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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  January 22, 2018 7:00pm-8:00pm GMT

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you're watching beyond 100 days. the us government will reopen tonight after a three—day shutdown. democrats agree to give republicans the votes to get things moving in return for discussion of a key immigration issue. but the deal only lasts a fortnight, which means we could be back in a shutdown again next month. it's an odd way to govern. scuffles in israel's parliament, as the us vice president announces america will move its embassy tojerusalem by the end of next year. also on the programme... we're in davos, where the snow is falling, and debate is shifting to how the world might better share the wealth that is created. and ‘grab and go‘ shopping, the supermarket in america with no queues and no checkout. get in touch with us using the hashtag... #beyond1000ays hello and welcome — i'm katty kay in washington,
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and christian fraser is in london. trust is a scarce commodity in politics these days. but today democrats decided to trust republicans and give them enough votes to reopen the us government. this means that after three days of shutdown, federal workers will go back to work tomorrow. in return for those votes, democrats won a promise from their republican colleagues to address a key immigration issue. today's deal is not popular with the left of the democratic party which feels its leadership caved too soon. and just a brief time ago, i spoke with democratic senator chris van hollen. senator, you voted to reopen the american government, keep it up and running, why? for a couple of reasons, number one i always wanted to keep the government up and running. the question was under what conditions and what circumstances and we now have a commitment from the republicans, not only to address
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a lot of the key budget issues, like funding for community centres, tackling the opioid epidemic, but a guarantee of a vote a little after three weeks from now on a bipartisan deal to deal with the dreamers, and thatis deal to deal with the dreamers, and that is something the republicans had refused to do. they had refused to allow the moxey to work. with it we have a strong bipartisan majority to do that, is we think we have. that is an important step. right, but even if your republican collea g u es but even if your republican colleagues in the senate have agreed to address the issue of dakar commute have no agreement to get the deal you want on protecting those young immigrants and republicans of the house may say we're not going to accept this. two things, we know in the senate there is already strong bipartisan support for the grand durbin bill. we are about 57 senators, we need to pick up a few more, so senators, we need to pick up a few more, so we senators, we need to pick up a few more, so we think we are in a good position here. you're right, in the
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house there are absolutely no guarantees. on the other hand, we also know there are a majority of members in the house, republicans and democrats, who support a bipartisan approach to daca. and so we need to create some are meant, and this is important momentum. you come from maryland, a pretty progressive state, and you know i'm sure what the base of your party is saying about this decision of yours, that once again republicans are playing hardball, that once again republicans are playing hard ball, democrats that once again republicans are playing hardball, democrats are playing hardball, democrats are playing softball, and the democratic leadership has caved. well, i don't see it that way at all. what i see is republicans in the senate being forced to make a promise, a commitment, that they never would have made otherwise, and the alternative would have been allowing the government to be shutdown alternative would have been allowing the government to be shut down for weeks and weeks and weeks, and the
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idea that this has republicans would wa ke idea that this has republicans would wake up one day and said they would put the daca reform bill into a budget plan in my view was not realistic. so people's negotiating leverage would have declined over those weeks as the government was shutdown, so my view is take a commitment you would not have gotten, except for the circumstances... it just sounds gotten, except for the circumstances... itjust sounds like the democrats don't have much power. we are in the minority party in the house and the senate, of course we don't control the white house, and so don't control the white house, and so my view is that we played the best hand we could, both to get commitments on the budget issues, to make sure we fund those priorities we talked about, kids health and community centres, but also to get a commitment to have a vote on an issue that republicans wanted to ignore. and so now we have a
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commitment to allow the senate to work it's well, add the girl to have to work the world to get a bipartisan daca bill passed. let's bring in former advisor to george w bush and political analyst ron christie, who joins us now from new york. it seems to me that from over here the democrats tied spending to immigration, and the republicans ran a pretty smart and discipline strategy of saying here is chuck schumer and his supporters, in effect, shutting down the government in favour of illegal in the women's. good evening to you, christian. that is exactly what has happened here. if you go back to 2013, the last time we had a government shutdown, the democrat schumer said it was an act of industry —— and active idiocy to shut down the government and tight immigration. these polls indicated a majority of the american
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people wanted the government open, rather thanjust shut people wanted the government open, rather than just shut it people wanted the government open, rather thanjust shut it down people wanted the government open, rather than just shut it down and to daca, and the two and most importantly perhaps, what impact of this have on our military readiness in this children's health programmes and ceremony of the goods and services the government provides? so to say faith, rather than —— save face, they got a three—week bill to fund the government are now we have reached a bring and ship point because now we only go in till february eight, and the house majority does not like the senate compper mize on immigration. so we can all breathe easy, the american government is back up and running again, you kind of thing that might be the minimum the american government will be ever to do, keep its doors open for business, but what happens in two or three weeks' time? we could be back here again, can we, because i don't see how this gets resolved in two weeks?” can we, because i don't see how this gets resolved in two weeks? i think we will be back in the same spot. as ijust said the christian, the grand durbin bill is so wildly unpopular and has senate, they believe it
