare workers will take the vaccine when it is made easy for them to it needs to be there when you arrive on your shift. somebody at the door with a needle thing here is your vaccine, so we have to make sure of that. but of course it is a professional duty of people who look after patients and the health service to protect all patients as far as we service to protect all patients as faras we can service to protect all patients as far as we can and in fact the general medical council does expect all doctors to be vaccinated against common infectious diseases. what we will do is see where this gets too. the rate are higher than they were, would like them to be higher still, we'll see where we get to the end of this season and have a conversation with the and staff throughout the service who of course are doing a fantastic job looking at,
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service who of course are doing a fantasticjob looking at, looking after people who have the flu and people with other illnesses because of course flu is only one part of the story. i gather from what you said at the beginning it is potentially possible that the number of people contracting the flu could still increase. we know the pressures on the nhs as it stands now. what concerns the you have over that? with the nhs, it can give a good account of themselves, of how they are coping, but the pressures on the nhs from the data they released yesterday to suggest that some of the pressures are slightly less tha n some of the pressures are slightly less than they were and that may also go along with the fact that we may in our indicators just be seeing a slowing of the rate of increase of cases of flu. as i say we do expect the height of the flu season to last some weeks, so we aren't through the woods yet and we in public health england are doing everything we can to support the nhs and i know the
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nhs is working extremely hard to deal with all of the patients with all of the different problems that, during the winter and of course there's a big vote of thanks to all of the staff in the nhs for the work they do on that. thank you very much for your time today. that was the medical director for public health england. matt has the weather for us from the cumbrian village of shap, where it's still very snowy. but apparently the wrong kind of snow to build a big snowman! good morning. it keeps on collapsing. good morning. we are calling it charlie. at least it has a face and some arms now. i have had to explain to some kids why i am making a snowman when they have to go to school. we are in they have to go to school. we are in the hills just close to shap. there are some icy conditions around this morning and we had a met office amber be prepared warning the issues
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to the south and east of glasgow. 0n high ground we could see as much as 30 centimetres of fresh snow, that's about 12 inches, before the day is through. be prepared, there could be some travel disruption later. certainly if you take a look at the forecast for today it is the case of some snow showers to the north and west. many southern and eastern areas will stay dry and sunny. let's get on with the forecast for today because it is going to be frequent snow showers throughout the day. further east in scotland we have some sunshine around, but wherever you are there could be icy conditions after plunging temperatures. a few snow flurries in cumbria today. the couple in the lancashire and maybe further south. a bit more hit and miss. but east of the pennines you should stay largely dry, to get yourself to work. but here and across the midlands, east anglia and southern england, colder
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than yesterday. widespread frost around. slippery on some of the roads and pavements. but towards the south—west we already have showers on the go. this could be in a migraine, some sleet and snow mixed in. the odd rumble of thunder. —— this could mainly the rain. in northern ireland with already had some snow showers pushed through. more to come. they will cause some issues on some of the roads. be aware of problems here and again some ice to begin with. through the day most of the showers are to the north and west. further north there is more likely to be snow. longer spells across parts of south—west scotla nd spells across parts of south—west scotland in particular. completely dry in some areas. 2— seven degrees and a strengthening wind through the day, with temperatures feeling colder, close to freezing, if not below. the night temperatures dropped below freezing in the
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northern half of the country. more clear skies around tonight. temperatures may be down to —10 in parts of rural scotland where the snow is lying. southern parts of on and wales, cloud increasing and rain spreading on. even that could come with a little bit of sleet and snow. a rather grey start to the weekend. rather cold as well. further rain and drizzle at times and even sleet and drizzle at times and even sleet and snow mixed in through the morning before things brighten up. in the northern half of the country, after that severe frost, only a couple of showers. most will have a fine saturday, with some sunny spells, but staying on the cold side. a noticeable change in the sunday. the weather front coming of the atlantic will bring outbreaks of rain, especially to western areas, or turn to snow as it hits the colder air of scotland. even hills of southern england could be snow for a time before that turns back to rain later. see the temperatures down towards the south—west get back into double figures more widely.
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that slightly milder air pushes the wall pass through the latter stages of sunday and into the start of next week. that's how the weather is looking. so you are climbing a bit of a mountain this morning, because you've got the snow that doesn't stick, the wrong kind of snow, and if it is going to be a charlie snowman, how you going to tackle the issue of the hair? have you not seen the hair? if you are going to compare hair, that's not a good impression. does it need to be more lush? definitely. i'm kind of ore node that it is named after me, but i'm not flattered, if i'm honest —— kind of honoured. maybe there's a little message for you, charlie. since 201a, uk employees have had the right to ask for flexible working, which can include cutting down hours, working home orjob sharing.
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but less than half of parents feel flexible working is an option for them according to the charity working families, who is calling on the government to do more to help parents achieve a work—life balance. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent nina warhurst reports. should alljobs work around our families or should ourfamilies be built around our jobs? for kaytie, the crunch came when she had pippa. in her global marketing role there wasn't an option to go part—time and stay in glasgow and after 12 years with the same company she took redundancy. it is hard because you have given an awful lot of who you are to that one job and then suddenly you are out of that, almost cast out, not intentionally. it's difficult to know who you are, where you are going next, what do i do now? kaytie has now set up a craft shop and she loves it, but can't help wondering what might have been. since 201a, if you've worked somewhere for more than six months
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you've been entitled to ask for flexible working. so that might be fewer hours, maybe working from home or perhaps a job share. but your employer has been allowed to say no if they've found its detrimental to their business and that, combined with a slow cultural shift in some places, means not everybody feels it's working for them. more than half of parents surveyed felt flexible working isn't a genuine option for them. nearly two in five said their current hours mean they don't get to say good night to their kids. and more than 13% said they are working the equivalent hours of an extra day a weekjust to get theirjob done. do you know what time that meeting's going to finish at? but things are changing, for some at least. with five kids, john needs a job that works for him and he's found it. he starts at 9:30am every day and doesn't work school holidays. does that mean things are nice and calm at home?
