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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  January 31, 2018 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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you're watching beyond one hundred days. donald trump gets good reviews for his unifying tone in the state of the union address. but it's already clear that there's a big difference between talking unity and getting unity. the president called for common purpose in what he described as a new moment for americans of all backgrounds. this is your time and if you work ha rd this is your time and if you work hard and believe in yourself, if you believe in america then you can dream anything. theresa may flies all the way to beijing to talk trade but even here she has to answer questions about brexit. also on the programme. uk politicians will be shown the details of a study leaked earlier this week which say britain will be worse off after brexit. and for the first time in a hundred and fifty years the world gets to see a super blue blood moon. get in touch with us using the hashtag ‘beyond—one—hundred—days‘. hello and welcome —
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i'm katty kay in washington and christian fraser is in london. donald trump's calming words of unity in his first state of the union address have already bumped against the harsh reality of a deeply divided american government. lawmakers on both sides today said realistically the chances of democrats and republicans working together on big issues is minimal. there was little sign of unity either in congress last night — with one side of the aisle sitting stony faced and the other rising for multiple ovations. but the public seems to want compromise. for a president with record low approval ratings last night was a high point with snap polls after the speech suggesting american voters liked mr trump's more conciliatory tone. this in fact is our new american moment. there has never been a better time to start living the american dream. so to every citizen
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watching at home tonight — no matter where you've been, or where you come from, this is your time. well, we can talk now to congressman brendan boyle — a democrat from pennsylvania. thank you forjoining me. when you hear the tone of the president and the reaction to that town i imagine democrats might be thinking this is someone democrats might be thinking this is someone who would be difficult for us someone who would be difficult for us to run against in november. well the reality is that one speech on teleprompter does not make a presidency. there's a difference between trump and twitter trump and the tramp you see on twitter and you see the other 99% of the time is who he is. so for one night he can stick toa he is. so for one night he can stick to a script, but that all goes out
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of the window the very next day. if we look back on the past year, i remember one year ago after his state of the union address when he was given quite high marks. he stuck to the script and within a few days that was all gone and the rest of the year looked very different from that state of the union address. although to be fair they have not been any tweets of that nature today. but look at the tone of the speech and also the fact that the economy is doing well and he can point the stock market and said to americans things are getting along well. i have cut regulations, done the tax cuts and that is what people really like. we are in the eighth year of really like. we are in the eighth yearofan really like. we are in the eighth year of an economic expansion that began roughly when president obama took over, about six months into his administration when the great recession bottomed out. job growth is continuing at the pace of the
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last five years although slightly slower. so we are seeing just the continuation and probably the tail end ofan continuation and probably the tail end of an economic expansion. he might want to be a bit too careful about putting all his eggs in the basket of the economy for them because we've never seen an economic expansion that has lasted 12 years. we've seen one that has lasted eight or nine sofa now he is able to claim some credit for the economy but in reality he inherited an economic expansion that was already happening for seven and a half years before he took office. that's just what's the reaction in the chamber about immigration stop under the current broken system a symbol —— a single immigrant can bring ina symbol —— a single immigrant can bring in a virtually unlimited numbers of relatives. under our plan we focus on the immediate family by
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limiting sponsorships to spouses and minor children. that is where some of the difficulty is but looking at the speech and the whole congress, things like prison reform, big infrastructure projects, family credits, things people want to see where you could work with his president and if you do not you might look obstructionist. well first when he addressed the family reunification aspect of immigration policy, we have something in common. neither here nor i would be here in the either states the family reunification were not a part of our immigration policies. both his family and mine were helped by that aspect in previous generations. the second point i would make, i'm someone second point i would make, i'm someone who second point i would make, i'm someone who wants second point i would make, i'm someone who wants to work with the white house when it comes to infrastructure. i was excited last year when he talked about infrastructure, i wrote to the white house with a group of democratic
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members saying we want to reach out and work with you. a whole year has gone by and not one bill has been brought to the hill that would address our infrastructure needs. so i hope now this year he reaches out to us not just i hope now this year he reaches out to us notjust in a speech but in terms of policy and legislation because if we're going to get a meaningful infrastructure bill done it needs to be bipartisan and there needs to be a plan. he cited one and half trillion dollars but where is that coming from. he just had a tax plan that blew a hole in the deficit. so it remains to be seen where this money will come from. thank you very much forjoining us. i'm joined in the studio byjim gilmore who's a republican and former governor of virginia. thank you for coming in. on this issue of immigration, there have