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still maintains a provision called chain migration, in other words if you are here illegally you will be to bring not only your parents but extended family members where they can have a path citizenship. that is not popular in the house, it is very popular in the senate, and i don't see how we get a compromise between the senate language on daca and what the senate language on daca and what the house position is by eight to february, we could very well be sitting in the same spot three weeks from now asking these very difficult questions of how do we continue to keep the united states government open and operating. thank you. great, we could be here again (!) with me now is the republican pollster kristen soltis anderson. you spend your life parling republican parties and voters, what do voters in the country make of what has just happened in washington? the irony is that something like daca, providing some legal protection to children, is quite popular even among republican vote rs quite popular even among republican voters full stop huge majorities of
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republicans think we don't necessarily want amnesty for everyone, for these folks who came in through no port of their own, let is do something about them. but republican leaders believe they are ina republican leaders believe they are in a strong position to get other popular things, in terms of immigration, whether it is increased border security, shifting to a more skills —based immigration system, these are things that some immigration hardliners in the white house are big fans of, and democrats believe that because of the changing demographics of america, publicans have backed themselves into an unpopular hardline view. but the tactic they have taken to try to make progress, shutting down the government, is in and of itself highly unpopular. so trying to believe what they is a popular with a unpopular means i think has worked out badly for them, which is why they have caved already afterjust a couple of days. so both sides seem to think this could work for them. i will paraphrase. let is through this forward to the mid—term elections, the republicans face critical elections in november, does this make any difference, or is the news
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world moving at such a hyperkinetic pace that by november people would think, shutdown, what shutdown?” pace that by november people would think, shutdown, what shutdown? i do believe either side gets to claim a victory from today's events that will in any way shape the events of coming november. there are in mind the last time the government shutdown, the government shutdown, republicans quote unquote lost that shutdown, they wanted to defund obamacare, it didn't work, the government was closed for a long time, and yet a year later republicans did quite well in those mid—term elections. this is the sort of thing especially if the shutdown is short, if there is not real significantly impact that people feel, i don't think it will affect many people's votes. how does the president come out of this, because it seems to be that he confused both the democrats and the republicans, he asked the democrats to come up with a bipartisan deal, which they did, and he turned his back on it, and the republican said... isn't it his fault, really? ithink and the republican said... isn't it his fault, really? i think this puts the president in a tough spot where he needs to be very clear about what he needs to be very clear about what he wants on immigration. he has had
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public statements that in some ways contradict one another. he says he wants to do something about the dreamers, get some kind of a daca fix. the understand that even within his own party, there is a majority in favour of it, but at the same time he has many advisers that believe strongly that we need to do a wholesale reform of our immigration system that includes changing things like the chain migration, and those are advisers who are quite influential, and understand that trumped himself has been an immigration hardliners since long before he was in the white house. so there are two sides to president trump in this issue. he needs to decide which one wants to come to the negotiating table in order for a deal to really get done. this is an issue, that america, along with many other countries in the west, have been wrestling with the west, have been wrestling with the years and years and years. what is the realistic chance it is an issue that the country can resolve in a way that people will actually vote on and pass? i think what it is
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going to require is that political leaders in washington listen to majorities of voters, and too often oi'i majorities of voters, and too often on these issues both parties are very captive to very loud extreme pieces of their base. on the republican side for instance, the vast majority want to do something about the dreamers, but there are some that think we can't do this because it is amnesty and if you going to do it you have to get a lot out of democrats for it. on the other hand there are folks in the democratic party that opposed even basic common—sense border security measures because they are concerned about their left flank. so as long as those bases are driving things it is very hard to see a good deal getting done. thank you very much coming in. dreamers aside, immigration reform aside, i'm just wondering, how does look from your point of view, from the other side of the atlantic, when the american government can't even keep itself open? it looks pretty chaotic, to be honest, because you have the world's biggest economy that can't keep the
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government open. they are kicking the can down the road every three weeks, how can you profess to lead the world of you can't even keep government open? we will talk later in the programme about trust. clearly they have had a discussion about how they can get bipartisan deals through within congress but also there is a fundamental lack of trust, it seems to me, within the united states the government as a whole, and this is not going to do them any favours at all, is it?|j would even argue that for other countries trying to deal with the united states, it is also the world's biggest military, and this makes it difficult when you lurch like this from week to week not knowing if the government will be open. as ron said, we could be back here soon. keeps us in business, though. on a visit to israel the us vice president has announced that the us embassy will move from tel aviv to jerusalem by the end of 2019. previously the white house had said it would take several years to complete the move. the decision earned the vice president loud applause in the knesset, arab israeli's walked out at the beginning of his speech.
