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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 20, 2018 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. shut down. the us government grinds to a financial standstill. in the last couple of hours, the senate failed to agree a budget to fund many public services, despite last—ditch talks which went late into the night. the cynical decision by some democrats to shove aside millions of americans for the sake of irresponsible political gains. the blame should crash entirely on president trump's shoulders. the shutdown comes on the first anniversary of president trump's inauguration. hundreds of thousands of public workers will now be told to stay at home. good morning it's saturday 20th january. also this morning: british tourists injamaica's
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montego bay are warned to stay in their resorts as violence on the streets leads to a state of emergency. a bespoke brexit trade deal is on the cards insists french president emmanuel macron — but he warns access to the single market will come at a price. you cannot by definition have the full access to the single market if you don't tick the box. pope francis sounds a stark warning about the future of the amazon while on a visit to peru, criticising big business for exploiting the region. while in sport they may have won the australian open title just two years ago but jamie murray australian open title just two years ago butjamie murray and bruno soa res ago butjamie murray and bruno soares are out of the doubles, beaten in the second round as the slump inform beaten in the second round as the slump in form continues. philip as the weather. good morning, it's a damp start for england, northern ireland, parts of england, northern ireland, parts of england and wales. it is brighter further north with wintry showers to be had and more snow forecast for some. i will have all the details in
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just a few minutes. we will see you then, philip. good morning. first, our main story. many government services across the united states have shut down after politicians failed to pass a spending bill. hundreds of thousands of public workers are being sent home until a compromise can be found. however, essential services including national security and air traffic control will continue. the last government shutdown in 2013 lasted 16 days. sarah corker reports. it's a government shutdown nobody wanted. it went to the wire but there was no last—minute deal. as democrats rallied on capitol hill, inside the senate, republican leaders couldn't secure enough votes to pass a spending bill to extend the funding of federal agencies. on this vote, the ayes are 50, nays are 49. the motion is not agreed. three fifths of the senators duly chosen to swarm, not in the affirmative, the vote is not agreed. now the trump administration faces an embarrassing shutdown.
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what we have just witnessed on the floor was a cynical decision by senate democrats to shove aside millions of americans for the sake of irresponsible political games. the government shutdown was 100% avoidable. president trump, if you are listening, please take yes for an answer. the way things went today, the way you turned from a bipartisan deal, it's almost as if you were rooting for a shutdown. at the centre of all of this, a row over immigration and the so—called dreamers. democrats demanded the bill included protection from deportation for 700,000 young, undocumented immigrants who came to the us as children. after the senate vote, the white house released this strongly worded statement: the last government shutdown
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was in 2013 and lasted 16 days. it means federal offices and services will close and thousands of staff placed on temporary unpaid leave as early as monday. military operations, though, will continue. republicans and democrats have traded blame for this crisis. neither side wants to be held accountable for closing the government, but a financial shutdown begins on the first anniversary of donald trump's inauguration as president. downing street confirmed theresa may will hold face—to—face talks with president trump next week. they will meet at the world economic forum in davos, the press secretary of the presidents of the meeting would be used to further strengthen the special relationship between the us and the uk. british tourists in
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jamaica are being advised not to leave their resorts unsupervised after a state of emergency was declared in the area rather popular holiday destination of montego bay. the changes have been prompted by recent rise in violent crime. nick davies has more. for a country that depends on tourism, the pictures of troops on the streets in montego bay, jamaica's biggest resort, isn't ideal, but the government says it is something that needs to be done. the security forces are expected and have been directed to treat citizens with respect and protect the dignity and safety of all. most of the tourists who visit montego bay and much of the north coast stay in gated or guarded secluded hotels. —— coast stay in gated or guarded all—inclusive hotels. but crime in the city has spiked. last year saw the 1,600 people murdered in jamaica. 335 of them in stjames, the area where montego bay is. most of the crime is gang—related and focused in a small
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number of communities. the foreign office has advised holidaymakers that they should only travel to and from the airport to their hotels and when they do take excursions to make sure they are arranged by official tour reps. the authorities say there will be more roadblocks and vehicle searches as they go after the gangs and their guns. a similar state of emergency in 2010, in kingston, saw the murder rate drop to its lowest levels in years, a statistic that meant lives saved. in montego bay it's hoped the same will happen again. nick davies, bbc news, jamaica. the french president has suggested the uk could get a bespoke trade deal with the european union after brexit, but again warned that britain would not have full access to the single market without accepting its rules. in an interview to be broadcast on the andrew marr show tomorrow, emmanuel macron said he respected, but regretted, the brexit vote, and said the eu would love to welcome the uk back.