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i wouldn't say that, with five kids. things would never be calm, however, it is a lot less stressful. less stressful for staff and the boss says better for business. since expanding flexible working, productivity has gone up by 30%. we've found is there's lots of mothers and fathers at home who have got great skills and capabilities, but little or no access to childcare or it's too expensive and they've never thought of asking for term—time working. and this way they can do both. they can do both, basically. the government told us: kaytie says getting to pick her children up every day is the best job she's ever had, but she hopes that if they become parents it won't come at the cost of compromising their careers. nina joins us now on the sofa.
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i know this is something that people really do engage with, because this doesn't work for everyone. breakfast tv for example does not work at lunchtime, does it? if only! but a viewer said, how could a bricklayer or engineer, someone who works in building, choose their hours, it doesn't work that way. the federation said things like restau ra nts a nd ca re federation said things like restaurants and care homes have to have certain hours that are covered around the clock. also some small companies, if their margins are tight and they have to make a big hr adjustment it can be expensive. but evidence shows it does pay for a company. so the company we saw there, all her staff worked for days instead of five. residents of flats in the shadow of grenfell tower say it's not fair people living in the walkway blocks on the lancaster west estate say there are still exposed gas pipes and other issues. the council says they will look at the issues. a family's bid for a fresh inquest into the death of their son, who's body was found at michael barrymore's home in essex, has been denied.
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stuart lubbock‘s body was discovered in the entertainer‘s swimming pool in essex in 2001. mr barrymore was arrested, but police later admitted his detention was unlawful and damages were paid. mr lubbock‘s father had believed new evidence could've overturned the original open verdict. 13 more tube stations are to be made more accessible for people with disabilities. among the stations to benefit include wimbledon, north ealing and northolt. it's all part of a drive to make a0% of the network step free by 2022. the streets of the capital were lit up last night thanks to the lumiere london festival. light displays like this one in leicester square will light up london for another three evenings. more than 50 artists have created installations. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there's a good service across all lines. 0n the trains, problems on c2c, where there is a replacement bus service running between pitsea and grays because of a powerfailure.
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0n the roads, this is the a13 which is slow moving, westbound from dagenham to barking. in old street, the a501 city road is closed in both directions between the old street roundabout and britannia walk let's have a check on the weather now. hello, there. it's another fairly breezy day ahead of us and you will probably notice quite a drop in the temperature this morning as well. maybe there's a little bit of frost in more rural spots, but we have sunny spells on the way and it's looking like it should stay dry for many of us. you can never rule out the odd shower here and there, but quite a good deal of sunshine on offer today. a bit of a westerly wind and it could feel chilly in the wind, with temperatures only reaching six or seven degrees celsius. towards this evening we will see some cloud building ahead a bit of a westerly wind and it could feel chilly in the wind, with temperatures only reaching six or seven degrees celsius. towards this evening we will see some cloud building ahead of a frontal system that's bringing some rather wet and windy weather
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in from the west. temperatures getting down to freezing in some spots. so it may be there's a little bit of wintriness associated with that rain. it continues into tomorrow morning and doesn't really clear until lunchtime for many, or certainly further eastern parts. temperatures getting up to about five or six celsius. leaving a fairly cloudy end to the day, although brighter in some spots. sunday we have more wet and windy weather on the way, but the temperatures are starting to rise. quite unsettled for monday too, but as you can see for the next couple of days we're down in single figures, getting up to 10—11 by monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with charlie and naga. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. scientists in the us are close to a major cancer breakthrough after trials for a new universal blood test detected eight common forms of the disease. overall, the test found 70% of the cancers.
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researchers say that although the results were promising, more work is needed to verify the test‘s accuracy. a couple from california who are accused of abusing their 13 children have pleaded not guilty to charges of abuse, torture and false imprisonment. david and louise turpin were arrested on sunday after one of the siblings escaped through a window. police found them suffering from severe malnutrition, living conditions at liverpool prison are the worst that inspectors have ever seen, according to a new report. her majesty's prison and probation service has said it's already taken immediate action by appointing a new governor and that cleanliness has also improved. borisjohnson has proposed building a 22—mile bridge across the english
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across the english channel. —— across the english channel. he believes another link would further improve relations between the two countries. he made the suggestion at a meeting with french president yesterday. sources close to the foreign secretary say he believes the fact that two countries are interconnected by one railway line is crazy. earlier”; wespfisefi- who is the medical director at public health england. he gave his advice on how to avoid contracting the virus. we contracting the virus. are being very clear to urge anybody we are being very clear to urge anybody who is in one of the eligible groups for a vaccine to go and get the vaccine if you haven't
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had it already, and we are giving the catch it, bin it, kill it message that we launched again last week, so that is the basic stuff about if you have a sneeze or a cough, and you catch it in a tissue, through the tissue away, and wash or hands afterwards. doing those things can help us to bring the flu season to enclose as soon as we are able to. the british author peter mayle, who wrote a year in provence, an elite bunch now because on nine british players have done that in the singles since 1970. wow! so it is virginia wade, john lloyd, a few others, sue barker... that is a rare group. it makes in a household name, doesn't it? as if he isn't already, he is number two in britain! despite the scorching heat, kyle edmund is through to the fourth round of the australian open for the first time, after beating the georgian nikoloz basilashvili. the 23—year—old came back from a mid—match slump to win in a match which lasted for 3.5 hours. it means he's now through to the last 16. week to win a match like that in
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really tough conditions, mentally, physically, and a five set match, which is good, lots of positives, art, evie, i am which is good, lots of positives, art, evie, iamjust which is good, lots of positives, art, evie, i am just tired at the minute, ethically and mentally, it ta kes a minute, ethically and mentally, it takes a lot out of you, that type of march. he has a great chance of going further because he whoever he faces next we ranked lower than him. let's get some reaction. andy murray was cheering edmund on. he tweeted: brother jamie, who's playing in the doubles tournament in melbourne: elsewhere in australia, where it isn't quite as hot, the second 0ne—day international between australia and england is underway in brisbane.