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mr pence said president trump's decision to move the embassy righted a 70 year wrong. he also urged palestinian leaders to return to negotiations. the trump administration believes it can accomplish what previous presidents have failed to do. let's hear from the vice president now. a warm welcome from one side in a contested city. mike pence met prime minister netanyahu contested city. mike pence met prime minister neta nyahu complete contested city. mike pence met prime minister netanyahu complete with an israeli honour guard. the vice president was a driving force in donald trump ‘s macon trev recognition of jerusalem donald trump ‘s macon trev recognition ofjerusalem as the capital of israel, and in response, praise from israel's leadership, which sees the city as its eternal, undivided capital. i welcome all of them to israel's capital, jerusalem. this is the first time i've been standing and we can say those three words, israel's capital, jerusalem.
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in making this historic announcement on december six, president trump did so convinced that by recognising israel's capital, jerusalem, that we would create a opportunity to move on. but the jerusalem move saw mr p shunned by arab mps, calling him the messengerfrom donald shunned by arab mps, calling him the messenger from donald trump, shunned by arab mps, calling him the messengerfrom donald trump, a political pyromaniac. meanwhile, the palestinian president mahmoud abbas has been urging the eu to recognise the state of palestine. there have been frequent clashes since america's decision, which palestinians say disqualifies the us asa palestinians say disqualifies the us as a peace broker. they want east jerusalem as their capital. mike pence's visit to the region has brought renewed focus on his own faith. he is an evangelical christian, among many americans who support for israel is expressed in religious as well as political terms. some believe in a second
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coming of christ, and think the bible suggestsjewish sovereignty overjerusalem first. we joined an evangelical tour of the city. israel has a right to be here, this is god's chosen spot for the hebrew people. it is just a joy to be able to be here. it is the rock, it is what the bible is based off of it, and they are god's chosen people. but palestinian christian church leaders say it threatens the state of the holy land. followers flocked recently for a yearly baptism ceremony where it is believed christ was baptised on the banks of the riverjordan. the american vice president had wanted to use his trip to doc about protecting christians in the middle east, but the jerusalem decision, while delighting his evangelical supporters at home, now sees him shunned by church leaders in the very birthplace of christianity. mike pence's visit
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will still address his belief in his boss's ultimate deal between israelis and palestinians, but for those opposed to the us strategy, there is unlikely to be a moment of revelation. tom bateman, bbc news, jerusalem. mahmoud abbas was in brussels while mr pence was in jerusalem, talking to european foreign ministers about a two state solution. all of this focus on the president's comments about africa the other way, mike pence was forced to a nswer the other way, mike pence was forced to answer questions today about an alleged affair that president is said to have had 12 years ago with a pawn star. yes, last week the wall streetjournal reported pawn star. yes, last week the wall street journal reported mr trump pawn star. yes, last week the wall streetjournal reported mr trump is my personal lawyer michael coen had set upa my personal lawyer michael coen had set up a shell company some years ago in delaware, and a pseudonym to pay hush money to stormy daniels, who you can see here, after the story was linked to a gossip magazine. mr pence said it was
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baseless. missed daniels has been taking under a tour, make america horny again. laughter pa rt horny again. laughter part of me can't believe that we're actually talking about somebody called stormy daniels and her horny tour of america, butler, look, here's the thing about this story, if this had been a story that had emerged under the presidency of barack obama, or george w bush for that matter, it would have been front—page news for weeks and weeks. that would potentially have derailed their presidency. this story emerges, and mike pence has said the allegations are just that, allegations are just that, allegations only and the president's lawyer has said they are baseless, but the story emerges and everybody says, oh, this is another story about donald trump and his relationships with a string of women. it is remarkable how he has
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changed the perception of normal for the presidency. he did say he could shoot anybody on fifth ave and they would still elect him, and perhaps this is evidence that there is nothing that touches him, not for his base anyway. we will not be going on that tour by the way, and following stormy daniels. the executive leadership of usa gymnastics' board of directors has resigned the resignations come in the wake of the sexual abuse scandal involving former us team doctor larry nassar. nassar has admitted ten criminal counts and could face life in prison. board of directors chairman paul parilla, vice chairman jay binder and treasurer bitsy kelley tendered resignations effective a day ago. turkish forces have shelled targets in northern syria, on the third day of an offensive, against the kurdish militia group, the ypg. turkish media say, the army has advanced at least five kilometres, into the afrin region. but the ypg says, it has halted the offensive and destroyed two turkish tanks. 12 senior members of ukip's front bench team have now resigned in protest at henry bolton's refusal to step down as leader of the party. mr bolton has been under pressure
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since it emerged his girlfriend had made racist comments. klindt the story of global income inequality is one we all know by now. and yet, the figures are still striking. oxfam has the latest report on the growing gulf between the super rich and the rest of the world. the charity says some 82% of money generated last year went to the richest 1% of the global population. it blamed tax evasion, companies' influence on public policy, the erosion of workers' rights for the gap. but some have queried the charity's figures. a year ago oxfam said eight individuals have as much wealth as the poorest half of the world's population. now it has revised that figure to 61 people. the report coincides with the start of the world economic forum in switzerland where christine lagarde, the managing director of the imf, raised the issue of income inequality. global growth has been accelerating
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since 2016, and all signs point to a continuous strengthening of that growth. this year, in 2018, and next year, in 2019. so this is very welcome news. growth, in our view, needs to be more inclusive. not only across country, which has occurred over the course of the last few decades, but within countries, and some areas of focus, in our view, require training for workers that are displaced or at risk of being displaced by new technologies and globalisation. we need those new opportunities for workers at risk we'd need new opportunities for young people, and we need new opportunities for women as well. and