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already been cries of outrage from some people on the more conservative wing of the president's base who say we do not like the idea of the kind of deal the white house is proposing because they say it would give amnesty to young people brought to america illegally by their parents. this is going to be very hard, whatever the president says about bipartisan solutions, there are real differences. and i would love to return back to the economy —— the economic thing but on your point of immigration, there are people in the united states that do not think there should be any amnesty for illegal immigration. in this insta nce we illegal immigration. in this instance we have young people who really do not know any other country than the united states and i think there is sympathy for that. at the same time the american left has got to tell us what their immigration policy is. is that the policy that anyone young or old who can get to the united states gets to be a citizen. if you have a complete amnesty for people and then they
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bring in, because they are innocent and their parents bought them, then you're bringing in for sedition ship the very people who broke the law in the very people who broke the law in the first place. so we are all sympathetic and accommodating for young people but at the same time we are entitled to know where this immigration is headed. you're out of politics now so you can at this a little bit more dispassionately. do you think what the president said last night in any way reflects what might happen in this country, that the two sides could come together and work on these issues?” the two sides could come together and work on these issues? i do not see it happening. well the anger expression of the minority party in congress last night was troubling and really not good. but you had that with republicans when barack obama was president. maybe so but if people are looking for working together that was not a good message last night from the democrats. an
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angry type of expression. but the president offered a conservatory comprehensive plan on immigration last night, the first we've seen in a long time. so now let's see if eve ryo ne a long time. so now let's see if everyone can come together and do something productive. well of course he promised to keep open guantanamo bay, 800 people in guantanamo bay at its peak and nowjust 41. but this was the reaction in the chamber. ijust signed an order directing secretary mattis to reexamine our military detention policy, and to keep open the detention facilities at guantanamo bay. what kind of deterrent is that if you just have 41 people in guantanamo bay bay now. it is seen
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asa stain guantanamo bay bay now. it is seen as a stain on the american reputation around the world and intelligence agencies would say of recruitment tool for terrorism. well you need to look at the big picture, this is about sending a message to people who are adversaries of the united states. in fact murderers worldwide, terrorists worldwide who wa nt to worldwide, terrorists worldwide who want to use force to victimise civilians, that there will be a penalty and that penalty will be a strong american foreign policy. i think the american foreign policy when you think about career has been generally pretty conciliatory. using diplomacy rather than force. but the guantanamo bay message is that we will not be tolerant of this kind of attacks on americans and their allies across the world. thank you very much. interesting that this president gets good polling figures for sticking to the teleprompter!
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lets talk about how it went down. we have some cbs polling here, which they carried out after the speech. three out of four people liked it. two thirds said it made them feel proud to be american. a third said it made them feel safer. and here's the numbers on the economy: 5a percent of the audience give him the credit for the current state of the economy, up from 51 percent before the speech. those approval ratings on the economy growing all the time. and those are the numbers that will concern democrats and the fact that in those people who were polled after the state of the union it showed independent voters also liked what they heard last night. the message seems to be from voters and we hear this from the president was made based as well, we like what he's doing but not always like the way he says that. so if he were able in contrast to this time last year to refrain perhaps from some of the
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tweeting and antagonistic language then perhaps the poll numbers would keep on picking up. because that was my take from that, if they liked what they heard last night, that is not what they get all of the time. british beef is about to go back on the menu in china, for the first since the bse crisis in the 1980's. on her visit to beijing, the prime minister theresa may said she is determined the two sides will find other markets where barriers can be removed. but take a look at the huge imbalance. in 2016, uk imports from china were £42.3 billion. whereas uk exports to china were worth £16.8 billion. that's a trade deficit of £25.4 billion. and as it stands — china accounts for only 3 per cent of all uk exports. post brexit, that will have to change. china is pushing for something in return. they want uk support for president xi's flagship belt and road initiative. china wants to return
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to its ancient trading routes. the plan is to plough hundreds of billions of dollars into new investment; new ports, new pipelines, new railways — all of it designed to bring the world closer to china. well professor steve tsang is with us, welcome back to the studio. going back to those figures, the prime minister talked about a golden era in china — uk relations. it does not look golden looking at those figures. not looking golden against the projection of the golden era. the trade imbalance is notjust going to go away. that is the point that president trump made last week in davos, free trade means fair