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let's get more on this from our political correspondent emma va rdy. good morning, what's nice on this occasion is we are able to say what the president said, as opposed to what someone else thinks he says. absolutely, this is his first visit to britain since becoming french president command so everybody has been looking to try to gauge how favourably france will look on britain when it comes to these difficult brexit negotiations. theresa may is of course calling for a bespoke trade deal after we leave the eu, that means being able to continue trading with european countries without the problem of having costly tariffs imposed. we wa nt having costly tariffs imposed. we want a deal that doesn't really exist at the moment, something better than any other country outside the eu has currently got. president emmanuel macron says a bespoke deal like that is something you may well end up with but has underlined the warnings we have heard from the eu before, that if you want full access to the single
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market it means playing by the rules, accepting the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice, and continuing to pay into the eu budget, something brexiteers will not want to do. i take two references, because this special way should be consistent with the preservation of the single market and our collective interests. you should understand that you cannot, by definition, have full access to the single market if you don't tick the single market if you don't tick the box. and to get full access to the box. and to get full access to the single market unique contribution to the budget and you have to accept... the freedoms. the freedoms and the four pillars and the jurisdiction. what >> presenter—macro: says matters because france is a big player in the eu and his voice will be influential amongst the other eu countries in this negotiations ——
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what president emmanuel macron. he reaffirms what our friends and allies have said, united with the rest of the eu, that britain cannot expect any special treatment. thank you. the family of the american rock star, tom petty, has revealed that his death last october was caused by an accidental drug overdose. he was found unconscious at his home in malibu, days after completing an extensive tour to mark the 40th anniversary of his band, the heartbreakers. the 66—year—old was on medication for a range of issues — including emphysema and a fractured hip. church bells and music venues in england are to be offered extra protection against attempts to silence them by people living in new properties nearby. the government is changing planning guidance so that long—standing, but noisy, community facilities wont have to make expensive changes because of complaints from neighbours. instead, developers will be responsible for addressing any noise issues when constructing new homes. pope francis has used a visit to peru to sound a stark warning about the future of the amazon and its indigenous communities. the pontiff told the people
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of puerto maldonado that the region had never been so threatened by businesses keen to exploit it for oil, gas, food and gold. tribal elders called on him to help protect them from being driven from their lands. a huge storm has been causing havoc across northern europe, resulting in the death of 11 people in germany and the netherlands. you can see some you can see some of you can see some of the images here. this plane struggled to make it on to the runway at dusseldorf airport as it was battered by the winds when it came into land. the rooftop of this apartment building was completely torn off in holland. meteorologists said it was the worst storm since records began in 1990. and pedestrians were blown down the street, with one man having his bike torn from his hands. the weather is improving slightly. those were the issues yesterday. we will have a full weather forecast
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for us in the uk not later. it is 8:11am. an appeal has been made for construction companies to offer training to the hundreds of apprentices affected by the collapse of carillion. after months of profit warnings, the firm finally went into liquidation on monday, with £1.5 billion of debt. its collapse came as a shock to thousands of workers — the company employs 43,000 across the world. more than 20,000 of them right here in the uk. of those, 1,400 of them are young apprentices — mostly bricklayers, carpenters and joiners — at the start of their working lives. let's talk now to nicholas richards, who's a carillion apprentice and lynn masterton, who's one of those trying to help those young people affected by the company's collapse. good morning to you. nicholas, we heard the statistics there. but here you are. explain what has happened. you were or you you are. explain what has happened. you were 01’ you are a you are. explain what has happened. you were or you are a carillion apprentice? i was a carillion apprentice, it started when i was on
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my way to work on monday and my mum called me and she said carillion have gone into liquidation and i was just like, god, this isjust my luck, i didn't know what to do, so carillion training services, i had to give them a call when it opened at 8am and when i called i wanted to enquire for more updates. but they didn't feed me anything, they didn't tell me nothing about it. what was the contract or the deal you had? how long have you been working on how long we supposed to be an apprentice? i had on my little one andi apprentice? i had on my little one and i was doing levelled two and had been transferred to level three after doing my level two and that was basically what allowed me to continue. what has happened between 110w continue. what has happened between now and then, between monday and now? a lot, i received a message that work and payments will continue and everything like that. i got a text immediately just saying and everything like that. i got a text immediatelyjust saying after the 31st you will not get paid, you will not be employed or anything.