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then being included safely in the workplace. two things i want to pick up on, first of all of the number of top people that china is sending. you might remember that president xi did quite well out of davos last year, a p pa re ntly quite well out of davos last year, apparently they are sending at least 111 leaders and representatives, compared to 84 last year and only 30 about ten years ago, so much more airport and for them, and india and russia are also increasing the size of their delegations. the world economic forum has carried out a survey of political leaders, still the biggest risk, but can you see for the long, further along, cyber risks, that has not appeared for three of four years. 2014 thing was the last time that cyber risks was
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flagged up as a concern for business, which tells you to things, one how serious they see the threat now, but secondly how they have been behind the curve. the three years wasn't even mentioned. it tells me a third thing, should that that laser surgery you had guys is very good because i could not see a word on that chart. i am getting long—sighted now! anyway... that chart. i am getting long-sighted now! anyway... all these chinese are turning up, which is ingesting because all of the discussion of the shutdown through into disarray the question of whether the president would be turning up. a whole lot of congressional members had cancelled their trip to davos. let's see if their trip to davos. let's see if the americans get on board. but the early indications are that the president will give a very tough speech to global leaders in davos, in which it was a you may all be focused on china but america is back, i'm the leader and things have new rules, and we will play tough on issues like trade. it will be
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interesting to see what the president can say. and good snow this year. they can go skiing. we've all been there. a quick zip round the supermarket only to get stuck behind someone buying enough food to feed a family of eight for a month. cue the long wait. nothing wrong with families of eight, i have a family of six and usually have about three supermarket trolleys, but if you shop at amazon, in—store, you can get away without the supermarket hell. the internet giant has opened its first supermarket in seattle — without checkouts. amazon go uses ceiling—mounted cameras and electronic sensors to identify customers and track what items they pick up. you get billed automatically when you walk out. did you think the shelves as unexpected item in the bagging area? i e—mailed somebody i know who is a
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senior executive at amazon, he says this is an amazing experience, the app clocks up what you get as you leave the store and they are very excited about it, but that, shenzhen with a tad about davos and income inequality, of course one of the big issues driving it is automation, morejobs are lost issues driving it is automation, more jobs are lost through automation than they are through trade deals. president trump talks about china and nafta but actually it is automation and robots that have caused most people to lose their jobs, have caused most people to lose theirjobs, and have caused most people to lose their jobs, and what have caused most people to lose theirjobs, and what amazon have just done will ring alarm bells i would imagine for quite a lot of checkout clerks, who think myjob won't even be needed. 1200 job cuts at tesco in customer care for stop people on the shop floor being replaced by, robots. there are 900 newjobs, replaced by, robots. there are 900 new jobs, they say, replaced by, robots. there are 900 newjobs, they say, but a lot of jobs going. we are not saying amazon should not do this, this is technology, and it must go on, but those people at davos need to address what the impact is on that. now donald trump has been quick
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to dismiss michael wolff's book as a tissue of lies and fake news but it seems it's being used as a way to sell even more copies of fire and fury. take a look at the window display of a major book shop here in london which has used the presidents tweet in a rather creative fashion in its window display. more evidence that the president's reaction to michael wolff is doing wonders for my coffee's bank balance. that my local store in suburban london there are plenty of copies of fire and fury in the window, the selling like hot cakes. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — the us secretary of state says it's time to pay attention to "the special relationship" between america and the uk and are you switching off your social media because you're fed up with fake news? that's still to come. hello, we have seen a real mix of
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weather over the past few days and i think that is how it will continue through the rest of this week. of course, some areas still have quite a bit of lying snow, but dare i say it, others, well, it almost feels like spring, and i think it is that feeling of spring that will win out for the next few days, simply because we have displaced the cold airto the because we have displaced the cold air to the continent and we are picking up a much milderflow from the atlantic, but that comes at a price. increasing amounts of cloud, a little bit of breeze coming in from the south western approaches, and eventually that cloud will thicken up to give rain across the western side of the british isles as western side of the british isles as we start the first part of tuesday. not a cold night anywhere, four to 9 degrees or so, so at least much of this rain, certainly at the lower levels, will be falling as rain rather than snow. and there won't be a massive problem with ice, either. here we are, first thing on tuesday morning, a really dank, cold start across western parts of scotland and northern ireland. further to the
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east, you will have had a pulse of rainfora time, east, you will have had a pulse of rain for a time, there it is living with intent across eastern parts, following on behind, the cloud sitting well down on the welsh mountains, and across the moors and the tours of the south—west. quite a breeze here as well, so fairly unpleasant conditions of the morning commute and the school run. does it get any better? all we will do is just gradually eased those weather fronts ever further towards the east. there will be some brightness in there, and because of the direction of flow from a relatively mild correction, quite a lot of double—figure action going on from across the british isles stop one or two spots might well make it to around 1415 degrees. as we move through tuesday on into wednesday, so we bring a succession of weather fronts and from the atlantic. quite a vigorous area of low pressure. notice how we squeeze those isobars. they will be gales or not severe gale force winds both near that weather front, which will be quite active and squally, following on
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behind the wind is not really using off that much either. really mild anywhere near the front and then it turned a wee bit fresher. by the end of the week, windy, sunny spells and showers, turning colder as well. just a quick comparison between tuesday's temperatures, the mild end of the spectrum, and then they rather fall away as we move on towards thursday, many losing three or4 towards thursday, many losing three or 4 degrees. this is beyond one hundred days, with me katty kay in washington, christian fraser's in london. our top stories, a deal is reached on the shutdown the us government reopens, as the two main parties strike a deal. republicans are happy but many democrats aren't. we are in the minority party in the house in the senate we don't control the white house so my view is that we played the best and we could. how is the special relationship going? rex tillerson is in london for top level meetings, just days after his boss snubbed a visit to open the new embassy there.
