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tv   Newsday  BBC News  January 26, 2018 12:00am-12:31am GMT

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i'm rico hizon in singapore. this is newsday on the bbc. the headlines: a mixed reception for president trump in davos. he fires a warning to the palestinians, saying they must accept his decision onjerusalem or aid will be cut. casey affleck has withdrawn from the oscars due to claims of sexual harassment. myanmar rejects criticism of aung san syi kyi by a long time friend and veteran us diplomat and drops him from its advisory panel. and we'll be hearing from china's "oprah winfrey," an empress of reality television, who happens to be transgender. live from our studios in singapore and london, this is bbc world news.
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it's newsday. glad you could join us. it's 8am in singapore, midnight in london, and 1am in the swiss ski resort of davos, where president trump is attending the world economic forum. he's the first us president to show up in 18 years, and he says he has come as "salesman in chief" for the united states. but he also had something to say about politics, in particular, peace in the middle east. he met with israeli prime minister netanyahu, and had words for the palestinian leadership too. they refused to meet with vice president mike pence last week after mr trump unilaterally decided to recognisejerusalem as the capital of israel. mr trump was not impressed. when they disrespected us a week ago
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by not allowing our great vice president to see them and me with them, hundreds of millions of dollars of aid and support, tremendous numbers, numbers that nobody understands, that money is not going to them unless they sit down and negotiate peace. i can tell you israel does want to make peace. otherwise we will have nothing to do with them. this was never brought up by negotiators, but it is brought up by negotiators, but it is brought up by me. so i will say the hardest subject they had to talk about was jerusalem. we tookjerusalem off the table. we will not talk about it any more. we took it off the table. we do not have to talk about it any more. i do not know that the
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negotiation will ever take place. but they have to respect the process also. there was an immediate reaction from the palestinians. the ambassador to washington dr husam zomlot, told the bbc earlier that only an international body could oversee peace talks in the region. the most important thing is that we solidify and strengthen our commitment as palestinians, and the palestinian president has been clear we remain absolutely committed to the 2—state solution from 1967, committed to the international consensus, and committed to nonviolence, and we remain committed toa nonviolence, and we remain committed to a adherence to a genuine peace process. and that peace process requires an international intervention. for many years we made an exception. in all other conflicts, we needed international principles to deliver success. now, we are seeing no principles to deliver success. now, we are seeing no way, we principles to deliver success. now, we are seeing no way, we need an international table. president trump has not taken the rhythm of the
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table, he has taken the table altogether. —— jerusalem table, he has taken the table altogether. ——jerusalem off. let's ta ke let's take a look at some of the day's other news. imagine if i told you we were 30 seconds closer to the end of the world according to the doomsday clock. don't panic. this is the clock. it's a symbol designed to give an assessment of how unstable the world is given recent events, and the closer it gets to midnight, the worse things are. it's run by a team of science leaders, and now they've moved the dials two minutes to midnight. have a listen to this. in 2017, we moved the clock to 2.5 minutes to midnight, to reflect and stability characterised by increasing recklessness around nuclear rhetoric and a decrease on expertise at the exact moment when it is needed. for the first time in
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many years, in fact, no us and russian nuclear arms negotiations are under way. if the posture review is any guide to us policy, there will be no us—russian arms control in negotiations in the foreseeable future. instead, we could see a return to the nuclear arms race. and this is also making news today. hindu hardliners have ransacked shops, burnt vehicles, and clashed with police in parts of northern india during protests against a bollywood film. "padmaavat" is a period drama about a relationship between a hindu queen and a muslim ruler. hindu extremist groups say the film distorts history. despite the threats, the film still opened in 5,000 cinemas. a high—speed train caught fire in china's anhui province following what is believed to have been an electrical fault. no casualties were reported. three fire engines attended the blaze which was quickly brought under control. the cause of the incident is under investigation. paris is on flood alert.