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the 31st you will not get paid, you will not be employed or anythingm this month? yes, this month, it was on thursday. i'm on a placement with a company and they are doing so much, trying to find me an apprenticeship, so they are trying to help me. they've been amazing. what are people like nicholas‘s rights, the potential opportunities to come out of this? i work for a couege to come out of this? i work for a couegein to come out of this? i work for a college in liverpool and we hosted an event for the construction industry trade board, the construction industry trade board called all carillion apprentices in to see what they could do to work with employers to try and find employment for those who have lost employment. we contacted any carillion apprenticeships, apprentices we had at our college and also put out a call to our employers to say please consider an apprenticeship because there is lots of young people here that have skills and they might be partly through their training and have a
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lot to offer a company and apprenticeships add value to companies. what we need to get across is the fact that apprenticeships are not like they used to be. it's not a day away from work. it can be tailored to the employer's needs. this is rather complicated because, nicholas, you mentioned it's a carillion apprenticeship that you work for a brickworks company and that company is trying to figure out whether or not they can give you a job? yes, the support i need. the company was contacted the support i need. the company was co nta cted by the support i need. the company was contacted by it carillion? what happens is basically carillion gave you your training and they provided your experience, didn't they? it's an apprenticeship and then i go and do my college work and that is what idomy do my college work and that is what i do my qualifications and get my level one and level two and at level two you get put out on a site and you go and collect evidence, take pictures of your work and take them back to carillion and they say you have done good work, and that is how
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you gain your knowledge and qualifications and stuff like that. since i've been on cara brickwork who realised the situation with carillion they have stuck their neck out and done well to try and employ me. the projects that were public projects are continuing? yes. that's the guarantee we have so if an apprenticeship was linked to one of those that would be continuing work, would it? is somebody obliged to pick of the carillion apprenticeships in these joint—venture projects? i'm not explaining myself well. if you have a joint—venture project, are the carillion apprenticeships going to be picked up the other party in a public joint—venture?” be picked up the other party in a publicjoint-venture? i don't know because i'm not involved in that. i work for hugh bird college and what we do know is if somebody is no longer employed they will not have an apprenticeship, so what we need to do is encourage employers to offer apprenticeships from employers that are there now. these are small
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firms which we are all asking to pick up apprentices. —— hugh baird college. this is the problem because we heard how difficult it is for small firms to allow apprenticeships even though they desperately want new blood in the industry. but there are incentives to take on apprenticeships, and also what we are saying is don't have the impression if you are a small business, that it has to be if you are taking one and apprenticeships domagoj pavicic, you release somebody for a day a week, talk to your training provider and local colleges, we need to find employers. these contracts are not going to stop, are they? you would hope eventually they would be picked up. we have no indication of that yet. what we need to do is get young people back into their training because it is their futures and we need to continue that training. nicholas, we wish you well. do you wa nt to nicholas, we wish you well. do you want to pitch for a job right now? go on then, if anybody wants to hire me, hire me. why? i'm a hard worker,
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i want to be out there working and nobody wants to be sat at home ever, do they? i don't want a job in bricklaying. welcome i do, but i wa nt to bricklaying. welcome i do, but i want to continue my qualification and get my level three and get out there and do all the real stuff then. i would there and do all the real stuff then. iwould rather get there and do all the real stuff then. i would rather get my level three and know everything about it. stay in touch with us because you will find out on the 31st what is happening so it would be interesting to talk to you after that. 100%. we to talk to you after that. 10096. we wish you well. thank you. time to get up—to—date with the main stories this morning. the time is 8:17am. many government services in the united states are facing a shutdown after politicians failed to agree on a new budget. a state of emergency has been declared in the jamaican holiday resort of montego bay, after a wave of violence in the area. tourists are being advised to stay in their resorts. we have been talking about some bizarre weather in northern europe,
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there were some really high winds tearing the roofs of buildings. luckily we're not dealing with wimps like that at the moment, are we? but we are dealing with extreme weather conditions in terms of snow. yes, we have lots of snow lying at the moment and there is more snow in this forecast and also warnings out this forecast and also warnings out this weekend for a real mix, we have ice warnings and also someone rings out for rain in northern ireland as well so there is a lot going on this weekend. it is not one of those still sort of scenarios at the moment, next of rain and snow already manifesting itself across northern ireland, down through wales and into the midlands and many of the southern counties of england and to the north about the skies have been much clearer overnight, underneath that banner of cloud and rain. i'm afraid is one of those, here is a picture from pontypridd, it is that gloopy. further north, as i say, complete contrast. we still have some wintry showers, nowhere near the extent and intensity we had
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yesterday, —9 at 8am this morning. back old but bright regime extends to the eastern side of the pennines but from northern ireland through wales, the midlands and the southern counties, it is that miserable sort of mix, grey, drizzly, wet, potential for some snow as this banner of cloud eases past the high ground of wales into the peak district also maybe even as far east as east anglia. it is a real marginal cool, that. you get the sense it's just one of those, a bit of brightness in the south—west later where it starts mild and continues mild and it's windy in the far west of cornwall and the rain dissolves away across northern ireland with a bit of brightness, the best sunshine in the northern half of britain if you can stay clear of the showers. once we get rid of the rain in the evening the skies were clear and here again is an issue, because there will be a problem with ice. there was a issue with rain arriving into northern
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ireland. it isn't going to stay has rain and that's our big problem for sunday. we are highlighting scotland and parts of northern england. as this weather feature moves in to that really cold regime, a bit like today, we will see a much more significant conversion of rain into snow and it will lie. this is not just a house don mackay ground problem, the eastern side of scotla nd problem, the eastern side of scotland and england, at ten, 11, 12 o'clock, anywhere near this conversion zone of the rain into the snow and lying? and that quite low levels. further south it will not be an issue because it's so much milder there than it is further north so it stays as rain in the south, look at the contrast in temperatures, one, two, three, four in the north and 7-12d two, three, four in the north and 7—12d across the south. tomorrow morning will be very tricky indeed. from a forecaster‘s point of view and for you too if you are on the move. we will give you the latest throughout the day. thank you, philip, we will keep in touch. 8:20am is the time.