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coming up in the next half hour: people are losing trust in social media, globally a massive 63 per cent say they struggle to tell real news from fake news. and guess who's getting they're very own star on the hollywood walk of fame. let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag 'beyond—one—hundred—days' more now on our top story, democrats have come to an agreement with republicans to reopen the us government. it's seen as a win for president trump but the democratic base is not happy. they feel the party's leaders gave too much away. to win enough democratic votes to open government republicans agreed to address the key immigration issue of dreamers, they are the children brought to the us illegally by their parents. democrats say they'll vote to keep the government open until february 8th. for more on this we can cross live to capitol hill to speak to our washington correspondent jane 0 brien. the white house press secretary has
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been speaking, she says the white house is very happy the government is back open. yes and in the words of donald trump that the democrats have come to their senses. this is not going to do much for bipartisan cooperation, and it also draws a distinction between what mitch mcconnell has said and is promising democrats to get that deal and what the white house may prefer because listening to that briefing, sarah sanders was asked repeatedly, does a deal on immigration include funding for the wall and increased border security? does the president agreed it should bea does the president agreed it should be a pathway to citizenship for the so—called dreamers? she was not able to a nswer so—called dreamers? she was not able to answer any of these questions giving won the sense that although the democrats might hope for a clean resolution to the fate of the dreamers the white house might be pushing for a far more comprehensive immigration bill which of course would be far more ambitious, far more contentious and prone to
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pitfalls. what is the mood on the hill today? because we keep hearing reports that i have seen on twitter and social media from groups on the left saying our leadership caved and give away far too much, what did democrats get in return? the sense among democrats is the ones i have spoken to seemed rather sheepish, they realise perhaps that they managed to get out of this impasse before there was any real political harm to them in the midtown is coming up, it was a short shutdown, two days of, it plays on saturday and sunday. but there seems to be sense that they did not get quite what they were hoping for or that they could have got. the deal is not substantially different, and again it is based entirely on a policy commitment by mitch mcconnell that he will address the issue of protections for the dreamers. and
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that there will be legislation that he will address coming up on friday the eighth but what's that legislation entails and whether the house will support it and whether the white house will support it or even the senate republicans is an open question is with —— it is a deal with the guarantees. the president is as material as ever, he spent the weekend bashing democrats and in the last few minutes he said we have a whole lot of daylight between the white house and democrats on immigration. that is a bold statement because the democrats and many republicans will say that they don't know what his position is on immigration, this was one of the problems that both parties had in the negotiations leading up to this shutdown. chuck schumer famously said it was like negotiating with jell—o schumer famously said it was like negotiating withjell—o because on one hand he seemed to say he was all in favour of coming up for protections for the dreamers and then he would take a hardline stance
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just one hour or so later so it is very difficult to knowjust just one hour or so later so it is very difficult to know just what that position is for the white house and of course that makes it more difficult going forward with this pledge to look at legislation that could end up with protections for them. sarah summers is currently giving her press conference and says they will make a long—term deal on immigration if and only if the deal is good for the country. as jane said what the white house is saying is pretty bold given that there are still differences. and the differences are significant, the rcs ideological differences with people have discussed in france, in the uk and they have discussed them in germany and comes to the issue of border security and what you do about people who are already in this country even if they came in here illegally? i just don't see country even if they came in here illegally? ijust don't see how in the space of 2/2 or three weeks the country can resolve something that it struggles to get to grips with
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over the course of the last eight yea rs. over the course of the last eight years. this is tough stuff and i just think you have these two wings of the party on the left of the democratic party in the right of the republicans and how you can bridge those to divide when you have people evenin those to divide when you have people even in the white house who are on the end of the spectrum on this. it is going to be very hard for them to come up with something that is satisfactory to all areas of the immigration debate. you could say the same about the middle east peace process. let's talk about the trip to israel. he has announced that the us embassy will move from tel aviv tojerusalem by the end of 2019. the trump administration believes it can accomplish what previous presidents have failed to do. let's hear from the vice president now. just last month president donald trump made history. he rated a 70 year wrong and kept his word to the american people when he announced that the united states of america will finally acknowledged jerusalem