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trade. and wherever you look around the west at the moment, america, france, germany, everyone has a huge trade imbalance with china. france, germany, everyone has a huge trade imbalance with chinalj france, germany, everyone has a huge trade imbalance with china. i think theissue trade imbalance with china. i think the issue in terms of fairness is whether there is reciprocity for access to markets and investments and companies to operate. in general terms countries like the united kingdom or the us or most eu countries are fairly open to chinese companies and investments. china is much more restrictive in terms of how companies can operate in china. and i think that is the issue that needs to be addressed. theresa may seems to be adopting something of a donald trump approach to relations with china which is one that is very transactional, she will say to the chinese that the uk is natural partner in the belt and road
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expansion even if it should meet international standards and they would say ok we will consider opening markets and investing in uk. is that the size of it? i think there is more to it. the belt and road initiative is fairly complicated, there is the issue of whether it is transparent and whether it is transparent and whether it is going to be official to get other countries involved. also the issue that the chinese ambassador to the uk had openly said he would ask the british foreign minister to officially endorse the belt and road initiative before she even set foot in china. that is a difficult thing because prime ministers of independent countries do not do what ambassadors instruct them to do. on the belt and road initiative, why are western
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governments loathe to give backing to it? well in general terms it is the uncertainty of how the belt and road initiative will pan out. the chinese government is projecting in terms of a modern version of a marshall plan but there are issues of one the loans mature, what will then happen. most of the countries that in the short term are beneficiaries of the infrastructure investments do not have the money to pay for them. the chinese have lent them the money, provided industrial capacity to build them but when they're finished, when the gnome has matured, what will happen then. always good to see you. —— when the loa n always good to see you. —— when the loan has matured. just looking at some figures about this belt and road initiative, it on percent of
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contracts for beijing backed infrastructure projects in europe and asia go to chinese companies. the germans and the french have spoken about this, it could be a driverfor spoken about this, it could be a driver for global growth but how much will be shared. and i think also looking at what the prime minister saying in china matches under some pressure from donald trump to hold the line. and aside from trying to get better relations with china she is also trying to do a trade deal with the united states. and that puts in a tricky position so and that puts in a tricky position so is she prepared to kind of goal against germany, france and the united states with this rather curious language of natural partner but needing international standards around belt and road to try to get the trade deal that she needs even though it is a small amount of british trade, she still needs those trade deals after brexit. that is the deal she's having to make with herself and with the chinese at the moment. tricky on all sides for
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theresa may. let's look at some other news. a train carrying republican lawmakers to a retreat in west virginia has collided with a truck. one person was killed in the incident while another was seriously injured. although no one aboard the train is believed to have been significantly injured. after 13 years of fighting the taliban in afghanistan — the bbc has found the militant group is growing in strength. our research suggests the taliban is openly active in 70 per cent of the country. more than 15 million people live in areas which are either controlled by the taliban or suffer attacks. formula one racing is to end the use of ‘grid girls' from the start of the 2018 world championship season. it says the decades—old custom of using promotional models in the grand prix is inappropriate and at odds with the modern vision for the sport. the uk government says it will release an economic study that suggests the british economy will be worse off after brexit,
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whatever type of deal it reaches with the eu. the research document was leaked earlier this week. but will it make difference to the way people feel. new polling from the think take uk in a changing europe shows a pretty even split between those who think it was right for britain to vote to leave and those who think it was wrong. britain is still just as divided as it was in 2016. but the data show that voters on both sides are becoming increasingly frustrated with the governments progress. the director of uk in a changing europe professor anand menon is with us. i know you have had a big day setting out some figures. the one that surprised me is one in eight people in the uk feel european. i would have thought it would have been more evenly split reflecting the referendum. we've always lagged behind europe and be near the bottom of that league table when it comes
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to feeling as if you are european. we always had a transactional view of membership. other member states, some parts of the population at least have bought into the idea of not just being least have bought into the idea of notjust being in the eu but being european. we have seen this more as the transactional thing, in it for economic gain. we have always lagged behind the others. looking at that graph, it is pretty stark. there has been a bit of movement either way but the economic analysis, the reports from either side, the reassu ra nces of reports from either side, the reassurances of the brexit—lite, nothing really changes where people said. a lot has changed in the background, looking at some other questions, far more people now than last year think brexit will be bad for the uk economy for dog for more people now than last year. but with that change their mind? that is the
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rub, people are more negative about brexit and government handling of brexit and government handling of brexit but that is not feeding through in any mass of way into the figures on whether you voted the right way or not. and during the referendum there was project fear and they still voted for brexit. yes and they still voted for brexit. yes and people distrust the figures they are given by the other side. we know the political science behind that. i just wonder if you think the uk is edging towards what we have in the united states, not just edging towards what we have in the united states, notjust policies the abiding people cabaye but tribal, people living in different areas from the opposite political persuasion, they have different media, the go to different schools and distrust each other is patriotism. i wonder if this could be starting to happen in the uk. well the big difference i think between us and the united states is the bbc. that is something you do not have in the united states. we did not pay him to say that! there