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the river seine has risen to more than five times its normal level in the centre of the french capital. the level rose again overnight, and is expected to peak this weekend. one train line which runs under the river has been closed until the end of the month, which is now officially the wettest in france for more than a century. a brazilian court has approved the seizure of former president lula da silva's passport. its a major blow to the politician's plans to run for the presidency again later this year. three judges voted on wednesday to uphold lula's convictions of taking a bribe and money laundering and extended his sentence. in sport, jose mourinho has extended his contract as manager at manchester united until 2020, with an option for another year. his previous deal was set to expire next year. mourinho said he was "delighted" that united felt he was "the right manager. " myanmar‘s government has accused the former us diplomat,
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bill richardson, of carrying out a personal attack on aung san suu kyi. mr richardson resigned from a burmese investigation into violence in rakhine state, calling it a "whitewash." he was particularly critical of ms suu kyi, saying she lacked moral leadership. our south—east asia correspondent, jonathan head, reports. for five months, myanmar‘s forfive months, myanmar‘s rakhine state has burnt and smouldered. its muslim population has fled in staggering numbers. and the reputation of its once untouchable leader has been irreparably tainted. aung san suu kyi has responded by promising to implement changes proposed by former un kofi annan, and by inviting a border statesman to advise her. among them, an old friend. bill richardson is a former
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us governor and one—time ambassador to the un, with a long—standing commitment to myanmar. aung san suu kyi also expressed a desire for genuine, high—level dialogue with the burmese government. in the early 19905, the burmese government. in the early 1990s, he was among the first diplomats to visit aung san suu kyi when she was under house arrest. so, his sudden resignation from the board is a blow. and he had some withering comments about aung san suu kyi's unwillingness to listen. it isa suu kyi's unwillingness to listen. it is a whitewash. i thought it would be independent, that they would be independent, that they would take her advice on the rohingya crisis. the citizenship issue, human rights, but instead, it issue, human rights, but instead, it is just issue, human rights, but instead, it isjust a validation issue, human rights, but instead, it is just a validation of a policy. this is the headquarters of aung san suu kyi's party, the nld, and it is the place that bill richardson would have come to in the 1990s when he
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was campaigning for the then democracy leader's released. today, we have been unable to find anyone to respond to the extraordinary criticism the former us governor has made about her. bill richardson is not alone in his disenchantment with the burmese leader. this man spent 11 years in prison for criticising the military. he is not afraid to criticise now. she is a very difficult person to work with. we thought bringing bill richardson on board would help because they are personal friends. board would help because they are personalfriends. bill richardson had helped her in those days when she was under house arrest. for things to turn out this way i think is very dismal and also very disappointing. but the other members of the advisory board are continuing their work, arguing that it is too $0011 their work, arguing that it is too soon tojudge the their work, arguing that it is too soon to judge the myanmar government's efforts to fix the rakhine state conflict. government's efforts to fix the rakhine state conflictlj government's efforts to fix the rakhine state conflict. i think bill
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richardson was a little bit in a hurry to make that statement. i think it is unfair. and like the statement says, it is not a legitimate statement by him. already, in the areas where there was fighting last august, now, there is rebuilding. transit camps are being prepared for returning refugees. but there is still almost no a ccess refugees. but there is still almost no access for the media or the united nations, no accountability for human rights violations, no guarantee of safety for those who fled. it is hard to call this progress yet. jonathan head, bbc news, yangon. the actor, casey affleck, has pulled out of this year's oscar's ceremony. he won best actor last year for manchester by the sea. in keeping with tradition, he was due attend this year to present the award for best actress this year. casey affleck has been accused of sexual harassment by female crew members on previous films, claims he denies.
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earlier, i spoke to our correspondent in los angeles, james cook, to find out if we have any more details on his reasons for withdrawing from the ceremony. well, what we know is that this dates back, as you say, to these previous allegations against casey affleck, which date back to 2010. and he settled out of court and since then has not offered any kind of comment, public denial, or otherwise, on the allegations against him which were made by these two women, a cinematographer and a producer, but he paid an undisclosed settle m e nt producer, but he paid an undisclosed settlement to them out of court. and really, from then on, his career nonetheless went from strength to strength, culminating in last year's award at the academy awards, an oscar for award at the academy awards, an oscarfor his award at the academy awards, an oscar for his performance award at the academy awards, an oscarfor his performance in manchester by the sea. but, of course, everything has changed in hollywood since the downfall of the producer, the powerful producer, harvey weinstein. the atmosphere is com pletely harvey weinstein. the atmosphere is completely different this year than
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it was last year. there was some murmuring of discontent last year about his best actor award. this year, people are not putting up with it and he has made the wise decision not to attend. have they said what they will do in that? no, they have not given any detail about exactly what they will do instead. they say they are glad this decision has been taken because they are glad this decision has been ta ken because it they are glad this decision has been taken because it enables people to focus on the show and what they call the great work of the past year. it will be interested to see, though, because there was an outpouring at the golden globes, how the oscar's, more austere, will reflect on that, with women wanting better working conditions and better treatment. also on the programme: we'll be