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england lead the series 1—0 and this match is intriguingly poised. australia won the toss and chose to bat and were piling on the runs with aaron finch making a century. england are due to start their innings in the next few world number 1a kyren wilson pulled off a shock at the uk masters snooker yesterday beating the two—time champion mark williams. and ronnie 0'sullivan, was also beaten, but he says he's glad to be out of the tournament. ‘the rocket‘ was knocked out in the quarterfinals yesterday by northern ireland's mark allen, who beat him by 6 frames to 1. 0'sullivan, who has won the tournment a record seven times, revealed he was suffering with dizzy spells and double vision. we are struggling, i don't know what it is, whether it is a virus or whatever it is that i have had it before and it is very difficult you know when you wake you knows what of getting dizzy spells a sort of
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things i will give it ago and obviously wasn't good enough you know if i could play someone who couldn't quite put the ball it would have been alright but he put a lot of pressure on. if you are feeling dizzy the last thing you want to do is spiritual of those snooker balls with all of their different colours! the big transfer story of the summer could come to an end later. arsenal manager arsene wenger says alexis sanchez is now likely to join manchester united. sanchez is close to signing a a—year deal at old trafford reportedly worth a staggering 180 million pounds. the deal could see united's henrikh mkhitaryan move in the other direction. that caused charlie to sneeze! impressive, charlie, the way you tried to stifle that sneeze. can i point out, the story about what is not all in your sneeze at the beginning of the week, i could feel it growing and i thought i shouldn't do that thing! that chap ruptured something? you have to be careful. apologies. don't apologise! something? you have to be careful. apologies. don'tapologise! i thought you were reacting to the big
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tra nsfer story! now, an odd issue for a premier league football manager to have to deal with in a press conference, but burnley boss sean dyche, has been forced to deny that he eats worms during training sessions. one of dyche's former team—mates said he often saw him eating earthworms, and it was one of the reasons for dyche's gravelly voice, but the manager says it's all a bit of a misunderstanding. you get one of those nice, big juicy worms hanging down your mouth just on the edge there, and then... as if you are chewing it. and, of course, the worm then comes out, wash your mouth out with water. so a bit of banter which was probably taken a bit too far. he's probably squealing and turning away at that moment. so, for the record, i definitely don't eat worms. there you go, eating earthworms doesn't cause you to have a wonky tyre, which i had. you have made it more wonky now. how does it make you have a gravelly voice though? i looked it up, in parts of the world you can eat them, deep—fried or whatever, but nowhere earthworms,
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gravelly voice, linked. i don't know. you have now squashed your tie further around. should i go whole hog? sportsman, having some fun, a quy hog? sportsman, having some fun, a guy is called tennis who looked at sta mford guy is called tennis who looked at stamford in the third round, he calls himself a go when he is ordering a copy or a meal but is your name is tennis spelt with a so we have had other names, then you stumble over is a variant hurdler which i cannot believe, and an american football, he is called chuck long. really? you know the stumbleover one, are you sure? it is a hurdler, vanya stumbleover. ready it isn't pronounced quite like that though. it's now 7.30 9am. donald trump came into office promising to change the face of american politics and transfer power "back to the people". this weekend marks a year in the job
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and it's fair to say it's been a presidency like no other. from twitter outbursts on "fake news" and north korea to the biggest tax reforms and cuts to unemployment, we've been taking a look at the highs and lows of his term so far. congratulations, mr president. largest audience to ever witnessed an inauguration, period. we are fighting fake news. fake, phoney, fake. no politician in history has been treated worse or more on fairly. it is not compassion but reckless to allow uncontrolled entry from places where proper vetting cannot occur. i think there is blame on both sides and i have no doubt
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about it. rocket man is on a suicide mission from himself. and for his regime. they will be met with fire and fury. bell rings. the stock market is as an all—time high, unemployment is at its lowest level in almost 17 years. we now have had two straight quarters of economic growth. the largest tax cut in the history of our country. and reform, but tax cut. really something special. we'rejoined now from our london newsroom by former ukip leader, nigel farage. good morning. thank you forjoining us. how do you think donald trump's first year as president of the
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united states has gone so far? first year as president of the united states has gone so far7m has been unconventional, controversial, almost on a daily basis, but highly effective and america is now going through a boom, not just the tax america is now going through a boom, notjust the tax cut america is now going through a boom, not just the tax cut you america is now going through a boom, notjust the tax cut you mentioned in your package but also deregulation on a very large scale and now what you are seeing a big american companies, apple for example, american companies, apple for exa m ple, reinvest american companies, apple for example, reinvest in tens of billions into the us economy and i was in washington, dc the week before christmas and you cannot —— kind of talk to taxi drivers and bartenders and there is a feeling of optimism in america and ultimately that it optimism in america and ultimately thatitis optimism in america and ultimately that it is prime ministers here or president in america it is on the economic circumstances of a country that people arejudged economic circumstances of a country that people are judged and he is doing very well. you said you stalk to taxi drivers and their opinion, have you managed to talk to donald trump in recent times? because at one point you were touting yourself as perhaps a go—between between the british government and donald trump in an effort to show yourself
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perhaps someone who could bridge the relationship? one regret really one year on is the president has been to france on bastille day and has been to brussels or he has been to italy, to brussels or he has been to italy, to poland, he has done big events all over the world and yet the one country that he himself feels the closest to, don't forget his mother was scottish, one country where he values our relationship in terms of security, in terms of defence, where he was very optimistic about putting together a trade deal and i would say frankly, we are now more or less ata say frankly, we are now more or less at a stand—off between downing street and washington, and i think thatis street and washington, and i think that is to be regretted. have you spoken to him recently? not for a little bit but the last thing i did, what struck me really very squarely was his absolute determination to carry out the things on which he was elected. when trouble put the ma nifesto elected. when trouble put the manifesto before the american people, he doesn't do it for short—term tactical advantage, he does because he intends to carry it