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it is nbc orfox did not pay him to say that! there it is nbc or fox so even your day—to—day news viewing is slightly echo chamber like. one of the things that came from this referendum, we a lwa ys that came from this referendum, we always have this culture divide in our country but there has been no way to express it because essentially the big parties are in roughly the same place. what brexit did was give an opportunity to people who are in social conservatives if you like rather than social liberals to voice their discontent and all evidence shows that has become a major division in our society alongside the traditional political one. so there isa traditional political one. so there is a chance that this could disrupt politics. we are out of time. but some interesting things on the website. thank you. millions of people across the world have been treated to a rare celestial convergence, known a "super blood blue moon". a combination of a lunar eclipse, a blood moon and a super moon. we have got a timelapse of the eclipse. this is from the griffin
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observatory in los angeles — three and a half hours reduced to just sixteen seconds. it's the first time in more than 150 years it has been seen in the western hemisphere. let's speak to the bbc‘s global science correspondent, victoria gill, who is at bayfordbury observatory here in the south of england for us. and we can see it behind you. it has been a lot bigger earlier in the evening. we got an absolutely stunning moonrise here in hertfordshire. we are at the observatory so we have many space scientists around so we were treated toa scientists around so we were treated to a beautiful moonrise with this supermoon looking huge and stunning but also an hour after that the international space station came over so international space station came over so it has been quite a
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celestial treat. we did not have the eclipse but we had quite a show tonight with this big bright moon. so will show some pictures of the moon in london. one from waterloo bridge looking over at st paul's. you give us the science as to what is going on. so when it comes to that moon close to the horizon that is an optical illusion, scientists do not know why it looks so much bigger closer to the horizon but it tricks the eye perhaps because it is closer to objects in the landscape and you get that sense of scale. the reason it is slightly bigger, around 10% bigger than average tonight is because it has an ellipse shaped orbit around the earth. it is about 50,000 kilometres further away than its nearest point. and because the nearest point coincides with the second full moon of the month of the uk we're getting this blue supermoon. on the other side of the globe where we had those spectacular
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pictures of it turning blood red, that whole event is combining in the triple celestial show of the eclipse. amazing, thank you very much. christian was dying to give that explanation! let's move on. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — as theresa may travels to china to drum up trade we'll hear from one of china's biggest banks. and the tale of the talking whale that can mimic human speech. that's still to come. much colder air has spread south
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across the uk and is here for the foreseeable. many of us have wintry showers and also we have some good spells of sunshine in the next few days. clear spells overnight so you could catch a glimpse of that blue supermoon. but also some snow to lower levels for a time. but elsewhere we have ice on untreated surfaces and temperatures are close to freezing. the wind could also be close to severe gale force in parts of scotla nd close to severe gale force in parts of scotland overnight. eight o'clock in the morning, further wintry showers in parts of northern scotland, northern ireland, wales and the west midlands and south west of england. sleet and snow tending to be to the higher ground going through the day. but away from these areas you're likely to see good
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spells of sunshine. again we have this cold wind and temperatures just above freezing to begin the day. continued scattering showers on through the day in some areas. out of the chilly wind and in some sunshine it may not feel too bad. factoring in the wind however for some it will feel very close to freezing if not a degree or so below. still some showers arrived on thursday night and into friday morning. frost setting in as the wind eases. still a brisk wind along north sea coast on friday with mostly rain showers. most other places have a dry day with a lighter wind and sunshine. it could be quite pleasa nt wind and sunshine. it could be quite pleasant on friday. but no holding back, i have to show you the weekend and here comes a weather system from the atlantic. this is moisture into cold air. some of us will have waned
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but there is an increasing threat as it moves further eased critically across the northern part of the uk to get some sleet and snow perhaps not just to get some sleet and snow perhaps notjust in the hills. any rain, sleet and snow fizzling out during sunday and it will be another cold day. this is beyond 100 days, i'm katty kay in washington, kristian fraser is in london. our top stories, president trump says his first year in office has advanced america's mission to make america a great again. as opponents say millions of people have been left behind. theresa may is in china to win friends and trade deals, but what can she do to improve britain's massive trade deficit? and in the next half—hour, the bbc‘s former chinese editor says the bbc needs to start telling the truth about how it pays some of its female staff an equally. and that is a whale