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as we've been hearing, failure to approve a spending bill in the us senate means many government services have shut down. 850,000 workers will now be told to stay at home. it comes exactly a year to the day that donald trump was sworn in as president. earlier, quentin kidd, professor of political science at christopher newport university in virginia told us about the impact the shutdown could have. what it means is we have created history for all the wrong reasons today. this will be the first time ever that a president wakes up on the first anniversary of his taking the first anniversary of his taking the oath of office and the government has shut down, it's somewhat symbolic of donald trump's first year in office but also this is the first time government has shut down when one party controls all of the branches of government. and so it really symbolises some of the dysfunction going on in washington. the practical realities of what this means, though, for the weekend are probably minimal. most federal workers are not going to be working on saturday and sunday, and so working on saturday and sunday, and so in reality republicans and
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democrats in congress and the president have the weekend to try and solve this before people are supposed to show up at work at 8am on monday morning and they are told not to. professor, in the late-night discussions we witnessed there was a lot of name—calling and a lot of blaming going on. there is probably blame to go around, honestly. both parties are playing to their base right now. the democrats really needed to let their base know that they cared about this daca immigrants, these dreamers, who will lose legal status on the 1st of march if something isn't done. republicans needed to let their base know they would not give in on any kind of immigration bill until the wall was funded, and that's really the loggerhead both sides are at, this war that president trump wants, and legal status. some long legal
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status for these dreamers. and legal status. some long legal status for these dreamerslj and legal status. some long legal status for these dreamers. i just wonder where this leaves us looking at american now we have the one—year anniversary for trump, but at the same time we have what some people say is a booming economy. they might say is a booming economy. they might say the trade—off actually, a strong economy but they stalling working system in the senate and in congress is not about trade—off really. is not about trade-off really. in fact, that's one of the bargains that republicans are hoping that voters make, that by the time we get to november and voters go to the polls and have to decide whether they have to elect a republican or democrat, republicans hope voters have told the positive effects of the tax cuts, feel like the economy is doing really well and want to reward republicans for that, so that is one of the deal is essentially that republicans have made with themselves. just looking at the implications of the shutdown in the
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us with professor quentin kidd. will talk a lot more about that but now it is time to look at the papers at 8:24am. broadcaster and former executive director of the fa david davies is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'll speak to him in a minute. good morning. how are things? bonjour. is that the reference to meetings with emmanuel macron?|j said bonjour —— bongiorno. meetings with emmanuel macron?|j said bonjour -- bongiorno. how many languages can you say hello in? i'm so languages can you say hello in? i'm so poor at languages and if i had my life again the one thing i would concentrate on is languages.” life again the one thing i would concentrate on is languages. i will try and make a tenuous link between what you said and your first story and there is a link because this is about links with other countries, isn't it? that was tenuous, charlie! the boris bridge is everywhere. i can only imagine what they are thinking this morning at no 10 downing st. you
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have an important summit this week with president emmanuel macron and what is the angle everyone is talking about? the boris bridge. there is a slightly unfortunate picture, naga, other rather large ship trying to get under the bridge. funnily enough, we spoke to nigel farage yesterday, was it yesterday 01’ farage yesterday, was it yesterday or thursday? it was yesterday, we talked to him about the proposal and he said with all of the big vessels from china this bridge would have to be very high. the significance of this story in the sun, as are the macro sung backing the bridge or boris? —— the sun. they are warm about this proposal warmer than some of the other papers. is before you get to the dreaded experts seem to be very sceptical. the truth is that in margaret thatcher's time this subject was debated endlessly and
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that's where the tunnel came from. as you probably remember, i certainly remember, talking about the tunnel and whether we should do it. all of the talk about the devastating consequences, for example that dogs would run across the tunnel bringing rabies. do you remember that? it sounds laughable 110w. remember that? it sounds laughable now. you have to be ambitious and think of the next generation etc. but is a bridge really the best option? that remains the question. or another tunnel? davos is coming up. extraordinary gathering. it began as just business, didn't it? up. extraordinary gathering. it began asjust business, didn't it?|j a lwa ys began asjust business, didn't it?|j always wanted sport to play a bigger pa rt always wanted sport to play a bigger part in this. but that's another issue. it's a meeting of important 01’ issue. it's a meeting of important or significant minds, isn't it? certainly going to be there this year, mrtrump and certainly going to be there this year, mr trump and mrs merkel and mrs may and president emmanuel macron, and john mcdonnell, our shadow chancellor, who sites marx as
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an intellectual influence as the times points out and they have five points forjohn mcdonnell on his trip to davos, how to get there, assume you can't catch a lift in a private jet, catch the train. walking boots are a must and plug converter. plugs in switzerland, as i know my cost quite recently they have plugs like nowhere else in the world. i've been to davos and worked in davos before in a previousjob. one of the tips is don't stay in clo iste rs, one of the tips is don't stay in cloisters, there are not enough rooms in davos so many delegates and with a 45 minute bus ride away in clo iste rs. with a 45 minute bus ride away in cloisters. however, perhaps you should stay there because the best conversations take place in the back of the bus. you have a great and the good sitting in one place. can you imagine the guys being the head of security this week? they normally have this long list of world leaders there. the head of security will
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have his or her work cut out. loss of former prime ministers and presidents attend davos so they will be quite used to it. not trump! this one is in the daily mail. winston churchill is everywhere because of the darkest hour and the film with gary oldman. i still haven't seen it come i'm desperate to see it for stop i saw it yesterday, it is fabulous. did the audience applaud? not in the cinema i was in. not in the cinema i was in. it does make me think about the great and the good, i've had to my christians in the house of commons in the 19705 and 80s house of commons in the 19705 and 805 —— i've had two stint5. i remember when enoch powell gave a speech, people would go back into the chamber, they would not agree with them but they would listen. is the reason that we seem to have such a shortage of great speakers,
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greater orators, to use the right word in this generation, the demands of churchill's age are so different today. what is it? i'm struggling to think of a great orator in our country as we sit here. people will definitely disagree with that but i'd love to know them. we can ask people to put in some ideas for people to put in some ideas for people who speak very well. you are going to be back with us. i know you wa nted going to be back with us. i know you wanted to talk about cyrille regis. very much so. shall we hold that one because it's worth talking about at a bit of length, so let's talk about that in the next hour and say goodbye for the moment. david, thank you. still to come this money, the diplomatic gesture has come to dominate the french president's meeting with theresa may. the bayeux tapestry. we will find out why this medieval work of art is so important. headlines coming up next.