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hearing from china's "oprah winfrey," the host of a dating show who happens to be transgender. the shuttle challenger exploded soon after lift—off. there were seven astronauts on board, one of them a woman school teacher. all of them are believed to have been killed. by the evening, tahrir square, the heart of official cairo was in the hands of the demonstrators. they were using the word revolution. the earthquake singled out buildings and brought them down in seconds. tonight, the search for any survivors has an increasing desperation about it as the hours pass. the new government is firmly in control of the entire republic of uganda. moscow got its first taste of western fast food as mcdonald's opened their biggest restaurant in pushkin square. but the hundreds of muscovites queued up today will not find it cheap with a big mac costing half a day's wages for the average russian. top stories: donald trump is world
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economic forum in davos. he said that the us. eight to the palestinians unless they take part in peace talks with israel. atomic scientists say the word is at a greater threat of nuclear catastrophe that at any point during the. they have set the doomsday clock at two minutes to midnight. and 50 cents has discovered that he isa and 50 cents has discovered that he is a bitcoin millionaire. years ago he accepted bitcoin as payment for
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an album he recorded. he forgot about it. today, it is worth between seven and eight million dollars. this is popular on bbc.com. wherever you are watching from around the world right now, it is either the 26th of january it will be seven, and that means one thing for australia: is the country's national day of celebration. it marks the anniversary of when british settlers arrived on australian shores for the first time back in the year 1788 when captain arthur phillip, commander of the first fleet of 11 british ships, arrived at sydney cove to signal the birth of the colony. however, there is controversy around us. however, there is controversy around us. some believe that the date should be changed, while others believe that it should stay the same. “— believe that it should stay the same. —— around this. why is that? indigenous and other campaigners believe it glorifies an invasion by
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europeans. however, many politicians argue that the date is wholly appropriate and rightly celebrates australia's past, multiculturalism, and unity. the seven prime minister tony abbott believes... —— from australian by minister. pat cash disagrees. joining me from sydney is our correspondent phil mercer. this date is a very polarising issue. some are for it and some are against it. that is right. what is supposed to be a day of great unity, rico hizon, is often affected by disunity. in melbourne, for example, there are about 30,000 people expected to attend an invasion day parade. that is replicated in cities such as sydney and also other invasion day events in other parts
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of australia. indigenous campaigners have long argued that the 26th of january, australia day, is a corroboration of genocide. the centre—right government here in australia, led by malcolm turnbull, certainly does not see it that way. it believes that today is a great celebration of australia's achievements. it believes that the date does not need to be changed. so a very divisive day here in australia. many, many millions of people enjoying the festivities. other indigenous campaigners are saying that this marks a day of aboriginal dispossession. there are even some quarters who are calling for a national vote on the date to let the people choose what they want? there was a poll recently, rico hizon, they suggested that quite a lot of the strains were not even familiar with the origins of australia day. so this whole idea that the australian people should be
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asked whether australia they should be today, generated 26, another day, one would imagine they would be quite a lot of education put into that debate, so that is to make an informed decision. —— australia day. we have seen thousands of people ta ke we have seen thousands of people take up australian citizenship today. clearly it is a very important date in the calendar for many, important date in the calendar for any important date in the calendar for many, many people. we have seen in the past 2a hours or so a statue of captain james cooke, one the past 2a hours or so a statue of captainjames cooke, one of the early explorers from britain who landed in australia, that statue in melbourne was defaced with graffiti. —— cook. this is an illustration of how divisive australia day can be here. is the government doing anything to resolve this huge divide? we have heard from various ministers, today, saying that they believe that the vast majority of australians are embracing today. it
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isa australians are embracing today. it is a public holiday, a day off work for millions of australians. there are concerts, barbecues, its liberties right around the country. —— festivities right around. it is not a sombre day for the vast majority of australia's. however, there is a significant portion of there is a significant portion of the population attending those in beijing day parades, who have a very different view of the 26th of january. thank you for updating us on the various issues involving australia day injanuary on the various issues involving australia day in january the on the various issues involving australia day injanuary the 26th. the television host, jin xing, is seen in china as their answer to america's oprah winfrey. both use television to promote socialjustice. jin xing is transgender and has a dating show that's boosted her popularity even more. every week parents of single men appear on the show to choose who they think is the best future wife for their sons. but critics say it's outdated and jin xing's views on women are too conservative. here's her response.
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when i became a teenager, that is when i started out myself. i wanted it is essential. and then i was like, 0k, it is essential. and then i was like, ok, what can i do? tell anybody? kill myself? when i went to america to study modern bands, then i was thinking to myself i should go back to myself, find me onwards as a woman. “—
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back to myself, find me onwards as a woman. —— find me a route is as a women. “— woman. —— find me a route is as a women. —— rapidly. as a desert, it was a tragedy. i am not showing me pretty face, pretty voice. the real voice can attract people. i still want to give people ideas, look at that, even the young people fall in love today in the 21st century. but when they come to marriage, the family still has a
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huge influence. that is still a big issue in chinese society. we cannot deny that society is still running the male mentality dominated. i said to the show, look at me, what have done by myself. of course, a lot of prejudice, disagreement, still teaches me. but i think the trick is that society is changing in the right direction. people are much more tolerant, especially with the chinese younger generations. that was trainer's oprah winfrey. —— china's. researchers have identified the remains of the earliest known modern humans to have left africa.