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is as real's capital. lets get more withjohn alterman. he is the director of the middle east programme and the centre for middle eastern strategic studies. the palestinians have responded to vice president penned by saying it is impossible for the americans to bea is impossible for the americans to be a neutral arbiter by moving the capital, saying they are recognising jerusalem is the capital. if that's the case? is the case that... that although the president says we want the middle eastern peace the americans have effectively shut themselves out of playing that role? ican themselves out of playing that role? i can figure out the theory that the administration thinks this makes the us more of a useful mediator in this conflict even a facilitator of the conflict. the arab side feels that they have been fighting from a position of weakness to start with, and now they have even less to give away. if the us is putting its thumb
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on the skill in favour of the israelis the arabs say, even arabs who say it is time to make the deal say it is much harder to make the deal because there's nothing left to give away. you speak to people in the white house and oliver the janet kershner‘s portfolio, this is something the president felt he could do and no one else could do. you'll might be present‘s approach to negotiations have not been what people expected, his approach to budget negotiations was not the wheeler dealer. this is a really ha rd wheeler dealer. this is a really hard problem. there are not a lot of solutions that people have not tried already. i think we have a really narrow zone of what the side can give. the question is what does a commitment mean? i don't think this gets us closer to the palestinians making the commitment meaning anything more than it would have meant before, the difference is the palestinians say there is no deal to be had any more. it complicates relationships in the region, he has had robust conversations injordan, king abdullah said he had a candid
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and frank talk about the us decision, warming edward exacerbates tensions in the region. this must be a concern not just tensions in the region. this must be a concern notjust about the palestinians. certainly for king abdullah, he is concerned with a large palestinian population perhaps 60% of the population ofjordan are palestinians, he had a hard line to walk because he wants to be aligned with the united states and palestinians in jordan say with the united states and palestinians injordan say this is absolutely outrageous. the president of egypt in a more secure political situation but it is notable that a trap where the vice president talked about aborting crescent images in the middle east, the large community and egypt, 10% of the population in the country had no interest in meeting the vice president because this makes christians in egypt and throws the middle east in a more vulnerable position because they seem to be aligned with an imperial power of the united states instead of being woven into the fabric of their countries. i should ask about
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extra lesson in the vice president, one in israel and one in london, both of them spending an enormous out of time trying to explain where the president is coming from and making excuses. he talks about africa today, the vice president, and the president is good in his heart and rex tillerson says do not taken seriously the relationship is what it was, is that good for american foreign policy win have to spend so much time doing this?m american foreign policy win have to spend so much time doing this? it is what it is, i think that when the president is predictable that is something people are used to, this president decided that there is a lot to begin from being unpredictable, by making people try to bring him over and you saw the way the chinese treated him in beijing, he felt that he got things out of china because they wanted to create and so well. the french want to treat him well when he went for bastille day. in the long—term whether the seven american interests we will have to see, but it is
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certainly hard when you are representing the united - and have fi‘v—f look over and wonder if is the term obsolete? citing anger american embassy. which is exactly where rex tillerson made his first stop. he then held meetings with theresa may their own relationship. the relationship between the us and
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the uk is absolutely fundamental to our diplomacy but also to our economy and as you know there are 1 million people at work in the united states and void by british companies as their1.2 states and void by british companies as their 1.2 million at work every country supplied by american companies, there is no other economic collision ship like it. we spend a lot of time talking about the world problems and sometimes we forget about the importance of the world problems and sometimes we forget abou‘ and i think ancw foreign = g on the elements g a é need of this relationship on as eh .-. in common cause 7,757 7t7..- in common cause to -f-.7 the serious around | the serious always
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both other nations..{ bigi‘giéil my relationships that v £7? 2- g!" g 27 2 1; gm 2; 3g 27 is have v 337? 2- 2s!" 2 27 2 2? 3“; 2; 32 27 2? have to v 337? 2- 2-7 2 27 2 2 2a? 2 32 27 27; have to it v 33? 2- 27 2 27 2 2 2a? 2 32 27 27; have to it is better you have to explain it is better than we think then you have a problem. he was also trying to push for a harder line on iran and commitments from european allies and was told that believe the cat because the deal that the uk supports and has reiterated its supports and has reiterated its support for is about the nuclear situation, it is not about as an's effect in the wider region. so pushed back again for borisjohn is in today. they have also been talking about another key thing in us foreign policy. to exercise restraint in its incursion into kurdish—held territory in northern syria. speaking to the bbc‘s selin gerit, the turkish presidential spokesperson — ibrahim kalin — defended turkey's operation in the afrin region, and had this message to international critics, many of whom are its allies in nato. what we would like to see is for the united states to stop supporting