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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. now a summary of this morning's main news. many government services across the united states have shut down after politicians failed to pass a spending bill. hundreds of thousands of public workers are being sent home until a compromise can be found. however, essential services including national security and air traffic control will continue. the last government shutdown in 2013 lasted 16 days, but it's hoped this one will be resolved over the weekend. it was a cynical decision by the democrats to shove aside millions of americans for the sake of irresponsible political gains. a government shutdown was 100% affordable. president trump if you're listening, i am urging you please take yes for an answer. the
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way things went today, the way you'd turned from a bipartisan deal, it is almost as if you were rooting for a shutdown. downing street has confirmed that theresa may will hold face to face talks with president trump next week. they'll meet at the world economic forum in davos. the president's press secretary said the meeting would be used as a chance to "further strengthen the special relationship" between the us and the uk. british tourists in the jamaican resort of montego bay are being warned not to leave their accommodation after a state of emergency was declared. the measures are in response to a recent rise in violent crime, including a number of shootings. the family of the american rock star, tom petty, has revealed that his death last october was caused by an accidental drug overdose. he was found unconscious at his home in malibu, days after completing an extensive tour to mark the 40th anniversary of his band, the heartbreakers. the 66—year—old was on medication for a range of issues — including emphysema and a fractured hip. pope francis has used a visit to peru to sound a stark warning
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about the future of the amazon and its indigenous communities. the pontiff told the people of puerto maldonado, a small town on the edge of the amazon forest, that the region had never been so threatened by businesses keen to exploit it for oil, gas, food and gold. tribal elders called on him to help protect them from being driven from their lands. a huge storm caused havoc across northern europe yesterday, resulting in the death of 11 people in germany and the netherlands. this plane struggled to make it on to the runway at dusseldorf airport as it was battered by the winds when it came into land. the rooftop of this apartment building was completely torn off in holland, where meteorologists said it was the worst storm since records began in 1990. and pedestrians were blown down the street, with one man having his bike torn from his hands. a look at the weather later on this
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morning but now the sport. not as extreme now in melbourne with temperatures, now almost unseasonably cold for the time of year, much more manageable. a great tournament so far and with the women's draw only two former grand slam champions left and there are about to meet. maria sharapova and angelique kerber. and they are warming up. maria sharapova county out of the rankings. and angelique kerber is way down at 21st. but we have a sneak preview as to how they have a sneak preview as to how they have been warming up behind the scenes, in a car park in melbourne. angelique kerber has opted for a medicine ball with her coach here on the ground. and here is maria
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sharapova and look at those reactions. looks great fun. a great way to sharpen up your skills ahead of the match. they're about to go on to court any time now. an interesting warm up. sometimes you wonder about them going through their paces in the locker room. there is a lot at stake today. absolutely, and kyle edman tonight flying the flag for great britain. there was huge relief, for world number one simona halep, who survived an epic battle, with the unseeded american lauren davis, to reach the fourth round — she saved three match points, before eventually winning 15—13 in the decider, after nearly four hours on court. that final set itself lasted two hours and 22 minutes. and chung hyeon has become the first south korean man to reach the last 16 at the australian open — and he beat the fourth seed alexander zverev to make it.