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out —— trump. does because he intends to carry it out -- trump. i admire that about him. what do you make of the opinion polls because when you look at them relating to trump, his average approval rating so to speak in the united states is 39%, the lowest recorded of any elected president in their first recorded of any elected president in theirfirst term. he is recorded of any elected president in their first term. he is officially one of the most unpopular president in the modern era, after 12 months in office does not this is according toa in office does not this is according to a gallup poll, how does that tally with what you are saying in terms of his delivering what he says and the manifesto and the economy. these polls are basically asking do you like the president? george bush senior had an approval rating after the first gulf war over 80% and yet he lost the next election. this is the point that you don't have to like your leaders, you have to respect your leaders and think they will do a good job. i would wager that with growth over 3% of america and set to rise this year, that come
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2020, if he wants to run against the president, he will win. the book that has just been released on him, fire and fury, i wonder, that has just been released on him, fire and fury, iwonder, i that has just been released on him, fire and fury, i wonder, i don't know if you have read the book or seen excerpts from the book but one of the descriptions of president trump from the white house staff is childlike. i mean, this is done not much to his reputation in terms of the image he is portraying. he is not a conventional political figure. he isa not a conventional political figure. he is a self—made billionaire from new york, the city from which they say things the way they see them. all to my life i've met people in business and politics, big and wealthy entrepreneurs, and every single one of them is idiosyncratic. yes, sure, the president gets upset with things and angry with edens. he is not like anybody else that's ever been inside the white house. but it doesn't matter because one of the
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reasons he won is people don't want career politicians like hillary clinton, they want someone different, someone straight and provided he keeps on doing the right job for the us economy he will go down as a very successful president. you say he is different but you look ata campaign you say he is different but you look at a campaign and look at what politicians promise and that's what most people base their voting decisions on. he promised a wall and he hasn't delivered on that. he is like the other politicians in terms of not delivering. if you compare what he has done in his first year 2 at the last four or five british governments have done, they promised things in their manifestoes that they have no intention of carrying out. he has done some remarkable things. tax reform, deregulation, a massive crackdown on illegal immigration. and he did promise a wall. he is only 25% of the way through his term. i'm convinced there will be a wall. moving to a
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bridge. apparently boris johnson thinks we need to have more of a connection with the continent, with the eu, especially seeing as brexit is on the cards. borisjohnson says we need more than the channel tunnel. what do you think of that? he likes big ideas. he previously wa nted he likes big ideas. he previously wanted a big airport. now a bridge across the english channel. all i can say is given the size of the modern container vessels that come through the english channel from china, it will have to be a very high bridge, which means on many days of the year when the wind is blowing people would be able to use it. sounds like a big waste of money to me. nigel farage, thank you for talking to us on bbc breakfast. matt is in the cumbrian village of shap, where it's been snowing again this morning. good morning! good morning!
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good morning. lots of snow over the past few days. given this beautiful and picturesque scene, hill is covered in snow. a few snow flurries this morning. 0ne covered in snow. a few snow flurries this morning. one has covered in snow. a few snow flurries this morning. 0ne hasjust departed. makes for a great scene. at least the m6 is moving well at the moment. 0n the m6 is moving well at the moment. on some of the back roads it is icy and there will be some further snow flurries around over the next couple of days. at the moment we've had a net office amber weather warning for parts of scotland, especially around the likes of lanarkshire and ayrshire. we could see up to 30 centimetres, which could lead to further disruption. it isn't just here we will have snow flurries. it will be a case of no showers to the north and west of the country. further south and east you will
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still see a lot of sunshine and dry weather. western areas are prone to the heavy showers. we got them already this morning in places. icy conditions elsewhere in scotland, as temperatures have dropped well below freezing. a few snow flurries to the north—west will come and go through the day and a couple of goes over to the day and a couple of goes over to the east of the pennines in yorkshire. further south and east, most yorkshire. further south and east, m ost pla ces yorkshire. further south and east, most places are dry and sunny. it will stay dry for many of you all day long. there are showers towards the south—west at the moment, mainly of rain, sleet and some hail. there could be the odd rumble of thunder in parts of wales. showers in wales are few in number. the northern ireland already lots of snow showers pushing through. that would cause a bit of disruption through the day. there could be further problems and i see on some of the back roads.
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there have been showers of the past few days. through the day we continue to have showers pushing across western scotland, northern ireland, north—west england in particular. the south and west couple of those continue, but many in central and eastern areas stay dry. 2— seven celsius in the day, feeling cold in the breeze further north. tonight it will still be windy for a time but showers become more numerous in northern uk. —10 is possible. to the south, cloud is pushing its way in. 0utbreaks possible. to the south, cloud is pushing its way in. outbreaks of rain, sleet and hill snow possible, keeping temperatures just above freezing into the weekend. so the weekend gets off and there the north and south split. southern areas much cloudier and a cold day to come. a severe frost in the north of the uk. a couple of isolated showers. most
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will have a dry day, with lots of sunshine. the best day of the weekend is saturday because by sunday cloud and outbreaks of rain spreading across the uk steadily through the day. sleet and snow as well on the high ground of scotland, northern england and a few flurries further south, just before it turns back to rain and temperatures start to rise. we finish the day with double figures in many south—western areas and the mild air will push in for all in the next week. for the rest of the day, staying cold and there could be problems with further snow showers. especially in parts of scotla nd snow showers. especially in parts of scotland and northern ireland as well. how is charlie the snowman getting on? the heck keeps on falling out. i'm really sorry. —— the hair. maybe there is some treatment or something. that is charlie the snowman keeping matt co.
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it looks like the rescue car is on the way. and a cup of hot chocolate. brilliant! a special supply of hair. tesco has delayed making changes to its clubcard scheme after a backlash from customers. but how relevant are loyalty cards today? i must say my purse is jampacked with loyalty cards. i have to have a separate container for them. that's dedication to the loyalty cause. there's questions about whether we still use them and whether we still use them and whether it is worth carrying them all around. crucially i think the backlash to the tesco changes show how much feeling there is about getting the money off. the tesco clu bca rd getting the money off. the tesco clubcard was the first loyalty scheme that started the trend for others. but are its days numbered? do we still use the plastic cards to collect points and rewards? we went to altrincham near manchester to find out.