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people and white pg. is turkey moving away from natal and the western alliance? sometimes our public fears that natal is not paying enough attention to turkey's legitimate security concerns. the city in war has entered its seventh year, we have had many casualties, we have fought against the daesh terrorists and pkk terrorists and other organisations and we have received very little help from natal and our public and people keep asking us, where as nato? but that does not mean that we are running away from nato or nato was away from turkey, . .. the away from nato or nato was away from turkey,... the united away from nato or nato was away from turkey, . .. the united states away from nato or nato was away from turkey,... the united states has backed the white pg and the turkish government sees it as an extension
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of the kurdish separatists in turkey, the pkk. do not forget that the americans and brits have special forces working alongside them and have been arming them. when you look in syria and how america is isolating itself when it comes to iran and then they stand up with a key nato allies like turkey, where is american power in the middle east at the moment? with the exception of saudi arabia they are almost absent. the argument from the white house would be look what a success we have had in the fight against isis and it is really under president trump that that accelerated by the process of the white house devolving a session ata the white house devolving a session at a power to the military generals, allowing the military to take command and supply the # with the weapons they needed and they are taking a lot of credit understandably in the fight against isis. i think this administration sees the middle east is one of their strong points at the moment. this is beyond one hundred days. still to come — a special,
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and some would say long overdue accolade for minnie mouse, a star on the hollywood walk of fame. we'll have more at the end of the programme he played more than 600 matches for blackpool, captained england and was even part of the victorious 1966 world cup squad — today tributes have been pouring in forjimmy armfield who has died at the age of 82. david ornstein looks back at his life. jimmy arnfield rose to prominence in black and white, he would go on to calm the most colourful careers. born in denton greater manchester police 1955, he was perhaps destined for the field. i nearly all my -- annually always had a little tennis ball in my pocket. that is how i learned to become a footballer. he
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had a record 627 games for blackpool. he was captain of a 17 year period as a dashing right back. that is why they have since then they stand after him, and erected a statue in his honour. jimmy was loyal and loved. he won 43 caps for england. and a perfect intersection. 15 as skipper and was part of the 1966 world cup winning squad, only injury prevented him from playing in the turnaround. is it you are not playing in the next one option must be fit for the world cup starts. and i never played again. it is better we won because today people look back and say well remember the world cup squad. it is not the same as being in the 11 who played in the final. the point was it is better that they won. later he turned his hand to management, guiding leeds united to the 1975 european cup final. he also spent the best part of 40 years as a summariser for the
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bbc, becoming known to many as the voice of football. in a statement, his family saidjimmy voice of football. in a statement, his family said jimmy passed away peacefully after a decade long battle with cancer. the flow of tributes a fitting reflection of one of the greats of english football. who we trust defines how we vote. with the spread of social media politics are becoming ever more divisive. the public relations firm the german published its 80th annual trust and credibility survey, information comes from over 30,000 people in 20 countries. the figures for the united states are alarming, trust in government to get sharpest fall on record, down 14 points. fewer than one in three people now believe that government officials are credible. 60% of people find it
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difficult to distinguish between real news and fake news. hewitt in the uk less than one quarter of people trust social media and most tv firms are not doing enough to crack down on the cleaners. let's speak to matt harrison. it is an alarming rate, iwent speak to matt harrison. it is an alarming rate, i went three and executive summary today. why do you think first of all when it comes to the us there has been such a colla pse the us there has been such a collapse in trust? thank you for having me on. it really is a dramatic report for others this year. devastating that we are living ina very year. devastating that we are living in a very polarised world. the us trusts and their index, are composite index has trust in government fail 37 points. what was interesting to know was that fell nine points amongst the general population but 27 points to the informed public. devastating for me i think the general consensus of a
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loss of positive fact —based information and the loss of civil discourse. we have seen that play out over the past week with the us shutdown and it has resulted in a colla pse shutdown and it has resulted in a collapse in trust in the us government. when you look at the social factors that are driving this at the moment, we have some of the lowest unemployment on record here in the uk and also in the us, we have record growth on the stock markets at the same time we have huge disparity in wealth and real concern about wage growth. is this what is driving this lack of trustees think? yellow light you have touched on the great irony of this finding. it is with high employment and a reading stock market and yet people are feeling very uncomfortable with the information they receive, they are not certain what to trust that true. in fact at the factor factor is.