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a new dating of fossils found in a cave on mount carmel near haifa in northern israel indicates that they left africa up to 100,000 years earlier than previously thought. our science correspondent, pallab ghosh, has the details. in the distant past, the first of our kind of old in africa. our a ncestors our kind of old in africa. our ancestors then left the continent and spread across the globe. just when and where that happened is one of the biggest questions in human revolution. this fragment of a jawbone has shattered the current theory. it has rewritten the story of how we emerged on this planet. the fragment was found in any case in northern israel. a study, published in the journal science, shows it was tens of thousands of yea rs shows it was tens of thousands of years older than scientists thought that modern humans left africa. years older than scientists thought that modern humans left africalj think that the whole biological history should be revised. if we
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have modern humans here about 230,000 years ago, it implies that our origins go back in time notjust 230,000 300,000 years ago, but probably much earlier, to about half a million years. theories may need to be changed. he previously was that our species began to live africa 100,000 years ago, but the new discovery in israel suggests it was much earlier, possibly 250,000 yea rs was much earlier, possibly 250,000 years ago. that means our species may have lived alongside other kinds of more primitive humans who lived outside of africa at the time, and that contact may have helped shape our culture and the way we look. that contact may have helped shape our culture and the way we lookm changes our understanding of the interaction between other populations such as neanderthals. if
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we say that we have modern homo sapiens in earlier times, these days, we need to reconsider our knowledge regarding the environment, the culture, and interbreeding with other populations. the current view is that we evolved relatively recently, just as other types of humans were dying out. that new research suggests we were more ancient species that show the planet with primitive humans fork tens of thousands of years. other ghost, bbc news. —— for tens. you have been watching newsday. stay with us. we'll be getting into the swing of the world's most watched cricket league. we'll see why the indian premier league is such a big deal.
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hello. vajder will be the coldest day per week, but with lighter winds, most will see sunshine some time. —— friday will. we are in between that assistance with lots of dry weather. weather fronts are coming infor dry weather. weather fronts are coming in for the weekend as we will show you in a moment. this is how it looks the early risers. if you show started about two parts of england and wales. call in with a touch of frost in any place that has been clear overnight. a few fog patches into northern ireland to begin the date will take a few hours to clear. asa date will take a few hours to clear. as a mention, and few showers about, particularly through central and eastern parts of england. very hidden list. by no means a rumble cadfan, but that is a possibility to sing in the morning. we are more likely to see sunny spells when the sun is up into wales in south—west england. some spots will be around for five degrees. we will not get to
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much higher in the day, but a fair amount of sunshine around. although the showers will clear away to some of us will have more cloud to bed with thursday. even here, sunny spells coming through into the afternoon. fairly light winds, and as you see, temperatures top around 4- as you see, temperatures top around 4— five degrees in scotland. going into the evening, at the breeze picks up. we get outbreaks of rain into northern ireland scotland, and that pushes further east as we go through friday and into sunday morning. the lowest bidders will be in the east. there could be a touch of frost developing in places that have been clear overnight. weather fronts coming in over the weekend. as you can see, initially through western parts, heavy bursts as the day begins. it also asked to movies goods. in effect as that is england,
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to list with early sunshine, outta kes to list with early sunshine, outtakes of rain pushing into the afternoon. —— outbreaks. just having to northern scotland. a milder day but when you. the wind picks up even further on saturday night and into the first by the sunday across the far north. there could be some severe gales. a bit of me they in place. still a lot of cloud on sunday, with patchy ranges across western parts. heavy rain in northern scotland. mild and windy. i'm ben bland with bbc world news. our top story: donald trump has threatened to stop aid to the palestinians unless they engage in peace talks with israel. he was speaking in davos alongside the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu. a former palestinian negotiator‘s accused mr trump of leading the region towards chaos. myanmar‘s rejected criticism of aung san syi kyi by veteran us diplomat, bill richardson. he called a burmese investigation into the rohingya crisis a "whitewash" and said ms suu kyi "lacked moral leadership."
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and this story is trending on bbc.com. casey affleck says he won't attend this year's oscars. he won the best actor award last year for manchester by the sea. he was expected to present this year's best actress category, as oscars tradition dictates. the actor has been accused of sexual harassment by female crew members on previous films, claims he denies. that's all from me now. stay with bbc world news. now on bbc news, it's time for hardtalk.
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