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after winning in five sets, he could face novak djokovic next. so the champions of two years ago, fall at only the second hurdle. jamie murray and bruno soares, lost in three sets, to the indian pair of leander paes, and purav raja. but britain's dom inglot, is through — he and new zealand's marcus daniell, beat the french duo, benoit paire, and hugo nys. one of the greatest formula one drivers of all time, sir stirling moss, has decided to retire from public life. he's 88 and has been in ill health recently — he spent around four months in hospital last year with a chest infection and his son said his recovery had been slow. sir stirling plans to focus on his family. darren is here from football focus. matt fitzpatrick in the gulf has
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birdied the first five. dzagoev. matt fitzpatrick in the gulf has birdied the first five. dzagoevlj know that you like your golf here. this is important information. andrewjohnson has been playing as well, he is nicknamed the beef. when he gets the birdie the crowd call, keith! but let's talk about football. football focus is back at midday today. and on the front page this morning you see the face of cyrille regis. every game to date in the premier league the players will be wearing a black armband. we asked a dream child who is a big west brom fan and growing up cyrille regis was
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his absolute hero. so a tribute coming up later. also christian eriksen of spirit, they face southampton tomorrow, we look at antonio conte who has been critical this week of var. and paul lambert on the programme, the news stoke manager and his team lost on monday night. they're manager and his team lost on monday night. they‘ re taking manager and his team lost on monday night. they're taking on huddersfield this weekend. they have conceded more goals than anyone else in the premier league. and he talks to mark clemmit about why he decided to mark clemmit about why he decided to ta ke to mark clemmit about why he decided to take the job and here is some of that interview. this has been a bolt from the blue for me, i was up in scotland when i got the call to come down. whether it was 15th or 50th it was totally irrelevant, i knew it was totally irrelevant, i knew it was a great club with a great fan base and a talented group. it never entered my mind —— my frame of mind
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that another few people had turned it down. plenty more of that later on. and he came down from scotland but great divine, the hearts boss. and also we will discuss what is going on at arsenal, the future of alexis sanchez. and also we will be speaking to francis coquelin who left arsenal to go to valencia. we get his version of events as to what is going on there at the moment. and we are honoured midday. -- were on at midday. up part from viewers in scotla nd at midday. up part from viewers in scotland because there is a cup match. cracking being game, aberdeen and saint mirren. there's bad news for the wales rugby union side ahead of next months 6 nations —
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rhys priestland is going to miss most of the tournament with injury. the bath fly—half had been carrying a hamstring injury, and has now withdrawn from the squad, to continue his rehabilitation. wales' first game is at home to scotland in a fortnight. it's crunch time in the champions cup, with the final weekend of pool games. exeter, saracens, bath and scarlets are among the sides looking to seal a place in the knockouts today. in the challenge cup, gloucester were already through to the last eight but they missed out on a home tie, with defeat to pau at kingsholm. it finished 34—24 to the french side. and coming up, semi finals day at the masters snooker and how to deal with a wasp. it's semi—finals day at the masters snooker — john higgins plays mark allen later — that's on bbc two — and this afternoon on bbc one you can seejudd trump against kyren wilson. trump beat shaun murphy — but trump wasn't murphy's only foe
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in their quarter—final — he was attacked by a wasp — rather surprising for the time of year, and the fact that snooker is an indoor sport — his cue made a handy lightsabre. that is not the way to deal with it, you are supposed to stand still.|j usually stand still. i would jump around. have you ever been stung? no, i have come close. your strategy may work. i did end up in a ditch in a car one may work. i did end up in a ditch in a carone time may work. i did end up in a ditch in a car one time because a wasp went up my a car one time because a wasp went up my shorts. but i never saw the wasp again! that is really weird. as opposed to it usually visiting you! do not deviate off the road, that is
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the lesson i learned. let's go to the lesson i learned. let's go to the winter olympics. and with the winter olympics, in pyeongchang, less than a month away, lizzy yarnold, just missed out on a medal, at the final skeleton world cup event of the season, in germany, finishing fourth. she'll be hoping to retain her olympic title next month, after a mixed run of results this season. the gb team for the games is announced on tuesday. and how about this for a way of ending your career? american downhill skier, julia mancooso, dressed as wonder woman for her final run in competition. a cape and tights is obviously not the most aero—dynamic outfit but mancuso wanted to go out in style — she's won a gold, two silvers and a bronze over the last three winter olympics but she didn't qualify for pyeongchang next month, so she's decided to retire now at the age of 33. the tights are ok but of course that keep is not very aerodynamic. but
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she made headlines around the world with that display. 70% of private new car sales are bought through personal contract purchases, which see drivers pay a monthly premium and at the end of the contract they can either give the car back or buy it at a previously agreed sum. bbc‘s moneybox programme has found that if drivers decide part way through a contract to give the car back some customers are facing hidden charges, which many experts say can't be legally enforced. we're joined now by moneybox presenter adam shaw who can explain more. what exactly are these charges? a lot of people have these contracts. well as you said what is striking is just how many people are involved. over 80% of car purchases are done through some kind of financing deal, 70% to these specific personal contract purchase is. so this will affect almost