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when we unpack media in particular there is a real drop in trust on social media and search engines, there was a bit of recovery in fact a 5—point increase in trust and traditional journalism a 5—point increase in trust and traditionaljournalism at a rise in journalists and a sense there of those trying to seek truth and storytelling. there are inherent contradictions in the report finding. it shows that more than half of people with like businesses to be better regulated, and yet they do not trust the government to make or enforce the rules. people want more rules in the business world but do not trust the government to carry out those rules. it is an interesting contradiction and i think you have seen in the us there isa think you have seen in the us there is a lot of —— think you have seen in the us there isa lot of ——a think you have seen in the us there is a lot of —— a loss of trust and the government and the belief that the government and the belief that the government is the most broken pa rt the government is the most broken part of a system. there is the belief that ngos represent the greatest approach to solving
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problems and i think that is an insta nce problems and i think that is an instance of ngos being expected to hold government and our business to account. business was right behind ngos and it is noteworthy that 63% also look to business to engage in societies challenges while delivering —— while delivering profit. there is an increase in trust and ceos in an expectation that ceos will begin to engage in societal issues and discuss societal issues. a call—back to last week for the call for businesses to be active in society. it does not only affects those who are in politics whether people believe fake news real news, it affects businesses as well because your company could be the target of a fake news campaign. howard concern is this causing amongst all of the ceos and the leaders that you're talking to in davos? how worried are they about this? i think we are all conscious
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that we are living in a very dramatically changed age. and that social media and the information being disseminated by social media can be used for illjust this —— can be used for illjust as well as good. people are looking to facebook and the changes they have made errors in news feed in the past couple of weeks, as beginning to try and wrestle this to the ground but it also becomes incumbent upon businesses to be more proactive in communicating their story and advancing the facts as they see them. frankie very much. -- thank you very much. her north korean delegation for a landmark visit to inspect cultural venues for next and all eyes have been on this woman hyon song wol. she is the leader of pyongyang's most popular girl band, the first time such a high profile figure from the north has been seen in soeul.
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among the bands many fans — is one kimjung un. pope francis has apologised for remarks he made last week in chile defending a chilean bishop accused of covering up sexual abuse. he said he was aware that his words had wounded many, though he repeated that he believed bishopjuan barros was innocent. he said his comments had hinged on the fact that he had not seen proof of guilt the uk is to have not one but two royal weddings this year. princess eugenie — the youngest daughter of the duke and duchess of york and eighth in line to the british throne — will marry her long—term boyfriend this autumn. the princess got engaged to jack brooksbank, manager of london nightclub, earlier this month. they're to get married at the same chapel as prince harry and meghan markle, st george's chapel at windsor castle. now here's some positive news in the gender equality movement in hollywood/. minnie mouse is finally due to receive a star on the hollywood walk of fame today.
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she's been in the entertainment industry for 90 years and many disney fans say her star is long overdue. her beloved mickey was honoured with a star four decades ago. for decades ago! not sure what to say about this. minnie mouse i would like to see what cream she uses because she has not aged a day! if she could give me the number of whether she is using. is this part of the call me to live in? the fact that many has been recognised as equal of many? he was the start of the show and she was the sidekick. that would be like you getting a star and that would be like you getting a starand me that would be like you getting a star and me getting pasta 40 years later. i am the sidekick. of course i get it later. wrong, kristian. that is what you're meant to say at that point. we come together, we are
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a package. two stars on the sidewalk! coming up next, rose and considers you with outside source. we would have all the latest headlines for viewers in the uk. we will be the same time tomorrow. join us for that. we have seen a real mix of weather over the past few days and i think thatis over the past few days and i think that is how it will continue through the rest of this week. some areas still have quite a bit of lying snow but there we say at others well it's almost feels like spring and it is the feeling of spring that will win out over the next couple of days certainly because we have displaced the cold air from the convent and picking up a much milderflow from the atlantic but that comes at a price. increasing amounts of cloud
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and the breeze coming in as i say from the south western approaches, and eventually that cloud will thicken up with rain and —— with rain across the western side of the butter aisles as we start tuesday. not people write anywhere,. at 9 degrees. much of this rain at the lower levels will be falling as rain rather than snow. there will be a massive problem ice, either. he we are, the first thing on tuesday morning a really cold start across northern and western parts of scotla nd scotland through northern ireland, too. further to the east we will have had a pulse rate for a time, there it is lurking. following on behind, the cloud sitting well down on the welshman to and, so to across the moors and part of the south—west. quite appreciate as well south—west. quite appreciate as well soa south—west. quite appreciate as well so a fairly unpleasant condition for the morning commute and school run. doesn't any better? all we are going to do through the day is easily these weather fronts over the worst east. there will be some brightness
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and because the direction of flow here from the relatively mild direction but quite a lot of double—figure action going on. one or two spots might well make it to around 14 or 15 degrees. as we move to choose the into wednesday we bring a succession of weather fronts through the atlantic, that is of of low pressure. notice how we squeeze those isobars in, possible severe gale force winds both knew the weather front which will be quite active and squally and following on behind the wind not easing off that much either. my other near the front and a little bit fresher and by the end of the week windy, sunny spells and showers and turning colder as well. and just to give you a quick comparison between tuesdays temperatures, the mild end of the spectrum and then the following to move on towards thursday, —— moving on towards thursday. this is bbc news.
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i'm ben brown. the headlines at 8: the ukip leader henry bolton insists he won't step down from his post, despite 12 figures resigning from their party roles in protest. it is now time to put an end to the infighting that has been going on for some time and to remove those who have been part of that. in a single phrase — it is time to drain the swamp. the us government partial shutdown is set to end, after senate republicans and democrats voted to approve a temporary funding bill.
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the head of the army warns that britain's military may struggle to respond to future threats without more money. on trial for murder and attempted murder — a court hears darren osborne drove into a crowd near a north london mosque because he wanted to kill muslims. also coming up, fresh evidence of the intense strain hospitals
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