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talking, we will look at why this whale's few words have got a zlatan arms. let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag #beyond100days. and the fbi is not happy about the release of the republican memo that deals with the surveillance of a member of the complexion campaign team. in an unusual statement, the bureau says it has grave concerns about releasing the memo. the statement puts the fbi at odds with the republican head of the house intelligence community, who wants to release the memo to show the fbi was biased against donald trump. the fbi has been over increasing pressure —— under increasing pressure over the russia investigation. intelligence
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experts are concerned that the memo gives an incomplete account of why a trump campaign aide was surveyed. it is also worried it could expose the bureau's methods. we will now speak toa bureau's methods. we will now speak to a former us representative of the democratic party. thank you for joining us, congresswoman. to what extent joining us, congresswoman. to what exte nt d oes joining us, congresswoman. to what extent does the fbi putting out a statement saying it has grave concerns about the release of an intelligence memo that the white house appears on the point of releasing seem unusual?” house appears on the point of releasing seem unusual? i served as the ranking democrat, the senior democrat on the house intelligence committee for four years after 911, and other we have differences, we worked together as one committee. the committee is now fractured. there is no, it seems to me, the relationship between the democrats and republicans. the fbi being worried about this memo tells me
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that its release could reveal sources and methods, how we get warrants, and how collect information on targets, and basically what our toolkit is. i haven't seen the memo, i don't know the back—up, but it is also surprising, sol the back—up, but it is also surprising, so i hear, that the chairman of the committee who is pushing for the police has not even read the back—up material. when i was ina read the back—up material. when i was in a position like his, i assure you i would never have done anything like this without reading it. but of course, congresswoman, you will know that the president does want to release. he was asked about it after he came out of the chamber after his speech last night. don't worry. one of percent. could you imagine? -- 100%. of course he is good to release it, but many democrats will say he is putting his personal interests above the national interest. there is also a bottle
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memo prepared by the democratic staff, as i understand that, on the house intelligence committee. i spoke to a member of congress yesterday who said that he had read both memos, and i think there is a work—out that would have members of congress are going to a classified space and with both memos. —— a rebuttal memo. but it seems to me pretty lopsided to put out a memo against... why don't the democrats lose it out from the floor? they could do that. —— read it out from the floor. given the floor privileges, they could do that. why is that a good idea? it is the same problem, revealing passively, again i haven't read it, revealing sources and teaching our enemy our tool box. these are dangerous times of the president said, and i strongly agree with him. we need the best tools and the best morale and our intelligence committee, and the fbi director as farasl
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committee, and the fbi director as far as i know, was recently confronted by congress, but is highly regarded. you were the ranking democrat on the house intelligence committee, which is the committee in question here. have you ever seen a committee in question here. have you ever seen a time in modern american history in which the fbi and intelligence agencies have been under such consistent pressure from an administration? because i can't remember a time recently where the fbi has been the target of so much pushed back from an administration as it is at the moment. well, not in this way. there were two huge intelligence failures earlier this century. one was 9/11, where we had pieces of the plot but did not put them together. in the second was on them together. in the second was on the intelligence estimate that there we re weapons the intelligence estimate that there were weapons of the intelligence estimate that there were weapons of mass the intelligence estimate that there were weapons of mass destruction in iraq, which also turned out to be false. after that, we did a complete reform of our intelligence
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committee. in 2004, was one of the principal authors. and that is when we set up the directorate of national intelligence. and since then, until now, although there have been criticisms of little things, nothing like this. and what worries me is not only that we are politicising people, but also we are undermining the morale of folks who have spent years, decades, carefully warning their trade, they are the tip of the spear, a loss of the things we have been able to file are only foiled because we got intelligence, presumably through our intelligence, presumably through our intelligence community, but it also works in coordination with intelligence committees around the world. jane harman, thank you very much forjoining us. i think that is the point, we have seen the fbi under criticism before, but not in this way that has been politicised and accused of bias. and you have to wonder, and i remember when i was speaking to a senator last week,
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this is a deliberate attempt to undermine the fbi in order to undermine the fbi in order to undermine the fbi in order to undermine the results of any investigation that, over russia and the trump campaign. and that is what is worrying to people who are in the intelligence committee, and i have heard people on the left and right say this, they do have some concerns about eroding trust in the institution that is meant to protect america. but it stands to reason. these warrants that go before a judge, they are 50, 60 pages long. if it was boiled down to four pages, it stands to reason that it will be selective. and as i was saying to the congresswoman there, the democrats could read out their rebuttal on the house floor, but then they, too, would be revealing delicate information. it is a tricky one for the democrats. yeah, both a ccu ra cy one for the democrats. yeah, both accuracy and national security, that is what people are concerned about. theresa may's mission in china is not only to convince the chinese government that the uk is open for business, but also to offer reassurance that the uk will be a reliable partner post brexit.