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everybody who is buying a car. and what happens is you pay a regular sum over an agreed period of time and at the end you give the car back and at the end you give the car back and at the end you give the car back and a bit extra and then get to keep the car. what is happening is some people who may have had a traumatic experience and a life lost a job in some way, there circumstances have changed and they cannot afford to keep it going and want to return the car. they are able to do that but all of a sudden the financing company says hold on, you have done a bit more mileage than we would have expected at this stage in the contract and so we're going to send you a bill and this can be quite substantial. some have said £800 extra they had to pay, an unexpected bill and therefore many people facing sometimes rather unexpected and very high bills. so are you required to pay them? this is the question. now the lawyers and the
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consumer experts that we've spoken to have said because of the consumer credit act under these kind of contracts once you've paid over 50% of the outstanding liability you can walk away from the deal as long as you are returning the goods in good order. now is true that is a massive bit of consumer protection and it means thousands of people can say look we do not want to carry on with this and we're going to walk away. the financing companies have gone nuts and said that is not true and we want our extra money. so this is a battle royal between the consumer experts and the lawyers we've spoken to who have said that these charges are not legally enforceable and the financing companies trying to charge them. but of course if true it is a massive bit of new consumer protection for people.|j massive bit of new consumer protection for people. i suppose it will come down to technicalities, what counts as wearing terror, a little bit of damage that the company might say the car is not as
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it was whereas it might be quite minor. the people that we've spoken to have not really picked up so much on that but it is the mileage issue and whether doing a bit of extra mileage is actually not in keeping with the contract. the problem and this is a problem, in one case study we feature, they have refused to pay and the finance company have marked that down as a bad debt and so their credit rating has fallen. the lawyers whispered to have said they just should not have marked it down asa just should not have marked it down as a bad debt, and they're not liable but yet it has been marked down and the person has suffered. so i would not be surprised if this thing ends up in court. this is a very significant piece of not new regulation but something we have identified which could be very useful for identified which could be very usefulfor consumers. identified which could be very useful for consumers. and i identified which could be very usefulfor consumers. and i think it is so important and affects so many people that it could end up in the courts. very interesting, thank you
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very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... many government services in the united states are facing a shutdown after politicians failed to agree on a new budget. a state of emergency has been declared in the jamaican holiday resort of montego bay, after a wave of violence in the area. tourists are being advised to stay in their resorts. here's philip with a look at this morning's weather. and there has to be some good news on the way but tomorrow does not look great. it does not look great, more snow in the forecast. just to show you this picture, and that mountain lurking in the distance, what i did not know was back in the later part of the
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18th century that mountain was the sight ofan 18th century that mountain was the sight of an experiment to try to determine the mass of the earth. that has got you in treat, you can go and look that up. i love these fa cts ! go and look that up. i love these facts! i cannot talk about that now, we are off on ourjourney across the british isles. a weatherfront coming in that is turning a bit wintry across northern ireland. elsewhere quite dank and miserable. across scotland some wintry showers and brighter and frosty sky is extending right through scotland into the north east of england. then northern ireland and down across that diagonal, that area of rain and snow. through into the afternoon there is just a snow. through into the afternoon there isjust a chance
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snow. through into the afternoon there is just a chance that somewhere along the northern edge as the mild air meets the colder we could see the conversion of rain into snow. not a big deal but it means that we have at dank afternoon for southern counties, east midlands. northern ireland picking up. so fora midlands. northern ireland picking up. so for a time overnight we get rid of that rain and it is still cold. but when not done with the cloud and rain story, another banner of cloud coming in from the west from the atlantic. and tomorrow morning the possibility of snow and ice because into that cold regime comes the weather front bringing all that rain. rain initially but again as it runs into the cold air, especially but not exclusively offering higher ground of northern britain, we get the snow. and this will lie so for a time in the morning conditions really tricky. up
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and over the pennines, the higher ground of scotland and onto the eastern shores of england. the eastern shores of england. the eastern counties. two or three centimetres, something about border. and then later in the day it stays cold but just warm and then later in the day it stays cold butjust warm enough to convert the snow back into rain. then all of this mild airand the snow back into rain. then all of this mild air and i should save the snow not an issue across the southern parts of britain because of that temperature profile. more interesting facts i suspect that some point through the course of the morning. well you know you cannot do a forecast without one because that other fact was brilliant. my research has been extensive! seconds! in television that makes you an expert. trust me, i know! young, recovering cancer patients in ireland are finding
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support from an unusual source — donkeys. it's part of a scheme being trialled at a sanctuary in belfast, where hands—on therapy is helping people come to terms with their experiences. our ireland correspondent chris page has been to see how it works. hello, wee man. donkeys and humans have been working together for thousands of years. now the animals are helping to emotionally carry people here on a particularly challenging journey. annelise was diagnosed with cancer after she suffered a brain injury when she fell off a jeep during her gap year. she has been taking part in what is known as donkey assisted therapy. put his head down and lifted it back up then, up towards me. and then i rubbed him again and that made me kind of aware that he was all right. and what were you aware of within yourself? that i wasn't scared. the basic idea is that being around donkeys helps people to talk about difficult experiences because the animals have a calming presence. leanne has been treated for a brain tumour.