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there is to many of them. every shop has a different one. it is storing them. i've got another personal christmas just for loyalty cards. we particularly like the ones where you buy nine cups of tea and you get the 10th one free. but lots of them are a little bit meaningless.” 10th one free. but lots of them are a little bit meaningless. i think the loyalty cards are worth having but instead and off the paper vouchers they should put the points on the cards when you use it it's easier than keeping bits of paper. some companies do and some don't. we don't use them because different outlets use different ones for different items. i suppose if you go to the same place it's worth it. with me is the editor of loyalty magazine. let's talk about the use of loyalty cards. they've been around a long time. 20 years. that's what is so staggering. we've got so used to using them. i pose the
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question at the beginning, whether this is the end of the road, the protests against the tesco changes would suggest not. absolutely not. customer loyalty is crucial to any business and it isn't going to go away any time soon. what will change is the way customers persuade... companies persuade customers to be loyal. for example, purse is full of loyalty cards, it is inconvenient. you said to me earlier that you never have the right card. it will probably go onto the phone, but the actual reward that customers get is crucial. important to them. i think the row that followed this decision to cut from times for two times three really doesn't illustrate that really well. —— times four to times three. a number of the big retailers have them and they really rely on them to work out what we are doing
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with our shopping habits. they do. it's all about the customer analytics, the data, mining the date to get the little gems of knowledge and they couldn't do without them. what do they do with that knowledge? decide what you are buying, how you are buying it. tesco told me a while ago that they didn't realise how many young men were going into a shop to buy food because they were hungry now. they didn't want it in one hour or next week, they didn't do the big weekly shop, they were hungry and wanted food and so that's why there are so many small stores, even the co—op, which is opening loads of small stores, because with all our habits. as a customer you would say, well, in return for me handing over all of that information about myself and my shopping habits, you should get something pretty decentin you should get something pretty decent in return, because they are making money off the back of it. why aren't they making it more
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attractive for us to keep hold of these cards? there's only a limited budget for any company and they are under huge pressure from competitors, not least amazon, who is the big wolf waiting to take the business. the cause amazon work as a marketplace, they are bringing more businesses into their umbrella and competing with them is very hard. when it comes to the future, we talked about loyalty cards on phones and a lot of sales are done online. that cuts out the need for loyalty is entirely because they can see what we are buying by clicking on it. it's all about the sort of jargon phrases that you get in industries, things like 0mni channel, the one to one relationship. that's holy grail, to get to a stage where a company knows everything about you, whatever channel you shop at, whether online or nipping into a little store, so that you always do show your credentials to show who you are.
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such an interesting area, about how much data they have. really good to talk to you. i will have more for you after 8am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. residents of flats in the shadow of grenfell tower say it's not fair that kensington and chelsea council plan to make them start paying rent and service charges again as of this sunday. people living in the walkway blocks on the lancaster west estate say there are still exposed gas pipes and other issues. the council says they will look at the issues. a family's bid for a fresh inquest into the death of their son, who's body was found at michael barrymore's home in essex, has been denied. stuart lubbock‘s body was discovered in the entertainer‘s swimming pool in essex in 2001. mr barrymore was arrested, but police later admitted his detention was unlawful and damages were paid.
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mr lubbock‘s father had believed new evidence could've overturned the original open verdict. 13 more tube stations are to be made more accessible for people with disabilities. among the stations to benefit include wimbledon, north ealing and northolt. it's all part of a drive to make a0% of the network step free by 2022. the streets of the capital were lit up last night thanks to the lumiere london festival. light displays like this one in leicester square will light up london for another three evenings. more than 50 artists have created installations. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there's a good service across all lines. 0n the trains, problems on c2c, where there is a replacement bus service running between pitsea and grays because of a powerfailure. 0n the roads, this is the a13 which is slow moving, westbound from dagenham to barking.
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in old street, the a501 city road is closed in both directions between the old street roundabout and britannia walk. that's roundabout and britannia walk. because of a burst main. let's have a check on the weather now. hello, there. it's another fairly breezy day ahead of us and you will probably notice quite a drop in the temperature this morning as well. maybe there's a little bit of frost in more rural spots, but we have sunny spells on the way and it's looking like it should stay dry for many of us. you can never rule out the odd shower here and there, but quite a good deal of sunshine on offer today. a bit of a westerly wind and it could feel chilly in the wind, with temperatures only reaching six or seven degrees celsius. towards this evening we will see some cloud building ahead of a frontal system that's bringing some rather wet and windy weather in from the west. temperatures getting down to freezing in some spots. so it may be there's a little bit of wintriness associated with that rain. it continues into tomorrow morning and doesn't really clear until lunchtime for many,
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or certainly further eastern parts. temperatures getting up to about five or six celsius. leaving a fairly cloudy end to the day, although brighter in some spots. sunday we have more wet and windy weather on the way, but the temperatures are starting to rise. quite unsettled for monday too, but as you can see for the next couple of days we're down in single figures, getting up to 10—11 by monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a breakthrough in the battle against cancer — scientists find a potential ‘affordable' and ‘universal‘ blood test. the new trial detects eight forms of the disease. it's been described as a major step towards one of the most ambitious goals in medicine. good morning, it's
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friday 19th january. also this morning... accused of holding their 13 children in shackles at their california home — david and louise turpin plead not guilty to charges of torture, false imprisonment and abuse. prisoners accessing drugs and a growing use of drones — a report into conditions at liverpool prison says it's "dirty, infested and hazardous." plans to shake up the uk's cash machine network could leave many remote areas with no access to cash. but with cards and contactless payments — do we still need them? in sport, britain's kyle edmund defies the heat to win at the australian open. he's through to the fourth round, for the first time, after a epic win in a0 degrees heat. we'll speak to the man who created a new british record — by navigating a 128—foot
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waterfall in a kayak. and we are in cumbria this morning with matt, who has some beautiful images and pretty severe weather conditions. good morning, the sun is up conditions. good morning, the sun is up over the snowfields of cumbria. further snow flurries coming to the north and west uk today and the met office have issued an amber weather warning for parts of south—west scotland. we have all the details on that and your full weekend forecast in the next 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. scientists in the us are close to a major cancer breakthrough, after trials for a new universal blood test detected eight common forms of the disease. overall, the test found 70% of the cancers, but researchers are cautiously optmistic, saying more work is needed to verify its accuracy. here's our health correspondent, james gallagher. more than 1a million people find out they have cancer
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each year worldwide. the sooner they're diagnosed, the more likely they are to survive. the test, called cancerseek, is a new approach that looks for mutated dna and proteins that tumours release into the bloodstream. it was tested on eight common times of cancer, including ovarian, pancreatic and lung. in the study, on more than 1,000 patients known to have cancer, the test correctly diagnosed seven in 10 patients. the researchers atjohns hopkins university in baltimore say more work is needed and are starting trials to see if the test can find cancers in seemingly healthy people. they say such tests could have an enormous impact on cancer mortality. experts in the uk said the approach had massive potential. i look forward to a time in 10 years where we'll be able to go to the pharmacy and buy shampoo, we get a blood test, and we get on with our lives.