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the prime minister says we are in a golden era of uk china relations but what does the uk stand to gain? jinny yan is a senior economist with icbs standard bank, one of china's biggest, which has a key role in china's overseas investments, including those in the uk. welcome to the programme. china says it wants to be a global player, but we have already shown on the programme the huge imbalance in trade between china and britain. when is china going to rectify that? i think what china has really rest recently, particularly, is that china is trying to increase imports. china is trying to increase imports. china has always been seen as an economy that produces particularly lower value goods. as china goes up the curve, china not only seeks to export more, to develop markets like the uk, but also to import more. so
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of course the uk has much to offer. for those joining of course the uk has much to offer. for thosejoining us now, let's see those figures again. there is the imbalance, over £25 billion. we are a service driven economy here in the uk, and there is huge potential in china. is the financial services market going to open up more than it does the moment? there has already been regulation regulatory reform announced recently to allow in the banking sector more foreign banking associations and to the chinese market. so over 2018, will definitely see more concrete measures to allow more foreign players, including british players, and the financial markets.” players, including british players, and the financial markets. i was just wondering, we heard the chinese premier say today that china would have to adjust to the reality of brexit in its relationship with
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britain, and! brexit in its relationship with britain, and i was wondering from the standpoint of icbc, your bank, whether they see any status in —— any change in the status of london asa any change in the status of london as a financial centre because of brexit? london remains in our view a very important financial centre. it has many of the advantages that others do not, such as the times and the english language. it also has probably the most concentrated amount of expertise and experiences, and also it is the british law that has fundamentally driven the advantage of london as a financial centre. recently, we have seen london's critical role in terms of the currency, and i think those things will continue. and as we have seen things will continue. and as we have seen recently, some of the things that have come out is that the london stock exchange, for example, will continue to push the bilateral
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agreements to allow for training of equities, for example, in both markets. very good to see you, thank you for coming in. thank you. on a day like this, it would've been good to talk to carrie gracie, but she stood down as the bbc‘s china in protest at gender pay inequality. she told mps that this is damaging the reputation of the corporation. she said that the bbc added insult to injury by suggesting she had been paid to injury by suggesting she had been pa id less by to injury by suggesting she had been paid less by male colleagues because she had been in development. we will hear from the director—general of the bbc in a moment, but first, let's wasn't what carrie gracie had to say. i have said i do not want any more money, i to say. i have said i do not want any more money, lam not to say. i have said i do not want any more money, i am not a fiscal liability to the bbc. trying to sort money at me to solve the problem, this will not solve the problem. —— throw money. my problem will be resolved by saying that my work was of equal value to the men and i
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worked alongside. an apology would be nice. the bbc said it is very grateful to men last week taking a volu nta ry grateful to men last week taking a voluntary pay cut. i have never said they are grateful to me for not taking a pay rise at the time. we got something is wrong. i wish we hadn't, but we did get something is wrong, and i would like to be clear about that. perhaps i might also say that i hold carrie in the greatest regard. i was lucky enough to spend some time with her in beijing when she was editor. i think she is absolutely first—rate editor and has done first—rate work for the bbc, andi done first—rate work for the bbc, and i do not want any way to undermine the work she has done, because i think she has been extremely good. i'm joined now by our correspondent. carrie was asked whether she thought the bbc was in breach of equality pay laws and she
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said emphatically, yes. absolutely. this is about much more thanjust carrie gracie's pay deal. but the thing about this afternoon is, i have watched a lot of select committee hearings over my career. this afternoon was quite extraordinary viewing, because the issue about pay and equality at the bbc has been front—page news now for months. and yesterday, we had a big independent report saying there was no gender bias in the way that the bbc awards its pay. however, this gave you a true inside track on the emotional impact this actually has on an individual. this will humanise the story. i know carrie gracie pretty well, she is a tough cookie, and when you watch her, you realise the sense of injustice and betrayal. she had been promised, she said, she would have absolute equality with her male colleagues. and four years down the line, she says there is a 50% gap. so that is what we are
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seeing, the sense of incredulity, what happened when the bbc was forced to release those salaries. there is a good story behind how this happened, it was equal when they made the promise, and then things changed. but it gave you a real sense of what the pay dispute in the pay gap actually means in personal terms. thanks for giving us that quick synopsis of a very interesting committee hearing earlier today. officials at the us federal reserve have left interest rates unchanged after the first policy meeting of 2018. but it's expected inflation will move up this year, a possible signal of faster rate increases ahead. the us central bank has forecast three rate hikes — the same as in 2017. moscow says it is organising a competition for russian athletes who are barred from taking part in the winter olympics. president putin apologised for failing to shield them from international action over a doping scandal. nearly 170 russians are being allowed to compete in south korea under a neutral olympic flag. getting 10,000 steps
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a day is something plenty of people aim for. but does it actually do you any good? the number comes from a marketing campaign injapan in the 1960s. now, new research has discovered taking three brisk ten minute walks a day provides greater health benefits. i'm sure you do both, christian.” don't have a fitbit, but i do have a wife who does this in bed at night to get over the 10,000. too much information, we don't need to know. this is beyond 100 days, and still to come... wikie the talking killer whale is taught to say hello, ajudge has strongly criticised the police and the crown prosecution service for "wholesale failures" —— after a human trafficking trial collapsed last week when material from mobile phones, that was disclosed late, cast doubt on the case.