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she and annelise say the programme has been priceless. yes, i think people would benefit from this who would not go to normal counselling. like one—on—one. and someone who wouldn't open up, the donkeys just help you to start and not realise that you're talking so much about yourjourney. how would you say it has helped in your journey through cancer treatment? it helped a lot, actually. doing this. because at the start i was like, i'm definitely not doing it and now people ask what did you think of it and i said, it was amazing. they always ask how to explain it and you can't, you just have to go and try it. to understand it. a lot of different emotions come out. they talked about a donkey being left abandoned on a highway and is there ever a time you have felt alone and stuff like that. and when you think about the treatment, you were alone. so it is all about encouraging emotional openness. any challenges? mindfulness, i find a bit challenging. the organisation which came up with the therapy says the donkeys are the perfect creatures
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to make it happen. donkeys are very social animals and they enjoy engaging and interacting with people. and they're also very aware of their environment and everything that is going on within it. so within the sessions they are able to act almost like a mirror to the participant and reflect back to the facilitator and the participant what maybe is going on in terms of how they're feeling emotionally but very much so the nonverbal communication that they're giving out within their session. that helps with life skills. the cancer charity which has been working with the donkey sanctuary says that the scheme has made a remarkable difference. we know at clic sargent that young people experience a lot of emotions. cancer can rob young people of their self—confidence, their independence. and actually stop career aspirations and goals. so this was just one innovative way that we want to make sure that young people get back on the same track in life that they were before cancer came in.
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as well as helping with therapy, the donkeys have a pretty playful life. but these friendly, gentle and intelligent animals have a new role. providing vital support to people who are coming to terms with cancer. chris page, bbc news, in county antrim. president macron has announced plans to loan the 70 metre long bayeux tapestry — which depicts the norman conquest of england — to britain as a sign of the special relationship between the uk and france. it will be the first time the artwork has left french shores in 950 years, and could be making an appearance in the british museum by 2020. here to tell us a bit about the tapestry‘s significance are medieval historian, kathryn hurlock, and brenda king who is the chair of the textile society. good morning. just explain the
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significance of this extraordinary piece of art and the history of it. it is important because it is a fantastic visual record of what happened in 1066 when the normans conquered england. it shows you events leading up to the battle and the battle itself. we have many narrative accounts but this is the only that plays it out in what effectively looks like a comic strip. it is not, it is on such a grand scale. longer than six buses end—to—end, 70 metres long. but also that leads to difficulties with moving and displaying it. tapestries meant a lot in terms of how people put history down and that is why it is so important. absolutely. it is the story of the battle but also you get intimate small portrayals of
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people, farmers sowing the seeds in the field and making boats and all that kind of thing. so a lot of information about day—to—day life as well and communities. what is the condition of the tapestry at the moment. just thinking about how it is going to be transferred from france. i have seen that it is getting quite a dark room under glass and preserved as much as it can be. basically we cannot see it but textile conservation experts are very knowledgeable. when they move it they will take every aspect into account. and museums are moving stuff around the world all the time. they will have every contingency plan for. it is one thing to make the announcement, but come the moment if someone is there and it is being moved and they have reservations, it is not going to happen? because there are more important things than diplomacy if
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you like, more important that it remains intact. it has lasted this long but people over the years have tried to fix it. so if you look up close it has been patched in some areas and things have been stitched m, areas and things have been stitched in, the most famous example is of course harold with the arrow in his eye. and how recently was that image changed? i think 19th century. eye. and how recently was that image changed? ithink19th century. do you approve of that? yes. i'm all for things being fixed if they are damaged but with this particular scene of course damaged but with this particular scene of course every damaged but with this particular scene of course every school child says that harold was shot in the eye with a narrow but the written account does not agree. when it was stitched in, we could see needle holes from before its restoration but it could be because that individual was holding a spear. the text on the tapestry is ambiguous and could be referring to the man on
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the horse or the man falling under the horse or the man falling under the force. if you look close at the face the arrow is not really even going into his eyes. in terms of the text file itself, what else is there that still exists that is comparable, are there any items that have that kind of history attached? the victoria and albert museum have plenty of wonderful textiles from the same era and more elaborate embroideries actually. this is important for the narrative as much as the technique. but of course they are fragile. once they are conserved and looked after and kept out of the light there is no reason why they cannot keep going for quite a long time. you hear about paintings being commissioned at certain times through history. but embroidery, that just does not through history. but embroidery, thatjust does not seem to be a skill or product that has lasted in terms of documenting. it has but
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they have a finite life so any text file will start to disintegrate at some point because that is the nature of the actual material. but still there are quite a few pieces left and quite a few pieces that have been commissioned for the church in particular. do we know how long it took for them to do the whole thing? not really, there are theories about when it has been started and finished and who commissioned it. a reasonable guess it was commissioned by the brother of william the conqueror and so the dates would range from soon after 1066, no later than probably 1082 when he was disgraceful that one theory is that he commissioned it in pa rt theory is that he commissioned it in part to celebrate and explain what had happened but also because he was having his cathedral built at bayeux and it was dedicated in 1077 so they would have gone together really well if it could have been displayed at the same time. so i'm happy to go
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with those dates but plenty of other theories out there. thank you very much for your time this morning. the headlines are coming up. we will see you soon.
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