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the nhs is spending more money diagnosing than treating disease because if we can diagnose it early then we can treat it sooner. the researchers' vision is an annual test that can catch cancer early and save lives. james gallagher, bbc news. we will continue to talk about this inafew we will continue to talk about this in a few minutes. if you have any questions about how the research works and how it will impact to, get in touch in the usual ways. a couple from california, who are accused of abusing their 13 children, have pleaded not guilty to charges of abuse, torture and false imprisonment. david and louise turpin were arrested on sunday after one of their children escaped through a window of their home. police found them severely malnourished with some in shackles. 0ur north america correspondent james cook reports. ..give up that right. david turpin appearing in court to deny torturing his own children and sexually abusing one of his young daughters. his wife, louise, also pleaded not guilty.
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prosecutors say the siblings endured the abuse for years as their parents plumbed the depths of human depravity. one of the children at age 12 is the weight of an average 7—year—old. several of the victims have cognitive impairment and neuropathy, which is nerve damage, as a result of this extreme and prolonged physical abuse. the children were supposedly schooled here in their home, but the district attorney said some didn't even know what a police officer was. they were reportedly allowed to showerjust once a year and were taunted with food that they were forbidden to eat. the 17—year—old, who raised the alarm after climbing out of the home through a window, had been plotting the escape for two years. one of her sisters made it out with her, but turned back out of fear. this case has sent waves of revulsion across the united states and beyond. the authorities say the siblings are doing well, but some of them at least have almost certainly suffered irreparable physical
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and mental damage. the parents are due in court again next month. if convicted, they face life in prison. james cook, bbc news, riverside in california. two fishermen are missing after their boat capsized off the coast of western scotland. lifeboats were launched after receiving a distress signal from loch fyne in argyll and bute yesterday evening. royal navy divers have been helping in the search. another man who was rescued is recovering in hospital. living conditions at liverpool prison are the worst that inspectors have ever seen, according to a new report. her majesty's prison and probation service said it's already taken immediate action by appointing a new governor and that cleanliness has also improved. 0ur health correspondent adina campbell reports. "dirty, infested and hazardous" — these are conditions hundreds of inmates are facing at liverpool prison, according to a new report by the prison watchdog. as well as problems with rats,
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broken windows and blocked toilets, it has also found two thirds of inmates had easy access to drugs, often smuggled by the growing use of drones, with more than one seized every week. and violence had also increased. more than a third of prisoners said they felt unsafe at the time of the inspection. i was horrified when i read this report. it's the worst report i have ever seen into a british prison and that's the assessment, too, of the very experienced inspectorate team. they said these were the worst living conditions for prisoners that they had ever experienced. her majesty's prison and probation service acknowledged that the conditions at the prison were unacceptable. it said it's already taken immediate action by appointing a new governor, and that cleanliness has also improved. it also says it has put a huge
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amount of energy and money into trying to improve the prison healthcare service there. the inspection took place in september last year, but last month, whistle—blowers told the bbc that inmates at liverpool prison had died or been injured due to poor care, which lancashire care nhs foundation trust has apologised for. today's report comes after the government was ordered to make immediate improvements to nottingham prison over safety concerns. eight men there are believed to have taken their own lives in two years. adina campbell, bbc news. the uk is in the grip of the worst flu season for seven years. officials say hospitals are seeing "very high" rates of admissions, and there are four separate strains of flu circulating. since early october, 120 people have died of flu—related symptoms in england, 21 in scotland and eight in northern ireland.
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public health england has advised basic measures can be followed to stop flu spreading further. we are being very clear to urge anyone in one of the eligible groups for a vaccine to go and get the vaccine if you haven't had it already. and we are giving the "catch it, bin it, kill it" message that we launched again last week. that's the basic stuff, if you have a sneeze or cough, catch it in a tissue, throw the tissue away and wash your hands afterwards. doing those things can really help us to bring this flu season to a close as soon as we are able to. borisjohnson has proposed building a 22 mile bridge across the english channel, saying he believes another link would further improve relations between the uk and france. he made the suggestion at a meeting yesterday with french president, emmanuel macron. a source close to the foreign secretary said he believed the fact the two countries are only connected by one railway line was "crazy". increasing costs on the build of the uk's new aircraft carrier
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programme is putting the budgets of other defence projects at risk, according to mp5. a public accounts committee report said the programme, which includes two new carriers costing £6 billion, is hugely complex and costly. the mod said that it was committed to keeping costs down. the crew of an antarctic research expedition had a new temporary team member... the scientists were out collecting water samples, when up popped an adelie penguin. the curious bird had a quick look around, decided it wasn't for him, and jumped back in to the icy water. the crew was from the australian antarctic program. more now on our main story this morning. scientists are a step closer to solving one of the biggest tests in medicine — a universal blood test for cancer diagnosis. doctors in the us say they've successfully trialled a method able to detect eight of the most common
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types, including breast, liver and lung cancers. the research is still at an early stage. professor richard marais is from cancer research uk and can tell us more about this potential breakthrough. there are tests that exist at the moment that can diagnose or identify certain cancers. that's a fact. 0bviously, certain cancers. that's a fact. obviously, if you have cancer, you can have a blood test which identifies changes in white blood cells which indicates sickness. but this is taking a number of cancers and saying, it can identify a certain type of cancer without having done the body scan? yes. we know if we detect cancer earlier, we can treat it earlier and save people's lives. the question is, how do you do that. blood tests are a great way of doing it because they are convenient and cheap and if you can detect 70% of cancers, as they
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claim in this publication, you can get treatment much earlier. it's detecting earlier, that's the key thing. it's very significant, this is one blood test and it will cover many possible cancers. yes, what they have done is drawn together all they have done is drawn together all the genetic features of different types of cancers into a single test. that's the breakthrough. being able to do this in a broad screen, and then seemed eight different types of cancers. if you have cancer of the pancreas or lung cancer, what's identifiable? it's the genetics. we know the dna that controls our genetic code is changed in cancer, so you look at those changes, by looking in the blood. when we go beyond just eight cancers, the exciting thing will be that you can have a blood test perhaps every year with your gp, or where ever it is,