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clive coleman reports. cristina bosoanca's story shows the devastating human effect that failure to disclose evidence can have. after 13 tough months in prison she can finally relax with the son she bore there. the girls were bullying me. it was difficult when i saw them going to the visits of... the prosecution case was based on the evidence of a woman who claimed cristina trafficked her into the country to work as a prostitute. she also alleged she was raped by a client and became pregnant as a result. christina's lawyers repeatedly told the police that there were phone messages which undermined the woman's story. it was only on the second day of the trial that 65,000 phone messages were disclosed to cristina bosoanca's team. they fundamentally undermined the woman's
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account and medical evidence also proved the woman was pregnant before coming to the uk. the case collapsed on friday, thejudge demanding police and prosecutors should come to court today to explain. in court, thejudge said there had been a wholesale failure of disclosure, and serious and repeated errors by both the police and the crown prosecution service. the senior crown prosecutor apologised and said a full review was taking place and a report would been sent to the director of public prosecutions. cristina bosoanca's experience shows disclosure failures go beyond recent highly publicised rape cases and there are likely to be more examples, each one affecting the lives of those charged, and their families. what americans sitting at home make
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of president trump's first state of the union address? the bbc caught up with a trump photo in washington state and a tremor in florida. president trump's speech was impressive. the state of our union is strong. i knew he would not talk positively about the immigrant community. crucially, our plan closes the terrible loopholes exploited by criminals and terroristss to enter our country. it's just shows what kind of person he is, trying to make is because of we are all criminals. the house in senate will be voting on an immigration reform package. the first pillar... the second pillar, the third pillar... the four pillars
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appeared to me to be very fair, very reasonable, to be something that we asa reasonable, to be something that we as a country can support. a practice as a country can support. a practice as is as an ship. my favourite part was the pathway to citizenship, to 1.8 million dreamers. army, staff sergeantjustin peck 1.8 million dreamers. army, staff sergeant justin peck 's 1.8 million dreamers. army, staff sergeantjustin peck '5 here tonight. the thing he did best was tonight. the thing he did best was to bring into his speech... corey adams is also with us tonight '5. the ordinary american citizens who have been involved for the past year. ajob well done. he really missed on the opportunity and the contributions we make to this country. the individual mandate is now gone. i don't care you can
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afford it or not, if you do not buy this health insurance, we are going to penalise you? that is just horrible. there is a tremendous disparity between the left wing, the right wing, the democrats. which is a shame. —— the republicans, the democrats. two very different perspectives from americans on what the resident had to say. wilbur mal talk to the president of the village of thiensville in wisconsin. we talked to him about this time last year. how do you think the president is doing based on last night?” think he gave a great speech and had a better year, and sol think he gave a great speech and had a better year, and so i am pleased with the speech and looking forward to the new year. he spoke a lot
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about the need of cooperation, bipartisanship, the idea of unity. of course, with cooperation comes compromise. would you want republicans to compromise with democrats to get things done in the country? yes, i do. he pointed to things that people in both parties are very happy with, expanding the economy, unemployment, the african—american community and the hispanic community. now we have an opportunity to work on some bipartisan things, and readily infrastructure packages something the democrats can embrace, and republicans as well. i think the immigration reform ideas he put out there, and is four pillars are very good pillars. ithink there, and is four pillars are very good pillars. i think we can all rally around those. he had bipartisan consensus on the need to make some better trade deals, particularly, and i think that is good for the american worker. and i think that everybody is in favour of a strong defence. sol think that everybody is in favour of a strong defence. so i think what he has laid out are some bipartisan ideas, and i expect there will be progress. when you look at how
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president trump is treated by the rest of the world, particularly britain, let's talk about britain, do you think he gets enough credit? i don't. you know, ithink do you think he gets enough credit? i don't. you know, i think a lot of the world economy is listed to changes in the united states. i think the opportunity for the united states and the uk to cooperate even in the future is even greater than it is in the past. we do have a special relationship, we are like family. i think that the british economy, and we are, i think... and i'm not british, although i love britain, i have been there before. i think they made the right decision with brexit, but i understand they are torn twin looking to the west and the open seas, and the continent, and i think they made the right decision. i think you should embrace trump and invite over the