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and they will be able to tell you that you have a signal in your blood that you have a signal in your blood that might indicate you have cancer. in terms of treatment, the joy of this, so to speak, is that it can identify very, very early stages, potential growth of cells in parts of the body that are scanned that may not detect. in terms of treatment, how early can you treat cancer? the earlier the better. cancer research uk want to make sure three out of four people survive cancer. even if you can't see it on a scan? we have systemic treatments like chemotherapy that can work with early cancers. you highlight a very interesting problem we might have from the test, a challenge, rather than problem. if you know somebody has a cancer, a signal in blood taken from their arm, where is the cancer but i don't also prove it to them. that'll be dependent on the
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strength of the test. they also found some healthy people gave a positive test. because these were healthy people, they couldn't check whether the seven people who gave a positive test actually had cancer. it could have been a test of the test, if you like, to show it worked. fast forward ten years and the timeline is we can't know how quickly it will be tested properly. how quickly will that work? will you have otherwise healthy people, people who think they are healthy, routinely asking for the blood test in the way they might get weighed when they go to the gp or have a blood pressure test. here in manchester we are doing exactly that, doing a trial where we will go out into the community and collect blood in cancer patients. this is the first part of exactly what you're saying, people will get on with their normal lives, go into their chemist, and have a blood test, perhaps one per year. they
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will get a letter, go and give blood, and they will get tested. if they have cancer, or a signal, they will be brought back for more tests. what will be the impact on the if it is successful? there will be two impacts. there will be definite cost saving for the nhs because the diagnostic test, this particular test, is about $500. the diagnostic test, is about $500. the diagnostic test will be much cheaper than the later test that people have to have when they have cancer. you will save money there. and very importantly, patients will benefit because you will not treat patients unnecessarily, if they don't have cancer. and also you will be able to get patients into treatment much earlier, and that is much more effective and much cheaper. good to talk to you this morning, professor. good to talk to you this morning, professor. let's bring you up—to—date with what
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is happening. this is a picture of cumbria, over the village of shap. it has been snowing bed this morning, it's quite thick and this is where matt is. one of the worst affected areas. is there more to come. yes, there certainly is. there's something beautiful about sunrise and snowfields and the sky looks amazing. behind me plenty of snow on the hills, the m6 is moving nicely at the moment, some of the back roads have seen a lot of snow and it's very icy, notjust in north—west england but across northern ireland and scotland as well. further flurries to come today. the met office this morning hasissued today. the met office this morning has issued an amber weather warning. be prepared for further heavy snow in scotland. areas of risk out of
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the south and east of glasgow, higher ground, we are talking about routes like the 73 and a 7a, they could affected as heavy snow falls today, to 30 centimetres, 12 inches potentially as we go through today. it's not just potentially as we go through today. it's notjust the only potentially as we go through today. it's not just the only area potentially as we go through today. it's notjust the only area where we will see snow around. let's get on with the forecast. it won't be everywhere. elsewhere, a cold frosty start but many to the 70s to the country will see a dry and sunny winter ‘s day. this morning western scotland, lots of flurries, they could cause problems, east of scotla nd could cause problems, east of scotland try and clear that icy conditions potentially. like in north—west england, in cumbria, and over the pennines to yorkshire, further south across the midlands, east anglia, it is a lovely day. a cold winters day admittedly, you will need to wrap up but dry and
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reasonably sunny weather at times today, and the wind nowhere near as strong as was yesterday. some show was already on the go, some on the heavy side, rain, hail, a that of sleet and snow of a higher ground, sunshine in between, but northern ireland has seen plenty of snow showers this morning, some heavy, they could cause disruption in places as we go through the morning into the afternoon, the snow showers keep coming today on strengthening breeze. in the west of scotland it could merge into a longer spells of snow towards the south—west. parts of lanarkshire, and l sure potentially affected. temperatures are highest in the south, but wherever you are it will be a chilly day and with the breeze and will feel subzero across northern parts of the country. tonight, shell is to begin with, that they become less numerous through the night, and with clear skies across the northern half of the uk, a cold night, some places
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could drop to minus ten. the difference further south, cloud increasing other parts of england and wales, we could see rain, sleet and wales, we could see rain, sleet and snow later but temperatures are higher than they were this morning. for the weekend we start with a north— south split, southern areas cold and damp, some sleet on high ground but it should brighten in the afternoon. more than half of the uk, severe frosts to begin with, some isolated showers, dry and sunny weather, still cold. the big change comes on sunday, saturday a better day at the weekend, and weather fronts coming in with any early sunshine disappearing, cold rain and as it hits the cold air over the hills of northern scotland and northern england we could see snow for some time. the further south and the west you are any snow will quickly turn back to rain, temperatures and the rise, will finish the weekend with temperatures in double figures in the south which will take us into a milder start to
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next week. today another cold day across the board, further snow showers to the north and west and met office amber warning in place for parts of south—west scotland. there could be transported disruption. back to you, charlie. matt, i hope that you've got a soup. i don't have soup but i do have cold toes! whatsapp would you have at this time in the morning? anything warm? —— what soup would you have. good morning, ben. what soup would you have? chicken. we go outside a lot, although you guys get to sit on the sofa... the resentment is coming through! and i get sent to all sorts of places. to remote areas where you might not find an atm. people have
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been looking at the availability of cash machines around the country. 70,000 of them, it sounds like enough but in rural areas this study suggests 110,000 people don't have access to a cash machine, or very little access. we have been working out why. it's partly to do with the companies that run them, there is a network called link made up of all the banks that are part of the scheme and they offer these cash machines in rural areas but it costs money to run them because they have to stop them and the percussion, maintain them, make sure that they are working. that group wants to reduce the amount of money and pays to people who look after those cash machines, so there is a danger that they will be fewer of them around they will be fewer of them around the country. we have been discussing this morning whether, given the rise of new technology we need as much cash because of a contactless payments and payments using your mobile. although i think a lot of people getting in touch say that cash is still king in many rural areas, stop retailers have stopped
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taking credit card payments. the charge to use a card has stopped although that means that some retailers say that they will not accept payment by car. also you need cash. mark in wales asks if people need cash when other options like co nta ctless need cash when other options like contactless payments are more useful. adrian says he uses it in the post office and can choose what coins and notes he wants. that's the problem, it's going hand—in—hand with the closure of rural post offices and rural banks, and if cash machines disappear, but looks like the end. it helps you budget better when you have cash. untilyou the end. it helps you budget better when you have cash. until you get your statement! wise words, ben. it's 22 minutes past eight. now, we like an extreme record breaker here on breakfast. so, how about one man, a kayak, and a 128 foot mexican waterfall... this is the moment bren 0rton
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plunged down the big banana falls in mexico, look at that! you can see him doing the drop. a british record for the highest waterfall ever navigated in a kayak. he hit the bottom at 60 miles per hour, in around 2 seconds. it really is so extreme. that must have felt amazing. brenjoins us now from uganda, where he is of course kayaking. good morning bren, congratulations. thank you so much for having me on the show, really appreciate it. we watch the pictures, bren, and you can explain, you were at the top of the falls, he paused for a little, explain what happens and what it feels like. by the time i'm coming
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down the falls in my kayak as i'm in the current and about to come down, all the thoughts and feelings of uncertainty and fear, that is all gone. that beautiful moment where you are not thinking, you are just reacting. great air all the way down. for anyone who hasn't heard the term air awareness, if you have dropped your mobile phone or lost a biscuit in your cup of tea you see it happening in slow motion! have you had that? that is what it feels like. super slow motion, you had that? that is what it feels like. superslow motion, reacting all the way down, my first conscious thought was, hell, i am still in the air! i will say, mind thought was, hell, i am still in the air! iwill say, mind your thought was, hell, i am still in the air! i will say, mind your language, ina air! i will say, mind your language, in a friendly way, because you are on breakfast television! i have dropped a biscuit in mighty, that's the sort of daredevil lifestyle that i have so i know exactly what it's like to go over a 120 foot
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waterfall! tell us about the impact. what is it like when you are in your kaya k what is it like when you are in your kayak and you hit the surface. that impact was huge. i had the water at 60 miles an hour. it was absolutely colossal. i haven't been hit that ha rd colossal. i haven't been hit that hard since my mum caught me swearing, as a kid! can you explain that more, it hits your whole body, presumably because you are in the kayak. does it hit the kayak first, and then, do you go a considerable distance under water when you hit the base? exactly. what you are aiming to do is like a hideout of the diving board, aiming to pace through the water and the accelerate slowly by going as you can. if you've done a belly flop you don't go deep in the water and it hurts. i impacted it at the best possible angle i could have and i was tucked up angle i could have and i was tucked up hard that it was still a massive
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impact. i was so winded at the bottom. the next parisse tasered felt like i'd been in a car crash and it hurt to turn my neck. but at the time i was so and relieved i thought it was great. with extreme sports, i'm glad everything worked and you have the record. yet presumably in the past you have done some way things have not gone as smoothly? yes, exactly. anyone that pursues sport full—time you've got to ta ke pursues sport full—time you've got to take your bumps and bruises along the way. i've had a broken back, some broken ribs, a broken eye socket, multiple broken hands and malaria are five times. you take your ups with the downs. in your case more downs. in your case, more downs! mostly at! what's the big one, what is the one that you want to do? ijust want
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one, what is the one that you want to do? i just want to one, what is the one that you want to do? ijust want to keep pushing ha rd to do? ijust want to keep pushing hard and move the sport in every direction. but my focus now is even bigger waterfalls, the world record is 186 feet and i hope to equal that later this year. that new ground, i need to see if i can go bigger and find the right waterfall and really just try stepping up from there but only if it feels right. bren, lovely to talk to you, congratulations again, iam to talk to you, congratulations again, i am glad that you are in one piece! thank you, appreciate that. he was speaking from uganda. what an amazing adventure. let's get the news, travel and weather where you are. wilshere shortly. —— we will see you shortly. coming up next the latest global business live news, followed by the victoria derbyshire programme. more winter weather expected of the
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united kingdom. snow showers. further south and east, more sunshine and drier weather. like yesterday, a lot of snow in the north and west of england and across scotla nd north and west of england and across scotland and northern ireland, more scenes like this. those showers coming in comey can see the speckled nature of the cloud, showers piling into scotland, northern ireland and northern england at the moment. it's in south—west scotland today where there is the most concern. a lot of snow here, 15—30 centimetres of fresh snow with disruption likely. the met office has issued an amber be prepared warning around south glasgow and dumfries and galloway.
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snow showers continuing in north—west areas. could be wintry flurries across the pennines and maybe across wales. generally speaking, the further south and east you are, it's drier and brighter but it will still feel cold wherever you are across the uk. through this evening and overnight, the snow continuing to move in across scotland, the far north—west of england. later, rain spreading into the south of england and south wales, starting to fall as snow over the brecon beacons. north and east, clearer skies and a cold night with temperatures well below freezing. saturday has a bit of rain across southern parts. maybe snow across higher ground of the chilterns and cotswolds. drier and brighter further north and east. going into sunday, this area of rain will move its way in. is it bumps into the cold air you can see there is snow for the pennines, southern uplands and into the highlands of scotland. heavy rain behind that. a really
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miserable day for many on sunday. but temperatures rising in the south—west up to ten or 11 degrees. this is business live from bbc news with alice baxter and david eades. the us congress has until midnight to agree a budget deal — or see government services shut down. live from london, that's our top story on friday 19th january. all eyes will be on the us senate today. hundreds of thousands of government employees could be sent home if the two major parties
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fail to overcome their differences. also in the programme... the controversial founder of uber — travis kalanick — becomes a billionaire after the ride—hailing company completes a massive round of funding. and we'll keep you up to date on all the latest market
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