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state visit, invite him to the royal wedding, and he will behave well, see what gifts he gives you, and i think we have a good year ahead of us. if only i had the power to invite to the royal wedding. invite all others! van, you, me, we will all others! van, you, me, we will all be there together. —— all others. katty, i would love all be there together. —— all others. katty, iwould love to all be there together. —— all others. katty, i would love to be there. if i can others. katty, i would love to be there. ifi can swing it, the others. katty, i would love to be there. if i can swing it, the you would be my first invite. thanks for joining us again. only a handful of animals can mimic human language. yet the idea of animals communicating fascinates us. dr doolittle, mr ed the talking horse, jonny morris, the zookeeper and bbc presenter who always had that animal magic. can't i have some more? in an hour or so. can't i have some more? in an hour
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or so. it's all gone, c? oh, dear. i wonder what he would have made of this. a killer whale who can mimic words such as "hello" and "bye bye" — the first of its kind to copy human speech. hello! weekey is a 16—year—old female whale who has learned to copy a trainer at a marine park in france. scientists say the ability to learn new sounds is a sign of intelligence and is very rare amongst mammals. let's have a listen. one, two, three. one, two, three. squelch
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i heard some hellos this morning.” cannot believe we have this on the programme. i want youtube addict thief wail. what i want to know is, if this is a french well, why is it not saying bonjour? fascinating. apparently, i should say, man next to not mimic humans very well, but some do, particularly those in water. dolphins, wales, those are the ones that seem able to mimic human sounds. christian, stop, let's move on to the moon. the one you wa nted move on to the moon. the one you wanted to see out there, the super blood blooming. air —— blue on. that
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isa blood blooming. air —— blue on. that is a nicer way to end the programme than christian going on about wales. i hope that is sped up, otherwise the moon is moving too quickly. goodbye. but some cold air, some spells of sunshine guaranteed as well, and that is the case of the next few days. with clear spells overnight, you might catch a view of the super moon. some snow perhaps to low levels, and the greater threat of these showers, once they clear. elsewhere, some ice of an untreated surfaces as temperatures dropped close to freezing. the strength of wind could be near severe gale for parts of north—east scotland into the normal northern
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isles through the night and into the morning. at eight tomorrow morning,, rain, hail, sleet, snow, tending to be to the higher ground as we go through the day. away from these areas, more likely to see some spells of sunshine and stay dry. but again, this cold wind, temperature is just above freezing to begin the day, and not getting much higher through the day. some areas will continue to see a scattering of showers through the day, variable cloud elsewhere, and sunny spells. may not feel too bad in places, possibly a bit warmer than today. factor in the wind, and it will feel like it is close to freezing despite what it says on the thermometer. a few of those showers still around on thursday night and friday morning, frost setting in as the wind eases a bit. still a brisk wind along the north sea coast, with most places having a dry day.
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that could make for a very pleasant winter's day on friday. but no holding back, i need to show you the weekend. here comes a weather system from the atlantic. this is moisture and cold air, and while some others will see some rain out of this, there is increasing threat of this moves further east, particularly across the northern half of the uk, but maybe not exclusively so, for some sleet and perhaps not just an hills. once this starts to clear away any rain and sleet and snow will fizzle out sunday on what will be another cold day. this is bbc news. i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at 8pm... theresa may says she's not a quitter. speaking at the start of a three day trade mission to china, the pm says there's a long—term job to be done. carrie gracie, who stood down as the bbc‘s china editor in protest about pay inequality, tells mps her case is an example of a bigger problem at the corporation. trust is broken between a lot of the
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people involved. it is not easy to repair that without outside help. we got something is wrong. we haven't got something is wrong. we haven't got those things wrong, but we did get those things wrong and i think we should be clear about that. the cps is accused of incompetence after the collapse of a human trafficking trial — we hear from a suspect in the case who was remanded injailfor over a year.
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